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Full text of "Memorials of the descendants of William Shattuck : the progenitor of the families in America that have borne his name; including an introduction, and an appendix containing collateral information"

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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MEMORIALS 



OF 



THE DESCENDANTS OF 




THE PROGENITOR OF THE FAMILIES IN AMERICA 
THAT HAVE BORNE HIS NAME ; 



INCLUDING 



AN INTRODUCTION, AND AN APPENDIX 



CONTAINING 



COLLATERAL INFORMATION. 

BY LEMUEL SHATTUCK, 

* * 

MEMBER OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY, AND OF THE AMERICAN ANTI- 
QUARIAN SOCIETY J AND ONE OF THE ORIGINAL FOUNDERS OF THE AMERICAN 
STATISTICAL ASSOCIATION, AND OF THE NEW ENGLAND HISTORIC- 
GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY, &C, &C. 



" To trace lineage, — to love and record the names and actions of those without whom we could never 
have been, who moulded and made us what we are, and whom the very greatest of us all must know 
to have propagated influences into his being, which must subtly but certainly act upon his whole con- 
duct in this world — all this is implied in ancestry and the love of it, and is natural and good." — 
Westminster Rcv'eu, Jv&m 1853. ,', 

Nil me poeni^eai samiri palris bUjus— I{orac±. -^evjej whi'e >p my Senses will I be ashamed of such 
a father ' ', , ' ' • „ ,° » ' • ' '. > ' 



' ■,/ -BOSTON: • 
PRINTED BiT DUTTON AND WENTWORTH 

FOR THE FAMILY. 
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Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1855, 

Br Lemuel Sdattuck, 

in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the District of Massachusetts. 



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X 

^ DEDICATION. 



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EACH AND ALL, 

WHO INHERIT THE NAME OF SHATTUCK, IN AMERICA OR ELSEWHERE, 

AND TO THEIR CONNECTIONS AND DESCENDANTS, 

THE AUTHOR DEDICATES THESE 

MEMORIALS. 

AND HE EAKNESTLY DESIRES AND HOPES— 

EACH ONE MAY OBTAIN ALL THE NECESSARIES AND LUXURIES OF THIS WORLD, 

WHICH CAN BE SECURED 

BY TEMPERANCE, HONESTY, JUSTICE, AND CHARITY — 

BY SAGACITY, INDUSTRY, ENERGY, PERSEVERANCE, AND ECONOMY, 

IN LIFE'S BUSINESS PURSUITS J 

AND ALL THE HAPPINESS WHICH RESULTS 

FROM STRUGGLING WITH ERROR WITHIN, AND TEMPTATION TO ERROR WITHOUT — 

WITH THE TRIALS AND VICISSITUDES, WITH THE FORTUNES AND MISFORTUNES OF LIFE \- 

FROM OVERCOMING EVIL AND SURMOUNTING DIFFICULTIES IN EVERY STRUGGLE; 

AND FROM THE PERFORMANCE OF EVERY DUTY IN EVERY STATION : 



®|at 



EVERY ONE WILL STRIVE WITH ALL POSSIBLE CARE AND ENERGY TO DO WHATEVER CAN BE DONE- 

AT ALL TIMES AND UNDER ALL CIRCUMSTANCES / 

TO PRESERVE AND TO TRANSMIT THE NAME, UNSTAINED BY CRIME OR ERROR, 
FROM GENERATION TO GENERATION : 



%\l\ 



AS ONE GENERATION PASSETH AWAY, AND ANOTHER COMETH, 

EACH MAY ARISE TO A HIGHER AND A STILL HIGHER AND NOBLER POSITION, 

THAN ITS PREDECESSOR, 

IN HEALTH, IN MORALS, IN EUDCATION, IN WEALTH, 

IN HONOR, AND IN ALL ITS PERSONAL ENJOYMENTS AND SOCIAL RELATIONS J 

AND CONTRIBUTE MORE AND MORE TO THE IMPROVEMENT AND HAPPINESS OF MANKIND,- 

MAKING THE WORLD BETTER NOT WORSE FOR THEIR HAVING LIVED *. 



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EVERY SOUL MAY BE PURIFIED AND RESTORED TO THE IMAGE OF ITS MAKER 

BY TRUE RELIGION; 

AND SO BE PREPARED FOR HIGHER AND MORE PERFECT ENJOYMENTS, 

WHEN IT ASCENDS UNTO GOD WHO GAVE IT ; 

AND THUS HAVE A NAME WRITTEN IN THE BOOK OF LIFE, AND WORTHY TO LIVE, 

WHEN THE PRESENT BODY SHALL RETURN TO THE EARTH AS IT WAS, 

AND WHEN THE PLACES THAT KNOW IT NOW ^ 

MAY KNOW IT NO MORE FOREVER, 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://archive.org/details/memorialsofdesce1855shat 



CONTENTS. 



INTRODUCTION. 

I. Origin of the Work ; and of the Name, 1 

II. General Views of the Subject, - - - 15 

III. Natural History and Physical Characteristics of the 

Family, -------- 31 

IV. Plan of the Memorials explained, 47 
MEMORIALS. 

I. First Generation and Children, 57 

II. Second Generation and Children, 66 

III. Third Generation and Children, 77 

IV. Fourth Generation and Children, - - - 92 
V. Fifth Generation and Children, - - - - 115 

VI. Sixth Generation and Children, - - - 167 

VII- Seventh Generation and Descendants, - - - 290 
APPENDIX. 

I. Samuel Shattuck of Salem, ----- 361 

II. William Shattuck of Boston, ----- 366 

III. Blood Memorials, ------ 3^3 

IV Chamberlain Memorials, - 372 

V. Parker Memorials, --.... 375 

VI. Names of Kindred and Relationship, - 377 

VII. Two Beloved Sisters, ------ 382 

VIII. Corrections, Additions, and Notes, - 385 
INDEX. 

I. Shattuck Christian Names, ----- 397 

II. Names other than Shattuck, ----- 400 



f 



SOSTO.N public fTRBAiry 



INTRODUCTION. 



i. #ri§ra of % Worli ; Hifo of % flame. 

This work originated in a desire of the author — a desire in 
which he will venture to assume that his kindred among the liv- 
ing participate — to acquire information concerning the ancestry 
and lineage of the Shattuck family. The blood, that courses 
through our veins had flowed through a long succession of gen- 
erations before it was parted into the drops which make us akin 
to each other, as well as to those who preceded us on these 
scenes of life. Who were these, our family progenitors ? What 
were their names? When, and where, and how did they live? 
What were their occupations ? Were their means of subsistence 
scanty or ample ? What were their characteristics, physical, 
mental, and moral ? What position in society did they sustain ? 
What were the incidents of their lives, by which their fortunes 
and their destiny were influenced ? What marriage alliances did 
they form ? And, what influence did these alliances exert upon 
themselves and their children ? Inquiries like these have arisen 
almost instinctively in the mind of the author ; and he has con- 
sidered it an enterprise worthy of attention to search for the 
facts by which answers and solutions might be obtained. 

All of the author's American ancestors, both paternal and ma- 
ternal, from their origin in this country, through six or seven 
generations, were natives or early settlers of Middlesex County, 
Massachusetts. While collecting materials for the History of 
Concord and the adjoining towns — the central section of that 
county — which was published in 1835, he met with many facts, 
incidents, and traditions, relating to the personal history of these 
ancestors ; and from those materials a brief, imperfect sketch, 
comprised in a few pages, and relating principally to the direct 
1 



2 INTRODUCTION. 

line of his own descent, was prepared. It was intended for pri- 
vate inspection only, and not for publication. This manuscript 
has, however, been seen by several persons ; and he has been 
repeatedly requested to print it for the use of the family. In 
1853, he consented to yield to this solicitation, provided such 
further information could be obtained as would enable him to 
make a work more satisfactory to himself. The whole genealo- 
gy of the family has since been reinvestigated; and inquiries 
have been extended to very many branches, with whose history 
he was unacquainted, and the result is here presented. The few 
manuscript pages of the original memoirs have been superseded 
by an entire new work, so largely increased as to become a 
volume. 

The means of information for a work like this are personal 
inquiry and oral communications j traditions and recollections of 
elderly persons ; family registers and private papers ; inscriptions 
on monuments and grave stones ; public records and documents — 
society, parish, church, town, county, and state, and of literary 
and other associations ; deeds, wills, and other papers, relating to 
the transfer and settlement of estates, usually, though not always, 
found in the offices of the Register of Deeds and Register of 
Probate ; correspondence with living individuals ; and works and 
papers in manuscript, or already printed. These extensive and 
authentic sources of information have been examined; and they 
have, as far as practicable, been laid under contribution for these 
Memorials. 

It has been found that traditions relating to the early history 
of families, like those relating to other matters, are generally 
vague and uncertain ; and such as relate to the same person or 
event, when given by different narrators, do not always agree. 
The stories of elderly people should certainly be obtained, but they 
cannot be depended upon alone as positive evidence of a fact, for 
they are sometimes incorrect, and are useful only as imperfect 
indications, which may lead to the truth by further investigation, 
and by a comparison with other evidence. A large majority of 
families and individuals leave no memorial, either upon record 
or in tradition, that they have lived ; or, if any be left, it is 
too indistinct to identify their history, descent, or connections. 
Though family registers are of obvious utility and importance, 



ORIGIN OF THE WORK. 6 

yet such registers are made and preserved by few families, and 
good ones by a still less number. This omission to perform a 
duty may have arisen from the want of a proper method for mak- 
ing the entries, from negligence, or from some other cause. It 
has been an immemorial custom, where family records are made 
at all, to enter them on blank leaves, inserted between the two 
Testaments in the Bible ; but, even in this imperfect form, they 
have been very much neglected, and comparatively few such 
records of past generations are now in existence. 1 * For the first 
hundred years after the settlement of New England the public 
registration of births, marriages, and deaths, was more gen- 
erally made than for the last hundred years ; and though many 
of the records have been destroyed by accident, or by the care- 
lessness or negligence of those into whose custody they were 
placed, yet family history can generally be more fully obtained 
in the earlier than in the later period. It is difficult, if not im- 
possible, to compile a genealogy from the public records for the 
last seventy-five years ; and future investigators will find this 
period a hiatus difficult to get over. "An impassable gulf will 
yawn between those ancient and modern times, spanned only by 
the treacherous and uncertain bridge of conjecture." The intro- 
duction of the new system of registration within the last ten 
years, if faithfully carried out, will henceforward obviate the 
difficulty, and render the history of families originating hereafter 
more easily obtained. This measure will do more for genealogy 
than all others combined. Sometimes, when public records exist 
in the offices of town clerks or in churches, they are found to be 
erroneous. Their errors often arise from the imperfectness of the 

* This custom probably originated among those who regarded such records sacred, like the 
book in which they were contained. Though this may have been a reason for the custom, yet it 
seems to us that they are now out of place in such an inclosure. In earlier times, when Bibles 
were more rare than at present, and when they were regarded with greater veneration, and pre- 
served with more care as sacred treasures, it might have been more proper, but they have now 
become so common that no one more than another can be considered by way of distinction the 
Family Bible, and as peculiarly the proper one for a Family Register. Besides, they cannot 
contain the proper forms for the entries ; and by frequent use they are exposed to injury and 
loss. The better method is to have the family record kept in a separate volume by itself, con- 
structed upon such a plan, and containing such blank forms, as will admit of entries being am- 
plified and extended according to the taste and means of information of different individuals. A 
more comprehensive signification has been given to a perfect register of this kind than the mere 
entry of the names of one's own immediate family and the dates of their births, marriages, and 
deaths. These should form an indispensable part of it ; but information should, as far as possi- 
ble, be included in regard to other families immediately connected, and particularly those in the 
lines of descent from the earliest known ancestor; and they should embrace such facts, incidents 
and traditions as would illustrate their lives and characters, and the natural history of the race to 
which they belong. Such a Family Register, designed for general use, has been prepared by 
the author of these Memorials. 



1 



INTRODUCTION. 



information communicated to the recorder, or from his own care- 
lessness ; at other times, though rarely, from a criminal design 
either to slander the dead, or to falsify statements regarding the 
living. Frequently deeds are not publicly recorded, notwith- 
standing such record is necessary to secure a perfect title to the 
property. A majority of estates are settled without the aid of 
the Probate Court, and of course the papers relating to them 
are not public, and if preserved at all can be found only in pri- 
vate collections. Sometimes, when an estate is entered for set- 
tlement in the probate office, papers which are very useful to 
illustrate some points of a person's history, or that of his family, are 
not recorded with his will, nor with the administrator's accounts, 
but are found in the files of the court. The author has addressed 
letters to every one of his name in this country, so far as his 
knowledge extended, whose history was not previously known 
to him. or which was not obtained in some other way. From a 
very large proportion he has received prompt, full, and accurate 
replies^ From others he has obtained less satisfactory informa- 
tion. A very few have made no answer at all, even after repeat- 
ed solicitation. 

The author of genealogical memorials has to rely much upon 
the assistance and cooperation of others ; and he must take the 
facts as communicated to him, or as presented upon record. Man- 
uscripts, often badly written, have to be deciphered ; and all state- 
ments received have to be carefully examined and compared with 
each other ; and where errors are discovered in oral or written 
communications or traditions, or in town, church, or other rec- 
ords, or when one statement or authority conflicts with another, 
as is often the fact, the author is compelled to make corrections, 
or to adopt that which seems most probable. In copying dates 
mistakes are often made. A correspondent was furnished with 
an abstract of the information which he had communicated re- 
lating to his family ; and in return he expressed surprise at an 
error which he discovered. On examination, however, it was 
found that the error was his own. He had given the wrong 
date in his first communication. Another writes thus, " I do 
not know that this information is all correct, but I guess it is 
near enough for your purpose" ! It is believed that few of our 
correspondents have been of this character. The author has 



ORIGIN OF THE WORK. 



made it a maxim of life, that whatever is worth doing at all is 
worth doing well ; and he always regrets to let a work pass out 
of his hands partly finished. The cases of imperfection, error, 
and wrong statement that have been presented have embarrassed 
the progress of the work, and very much increased the labor and 
expense of obtaining, comparing, and classifying the facts. They 
are, however, not peculiar to this work, but are presumed to be 
incidental generally to all enterprises of this kind. Every printed 
book, too, is liable to editorial and typographical errors ; and 
these Memorials do not claim to be exempt from this liability. 
Among such a large mass of figures, names, dates, and other 
facts, it would be strange indeed if errors did not sometimes 
occur. It would, perhaps, be impossible to avoid them. Com- 
pleteness and perfection cannot, of course, be attained in relation 
to currents of life which, in some branches, are ceasing to flow, 
or which in others are disclosing new beings, or changing the 
relations of those already in existence, bringing to light new facts 
and new matters proper to be mentioned. Under all these cir- 
cumstances the author does not claim to present a work free from 
imperfections. He does claim, however, to have used all his 
industry, sagacity and care, and to have spared no labor or ex- 
pense to render the Memorials as full and as accurate as possible. 
And it is probable that they are, in the main, nearly correct. 
As many other matters press upon him, requiring attention, he 
feels compelled to submit the manuscript to the printer, imperfect 
though it may be, rather than wait longer for further corrections 
and additions. Those who are not noticed, or whose families 
and connections are imperfectly given, or not given at all, must 
attribute it, in some instances at least, to the imperfection of the 
information they have communicated, or to their own entire 
neglect. They should look kindly upon the author's labors, and 
not criticise too harshly, for some of the defects or blemishes 
may perhaps be justly chargeable to themselves. 

In these Memorials appear notices of the birth of many indi- 
viduals, about whom no records or traditions have been dis- 
covered by us, by which their history, or that of their posterity, 
if any have existed, could be traced. Some also may have been 
born whose names are not included with the others of their 
family here given. Perhaps, however, some of these undescribed 



O INTRODUCTION. 

persons, should they see these pages, may here find the informa- 
tion by which their own connection with our original progenitor, 
or some of his descendants or kindred, may be ascertained. We 
most deeply regret that our ancestors left so few memorials of 
themselves for the gratification and improvement of their suc- 
cessors. Many facts and incidents of their history, if now known, 
would greatly interest us. They were, however, too much em- 
ployed, or did not sufficiently anticipate the desires of their pos- 
terity, to place upon record a description of their persons, or of 
the vicissitudes of their lives — the toils they suffered, the trials 
through which they passed, or the triumphs they achieved. 
These can hardly be conceivable by us now, and must forever 
remain unknown. The few elementary facts which they actual- 
ly did leave, are fast fading away ; and the difficulty of ascer- 
taining them, always great, is constantly increasing. We have 
endeavored to gather up the few scattered fragments of their 
history existing in the various sources of information here indi- 
cated, fully believing that the work has already been delayed too 
long, and if not done soon will be impossible to be done at all. 
We have arranged the information in a systematic and enduring 
form, accessible and intelligible to all. We most earnestly urge 
upon existing generations to spare their posterity this regret and 
this labor, in regard to themselves. The information existing in 
living minds should now be committed to writing. Every branch 
of the family, and all persons of the name, and their kindred of 
other names, before it is too late, should gather *ip the events of 
their own history, and trace out and ascertain, as far as possible, 
their precise connection and relationship to some individual men- 
tioned in these Memorials. If errors are discovered in the ac- 
counts here given they should be corrected ; and such additional 
facts, incidents and traditions relating to any person, as may be 
known, and are worthy of preservation, should be carefully writ- 
ten out on blank leaves inserted in the end of the volume, or in 
a separate Family Register, which should be kept by every 
family. And this history should be continued onwards, year 
after year, from one generation to another. Each one of us 
should consider it a sacred duty to perform this labor. It is due 
to our ancestors, and to our posterity. Those that come after us 
will hold us responsible for its discharge. Difference in wealth 



ORIGIN OF THE WORK. 7 

and social position, or any disrespect we may entertain from any 
cause towards any one, will not excuse us. Let us leave to our 
kindred and to our descendants a memorial of our own existence, 
and an example worthy of imitation. What legacy could we 
transmit to our children and our children's children which they 
would more highly prize ? 

To prepare and print a work of this kind involves no inconsid- 
erable labor and expense. It cannot be undertaken as a mere 
money-making affair, for the demand for it must necessarily be 
limited to the families of the name, and to their immediate con- 
nections. Sometimes liberal subscriptions are obtained towards 
the cost of such a book ; or it is purchased generally and freely 
by those interested. At other times, hardly enough are sold to 
pay the expense of printing, leaving nothing for the cost of col- 
lecting the information and of preparing it for the press. It 
w r ould be a matter of deep regret and mortification to find that a 
sordid, unworthy motive had induced any one to withhold in- 
formation from a work prompted by so kind and friendly inten- 
tions. The obligations of the contributors and of the author are 
mutual. If he who furnishes information is entitled to consider- 
ation, he who prepares it for the press, and pays the expense of 
the printed page upon which it appears, has, to say the least, 
equal claims. The privilege of having an account of a family 
inserted in the book is generally considered more than an equiva- 
lent for the labor of furnishing the facts to the editor. If any 
one should so far misapprehend the author's motives in this en- 
terprise, as to consider them mercenary, it is hoped that a perusal 
of the work itself will correct such an error. Though the labor- 
er is worthy of his hire, yet he would not have undertaken it, 
unless moved to it by other considerations. He desired to make 
a book which would be acceptable to those for whom it is espec- 
ially designed ; interesting to be read and referred to ; and useful 
in suggesting motives to elevate and improve personal character. 
And he feels some assurance that he has succeeded. Should it 
be approved and generally sought for by those interested ; and 
should it be prized, preserved, and have the influence desired, he 
will be satisfied. But whatever may be the success of the work, 
or the pecuniary result of the undertaking, he feels conscious of 
a sincere desire not to wrong any individual, but to promote the 



8 INTRODUCTION. 

honor and respectability of the name, and to confer a real sub- 
stantial benefit upon the family. He will hope that his inten- 
tions and his labors will meet the approbation of his kindred ; 
and that they will all regard with favor his efforts to perpetuate 
the history of the race. He will at least have the satisfaction of 
introducing to each other many individuals not hitherto known 
as cousins or relatives ; and of rescuing for preservation the fact, 
that the persons here named existed, which might otherwise 
have been forgotten and passed into oblivion. Most persons soon 
become, in the ordinary history of human life, as if they had 
never been. The announcement that "he is dead," may create 
a temporary sensation, but it is soon forgotten. In a few years 
no one can be found who can say, "I remember him." If oth- 
erwise, the cases will be exceptional ones. These more endurable 
records will be an evidence that we have lived. 

This book owes much of its fulness and value to those individ- 
uals who have favored our purpose and zealously aided in fur- 
nishing information. Posterity will unite with us in feelings of 
gratitude for their labors. All contributors cannot be mentioned, 
but it would be injustice to omit special acknowledgments to 
Geo. O. Shattuck of Andover, who furnished the principal part 
of the information concerning the posterity of Joseph Shattuck ; 
to Noah Shattuck of Groton ; to Lovell Shattuck of Pepper- 
ell ; to Alvan Shattuck of Hinsdale, N. H., and to Sylvester 
Judd of Northampton. Some other contributions will be par- 
ticularly acknowledged in the body of the work. 



The name of Shattuck is of doubtful origin. Whether it was 
assumed as a whole in nearly its present form, or whether it is 
compounded of parts of other names ; or whether it had any 
specific meaning ; or what changes it underwent antecedent to 
the date of its earliest history known to us, is now entirely 
hypothetical. Its proper orthography is Shattuck; and its 
proper pronunciation as if written Shat'-uk, with the accent on 
the first syllable. This spelling and pronunciation should be 
insisted upon, and every deviation from it avoided. Few names, 
however, have been presented in a greater variety of written 
forms. This has been occasioned, probably, by the different 



ORIGIN OF THE NAME. 9 

modes of its pronunciation, and by a representation of its pho- 
netic sounds by letters. Sometimes it is written nearly in con- 
formity with the true orthography and pronunciation, as Shatac, 
Shattauk, Shathooke, Shathauk, and Shatoc, Shattock, Shat- 
tocke. At other times the pronunciation is varied by substitut- 
ing the sounds of d for t, and o for u, and is written Shadduck, 
Shadock, Shadoc, and Chaddock, Chadduck, Chadock, Chadoc, 
&c. It is also written Shaddic, Chadwick, Chadwyke, Chadioke, 
Chadioc. Shattocke was the spelling in use when our first 
American ancestors emigrated to this country, and it is still in 
use in some of the municipal registers in England. 

Chaddock, or Chadduck, as a distinct name, has been occa- 
sionally, though rarely borne, by persons from the first settlement 
of New England. Winthrop, in 1643, makes mention of "one 
Captain John Chaddock, son of him that was governor of Ber- 
muda, a godly gentleman." There was a Thomas Chaddock of 
Newbury, who married Sarah Walcott in 1674. Elias Chaddock 
(sometimes written Shaddock and Shadock) died in Windsor, 
Conn., in 1676, leaving a daughter Hannah, and a widow 
Hannah who married, in 1678, Benjamin Egelson. James 
Chadduck was paid, in 1676, by the governor at Hartford, £5 
•'for his services as commissioner, besides his soldier's pay." 
Samuel and John Shaddock were taxed in Boston in 1695. 
What the true name in these cases was, whether Chaddock, 
Shattuck, or Chadwick, or whether they were, or were not, all 
one name, is uncertain. Rev. Calvin Chadduck, who was grad- 
uated at Dartmouth College in 1791, and afterwards lived in 
Rochester and Hanover, and died in Virginia, (see Barry's His- 
tory of Hanover, pp. 70, 93, 263,) was father of E. N. Chaddock, 
once of New Bedford, and now of Boston. His mother, Mala- 
tiah, died in the latter place, October 5, 1854, aged 84. The 
father of Rev. Calvin was Joseph Chadduck of Brookfield, and 
his grandfather is said to have been of Reading, and his original 
name is supposed to have been Chadwick. David " Shaddock," 
probably a descendant of this Joseph, now of Buffalo, was the 
son of Isaac Shaddock, and born in Boston. 

Chadwick has sometimes been regarded another form of the 
name of Shattuck, and as originating from the same source. 
This may have been true as to its origin in England, but it has 
2 



10 INTRODUCTION. 

ever been borne by separate and distinct families from the first 
settlement of this country. There was a Charles, a John, and a 
Thomas Chadwick, in Watertown, sons of Charles Chadwick, 
and contemporary with our ancestor, the first William Shattuck, 
and, as far as can be ascertained, not his relatives. Their names 
were, however, occasionally written both ways in the records, 
the one for the other. Entries of "John Chadwick," April 7th, 
and " John Shadduck," June 4th, 1685, relating to the same 
person, are found upon the records of Watertown. The entry of 
"Mary Shattuck, daughter of John and Mary Shattuck, born the 
14th of December, 1678," should be Mary Chadwick, daughter 
of John and Sarah Chadwick. There was a Samuel Chadwick 
(sometimes written Shattuck,) in Woburn, in 1675. He had 
children who lived in Reading, and he was probably the ancestor 
of Rev. Calvin Chadduck, before mentioned. Joseph Chadwick, 
who married Mary Jenkins, in Maiden, in 1732, is supposed to 
have been his grandson. Others of this name are found else- 
where in New England. A curious illustration of the variations 
in its orthography appears upon the records of Worcester County. 
In 1765, "Henry Shaddick" was appointed administrator on the 
estate of his father "Joseph Chadwick." In 1767, "John Shad- 
dick" of Worcester, executed a will, mentioning his son " Joseph 
Chadwick ;" while in 1787, " David Shattuck," of the same 
family, purchased lands. The true name of these cases was un- 
doubtedly Chadwick, but it is curious that such variations should 
appear in official documents, nearly contemporary, relating to the 
same family. Thomas P. Shaddick, now of Boston, whose father 
lives in Middletown, Conn., probably originated from the Chad- 
wicks. 

The name of Shattuck, though not very rare, cannot be con- 
sidered as very common. It occasionally appeared upon the rec- 
ords of Essex County, in connection with Samuel Shattuck and 
his posterity, from 1641 to 1735 ; but it afterwards became 
extinct in that line. It, however, has appeared in that county 
relating to Joseph Shattuck of Andover, a different branch of the 
family, and has continued there for the last hundred and twenty- 
five years. In Watertown, Middlesex County, the residence of 
our first American ancestor, it often occurred for the first hundred 
years after its settlement, but for the last hundred years is not 



ORIGIN OF THE NAME. 11 

found upon the town records. Three of the grandsons of the first 
William settled in Groton. Descendants of one of them have 
ever lived in that town, as now constituted. Descendants of the 
other two were the principal settlers of that part of Groton which 
is now comprised within the town of Pepperell. This territory, 
originally a part of Groton, was incorporated, in 1742, as a sep- 
arate parish, and, in 1753, as a town. The Shattucks and their 
connections were the largest original proprietors, and owned the 
largest part of this town. The name is now and ever has been, 
more common there than any other. In 1761, of the 106 families 
then in Pepperell, 11, or nearly 11J per cent., bore the name of 
Shattuck. In 1853, of 426 legal voters, 36, or nearly 8j percent., 
bore the same name. Rev. Mr. Emerson, the first minister of 
Pepperell, is said to have remarked, that "he sometimes regretted 
that he did not marry a Shattuck, for he should then have been 
related to the whole town" ! The name does not appear in the 
Indices of the Suffolk Records prior to 1800, excepting in con- 
nection with William Shattuck, then a distinguished merchant of 
Boston, or his family. A mortgage deed to Josiah Shattuck of 
Cambridge occurs, as the only exception. William, just men- 
tioned, is the only instance which appeared in the Boston Direc- 
tory prior to 1800. Dr. George Cheyne Shattuck is the next in 
the Directory, and first appeared in 1809, then the only repre- 
sentative of the name. In 1830, five of the name are found in the 
Directory ; in 1835, six ; in 1840, ten ; in 1845, nineteen ; and in 
1850, twenty-one. It lias not often appeared in the Directories of 
other cities. In that of New York, for 1853, one only is found ; 
two in Philadelphia, none in Baltimore, two in Buffalo, and two 
in Cincinnati. It now occurs, however, in nearly every state in 
the Union. Prom a statement, presently to be exhibited, it is 
supposed that four or five thousand of all ages and sexes are now 
existing who bear the name, all of whom, probably, originated 
from William Shattuck, the Memorials of whose posterity consti- 
tute the principal part of this work. 

Thirteen of the name of Shattuck had graduated at the dif- 
ferent colleges in New England prior to 1853. Six at Harvard — 
Benjamin, 1709 ; Stephen, 1756 ; Benjamin, 1765 ; Benjamin, 
1797 ; George C, 1831 ; George O., 1851. Five at Dartmouth- 
Caleb, 1794; Nathaniel, 1801; George C, 1803; Cortland W. 



12 INTRODUCTION. 

1840; Jonathan C, 1842. One at Burlington — Erasmus D., 
1848. And one at Middletown — David O. One by the name 
of Chadduck, at Dartmouth — Calvin, 1791. Five by the name 
of Chadwick, one at Harvard— Benjamin, 1770 ; two at Dart- 
mouth — George, 1825 ; William, 1830 ; one at Yale — Joseph, 
1821 ; and one at Bowdoin — Edmund, 1840. Dr. George C. 
Shattuck left a legacy to Harvard College, which has been set 
apart to constitute four scholarships, and denominated " Shattuck 
Scholarships." The name is therefore likely to be perpetuated 
in that institution. y 

Few attempts have been made to ascertain the European 
origin and history of the family. Our design has been to trace 
our ancestors back to that heroic and noble band of Puritan emi- 
grants who first settled New England, and gave it its distinctive 
character ; and to exhibit the different generations of their 
descendants, Americanized and modified by the circumstances 
of their existence, and by the peculiar institutions they have 
aided in founding, and with which they have been connected or 
surrounded. This has been considered a sufficient gratification 
for the labor required. The difficulties of authenticating a connec- 
tion between an American and English ancestor are so great, that 
we prefer to leave the problem unsolved, rather than to assume 
any relationship from any cause unsupported by conclusive evi- 
dence.* A tradition has existed that the family were of German 
origin ; but if such be the fact, which is not improbable, it must 
have existed there in a very remote antiquity. It may have been, 
and probably was, among the Angles and Saxons, or Anglo-Sax- 
ons of the northerly part of Continental Europe, who peopled 

* After this was written we received the valuable work of the Rev. Joseph Hunter of London 
on " The Founders of New Plymouth. 77 In a note (p. 6,) the author desires, "in the most 
friendly spirit, to offer a hint or two to our brethren in New England/ 7 and says : — " No geneal- 
ogy is of the least value that is not supported by sufficient evidence from records or other con- 
temporary writing. The mere possession of a surname which coincides with that of an English 
family is no proof of connection with that family. Claims of alliance founded on this basis are 
not the legitimate offspring of laborious genealogical inquiry, but of self love, and the desire to 
found a reputation for ancestorial honor where no such honor is really due. Search out the 
history of your ancestors by all means : but claim no more than you can show to belong to 
you. As far as you can prove you are safe, and you are doing a work that is good : but the 
assumption of the armorial distinctions of eminent English families who happen to bear the same 
surname with yourselves is not to be approved, and still less to claim alliance with the ancient 
nobility or gentry of England. When it can be proved, well and good : but no terms can be too 
severe to reprobate it where there is no proof, or even where there is no show of probability. It 
may lead to unfounded claims, not only to honor, but to property. 77 And he proceeds to state 
that Winslow, Brewster, and Bradford are the only passengers in the Mayflower who have been 
traced to an English birth place. Guided by these wise suggestions, some of our genealogical 
structures would have to be repaired or remodeled before they would become safe dwelling- 
places. 



ORIGIN OF THE NAME. 13 

England and America with their most shrewd and energetic races. 
If we adopted terms in common use in our day, we might 
denominate ourselves Americanized-Anglo-Saxons. 

A friend of ours, in making researches for other purposes, inci- 
dentally met with some facts, from which it appears that he 
found the name in Old England more than a hundred years 
before the settlement of New England. In the year 1525 Sam- 
uel Shattocke and Alice Shattocke of Tolland, in Somerset- 
shire, appear upon the Rolls which contain the Assessments of 
the Subsidies granted by Parliament. At Wells, in that county, 
are deposited the will of John Shattocke of Beckenaller, proved 
in 1533, which mentions son Thomas and relative John Grant ; 
and the will of Alexander Shattocke of Bagborough, proved 
in 1588, which mentions sons Alexander, Robert, and William, 
daughters Joan and Dorothy, wife Susan, executrix, brother 
Richard Shattocke, and witnessed by George Shattocke and 
others. In the Subsidy Rolls for 1597, John Shattuck was 
assessed for lands, and William Shattocke and Joanna Shattuck 
of Burland were assessed for goods ; Henry Shattocke of Bishops 
for lands; Isota Shattocke, widow of Elworthy, for lands; 
Thomas Shattocke of Cumberland, for lands ; Robert Shattock 
of Norton, for goods ; Henry Shattocke of Westminster, for 
goods. In the same Rolls for 1628, Humphrey Shattocke of the 
same place was assessed for lands. And in 1642, Philip Shat- 
tuck of Taunton, Thomas Shattocke of Kingston, the widow 
Shattocke of Staplegrove, and Henry Shattocke of Norton, were 
assessed for the same purpose. In the parish register of St. Law- 
rence in Reading, Berkshire, are found the baptism of the follow- 
ing children of William Shattuck : — William, May 3, 1628 ; 
Susan, Sept. 14, 1632 ; Elizabeth, April 29, 1635. Also, the 
marriage of Samuel Shattuck and Mary Snell, July 19, 1628 ; 
and the burial of Elizabeth Shattuck, Dec. 31, 1636. The name 
might probably be discovered in other counties, by an examina- 
tion of the records.* These facts show that the family were 

* A Catalogue of a London Bookseller, for 1854, advertises a manuscript almanac, described 
as " very cleverly written, in exact imitation of printing* type, a work of untiring labor, 
the whole interspersed throughout with verses on the months, chronology, &c. 8vo, neat, £l 
Is. 77 Under the title, " Calendarium Astronomicum ; a Compleat Ephemeris of the Celestial 
Motions, for the year of Christ, 1704, with drawings of the Eclipses, 1703 to 1763, exactly 
calculated from '• Astronomina Carolina/ 7 by John Chattock, Schoolmaster of Castle Brom- 
wick, in Warwickshire." 



14 INTRODUCTION. 

owners of lands and other property — evidences of respectability 
at that time, in that country. The name is still found in some 
of the counties above mentioned, and in other parts of England. 
John Shattocke, whose name appears in the London Directory for 
1824, and George Shattuck, in that of 1841, are the only instan- 
ces of its occurrence in those years in that city. 

In printed works we often find mentioned names which it 
has been supposed were once synonymous with ours. William 
Chaddock was one of the " pilgrims from England to Rome," in 
1582. Joseph Chaddock, Esq. married Mary Chetham of Derby- 
shire, in 1703. Thomas Chaddock was of Congleton, in 1831. 
And this name occasionally, though rarely, occurs elsewhere. 
In 1570 there was a Chittock who owned a manor in Norfolk- 
shire, but whether this name had an origin similar to the other 
names we have mentioned is conjectural. 

Chadwick is a name of great antiquity in England. In Burke's 
Landed Gentry, and in his Commoners, (Vol. Ill, p. 444,) it is 
stated that William de Chadwyke, said to have been the first of the 
name upon record, was born about the year 1355, five hundred 
years ago, and was living in 1413. He had sons William and 
John de Chadwyke, and perhaps other children. There was also 
a Nicholas de Chadwycke, nearly contemporary with the above 
William, but whether a relative or descendant is not positively 
stated. He was born in the time of Edward III., and died before 
1443. He also had a son, John de Chadwick. Alliances were 
formed between these and other patrician families ; and from 
them have descended a long line of nobility and gentry, some of 
whom are still existing in England. There were other descend- 
ants, who were not entitled to armorial bearings. The family 
were possessed of large estates in the hamlet of Chadwick, in 
Lancashire, and elsewhere. 

Chadioke js another ancient name, which bears some resem- 
blance to Shattuck, and which, it is conjectured, might have 
been originally the same. There was a Sir John de Chydeoke 
(sometimes written Chideoke, and Chadeoke,) who was one of 
the Barons of Somersetshire, as early as the thirteenth century ; 
and who, in the time of Henry VII., was described as one of the 
" noble families related to the Blood Royal/' From him were 
descended, in male or female lines, many families of great dis- 



GENERAL VIEWS OF THE SUBJECT. 15 

tinction, and of great wealth, as well as others in the untitled 
ranks.* 

History shows that as great and even greater alterations have 
been made in process of time in the orthography of names, as 
would be required to change Chaddock, Chad wick, and Chad- 
ioke into Shattuck. And an assumption that some of the fam- 
ilies by the name of Shattuck, in Somersetshire and elsewhere, 
already mentioned, and even our own American ancestor, Wil- 
liam Shattuck, were descended from William de Chadwyke, or 
John de Chadioke, might not be farther from the truth than are 
some genealogical deductions we have seen published. And 
yet such an assumption is not proved ; and it rests upon proba- 
bilities too feeble to be claimed with entire confidence. If any 
portion of noble blood, derived from these sources, courses in our 
veins, it is imperceptible, and is too small to remain uncontrolled 
by larger portions derived from other sources. 



ii. §tmd firfos of % j&rfrjwt. 

It may be asked, Wliy are these Memorials printed ? What is 
there in the history of this family to render it worthy of being 
handed down to posterity upon the more endurable records of the 
press ? We answer, nothing which does not belong in common 
to many other families. We deem it right and proper, however, 
that such Memorials should be prepared and printed concerning 
every family, for its own use and benefit, whatever may be its 
circumstances and social position. And when it is announced 
upon the title-page as "printed for the family" only, not "pub- 
lished," it is a matter in which the public have no right to inter- 
fere, or to criticise and censure if prepared in an unsatisfactory 
manner. No one, however, can have a stronger dislike than the 
author to make any such history, whether the family be of pa- 
trician or plebeian origin or rank, a cause of family pride, or of 
egotistic, ostentatious display. Nothing can be more distasteful 

* See Nichols's " Collectanea Topographica and Genealogica," and Burke's Encyclopedia of 
Heraldry. 



16 INTRODUCTION. 

or absurd. We have had a higher purpose in view. We have 
desired to preserve an accurate record of persons, classed in gen- 
erations and families, to assist in obtaining a knowledge of an- 
cestry ; and to illustrate the history of men as they are, and as 
they have been in older times ; and of the race to which we 
belong, and of our own constitution and organization, in partic- 
ular. From these facts we hope to derive philosophical and 
moral lessons, which may be useful in practical life. Though 
there may not be in the history and condition of the Shattuck 
family much to boast of, yet there is as little, perhaps, as in most 
other families equally numerous, to be ashamed of. Though 
they have not been exempt from the common frailties, imperfec- 
tions and errors of human nature, yet very rarely, indeed, has 
the name appeared in the criminal calendar. In one instance, 
which will claim our notice, the offence was rather a political 
than a moral one. While few have been eminently rich, few 
have been public paupers.* They have generally belonged to 
the well-to-do, the neither-riches-nor-poverty class, born happily 
because they were not born rich, and blessed with the necessity 
of laboring for their subsistence, and of being the architects of 
their own fortune, and with a capacity and a disposition to per- 
form what that necessity required. Their industry, energy, and 
perseverance, and their power of physical endurance under labor, 
and even under hardship and suffering, will compare favorably 
with that of any other race. A majority of them have been 
farmers and mechanics. Some have possessed the restless, change- 
able character, peculiar to many of the New England population, 
and have thrown aside their usual occupations, and followed 
new employments and new pursuits, and in new localities, as the 
exigencies of life seemed to require. They have formed a fair 
average specimen of the honest, independent yeomanry of New 
England — that class of men and women who make the foundation 
strength and energy of the republic ; and who can be relied upon, 
generally, for its peace, stability, and progress ; and, in cases of 
emergency, for its protection and preservation. They have, in 
the main, been independent thinkers, stable in their opinions, not 

* The burial of four persons bearing the name of Shattuck is entcre 1 upon the records of 
Boston, between 1824 and 1846, as 'city poor." But, upon investigation, they were found to 
have been colored persons — a man, his wife, a daughler, and a grand-daughter — the descend- 
ants of a manumitted slave once belonging to the family, and who had assumed the name. 



GENERAL VIEWS OF THE SUBJECT. 17 

afraid to express them on any proper occasion, and unwilling to 
submit to oppression or unreasonable dictation. Many of the 
name, possessing strong common sense and great energy of char- 
acter have existed ; yet too little attention, perhaps, has been paid 
by the family, generally, to intellectual cultivation and improve- 
ment. There have been among them wise and good men in 
each generation ; but comparatively few have been elevated to 
posts of social power and influence, or exalted and distinguished 
in the world's esteem ; nor have they been conspicuous as heroes, 
statesmen, or men of letters, in the public historical annals of the 
country. This may be owing partly to the accidental circum- 
stances of their lives, which may have prevented or may not 
have favored the development of native talent, or called it forth 
upon great emergencies in public life ; or to their neglect of op- 
portunities which might have been improved for their advance- 
ment and promotion. But perhaps it has arisen more frequently 
from their characteristic love of peace and retirement ; from their 
preference of honest industry to the strife and uncertainty of 
public life ; and from their deep hatred of the arts and acts of 
demagogues to obtain, unasked and undeserving, public station 
and power. A majority of the existing generations have belonged 
to the democratic division of the two great political parties of the 
country, though very many exceptions have been found among 
the whigs and other parties. They have generally been honest, 
peaceable, and worthy citizens, respectable and useful in their 
sphere. A large average proportion of them have been professors 
of religion, and eminently moral christian men and christian 
women, careful in the performance of all duty arising from such 
professions, and mindful of the higher and ultimate purpose of 
their creation. The Memorials of a family even of this character 
will not, it is supposed, be without their utility, particularly to 
those for whom they are especially designed. 

It is difficult for us, enjoying our comfortable, peaceful homes, 
our labor-saving machinery, our means of locomotion, the circu- 
lation of printed information, and the other peculiar advantages 
of the present age, to picture to the imagination the true condi- 
tion of the early settlers of New England ; to look back upon 
their living households ; to obtain a clear idea of their every-day 
interior and exterior life, and to compare their circumstances with 
3 



18 INTRODUCTION. 

our own. Yet such a view, even if it be imperfect, cannot but 
be interesting and useful. 

Then, salt beef and pork, boiled with such vegetables as could 
be had, constituted the usual dinner. Fresh meat was a great 
rarity. Potatoes are among comparatively modern eatables, of not 
more than one hundred years' culture. Bean-porridge, or brown 
bread and milk when it could be obtained, formed the morning 
and evening meals. Wheat flour, tea and coffee, were only 
occasional luxuries. Now, we are fed with a greater variety of 
food, prepared more nicely, and served in different style, but 
without producing better health or more enduring constitutions. 

Then, the mothers and daughters were all workers. They 
hired no help, or, if they did, the distinction between the kitchen 
laborers and the parlor was unknown. They not only performed 
the ordinary household work, but they were manufacturers and 
tailors. By their hand cards, their spinning wheels, their looms 
and their needles, the wool and flax, produced on their farms, 
were converted into clothing for themselves, for husbands, for 
fathers, and for children. Fine woollen, linen or silk fabrics 
were used only by a few of the favored aristocracy. Now, arti- 
cles made by labor-saving machinery, or imported from foreign 
countries, have taken the place of the domestic manufactures ; 
and " accomplishments'' are substituted for many former useful 
female employments. 

Then, the means of locomotion consisted of an ox-cart, or the 
back of a horse furnished with saddle and pillion, and designed 
to carry from place to place, at a slow pace, a father, mother, and 
several children. A chaise, or even a wagon, was a curiosity. 
Now, means are provided to "run to and fro." Many of us go 
every morning from our homes to our places of business, and 
return again at evening, twenty, thirty, or more miles — an un- 
dertaking which would have occasioned our fathers a long period 
of anxious preparation, and many an earnest petition to Heaven 
for a prosperous journey and a safe return. 

Then, the only means of information concerning passing events 
were verbal or written communications from one person to another, 
forwarded by special messengers and by the tardy means of con- 
veyance then in use. Newspapers and periodical literature were 
unknown. The Bible, the Psalter, and a few religious books, 



GENERAL VIEWS OF THE SUBJECT. 19 

constituted nearly the whole reading. Now, steam and lightning 
distribute printed accounts of almost everything that occurs, and 
of some things that do not occur, to nearly every man's door, 
every day of the year. All are taught to read ; and newspapers, 
periodical works, books and other printed matter, are scattered 
like flakes in a snow shower over the land, to inform, corrupt, or 
improve the people. 

Then, in fine, the habits and modes of living were simple and 
frugal. Personal wants were few ; and, even with the limited 
means of supply, few remained unsatisfied. All were workers — 
few were drones. Boys and girls, as soon as they acquired 
muscular power, were taught to apply it to some useful purpose. 
Every one was required to make the most of life, and none were 
allowed to waste it in idleness. Yet contentment and happiness 
generally reigned in their humble abodes, and amid all their labo- 
rious toil. Their firm and inflexible integrity allowed them to 
subsist by honest means only. Now, new habits and new modes 
of life are introduced, in many cases for the better but in others 
for the worse. Artificial wants have become greatly multiplied. 
What were once luxuries have now become necessaries. But 
though the means of gratification are indefinitely extended, the 
supply hardly equals the demand. Life has become too often 
rather a race for riches, or for fashionable folly, than an earnest 
desire for happiness ; and, in the means to attain the end, crime 
sometimes overleaps integrity. Sons of wealthy or weak parents 
are often brought up in idleness and self-indulgence, and daugh- 
ters in ignorance of the labors and duties of domestic life, essen- 
tial to render home prosperous and happy. Many thus waste 
their days, consume the earnings of the more honest and indus- 
trious, and contribute nothing to their own higher good and hap- 
piness, or to the general welfare and happiness of others. 

Some of our ancestors were pioneer settlers in the wilderness ; 
and while subduing the forests and preparing the soil for the 
dwelling-places of civilization, they w T ere often surrounded by 
savage men and wild beasts, watching to plunder them of their 
scanty means of subsistence or to destroy their lives. Yet they 
braved those dangers with indomitable courage and unyielding 
wills ; endured the toil and trials incident to their situation with 
fortitude, cheerfulness and hope ; and submitted to privations and 



20 INTRODUCTION. 

suffering without murmuring, and in uniform trust in the recti- 
tude of their purpose and in the righteousness of Heaven. They 
"acted well their part" in introducing new and noble features 
into the progress of humanity. By their virtues, by their heroic 
deeds, by their sufferings, by the shedding of their blood, they 
aided in founding a government recognizing political equality 
and religious freedom. They left a goodly heritage to their 
posterity. We ought to be grateful to them for the legacies they 
have bequeathed to us ; and should transmit the great inheritance 
to our successors, not only unimpaired but improved by our own 
efforts, stimulated by their wisdom, experience and example. 
We should remember that our descendants will look back upon 
us as we do upon our ancestors and compare our merits with 
theirs. This should be a strong motive to move us to do what- 
ever can be done to elevate our own characters and to render our 
example and our achievements still more worthy of regard and 
imitation. We should leave to our heirs some proof "that in 
our estimate of public principle and private virtue, in our venera- 
tion of religion and piety, in our devotion to civil and religious 
liberty, in our regard for whatever advances human knowledge 
or improves human happiness, we are not altogether unworthy of 
our origin." 

A few of the early inhabitants of New England were descended 
from titled families in the Old Country ; and it is natural that 
their posterity should feel some pleasure and pride in tracing their 
pedigree back to such progenitors. Pictures of coats-of-arms are 
found in very many families, purporting to have belonged to their 
ancestors. We have seen several such pictures, under some of 
which was written our name, or that of an ancestor of some other 
name. A few of these emblems of gentility, unmeaning though 
they may be to us simple republicans, are undoubtedly authentic. 
Some however belonged to collateral branches of the family, and 
were created after their separation from the particular one to 
which they profess to belong. Others were given to the same 
name but not to the same person as our ancestor ; others were 
assumed without authority ; and others are mythical in their 
origin, and have been handed down by tradition without reliable 
evidence of their authenticity. " It is certain," says Lower, "that 
comparatively few families of ancient gentry have any record 



HOfflXm PU2LIC LIBBAECST 



GENERAL VIEWS OF THE SUBJECT. 21 

of the date of their arms, or of their being conferred in a legal 
manner." Yery many of the coats-of-arms pictured and found 
in New England families, are fictions made to order, got up and 
misapplied by artists for money. About fifty or sixty years since 
there was carried on a considerable imposition of this kind upon 
the credulity of our fathers. One of the most prominent actors, 
now remembered, was a man by the name of Brinton, said to 
have been a deserter from the British army in Boston during the 
revolution. He was a man of considerable ability, learning, and 
artistic skill ; had some knowledge of heraldry ; and had access 
to pictures of many different heraldic emblems. For a consider- 
able time he obtained his living by visiting different families and 
painting what he falsely assured them was their coat-of-arms. 
He however really copied from those belonging to other families, 
or invented a fiction for the occasion. This man became ex- 
ceedingly intemperate and died in the alms-house in Groton — a 
state pauper. Even now there are in New York, and 'perhaps 
elsewhere, offices where coats-of-arms are sold as matters of busi- 
ness. And some of the money-proud, or conceited folks, who 
are justly untitled, purchase these counterfeit articles to be em- 
blazoned on their houses, their furniture, or their equipage, as 
ornaments, and to establish their claim to be ranked with the 
aristocracy and the nobility ! Knowing these facts, we have not 
placed a high value upon these doubtful, mythical evidences of a 
noble ancestry. 

We would not undervalue a descent from the nobility of 
England, especially if there was nobility of character as well as 
title ; nor the important influence which such an ancestry should 
have to produce noble traits of character in posterity. It ought 
to be remembered, however, that a title to nobility, even when 
proved to be authentic, is not always an evidence of real worth. 
It is said to have been conferred originally as a mark of distinc- 
tion upon gentlemen, and to elevate the possessor above the 
masses, for his birth, his wealth, his office, or his heroic deeds, as 
one of the leading class of his age. But it has long been a sub- 
ject of barter and sale ; and has often been given, not as a reward 
of merit, but for other reasons, to base men, and inherited by 
others still more unworthy. Many a title has been obtained by 
accident and fraud. " The whole tendency of the creations dur- 



22 INTRODUCTION. 

ing the last century was to vulgarize the institution. Of thirty- 
two Peers whom George II. made, five only are calculated to 
have been country gentlemen of ancient descent and good estates; 
and the old titles died almost as quickly as the new ones were 
made." (Westminster Review, July, 1853.) Every person 
has two parents, four grandparents, eight of the fourth genera- 
tion, sixteen of the fifth, thirty-two of the sixth, sixty-four of the 
seventh, and one hundred* and twenty-eight of the eighth, doub- 
ling the quarterings, as they are called, in each degree of removal 
into the past. The eighth generally carries the New Englander 
back to an English ancestor existing at the first settlement of this 
country. To boast of a descent from noble blood when one one- 
hundred-and-twenty-eighth part, or quartering, or a more minute 
portion, only, is of that character, would be like claiming that a 
small spring in the Rocky Mountains gave its character to the Mis- 
sissippi. If it is an honor to be the architect of one's own fortune, 
and to have a title conferred on that account, the nearer in descent 
we are to the architect the greater the honor. The influence of the 
nobility has been constantly decreasing as civilization and intelli- 
gence increases ; and in no period has it been less than at present. 
" Germany, the most aristocratic country in Europe, owes her 
great modern renown in the world of intellect to men who did 
not belong to her rigid and long-descended and strict-quartering 
nobility." But whatever estimate may be placed on such an 
inheritance, authentic or assumed, real or imaginary, it will be 
found poor capital to live upon. Lord Bacon has remarked that 
they who derive their worth from their ancestors resemble " po- 
tatoes, the most valuable part of which is under ground." It is 
one of the excellencies of our institutions that the mantle of no 
man's nobility or distinction descends to his posterity. A man 
who claims to be aristocratic, and assumes a leadership among 
his fellows on account of his ancestral antecedents, and does 
nothing worthy of his position, disgraces himself. Those alone 
should be distinguished who distinguish themselves. Every man 
is valued or should be valued according to his own merit. He 
himself, not his titled ancestors or connections, is the main article 
in the inventory, and the value of that article he has made chiefly 
himself. Even wealth itself, into whatever large heaps it may be 
accumulated, although it often gives a false idea of one's really 



GENERAL VIEWS OF THE SUBJECT. 23 

deserved position in society, soon becomes distributed or annihi- 
lated by succeeding generations. Poor descendants have to begin 
again to work up the hill of life to wealth and eminence as new 
aspirants. Under the old Colonial and Provincial laws the eldest 
son had a double portion ; but this distinction was very properly 
abolished in 1780. All children now share alike. The wealth, the 
character, the nobility of every man now generally depend upon 
himself. All are not born with equal capacity, but the avenues to 
excellence and to distinction are open equally to all. Whosoever 
will may enter therein. Every man, whatever be his condition, 
can acquire, if he tries, those traits of character and that position 
among his fellows, which should entitle him to be considered a 
gentleman. 

But while we throw aside an ancestral title as of little value in 
itself considered, there are dangers in this country from other 
sources. Too much sickly sentimentality, and too many false 
ideas of true greatness, or what should be considered the true 
glory of the human race, prevail amongst us. Wealth instead of 
character too often gives a social position undeserved by antece- 
dent respectability, education, moral worth, or personal manners 
and refinement. It is said that four of the most elegant and costly 
dwellings in the Fifth Avenue in New York, — the noted resi- 
dence of millionaires and the aristocracy of wealth, — are owned 
by a button maker, a candy manufacturer, a sarsaparilla vender, 
and one made suddenly rich by California steamboating. The 
accumulation of wealth is most certainly to be commended, if 
there are combined in its possessors those traits of character which 
give it its true nobility ; and many such instances exist in this 
country. It increases the bad man's means of self-indulgence and 
crime and the good man's means of independence and usefulness. 
But there are to be found some families and individuals, who, 
from having become suddenly rich or from other cause, strive to 
assume aristocratic airs and a style of living which does not be- 
come them, and in which they do not seem at home. Such per- 
sons often indulge a family pride, exhibit a love of ostentatious 
display, and look with disfavor upon those they consider their 
inferiors in wealth or station, viewing themselves for an unknown 
reason as belonging to the better class of people. They have no 
desire to learn anything of their ancestors or connections because 



24 INTRODUCTION. 

they were poor, or because they suppose them beneath them- 
selves. Their children spend with freedom — their daughters 
upon useless vanities, and their sons upon something worse — 
the hard earnings of industry and toil, but for the laborers them- 
selves they have little respect. This class of persons may be 
said to belong to the upper ten-dom, or the aristocracy, of folly, 
and are subjects rather for ridicule or compassion than for regard. 
Others, however, are not of this character. " Charles," said a 
certain true nobleman, " you see that little shop ; I have brought 
you here on purpose to show it to you. In that shop your grand- 
father used to shave for a penny. That is the proudest reflection 
of my life" ! It was once said — " Who amongst us can go back 
two generations without running his head against a ploughshare 
or an anvil ? And he is somewhat lucky if he can hit anything 
as genteel as these." Whether this was said in soberness or in 
jest, or by one who would forget his progenitors, it is a forcible 
illustration of the peculiar excellence of our institutions. Almost 
all our great men, in the general estimation of the world, have 
had a comparatively humble origin. If we look into Boston, 
New York, or any other great commercial mart, and see who are 
and have been the solid men, the opulent merchants, the influen- 
tial citizens, the "aristocracy," we shall find that they are gen- 
erally natives of the country towns — sons of farmers and me- 
chanics, who have been taught the value of a dollar, and how to 
earn it by their own industry, and how to take care of it and to 
use it to the best advantage after it was earned. They learned, 
early in life, that self-reliance is the surest guarantee of individual 
success and personal independence. Though of moderate pos- 
sessions, those fathers and mothers taught their children how to 
live within their means, and how to make the most of those 
means ; and so to economize time, money and self-gratification 
as to live honestly and happily upon a small and limited income. 
They impressed upon them their virtues and their characters, 
which under different circumstances have often been the founda- 
tion of great moral worth, commercial or professional success, or 
colossal fortunes. If there be any just cause of ancestral pride it 
is for a descent from such progenitors. Who would not prefer it 
to that of a descent from a nobility or an aristocracy which rests 
its claim to distinction upon a title, or upon accidental wealth or 



GENERAL VIEWS OF THE SUBJECT. 25 

other circumstances unaccompanied by those traits of physical, 
intellectual and moral worth without which there is no real ex- 
cellence ? Nature's noblemen and noblewomen are confined to 
no place or occupation, but are found everywhere — on the farm, 
in the workshop, in the humble walks of domestic life, as well 
as in professional ranks, and among the entitled aristocracy, or 
the aristocracy of money. Many persons — men and women — 
though they may not have left any visible foot-prints upon their 
age, may nevertheless have planted the seeds of an influence 
which may germinate, grow to maturity, and sway the destiny 
of nations. "One soweth and another reapeth." "It is the 
strong-handed, intelligent, laborious, independent, and virtuous 
yeomanry of New England that have made what was once a 
frowning wilderness, now the smiling abode of plenty, the happy 
home of contented thousands that own and till her soil, the 
fruitful mother of other thousands that carry New England 
hearts and New England principles into every state and section 
of our great country, modelling their institutions after those of 
their native land." 

" Nil me poeniteat sanum patris hujus ; eoque 
Non, ut magna dolo factum ncgat esse suo pars, 
Quod non ingenuos habeat clarosque parentes, 
Sic me defendam."* — (Horace, Book I. Satire VI.) 

Families, like nations and like individual man himself, are sub- 
ject to growth and decay. They have their periods of prosperity 
and adversity. Their circumstances do not long remain the same ; 
but often vacillate in the ups and downs — the vicissitudes of life. 
In physical capability, in intellectual capacity, in wealth, in social 
position, and in moral influence, they rise, culminate, and decline, 
in successive periods and generations. The history of the changes 
by which they are marked is an interesting and useful subject of 
investigation ; and it is abundantly illustrated by instructive ex- 
amples in almost every one's own experience and observation. 
A family whose history is now remembered, descended from 
"noble blood," rose to distinction and were for many years the 
leaders in an important New England town where they resided ; 

* " Nor, while my senses hold, shall I repent 
Of such a father, nor with pride resent, 
As many do, th' involuntary disgrace 
Not to be born of an illustrious race." 



26 INTRODUCTION. 

but at length their fortunes gradually waned ; and the last of the 
name in that town died in the alms-house. An off-shoot, how- 
ever, settled in another locality, renewed its ancestral energies, 
and again became eminent. Similar changes have occurred in 
numerous families. It has always been so ; and in the Old Coun- 
try more than in this. Yery few of the families from whom the 
present nobility of England descend, existed in patrician ranks 
at the settlement of New England two hundred years ago. The 
race of nobles is constantly dying out and becoming extinct ; and 
the vacuum has to be filled by new creations from the plebeian 
ranks ; or. if sustained at all, by a union with plebeian blood. 
We learn from the history of these families that they "bud, 
flower and die. Industry, energy, and perseverance beget wealth 
and position. These, allied with ability, talent and refinement, 
produce distinction and eminence ; but prodigality, decay, insan- 
ity or annihilation generally follows."* This series of changes 
happens in a shorter or longer period according to attendant cir- 
cumstances. In some cases they are passed rapidly in two or three 
generations ; in others they may be prolonged to eight or nine as 
their extreme limit. These facts are familiar to any one who 
may have paid any considerable attention to the subject. It is 
said by a recent writer (Westminster Review, July, 1853) that 
the last male heir of the once great family of Earls of Stafford, 
allied to the Royal blood, after several generations " died without 
issue, which was the best thing he could do ; but his sister, Jane 
Stafford, married a joiner and produced a cobbler ; and the poor 
fellow had only to step ' beyond his last' to claim kin with all 
that was noblest in England." Such persons literally descend 
from a higher to a lower, from a noble to an ignoble, ancestral 
station. These facts tend greatly to modify existing family pride. 
Those who choose may indulge it, but we prefer the ascending 
scale, even should it begin at the " ploughshare," the " anvil," or 
the "last." 

Human history and experience show that there are no declara- 
tions more hopeful to the good, or more awful to the bad, and 
yet more true, than that " the iniquities of the fathers are visited 

* See Gentleman's Magazine for 1846, New Series, Vol. XXV. p. 485; and Vol. XXVI. pp. 
150, and 309, for some interesting observations on the science of Genealogy and Genealogical 
Fictions. 



GENERAL VIEWS OF THE SUBJECT. 27 

upon the children and upon the children's children unto the third 
and fourth generation ;" and that " I have never seen the right- 
eous forsaken nor his seed begging bread." The strength and 
the weakness, the intellect and the mental imbecility, the indus- 
try and the laziness, the energy and the inertion, the morality 
and the immorality, of the father and the mother, or of either of 
them, do not end with their lives, but descend to a greater or less 
extent to their posterity. The prosperity, the fortunes, the des- 
tiny of children, too, as well as their physical and mental charac- 
teristics, are made the better for the virtues, and the worse for the 
vices, of their parents. There is scarcely any family in which 
great diversity of circumstances has not existed, and in which at 
different periods great changes have not taken place, producing 
great alterations in relative wealth, social position, and moral 
influence. At one time it may be comparatively unknown in 
society; at another, among the most distinguished. Again, the 
circumstances of life may change and bring it into obscurity. 
And in the same family some members attain among their fellows 
a position in wealth and in social and moral influence, almost 
enviable ; while others, sometimes with no apparent ill-desert, 
struggle through life in comparative poverty — almost unnoticed 
and unknown. Why is it so ? Were the causes analyzed, an 
answer might in most cases be obtained. And is it not of im- 
portance to know what produces these great changes — this great 
diversity of character and circumstances, that in our struggles 
with our own propensities and with the influences that surround 
us, to resist evil and temptation to evil, and to acquire compe- 
tence and respectability, we may avoid the mistakes committed 
by others, escape the disasters that have fallen upon them ; and 
that we may acquire all that the most highly favored have en- 
joyed, and be all the most worthy have been ? This is possible 
notwithstanding any unfortunate antecedents ; and in this way 
we can come off conquerors over internal and external imper- 
fection and error, and learn to meet with more manliness, energy, 
and propriety the vicissitudes of life, and be better prepared for 
its close. We venerate the memory of our ancestors, and like to 
study their history. We desire to know the physical, mental and 
moral elements that were combined to form their characters. 
We would not however hold them up as faultless. They lived 



28 INTRODUCTION. 

in an age of darkness, compared with our own. Like other men 
they had the faults of their nature and of their age — their blem- 
ishes — their sunny sides and their shady sides. If any erred, by 
knowing how and why they erred we ourselves might be in- 
duced to conduct differently. The very record of an error is 
not without its utility. If any made a wreck of their fortunes or 
their character, or did not attain the full development of their 
natures, or failed to leave a favorable mark upon their age or no 
mark at all, it is well that the rock on which they foundered 
should be mapped upon the voyage of life, that it may be avoid- 
ed by future navigators. The superior light of the present age 
should guide to a more successful result — to a more worthy and 
honorable position. 

We are fully aware that a difference of opinion prevails as to 
the value and importance of Memorials like these. Some persons 
regard such matters with indifference. There are those who 
exist in the supreme selfishness of the present, and have no 
regard to antecedents and consequences. They live, but how 
they came to live they know not, and seem not to care ; and in 
regard to the purpose or consequences of their lives they seem to 
be equally unconcerned. We have met with persons, and some 
of education too, who could not tell the date of their own birth or 
marriage, or of that of their children ; and with others who could 
not tell the names, much less the character, of their grandparents 
or other ancestors ; and who seemed to care as little as they 
knew. "My ancestors left me nothing," say they, "and why 
should I remember them." — "Posterity has done nothing for me, 
and why should I do anything for posterity"! Such ignorance 
and such indifference seem to us unpardonable. Burke uttered a 
noble sentiment when he said, "Those only deserve to be re- 
membered by posterity who treasure up the history of their 
ancestors." Another author has remarked that "he who pays 
no regard to his ancestors is a bad man." Whether this be true 
or not it may be safely said that such an one is unworthy to have 
had any ancestors, and does not deserve to be remembered by pos- 
terity, if he should happen to have any. If he is not treated with 
indifference and neglect, or in memory forgotten, it will not be 
because it was undeserved. We do not belong to this class of 
persons. But while this matter of ancestry, genealogy, and per- 



GENERAL VIEWS OF THE SUBJECT. 29 

sonal history is regarded as an important object of knowledge, it 
should be estimated aright, and among other matters it should 
have its proper place and receive its appropriate share of atten- 
tion. It should not be exalted above nor sunk below its just 
value. We would not have it administer to a weak pride nor to 
a grovelling avarice. While we would not be indifferent to the 
past and future we would not disregard the present. A knowl- 
edge of those who gave us form, brought us into existence, and 
made us what we are, seems required to satisfy the promptings of 
our nature. A strong desire exists in the author's own mind, at 
least, to know something of those who have preceded us in this 
drama of life, and of the manner in which they have performed their 
respective parts. We believe with Mr. Webster, (Works, Vol. I. 
p. 6,) that "there is a moral and philosophical respect for our 
ancestors, which elevates the character and improves the heart. 
Next to the sense of religious duty and moral feeling, I hardly 
know what should bear with stronger obligation on a liberal and 
enlightened mind, than a consciousness of an alliance with ex- 
cellence which is departed ; and a consciousness too, that in its 
acts and conduct, and even in its sentiments and thoughts, it 
may be actively operating on the happiness of those that come 
after it." 

Those who choose may regard the names and dates in these 
Memorials as dry and uninteresting. In our view they form an 
essential part of the picture intended to be presented. Without 
such facts the history and exhibition of no life would be complete. 
A knowledge of the date of a birth, a marriage, or a death — the 
three most important epochs in the history of individuals — has 
been the means of saving, and the want of it of losing an estate. 
But besides these and other important purposes presently to be 
noticed, they ought to suggest some useful moral thought. What 
a day was each of these dates to some human family, or to some 
circle of loving human hearts like our own ! How much of joy 
or sorrow, of hope or despair, is hidden under these significant 
facts ! Each is a memorial, not of death only, but of life ; — of 
a human heart that once lived and loved, "a heart that kept 
its steady pulsations through some certain period of time and 
then ceased to act and mouldered into dust ; of an individual 
human life that had its joys and its sorrows, its cares and its 



30 INTRODUCTION. 

burdens, its afflictions and its hopes, its conflicts and its achieve- 
ments, its opportunities wasted and improved, and its hour of 
death." 

A distinguished individual now living has said that the reflections 
of his father at his own birth and baptism which he discovered 
several years after his parent's death "made an impression upon his 
mind which was never effaced. It proved, he verily believed, to 
be that word in season so often efficacious in leading the thoughts 
too much engrossed by the world to the one thing needful." 
This certainly should be the effect of discovering the written 
expression of the desires of a pious parent, anxious for the wel- 
fare of his children. A review of the lives and history of virtu- 
ous ancestors — those who have lived without reproach and per- 
formed useful service in their day and generation, and who have 
died leaving a good name and a good character as a legacy to 
their posterity, assuredly should always arouse whatever of good 
there is in our natures, and lead us to aspire to whatever of good 
it is possible for us to attain. It should move us onward to 
more wise and more energetic and persevering efforts, to fill up 
life with useful and noble deeds ; to a more active performance 
of every duty of our station, whatever that station may be ; and 
to a more earnest desire to preserve and hand down of ourselves a 
good name and a good character to our posterity. Life may thus 
be crowned with an honorable success and completeness, instead 
of being disgraced as a failure. In these Memorials we behold a 
mirror which reflects our own image, — what we have been, and 
what we must become — our origin and our destiny. They make 
us all conscious, whatever may have been our ancestry, that 
our existence here is only temporary, and that this world is not 
to be our permanent abode. They show us multitudes of human 
beings, some of whom are ever in-coming or out-going. Like a 
moving panorama, they exhibit living individuals, who for brief 
periods perform their parts and then pass away, leaving their 
places to be filled by others, who in their turn perform similar parts 
and have similar exits. Here we see some currents of life that 
are ceasing to flow ; there, others that are sending forth new 
branches, expanding into other channels of greater magnitude 
and of more extended capabilities. At one time, we see little 
ones receding from our view, ere they are able to share in the 



PHILOSOPHICAL GENEALOGY. 31 

activities that surround them ; at another, others are ceasing 
their course, just as they are blossoming into manhood or wom- 
anhood ; then, some in the full vigor of middle age disappear ; and 
again, others laden with the fruits of old age, or the blossoms of 
second childhood. An exit happens alike to all without distinc- 
tion of age, sex, or condition. And these scenes are repeated 
onward and onward, " ever varying, yet ever the same." We 
ourselves are seen as the present living actors ; but soon others 
will have our places in the exhibition. We also shall have 
passed out of sight, and be numbered with those who have float- 
ed down the stream of time, to be swallowed up in the ocean of 
eternity ! What lessons of life does such a picture teach ! With 
what significance are they impressed upon us ! Cold and callous 
indeed must be the heart of any one who can peruse these pages, 
and especially those relating to his own kindred, with personal 
indifference, or without personal improvement. As we look over 
these Memorials may we be moved to aspire to a higher and 
nobler position, and to a better type of excellence, in humanity; 
to struggle constantly to live aright, and so worthily as to be at 
peace with our own consciences, our fellow men and our Creator ; 
ever to strive while we live, to make ourselves and the world 
around us better and happier ; and may we never cease to remem- 
ber that to improve our hearts and form our characters, we now 
enjoy our only time, and that the present is our only opportunity, 
antecedent to this mortal putting on immortality ! 



III. 

luteal |f isiorjj aub |) jjgsttal C|aradrasib of % Jf an% 

Genealogical investigations should have two great objects in 
view : First, to ascertain and record the most important facts in 
the history of generations, families and individual persons ; and, 
secondly, to abstract, analyze, and classify these facts so that 
they may illustrate the Natural History of the race to which they 
refer. The former may be denominated Historical Genealogy, 



32 INTRODUCTION. 

and the latter Philosophical Genealogy. Hitherto, investigations 
have been confined almost exclusively to the first department of 
these inquiries : and the incidents of personal history have pos- 
sessed sufficient interest to secure attention. Philosophical Ge- 
nealogy is, however, of much more importance. The great 
truths it develops might be applied to facilitate our personal 
improvement, and to increase cmr happiness in the every-day 
acts and duties of life. Considered in this light, Genealogy be- 
comes a science of the utmost utility. Though it has as yet 
received little attention, and been but imperfectly understood or 
appreciated, it should nevertheless be a popular science, and 
should take its place among the most important objects deserving 
attention and investigation : — 

" The proper study of mankind is man." 

The general characteristics of a family are perpetuated through 
successive generations. Modifications and even peculiarities may, 
however, be introduced, and may be transmitted for shorter or 
longer periods, though there is a constant tendency in nature to 
return to the original type. It is well known that different races 
and different families of the same race, do not uniformly possess 
the same characteristics ; and that they often differ materially 
from each other. Even the different members of the same fami- 
ly frequently exhibit great diversity in their natural capacities 
and propensities. Some families and individuals are remarkable 
for their muscular power, their industry, energy and perseverance ; 
others for their mental superiority ; some for other characteristics, 
physical, intellectual, or moral; and others for opposite or different 
qualities. Some seem to inherit a predisposition to consumption, 
apoplexy, fever, insanity, or other disease, which will be devel- 
oped under circumstances that favor it ; while others seem en- 
tirely exempt from such tendencies, and can expose themselves 
to hazards with impunity. The transmission of these character- 
istics is not uniform. In some cases they affect a part of the 
progeny only ; in others they skip one or two generations to 
reappear in a grandchild or a great-grandchild. The size, form, 
complexion, color of the hair and eyes, or other physical, or 
even intellectual or moral traits of character, may be produced by 
the peculiarities of the father or of the mother, or by a combina- 
tion of the peculiarities of both. Offspring often resemble the 



PHILOSOPHICAL GENEALOGY. 33 

paternal grandparent more than the father ; and the children of a 
wife by her second husband have been known to bear a greater 
resemblance to her first husband than to their own father. Some- 
times the peculiar circumstances and propensities existing at the 
time of generation, and especially the condition, association and 
influences of the mother daring gestation, may originate a new 
trait of character, which may be transmitted to the "third and 
fourth generation," or until eradicated by other causes and cir- 
cumstances. The characteristics of a noble and generous, as well 
as of a mean and grovelling nature, may be perpetuated through 
many generations. Other elements, however, may be introduced, 
and other influences may be brought into combination, which 
may exterminate or modify good or bad qualities, and produce 
other types of character differing from the originals that have 
preceded them. The causes of good and evil which often hover 
over the history and destiny of families, to enlighten or darken the 
domestic fireside, are often traced to the marriages of individuals, 
which have an immense influence upon their happiness, pros- 
perity and perpetuity. Many husbands are unworthy of their 
wives, and many wives are unworthy of their husbands, — the 
one unfit or uncongenial to the other, either in physical or mental 
capacity, or in social or moral training ; and such alliances should 
never have been formed. Eminent naturalists have stated, and 
probably truly, that if they could have the control of mar- 
riage connections, and determine what persons should be united, 
they could produce a race of idiots, or a race of nature's noble- 
men. 

These principles rest upon the well-established fact in nature, 
that like produces like. They are of the highest importance, and 
should be well understood. We have already alluded (p. 25) to 
the rise and fall of families. Many of the causes of these changes 
lie in this direction. Every one should be aware that in all mat- 
ters relating to his physical and intellectual, as well as to his 
moral powers, he can make the good better and the bad worse by 
his own conduct and by the social connections he forms. And it 
is well that he should thoroughly study and understand the 
history and condition of his own constitution, and the causes 
which have made it what it is, and the means which may be 
used to make it better, and to transmit it improved to others. 
5 



34 INTRODUCTION. 

What is the character of the blood that courses in his veins ? 
To what propensities does it lead ? What traits of character does 
it tend to develop ? And how can a bad impulse be restrained 
and a good one enlarged and transmitted ? The same informa- 
tion should, as far as possible, be obtained concerning the person 
with whom a marriage union is proposed, male or female, that 
the probable results of such a union may be anticipated, and 
whether they would be likely to improve the physical, mental 
and moral condition of the race or otherwise. Marriages be- 
tween relatives of the same family should if possible be avoided. 
Preference should always be given to an admixture of different 
blood. If this matter was fully understood it would greatly aid 
in guarding against those propensities which are opposed to health 
and happiness and in increasing those that promote them ; and 
be more likely to produce sound minds in sound constitutions in 
the offspring. This is a practical suggestion. "I know a case," 
says a recent English writer, " where a besetting weakness in 
the blood had for four generations prevented the prosperity of 
the family ; the fifth in descent, having penetrated the secret 
cause of his family misfortunes, resolved to conquer and crush 
the impulse, which was quite as strong in himself as in his 
progenitors. He did so and succeeded in establishing his fam- 
ily." Similar results have followed very many other efforts of 
tt.he kind. 

We do not propose, in this place, to discuss this great subject 
in its various bearings and relations; but we deem it proper to 
make these brief suggestions, as introductory to a statement of 
the results obtained by analysis and calculation from several 
classes of facts, which have been carefully abstracted from these 
Memorials. They are important illustrations of the Natural His- 
tory and Physical Characteristics of the family, and will un- 
doubtedly be interesting and useful to them and perhaps to oth- 
ers. If genealogists would publish similar deductions concerning 
other families, founded on full and accurate data, we might pos- 
sess, more fully than we now do, the means of ascertaining the 
laws of human life existing in this country, and the changes, if 
any, that have taken place in relation to these laws in the differ- 
ent periods of its history. To render such data perfect, the exact 
xlate of every birth, every marriage, and every death, in every 



PHILOSOPHICAL GENEALOGY. 35 

family, including those who die young as well as others, should 
always be accurately given. 



The personal conformation of our family, where its peculiar 
type prevails, has some distinctive characteristics. It may be de- 
scribed generally as of the medium height, full chested, thickly 
set, compactly built, and well proportioned, with rather more than 
the average weight and athletic or muscular power; the features 
usually full and regular, and the complexion fair ; a constitution 
capable of enduring hardship and toil, and favorable to health and 
long life. There have been many males and females of com- 
paratively early maturity and of considerable beauty. Excep- 
tions to this general description, of course, have often occurred, 
produced by the admixture of different blood, or by other circum- 
stances and causes. Instances are not uncommon of persons 
slightly built and under the usual size and weight ; and of others 
who have grown upwards above the usual height, and expanded 
outwards beyond the usual breadth ; and of others who have had no 
traits of beauty to spare. One man writes us that he carries about 
with him a person weighing two hundred and fifty pounds ; and 
other instances exist of similar corpulency. Another writes that 
he is six feet four inches high, and in other respects well propor- 
tioned. Another, that his four aunts were tall in person and 
weighed over two hundred pounds each, and yet were well pro- 
portioned and handsome women. The height and weight of 
persons differ from each other in the same stock and in the same 
families ; and the same person may vary in his weight in the differ- 
ent periods of life. The author is five feet nine inches high, and 
his average weight, until he was over forty years old, was about 
one hundred and forty pounds ; now, at the age of sixty, it is 
two hundred pounds. If observations were carefully made and 
recorded in these matters relative to a considerable number of 
persons, and to the same persons at different ages, as they should 
always be, interesting comparisons and deductions might be 
made ; but there are unfortunately too few relating to our family 
to be of very general utility in ascertaining the general law of 
our physical development and growth. 

The sex of 4,121 newly created lives, produced or descended 



36 INTRODUCTION. 

from our first American ancestor and named in these Memo- 
rials, has been determined. This number does not include all the 
descendants of the name, nor very many of those of other names. 
Several schedules were received after this abstract had been made. 
If these had been included, the aggregate numbers would be 
largely increased ; but the proportional results would probably be 
nearly the same as now ascertained. Of these 4,121 lives, 2,157 
were males and 1,964 were females; or for 100 females there have 
been born on the average 109 males. To ascertain how far this 
difference in the proportion of the sexes prevailed in different 
periods we have divided them into three groups, — those included 
ill the first four generations, those of the fifth and sixth, and 
those of the seventh. And it appears that in the first group, of 
515 lives, 279 were males and 236 were females : or for 100 
females, 118 males were born. In the second group, of 2,073 
lives, 1,069 were males and 1,004 were females; or for 100 
females, 106 males were born. And in the third group, of 1,533 
lives, 809 were males and 724 were females; or for 100 females, 
112 males were born. It is a universal law of human life, in all 
nations, that more males than females are born, but the propor- 
tion of males to females here indicated is greater than the general 
average, and may be considered an evidence of a vigorous race. 

Among these births were 72 twin children, or every 57th child 
was a twin. This is about the proportion that prevails, on the 
average, throughout the whole population of Massachusetts. It 
is a remarkable fact that the sexes of those 72 twin children were 
exactly equal. Several mothers had twins more than once. Two 
mothers, in two cases of birth, produced twins in each case, the 
one immediately succeeding the other. 

How many of the persons born lived to maturity and were 
married ? To answer this interesting question 1,037 lives in the 
first six generations have been examined, all the great epochs of 
whose history are given ; and we have obtained the following 
results. Of these 1,037 lives (561 males and 476 females.) 139, 
or 13.40 per cent., died under 20 years of age ; and 898, or 86.60 
per cent., lived over 20. Of 561 males, 76, or 13.55 per cent., 
died under 20, and 485, or 86.45 per cent., survived that age ; 
and of 476 females, 63, or 13.24 per cent,, died under 20, and 
413, or 86.76 per cent., survived 20, showing nearly equal tenac- 



PHILOSOPHICAL GENEALOGY. 37 

ity of life in the two sexes. Of the 485 males who lived over 
20 years, 442, or 91.13 per cent., were married, and 43, or 8.87 
per cent., were nnmarried. Of the 413 females who survived 20 
years, 380, or 92.01 per cent., were married, and 33, or 7.99 per 
cent., were unmarried ; indicating that the chances of marriage have 
been less than one per cent, in favor of the males, and that the prob- 
abilities of living a single life have been nearly equal in each sex. 
Of 898 persons of both sexes who lived over 20 years, 822, or 91.54 
per cent., were married, and 76, or 8.46 per cent., were unmar- 
ried ; showing that in our family, to persons who survived 20 years, 
the chances were 92 nearly in every 100 that they would be mar- 
ried, and only 8 nearly in every 100 that they would live a single 
life. Of the whole 1,037 persons born, 822, or 79.27 per cent., 
were married, and 215, or 20.73 per cent., died unmarried. These 
figures show that a very high probability indeed of living to be 
married has prevailed. They may be somewhat higher in favor 
of marriage than all the facts would justify, if the natural history 
of every life was known and included. We suppose, however, it 
may be stated with truth that seventy-jive per cent., at least, of the 
persons born in the first six generations were married ; and that 
twenty-five per cent, only died in single life. We have not in- 
cluded all of the sixth, and none of the later generations, because 
the incompleteness of their lives does not afford the means of 
doing it correctly. On the most careful estimate that we have 
been able to make of these later lives it appears evident that a great- 
er proportion die at the present time under 20 years of age, and 
that of those that survive that age, a less proportion are married. 
And when a child is born, there is a less probability now, than in 
the earlier generations of our family in this country, that it will 
survive and be married. How great this difference is cannot be 
exactly ascertained, but it is probably not less than ten per cent., 
and may be more than that. But taking this to be true, two 
thirds nearly of the existing generations will live to be married, 
and one third will die unmarried. Even with this reduction in 
the physical vitality of the race, the remainder is probably greater 
and shows a higher degree of health, than the families of man- 
kind generally would average. 

By deducting the date of birth from the date of marriage, we 
have calculated the exact ages at marriage, in years, months, and 



1750-1850 469 

Ferns. 1(542-1750 66 

1750-1800 150 



38 INTRODUCTION. 

days, of 530 males, and 560 females, selected in course from these 
Memorials. These are all cases of first marriages, and include 
none of second marriages. We have divided them into four 
groups, according to the sexes and the periods of time in which 
the marriages were solemnized. The aggregates of the whole, 
for the first and for the last hundred years, are also given. The 
following statement exhibits the number of cases, and the aggre- 
gate age and the average age, in each group, showing the result 
of the investigation : — 

Sex. Period. Cases. Aggregate Age. Average Age. 

Males, 1642-1750 61-r 1,517 y. 3m. 18d. = 24y. 10m. 14 d. 
1750-1800 147 — 3,702 24 =25 2 6 
1800-1825 122 -f- 3,012 3 21 =24 8 8 
1825-1850 200^- 5,068 7 10 =25 4 3 

11,782 11 25 =25 1 14 
1,377 11 7 =20 10 16 
3,349 7 13 =22 3 28 
1800-1825 120 -7- 2,721 4 =22 8 3 
1825-1850 224^- 5,133 3 11 =22 10 29 
1750-1850 494-^11,203 10 28 =22 8 4 
From this statement it appears that among the males the 
average age at marriage for the first hundred years, was 24 years 
10 months 14 days, and for the last hundred years, 25 years 1 
month 14 days, showing a difference between the two periods of 
only 2 months days. Between the periods 1800 to 1825 and 
1825 to 1850, there is a difference of 7 months 25 days, and 
between the second and the last period, of 1 month 27 days. 
Among the females the average age at marriage for the first hun- 
dred years, was 20 years 10 months 16 days, and for the last 
hundred years, 22 years 8 months 4 days, showing a difference 
of 1 year 9 months 24 days ; and it appears that the average age 
is greater and greater in each group, and that there is a difference 
between the first and the last group of 2 years months 13 days. 
An impression prevails that marriages in our country are not con- 
tracted now as early as in former periods; and these figures seem 
to indicate that it is correct, but they do not exhibit so great a 
difference among males as females, nor so great a difference gen- 
erally as many have supposed. The youngest person at marriage 
was a female, aged 13 years 3 months 23 days ; another female 



PHILOSOPHICAL GENEALOGY. 39 

married at 13 years 5 months 27 days ; another at 13 years 8 
months 26 days ; and another at 14 years 3 months 24 days. 
The oldest person married was a male, aged 88 years 9 months 
17 days — his second marriage. 

Of 377 marriages in the first six generations, 318, or 84.35 per 
cent., were first marriages; 53, or 14.06 per cent., were second 
marriages; and 6, or 1.59 per cent., were third marriages. Of 
the 53 second marriages, 29 produced children and 24 were un- 
productive. The 377 marriages of all kinds produced 2357 
children, or 6| nearly, on the average, for each marriage. The 
318 first marriages produced 2,228 children, or 7 on the average 
for each marriage. Seven may therefore be considered as the 
average number of children to a family in the first six genera- 
tions. An exact, calculation in regard to the families in the 
seventh generation cannot be made ; but as far as they may be 
estimated, the average number of children is not quite as great 
now as in the earlier generations, and probably the families will 
not average more than 6| instead of 7 to a family, and 6 to all 
the marriages. By examining these Memorials it will be found 
that a large number of families have had nine children each, so 
much so that that number among the Shattucks seems to have 
been a favorite. The author's grandparents and great grand- 
parents had each nine children, all of whom in both families 
lived to be married. His great-great-grandparents had nine 
children also. 

The first female just mentioned, who was married at the age 
of 13 years 3 months 23 days, became a mother at 14 years 7 
months 28 days, and died aged 46. The second, who was mar- 
ried at 13 years 5 months 27 days, became a mother at 14 years 
9 months ; and she had two grandchildren, — one by the eldest 
and one by the third child, before the birth of her own youngest 
child, making the nephews older than their uncle. The interval 
between the birth of her oldest and youngest child was 26 years 
7 months 19 days. The other female, who was married at 14 
years 3 months 24 days, was a mother at 15 years 6 months 2 
days. She had four children after the marriage of her third 
child, and had one grandchild by her second and four by her 
third child before the birth of her own youngest child. The 
oldest nephew was 5 years 9 months 22 days older than his aunt. 



40 INTRODUCTION. 

The interval between the birth of her oldest and youngest child 
was 27 years 7 months 23 days. The two mothers last named 
are now (1853) living, the first aged 74 and the second aged 60. 
The first has had eighteen, the other thirteen children, indicating 
that in these instances, at least, early marriages have not had an 
unfavorable influence on vitality. Another female married at 13 
years 8 months 26 days, but did not become a mother until 17 
years 2 months 24 days. These have been all the instances 
that we have found of females marrying under 16 years of age. 

One male, not a descendant but a connection, was the father of 
a daughter born when he was over 80 years of age. Another had 
a daughter born when he was 69 years 6 months 8 days. Sev- 
eral births of children by fathers aged from 50 to 60 years, are 
contained in this volume. 

The average intervals between the births of successive children 
of the same family are found by deducting the date of birth of 
the oldest from that of the youngest child, and dividing the dif- 
ference by one less than the whole number of children, twins 
being considered as one child. To ascertain the law prevailing 
in this respect in our family we have calculated 313 cases in the 
first five generations, and 568 in the seventh ; and the result is as 
follows: — 

Period. Cases. Aggregate Intervals. Average Intervals. 

First 5 generations, 313 791 y. 9 m. 10 d. 2 y. 6 m. 10 d. 
From 7th generation, 568 1,457 4 6 2 6 24 

From this statement there appears to be a difference of fourteen 
days only in the averages of the respective periods. There are 
some families in which the average was less than 2 and others in 
which it was more than 3 years, but 2 years 6 months may be 
considered as about the general average in this characteristic of 
the natural history of the race. 

The duration of married life, though it has not hitherto been 
investigated, is an interesting characteristic in the natural history 
of man. It is ascertained by deducting the date of its commence- 
ment or of marriage, from the date of its termination or of the 
death of either partner, the husband or the wife. We have 
selected 204 cases of first marriages from these Memorials, nearly 
all contained in the first six generations, in which all of the facts 
were known. None have been selected from the seventh genera- 



PHILOSOPHICAL GENEALOGY. 41 

tion, because the lives of the smaller portion already terminated are 
shorter than those of the larger portion yet to be terminated, and 
hence a fair average could not be obtained. Some imperfection 
may be supposed to attach to the number of facts in the early pe- 
riods, but as a whole they may be considered as data sufficiently 
ample for authentic and reliable deductions. The average duration 
of married life in these 204 cases was 31 years 8 months 15 days. 
The first 80 cases averaged 27 years 8 months 21 days, and the 
last 124 averaged 34 years 4 months 22 days. Dividing the last 
124 cases into three groups, the average duration of married life 
in these several groups does not vary from each other more than 
one year. From these facts it appears that during the first 100 
years after our ancestor settled in this country, the average dura- 
tion of married life was not as great, by nearly seven years, as 
during the last 100 years. That there was a difference appears 
evident, but whether as great as seven years admits of some 
doubt. If every case in the early generations were exactly 
known it would probably produce a different result, though it 
might not be very considerable. Of the 204 cases, 4 terminated 
under 1 year, 26 between 1 and 10, 29 between 10 and 20. 33 
between 20 and 30, 40 between 30 and 40, 37 between 40 and 
50, 29 between 50 and 60, and 6 over 60. The shortest period 
was 2 months 10 days, and the longest, 65 years 1 1 months 6 
days. The average duration of married life in our family may 
therefore be considered as about thirty-three years, or one third 
of a century. 

The average interval which elapsed between the first and 
second marriage in 36 cases of males was 2 years 8 months 3 
days. In 20 cases of females it was 4 years months 5 days, 
showing that it is longer in the female than in the male, which 
it is believed will be found to be a general law in the population 
at large. The shortest interval among the males was 2 months 
17 days; the longest, 10 years 11 months. In one instance the 
first husband was the father of a child born after the mother's 
marriage to her second husband. 

The average duration of the marriage relation in 30 cases of 

second marriages was 23 years 5 months 2 days, which may be 

considered as nearly a correct estimate. In a majority of these 

cases one or both of the parties were young ; and hence there is 

6 



42 



INTRODUCTION. 



not as much difference in duration between first and second mar- 
riages, as might be supposed without an accurate knowledge of 
the facts. 

Of 195 cases, 120 husbands, or 62 per cent., died before their 
wives ; and 75 wives, or 38 per cent., died before their husbands. 
And it has been found generally the fact that more females than 
males are left in widowhood ; but perhaps more extended investi- 
gations might show a proportion somewhat different from that 
indicated by these figures. 

The average duration of widowhood, or the length of time 
which elapses between the death of either husband or wife and 
the death of the survivor, has been calculated in first or single 
marriages. In 33 cases of males, it was 12 years 10 months 28 
days ; in 79 cases of females it was 13 years 5 months 16 days, 
showing a difference between the sexes of 6 months 18 days 
only. And it is a remarkable fact, tending to show that this is 
nearly the average when applied to the race generally, that in 
dividing these cases into nearly equal groups, the average of each 
group does not differ one year from the average of the whole. 
The shortest period of widowhood among males was 5 months, 
and the longest, 46 years 4 months 21 days. The shortest 
among females was 9 days; the longest, 46 years 9 months 26 
days. 

The duration of life of each person is an interesting matter. 
The period of life it is well known is liable to be terminated at 
any moment after birth, but may be prolonged and in rare in- 
stances has been actually prolonged beyond 100 years. The end 
comes sooner or later according to the degree of vitality inherent 
in the constitution, and to the circumstances with which it is 
surrounded. To assist in ascertaining the laws of life, and the 
degree of vitality existing in our family, we have calculated the 
exact duration in years, months and days of each life, in every case 
where the dates of birth and death were known ; and have based 
our calculations on all the known cases, whether dying young or 
otherwise, selected in the order in which they occurred in the first 
fvYe and part of the sixth generations. So many lives are yet 
unfinished in the seventh and part of the sixth, that to separate 
these longer lives from the shorter ones already terminated would 
not give a fair average. The selection comprises 522 lives, (285 



PHILOSOPHICAL GENEALOGY. 43 

males and 237 females,) and the calculation exhibits the follow- 
ing results : — 

Aggregate Ages Average Age. Prop, per ct. 

118y.8m.10d. ly.llm.10d. 11.68 

122 9 9 8 9 7 2.69 

6,944 11 10 39 2 25 33.91 

20,752 6 17 76 10 10 51.72 



Both 


Ages. Persons, 


sexes, 


Under 5 61 




5 to 15 14 




15 to 60 177 




Over 60 270 



All ages, 522 27,938 11 26 53 6 8 100.00 



Males, Under 5 


37 


77 


7 


26 


2 


1 


5 


12.98 


5 to 15 


7 


59 


11 


5 


8 


6 


22 


2.46 


15 to 20 


6 


99 


2 


24 


16 


6 


14 


2.11 


20 to 60 


93 


4,010 


8 


10 


43 


1 


15 


32.63 


Over 20 


235 


14,903 


7 


4 


63 


5 


1 





Over 60 142 10,892 10 24 76 8 15 49.82 



All ages, 285 15,140 5 9 53 1 14 100.00 



Ferns. Under 5 24 41 24 1 8 16 10.13 

5 to 15 7 62 10 4 8 11 22 2.95 

15 to 20 12 221 7 21 18 5 19 5.06 

20 to 60 66 2,613 4 15 39 7 4 27.85 

Over 60 128 9,859 7 23 77 10 54.01 



All ages, 237 12,798 6 27 54 100.00 

This statement exhibits the aggregate number of persons of 
both sexes and of each sex, who died in the respective periods of 
life, or at the ages specified ; the aggregate and the average ages; 
and the proportion per cent, in each period. The average ages 
of the 522 persons of both sexes was 53 years 6 months 8 days; 
of the 285 males, 53 years 1 month 14 days ; and of the 237 
females, 54 years months days, showing a difference in their 
ages between the sexes of 8 months 16 days only. The average 
ages of 270 persons of both sexes who survived 60, was 76 years 
10 months 10 days ; of the 142 males, 76 years 8 months 15 
days ; and of the 128 females, 77 years months 10 days, showing 
a difference of 3 months 25 days only in favor of females. The 
average ages of the males who died between the ages of 20 and 



44 INTRODUCTION. 

60, was 43 years 1 month 15 days, being 3 years 6 months 11 days 
greater than the ages of the females who died in the same period. 
The proportion of both sexes that died under 5 years of age, was 
only 11.68 per cent. ; and of those that survived 60, it was 51.72 
per cent. The proportion that died under 5 and between 20 and 
60 years, was greater among the males than among the females ; 
but between the ages of 15 to 20 the proportion was more than 
double among the females, showing in regard to that sex that 
this is the most critical period in their lives and should be most 
carefully guarded. Other interesting comparisons might be drawn 
from this statement. The law of mortality, thus ascertained to 
exist in our family, is more favorable to a strong vital force and to 
longevity than in the average of mankind. The average age of 
all the males who survived 20 years, was 63 years 5 months 1 
day. The average of 21,484 males of all professions, who died 
in Massachusetts during the last eight years, was 51 years 7 
months 27 days ; and of 6,747 farmers, — the most favored classes, 
63 years 11 months 4 days. This shows that our family lived on 
the average 11 years 9 months 4 days longer than the average of 
all the professions, and within 6 months 3 days of the average of 
the longest lived profession. In England the mean future life- 
time of a man aged 60 is calculated to be 14 years 2 months, or 
according to the foregoing statement, 2 years 8 months less than 
the mean future lifetime of a man of the same age in our family. 
The proportion of children that died under 5 years of age has 
been unusually small, being only 11.68 per cent., whilst in most 
of the cities 40 to 50 per cent, of all the deaths have been of 
persons under that age. 

It is an interesting fact that nearly the same results as are here 
presented, are obtained by subdividing the numbers into smaller 
groups according to the order of time in which they occurred. 
Dividing the 142 males and the 128 females into four groups 
each, the average age of each group will not differ 4 years jYom 
the average of the whole ; and this uniformity prevails with the 
other ages specified in the statement. How far these favorable 
results would apply to existing generations — the present living 
descendants — is a matter of great interest, but one that is not 
easily ascertained. From the most careful estimate that we 
have been able to make, we are inclined to believe that the 



PHILOSOPHICAL GENEALOGY. 45 

members of our family do not live quite as long on the average, 
or enjoy quite as strong vital force now, as they did in the gen- 
erations that have gone before us. This we believe to be true 
in regard to others. It is frequently said that owing to the 
great improvements in medical science mankind live longer 
now than formerly, but investigation leads us to the belief 
that this statement is erroneous. Numerous facts show that the 
average length of life is not now as great generally as it was 
fifty years since. 

The diseases and causes of death are most important facts in 
the natural history of a race, and they should be carefully stated 
in all Family Registers. The very small number of cases in 
which they are given in these Memorials, however, does not afford 
the means of making an abstract of any utility. Consumption, 
fever, apoplexy, and other diseases have prevailed ; but no pecul- 
iar liability to any one of these diseases appears to have been a 
characteristic of the family. In constitutions in which the Shat- 
tuck blood, or conformation, has been predominant, consumption 
seems to have been rare ; but in constitutions in which other 
blood seems to have had the greatest influence, that common 
but dreadful disease has been often developed and found fatal. 
Fever and apoplexy have been common in the family. It is 
important that every one should examine carefully the diseases 
and causes of death that have prevailed in the branches of the 
family from which he is descended, and with which he is im- 
mediately connected — his parents and his grandparents and each 
of their families and connections ; and if a tendency to con- 
sumption, or any other known disease, is discovered, to take 
all proper measures to guard against its introduction or devel- 
opment. 

The number of the descendants of our first ancestor may be 
estimated by calculations from the data we have already given. 
If the average number of children to each family was seven, 
and if two thirds of all the children born lived to be married, 
as has been stated in the foregoing pages, then, assuming ten 
to be the number of children in the second generation, as was 
actually the fact, and calculating the others, we obtain the fol- 
lowing results: — 



46 



INTRODUCTION. 



Generation. Descendants. Die unmarried. Live to be married. 

1st Generation, 10 1 

2d Generation, 10 3 7 

3d Generation, 49 16 33 

4th Generation, 231 77 154 

5th Generation, 1,078 359 719 

6th Generation, 5,033 1,677 3.356 

7th Generation, 23,592 7,864 15,728 

8th Generation, 110,096 33,365 76,731 

If half of these numbers be allowed for the increase of an 

equal mixture of other blood, introduced by marriage, then the 

number of descendants of the eighth generation would be half of 

110,096 or 55,048; and the same proportion of those that die 

unmarried and of those that live to be married. But there have 

been intermarriages between descendants of the same blood and 

of the same name ; and this would reduce the number still more. 

If ten per cent, for these intermarriages be deducted there would 

still be left nearly 50,000, as the descendants of one man in 

the eight generations ! over 30,000 of whom will survive to be 

married ! 

How many of these descendants, bearing the name of Shattuck, 
are now living ? An accurate answer to this question cannot be 
obtained. It can only be approximated. It has already been 
ascertained that the persons here noticed have been about equally 
divided between the sexes. The name can be perpetuated of 
course only through the male line. By dividing the above num- 
bers in the respective columns and generations into two equal 
parts, and by deducting ten per cent, for intermarriages between 
blood relations, we approximate the number that have borne the 
name in the different classes and generations. By referring to 
the following Memorials it will be perceived, that many of the 
sixth generation or children of the fifth, are still living ; and a 
portion only of the seventh are yet in existence. A large num- 
ber of the eighth, a considerable number of the ninth, and a few 
of the tenth, are, however, already born. It would be nearly 
true to assume that the number of descendants of the name now 
existing is equal to the entire seventh generation as above 
estimated. Such being the case, we obtain by calculation 
(23,592^2— 1,177)=10,594, as the whole number of descend- 



PLAN OF THE MEMORIALS EXPLAINED. 47 

ants; and (15,728-^-2— 786 )=7,078, as the number that will 
probably survive and be married. Half of this number, or 5.297, 
(or 757 families of 7 each,) are descendants; and 3,539 will 
probably survive and be married, and bear the name of Shattuck. 
These numbers, obtained by estimation and calculation, are not 
presumed to be exactly correct, but 5,297 may be taken as an 
approximation to the actual number of persons of this name of all 
ages and sexes now existing in the United States. 



iv. JJIan of % IPenwrkls e^Ianttb. 

It is desirable that Genealogical Memorials should be so ar- 
ranged that the facts may be presented, as far as practicable, with 
fulness, accuracy, and perspicuity ; and in a readable form. In 
proportion as this is accomplished the work will be valued by 
those who are competent to judge of its merits. While such 
Memorials should contain an entire record of successive genera- 
tions, families, and individuals, they should not be a mere collec- 
tion of names and dates, but should also embrace such other 
incidents relating to the history of separate lives as will illustrate 
their physical, intellectual, and moral characteristics, and thus 
provide matters of greater interest and utility for the reader. 
Many works of this kind have already been printed ; and from 
the great attention paid to the subject they are likely to constitute 
a distinct department of literature. Dealing as they do, however, 
principally in facts and figures, they cannot be a medium for a 
display of the elegances of style, nor a proper basis upon which 
to found a reputation in authorship. And yet it is quite desira- 
ble that a plan might be devised which should embrace the best 
suggestions of different authors, and be adapted to general use. 

We have desired to ascertain concerning every person, — those 
who die young as well as those who survive to old age : — 

I. — 1. The place and date of birth ; 2. The name of the 
father and the maiden name of the mother ; 3. The occupation 
or profession of males over 20 years of age ; 4. The place or 



48 INTRODUCTION. 

places of settlement and residence, and the date of removal from 
one to another ; 5. The place and date of death j 6. The dis- 
ease or cause of death ; and 7. The exact age at death, in years, 
months, and days. 

II. If married, 1. The place and date of marriage ; 2. By 
whom, and the whole name of the person to whom married ; 
3. The place and date of birth of such person ; 4. The place 
and date of death ; 5. The disease or cause of death ; 6. The 
exact age at death ; 7. If a male, the occupation or profession ; 
and 8. The name of the father and the maiden name of the 
mother, their residence, and any account of their ancestors, and 
of important incidents in their history. 

III. Other information will also be useful to illustrate the 
history of some lives ; such as, 1. The exact place of birth, resi- 
dence, and death, identified by specifying the present number of 
the same place and street in a city, or the name of a present resi- 
dent iu the same place in the country ; 2. The height and 
weight of persons, to show physical development and personal 
appearance ; 3. The public offices, either in church,* town, coun- 
ty or state, held by males, and the years when in office ; 4. The 
church in which any male or female was a member ; 5. The 
place of interment and exact copies of inscriptions on grave 
stones and monuments ; 6. Copies of family records ; 7. Copies 
or abstracts of wills, inventories and settlements of estates ; 8. 
Copies or references to any printed obituary or biographical 
notice ; 9. The printed books or works of which a person has 
been the author ; and 10. Any other facts or anecdotes of inter- 
est and worthy of remembrance to illustrate the history of any 
one of either sex, or to show their general characteristics. 

Though we may not have been always successful, yet we 
proceed to point out the pathway we have taken to procure the 
information, and to present it to others ; and we offer the results 
as suggestions for the benefit of those who may not have reflect- 
ed so much, or may have had less experience than ourselves 
relating to these matters. 

In tracing the history of ancestors the first step to be taken is 
to ascertain the whole name of the oldest one about whom the 
date of death and age are known. It may be a parent, a grand- 
parent, or some other more remote ancestor, male or female. 



PLAN OF THE MEMORIALS EXPLAINED. 49 

Next, deduct the age of such person from the date of death, and 
the remainder will be the year of birth. From the traditions of 
elderly persons, or in some other way, ascertain, if possible, the 
place of birth, and other matters relating to this person ; and 
consult the records of the town where born, for the particulars of 
birth, which, if found, may lead to the particulars of marriage 
and of death also, and perhaps to the names of father, mother, 
brothers and sisters. In like manner the investigation may 
be extended to generations of more remote antiquity. If the 
town records be deficient we must resort to other means. By 
perseverance in consulting the various sources of information 
already indicated (pp. 2 and 3,) and by knowing where and how 
to go to work, the desired facts may generally be ascertained. 
A properly arranged systematic plan and a little experience will 
be no disadvantage. Make memoranda of the information and 
of the sources whence procured in a blank book prepared for the 
purpose, specifying the name of the person from whom it was 
derived, or the page of a written or printed book where it is 
contained. This information should be carefully revised, cor- 
rected, and arranged, and afterwards copied into its appropriate 
place in the Memorials. 

General, indefinite terms, should, as far as possible, be avoided 
in such works. In naming places, instead of saying "he went 
west," or "to New York," or "to Ohio," or "to Missouri," the 
name of the post-office address and of the town, as well as county 
and state where settled or residing, should be given. In these 
Memorials, where no state is named, Massachusetts is generally 
to be understood. When an occupation is mentioned it is unsatis- 
factory to say "mechanic," but the specific work of the mechanic 
should be stated. So, too, exact dates, whether relating to births, 
marriages or deaths, or to those who die young, or to others, 
should be carefully given ; and these dates should include the day 
of the month as well as the year. When it is possible to give 
the exact date, the word "about," as "he was born, or married, 
or died, about 1792," or "about" any other year; and the words 
" died young," or " died in infancy," should not be used. The im- 
portance of this exactness in relation to all lives, young and old, 
will appear from what has already been said under the head of 
the Natural History of the Family. We have regretted the 
7 



50 



INTRODUCTION. 



necessity which compelled us sometimes to insert these indefinite 
terms in these Memorials. 

Prior to 1752 the year commenced on the 25th of March, and 
March was called the First Month, April the Second, and so on 
to February, the Twelfth. Two methods of dating were used, — 
one in which the number of the month, day and year, were 
given, as " 15: 11 : 1645," or " 15th 11 mo. 1645," and the other 
in which a double date between January 1st and March 25th 
was made; as "Jan. 1645-6," or " 164J." In these Memorials 
the true or latest date of the year is substituted for the numbers 
and for double dates, as "Jan. 15, 1646"; but the day is given 
according to the old style. To make the old style conform ex- 
actly to the new style, ten days must be added to the dates prior 
to 1700, and eleven days to those from 1700 to 1752. 

Yarious plans have been devised for Family Genealogies; and 
it is natural that each author should prefer his own. It is ob- 
vious, however, that a plan may seem simple and effective to one 
who devises and uses it, but not equally so to others. Those that 
are most readily comprehended, and most easily carried into prac- 
tice by one unacquainted with such works, should be preferred. 
The plan after which the Minot family is presented in the first 
volume of the New England Historic-Genealogical Register has 
been adopted by several authors. Another plan, presented in the 
Genealogy of the Farmer family, in the same volume, has also 
been copied. More reflection and more experience have, how- 
ever, been bestowed in recent years upon the subject ; and it has 
been found that both of these plans are too much encumbered by 
numbers and references ; and that they may be simplified and 
improved. The Foot and Nash families are the best arranged 
genealogies that we have seen, though they do not seem entirely 
free from imperfections. No more numbering or references should 
be used than are necessary to exhibit the generations, families and 
individuals, clearly, and to show their relative connection with 
each other. By arranging the families in separate generations, 
with a running title at the head of the page to indicate which 
one is there described, it becomes unnecessary to affix numbers to 
individuals to show the generation to which they belong. 

In these Memorials we have numbered the different genera- 
tions, the different families (or the sections or paragraphs in which 



PLAN OF THE MEMORIALS EXPLAINED. 51 

they are described,) and the children of the same family, each 
consecutively, and generally either according to seniority, or in 
the chronological order in which they occur. On the right side 
of the page, against the name of each child who became a parent, 
we have affixed the number by which his or her family is desig- 
nated, referring forward to the subsequent section or paragraph 
of the same number, which contains the biographical notices of 
such parent and of the person to whom married, and the names 
of all their children. And in the biographical accounts is insert- 
ed a number referring back to the previous page on which the 
name, parentage, date of birth, and the number of the family on 
the right of the name, are first introduced. If a number does not 
appear on the right of the name, it is to be inferred that no further 
notice is taken of such child or any descendant. To give a full 
and connected biography of a person in one place some little repe- 
tition may become necessary, but such repetition will occupy far 
less space than the figures of reference used by some genealogists. 
This simple plan for the arrangement of the facts, unincumbered 
by unnecessary figures or references, is sufficient to show clearly 
and at one glance the generation to which the person belongs, 
and whether any descendants are given in the book. It will also 
show the relation which the different generation, families, and 
persons sustained to each other ; and will enable any one to trace 
a lineage backward or forward easily and readily. The Memo- 
rials by this plan acquire a more simple and readable form.* 

Some authors give the biographical notice of the person where 
the name first appears. This is proper when the individuals do not 
live to adult age, or do not become parents, but in other cases the 
most appropriate place for such notice seems to be where a per- 
son stands at the head of his family as a parent, and immediately 
preceding and in connection with his children. This plan is 
followed in these Memorials. And it will be perceived that a 
separate division, or part of the paragraph, where the facts are 
sufficient to justify it, is generally devoted to each parent, to in- 
clude whatever is desirable to be said, or the means of information 

* In preparing manuscripts of this kind, paged blank books should be uscd ; and instead of 
the number referring to the subsequent paragraph a number referring to the subsequent page of 
the manuscript may be inserted on the right of the name. This will render it convenient to 
make additions to Memorials imperfectly prepared, without rearranging and copying them until 
the whole are finished. 



52 INTRODUCTION. 

will allow, in relation to such person ; the direct descendant, 
whether male or female, occupies the first part of the paragraph, 
and the person whom such person marries, occupies the second. 
Each husband and each wife, if either marry more than once, is 
separately noticed. These are believed to be features in such 
Memorials somewhat new and improved, and they are more per- 
spicuous than the usual mode of presenting the facts. The 
names of the parents are printed in capitals and the names of their 
children in italics. Grandchildren, when they are mentioned in 
the same family or paragraph, are printed in the usual type. 
We have been more particular than genealogists usually are in 
stating the birth, residence, and parentage of persons of other 
names who marry into the family, that those who desire it may 
be aided in tracing the ancestors of those new relatives ; and also 
for the purpose of illustrating more fully the natural history of 
the family. The biographical notices should contain copies of 
wills, inventories of estates, and other documentary illustrations, 
which are usually separated and thrown into an Appendix. 
They may be printed in smaller type, but if worthy of publica- 
tion at all, the proper place for them to appear is in immediate 
connection with the biographies to which they relate. It is to be 
regretted that materials for illustrating the lives and characters of 
so few of our ancestors are preserved. And it should be remem- 
bered that the length of a biographical notice is not always an 
indication of the importance or value of the life, but that it is 
often owing to accidental circumstances that less or more mate- 
rials concerning it happened to be found. 

In the early periods of the history of New England, a person 
who held official station, either military, civil or ecclesiastical, 
was generally designated by the title which it conferred. If a 
deacon, a captain, an ensign, or even a corporal, we find him 
frequently so entitled in the records. Entries such as V Corporal 
Lakin" or " Sergeant" some-other-person, was chosen selectman, 
or was appointed for the performance of some other duty, are 
often met with in the public records. Such titles were then 
considered as important and honorable, and generally as an evi- 
dence of real merit ; and they were often held for many succes- 
sive years. The office of constable was conferred only upon per- 
sons of an established reputation for high moral integrity and of 



PLAN OF THE MEMORIALS EXPLAINED. 53 

sterling ability. In more recent and existing generations, how- 
ever, military and other titles have become so common that their 
comparative honor has been considerably diminished. Offices 
now-a-days are unfortunately too often conferred not as a reward 
of merit but for other causes. In some cases in these Memorials 
the title possessed by a person is mentioned as a part of his biog- 
raphy, but in very many others it is omitted. If we were to 
enumerate all who have held military commissions, the number 
would be sufficient to officer quite a formidable army. 

The information contained in this work was obtained princi- 
pally in 1853 ; and it was designed to be brought down to that 
year. In many cases, however, it does not include so late a 
period, because the necessary facts were not communicated to the 
author. Some genealogists regard the history of existing or 
recent generations of little consequence. Any one, they say, 
who desires may obtain it. We consider this an erroneous opin- 
ion. Whoever writes for posterity ought to endeavor to antici- 
pate the judgment of posterity upon his labors, and to conform to 
its just decisions. Those who come after us, as already inti- 
mated (p. 3) will find less information upon the public records in 
New England relating to the last fifty years, and will find it 
more difficult to write the history of the lives that existed during 
that period, than in any other since the first settlement of the 
country. For this and other reasons it will in future be a matter 
of deep regret, that information concerning recent or existing lives 
has been omitted in Genealogical Memorials. 

In cases where females of the name have married persons of 
other names we have designed to give their families only, their 
children and sometimes their grandchildren, but rarely their more 
remote posterity, unless for the purpose of naming some distin- 
guished descendant. It is supposed that this will be sufficient to 
enable persons of other names, who desire it, to trace their ma- 
ternal descent to this family ; and to identify the precise connec- 
tion which existed. 

Additional advantage may be derived from subdividing the 
generations, and designating the different branches of the family, 
and their connections and descendants, by the name of the par- 
ticular place in which they originated or most generally resided. 
To aid in rendering this work more perspicuous some parts of it 
are so divided. 



54 INTRODUCTION. 

The orthography of some christian names varies in different 
periods and in different families in the same period. In some 
few cases in these Memorials the spelling used in a particular 
family, even if it was peculiar, has been followed. But gen- 
erally the usual orthography in common use has been adopted. 
First names, particularly those of females, for the first hundred 
years after the settlement of New England, were generally used 
as they are at present. Anna and Hannah occasionally were sy- 
nonymous. The term cousin generally expressed the same rela- 
tionship as nephew or niece, but sometimes an indefinite degree 
of kindred. From 1750 to 1800, sometimes a little earlier or 
later, instead of giving the true names, others considered as sy- 
nonymous were substituted. Nabby was used for Abigail ; Patty 
for Martha ; Polly and Molly for Mary ; Sally for Sarah ; Betsey 
and Betty for Elizabeth ; Nancy for Anna, &c. Fashion seems 
to have had its influence in this as in other matters ; and the 
early use of names has been very properly restored. Double 
names were seldom used before 1800. In Genealogical Memo- 
rials these names should not be abridged by initials, but all the 
names should be given in full. 

It has seemed proper to notice some families of the name who 
were not descended from our first American progenitor, and 
some by other names who were immediately connected with 
ours ; and as these notices could not with propriety be included 
in the Memorials, they are placed with other matters in an 
Appendix. 

Two Indices are inserted at the end of the work. One con- 
tains most of the different first names given to the Shattucks in 
these Memorials ; the other includes the whole names of other 
persons who have been connected with the family by marriage, 
or who for other reasons are inserted. By referring to these 
Indices any one can easily ascertain any name which is con- 
tained in the work. 

The abbreviations chiefly used are — b. for born ; bap. for bap- 
tized ; m. for married ; unm. for unmarried ; d. for died ; a. or se. 
for age or aged ; s. for son ; dau. for daughter ; p. for page. In 
dates and ages, y. stands for years ; m. for months ; and d. for 
days. In cases in which a parent marries more than once, the 
different marriages are designated by figures placed immediately 



PLAN OF THE MEMORIALS EXPLAINED. 55 

after m., the abbreviation of married; as " m. 1" means married 
first, or for a first wife, or a first husband; "m. 2," married sec- 
ond, or for a second wife or a second husband ; " m. 3," married 
third, and so on. Cases sometimes occur in which the maiden 
surname of the wife before marriage is inserted in a parenthesis 
between the christian name and the surname she acquires by 
marriage; as, Susanna (Randall) Shattuck, shows her maiden 
surname to have been Randall. In some instances (C) stands 
for Congregational Church; (B) for Baptist ; (M) for Methodist; 
(U) for Universalist, &c. Persons are occasionally noticed as 
members of churches, but many who sustained that relationship 
are not thus characterized for want of the requisite information. 
The names of towns which are often repeated are sometimes 
abbreviated ; as, Wat. for Watertown ; Gro. for Groton ; Pep. for 
Pepperell. Other abbreviations occasionally occur. 

The form of the volume is octavo, and it is quite desirable 
that all Genealogies, whatever may be the amount of matter 
they may contain, should be printed in the same form, that those 
who make collections of such works may have them in uniform 
size. It is also the most convenient and economical size in 
which to print the materials of such a work. 

Blank pages are placed at the end of the volume for the in- 
sertion of corrections and additions, and for the continuation of 
Family Histories. 



MEMORIALS. 



i. Jfirut §tnxnihn anft Cjjilbnn. 

1. WILLIAM SHATTUCK was the most remote ancestor 
with whom we have been enabled to connect ourselves, in our 
history, upon satisfactory evidence ; and we begin with his, in 
our classification, as the first, or earliest known generation. From 
him, as their common progenitor, have descended nearly all, if 
not every one, of those who now bear his name in America. He 
was born in England in 1621 or 2, and died in Watertown, Mas- 
sachusetts, August 14, 1672, aged 50 years. His exact origin 
and early history are involved in obscurity. Neither the place of 
his birth, nor the year in which he came to this country, nor the 
names of his parents, are certainly known. There is no doubt, 
however, that his immediate ancestors and connections were resi- 
dents of England ; and they were probably among those already 
mentioned in our introductory observations, either of Lancaster- 
shire, Somersetshire, or Berkshire, but we are unable to specify 
the particular persons or locality. He must have emigrated 
when in or near his minority. It has been conjectured that his 
father might have died on his passage or soon after his arrival ; 
and also that he might have been the son of widow Damaris 
Shattuck, who was admitted to the church in Salem, in 1641, and 
a brother of Samuel Shattuck, noticed in the Appendix to these 
Memorials ; and their ages, the prevalence of similar names in 
their respective families, and other circumstances, give some 
probability to these conjectures. But of such a connection, if in- 
deed one existed, we have as yet obtained no conclusive proof. 
If not a brother he was probably a near relative of Samuel 
Shattuck. 

8 



58 FIRST GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

Massachusetts was first colonized by the English Puritan emi- 
grants, in Boston and its vicinity, in 1630. Watertown was set- 
tled in the same year, — ten years later than the founding of Plym- 
outh. This town is in Middlesex County, from four to seven 
miles westerly of Boston, and has Cambridge, easterly, interven- 
ing between the two places. It originally included the present 
town of Waltham, incorporated separately in 1737. It is thus 
one of the most ancient, and it was early one of the most impor- 
tant, towns in the Province. The General Court and the Pro- 
vincial Congress held several sessions in this town. Mr. Shat- 
tuck's name appears in an old list of the proprietors of Watertown, 
made about 1642, twelve years after its first settlement, although 
he was then only twenty years of age. The first lot of land 
granted to him is described upon the records as follows : — 

" William Chattuck. 

" 1. An Homstall of one acre, by estimation, bounded souwest with Common- 
land, y e east w th John Clough and y e west w th William Perry in his possession. 

"2. Three acres of upland, by estimation, bounded the north w^ Joseph 
Morse, the south w th William Perry, the east w th John Clough & y e west 
w lh Commonland in his possession." 

To this estate he made large additions by subsequent grants 
and purchases. Among other parcels of land the records state 
that on the 4th July, 1654, he bought of his neighbor John 
Clough, his house, garden, and thirty acres of land, situated on 
Common Hill, near his own estate, bounded east by William 
Payne and E. Goffe, west by the highway, north by Joseph 
Morse and "south by the highway to the pond;" probably ly- 
ing in the corner easterly and northerly of the intersection of 
the two roads, now called Common street and Washington street. 
Also twenty-five acres of upland ; three acres of swamp land ; 
and one third part of twelve acres of meadow land. He also 
bought a farm at Stony Brook, near the present bounds of Wes- 
ton, and four acres of meadow in Pond Meadow, which he be- 
queathed at his death, in equal shares, to his sons, Philip and 
William. He also bought a dwelling-house and a large farm of 
Edward Sanderson ; but a question having arisen as to his title 
to some parts of it, the town voted, December 27, 1664, that 
"William Shattuck shall enjoy the land he bought of Sanders. 



WILLIAM SHATTUCK. 



59 



provided he pay to Sanders twenty bushels of good merchantable 
Indian corn to spend in his house." 

We have found it difficult to ascertain the exact place where 
Mr. Shattuck resided. It was, however, undoubtedly on Com- 
mon Hill, near " King's Common" so called — the Common land 
reserved and owned by the town. This locality was northerly 
of the celebrated residence of J. P. Gushing, Esq. ; southerly of 
the Wellington Hill Station on the Fitchburg Railroad ; and 
easterly of Common street, leading from that station southerly to 
Watertown village. Permission was frequently given by the 
town to make bricks "at the clay pitts near William Shattucks." 
This bed of clay was then considered a rarity ; and it was re- 
served by the town as a public place for brick making. It was 
on the hill northerly and near Washington street, then an ancient 
highway leading from Common street to Fresh Pond, and in the 
vicinity westerly of the residences of Mr. Chenery and Mr. Stone, 
as laid down on Shield's Map of Boston and Vicinity, published 
in 1852. And Mr. Shattuck's dwelling-house was on the hill, 
somewhere on the north side of this highway. The Watertown 
records, in describing a piece of common land sold by the town, 
in 1743, to Ebenezer Chenery, " lying above the clay pitts," say 
the bounds run "on a line to a rock at said Chenery's fence, 
above or west of a spring (commonly called Shattuck's Spring.)" 
The residences on this hill command a fine view of Fresh Pond , near 
by, and of Boston and its vicinity in the distance ; and are among 
the most delightful in Watertown. Successors bearing the name 
of Shattuck occupied the estate for about one hundred years, but 
for the last hundred years it has been in the possession of others. 

Mr. Shattuck is sometimes denominated a weaver ; an humble but 
honorable handicraft of considerable importance in his day, when 
all articles of clothing were the product of household manufacture. 
And it is not improbable that he combined his mechanical with 
other occupations, and wrought in his loom as well as on his 
farm; for at his death he actually bequeathed his "loom and its 
appurtenances" to his son William. Agriculture seems, how- 
ever, to have been his principal employment, as it has been that 
of the larger part of his posterity. His example of uniting the 
labors of the farmer and mechanic in one person has been fol- 
lowed by many of his descendants. He resided in Watertown 



60 FIRST GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

about thirty years ; and by his sagacity, industry and economy, 
though dying in the full vigor of manhood, he acquired, for the 
times in which he lived, a large property, the inventory of which 
amounted at his death to £434 19s. ll^d. sterling, of which 
£200 was in real estate, and £234 19s. 11 ^d. in personal estate, 
including £103 17s. l\d. in money. He appears, so far as can 
be ascertained from contemporary records, to have sustained the 
character of a sagacious, energetic, and successful business man ; 
of an honest, upright, and worthy citizen ; and of a good and 
peaceable neighbor. He held a respectable social position among 
his fellow townsmen ; and his family and the families to whom 
they were allied by marriage were highly respected, and among 
the most wealthy and influential in Watertown. 

He was interred in the ancient burying-ground situated on the 
old road leading from Cambridge to Watertown, a short distance 
westerly of Mount Auburn. A simple but substantial marble 
tablet, resting in a granite base, has recently been erected near 
the northwesterly corner of this ground, at the turn of the road 
to Brighton, bearing the following inscription : — 

"To perpetuate the memory of 

WILLIAM SHATTUCK, 

who died in Watertown, 

Aug. 14, 1672, aged 50; 

The progenitor of 

the families that have borne his name 

in America. 

And of his son, 

JOHN SHATTUCK, 

who was drowned 

in Charlestown Ferry, 

Sept. 14, 1675, aged 28. 

This simple memorial 

was erected in 1853, by 

Lemuel Shattuck, 

who holds in grateful veneration 

the character of 

the Puritan Fathers of 

New England." 

William Shattuck was married about 1642, when he was 
twenty years of age. The christian name of his wife was SU- 
SANNA ; but neither her surname, nor her parentage, nor the 
exact date or place of her birth or marriage, has been ascertained. 



WILLIAM SHATTUCK. 61 

She remained a widow about fifteen months after his death, and 
married, Nov. 18, 1673, Mr. Richard Norcross, who survived her. 
She died in Watertown, Dec. 11, 1686, fourteen years after the 
death of her first husband.* 

In his will Mr. Shattuck mentions "his ten younger children," 
as if he had others, but it does not appear that he had more than 
that number. The births of the second, third and tenth only are 
entered upon the Watertown records. The remainder are ascer- 
tained from other authentic evidence. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY SUSANNA , BORN IN WATERTOWN. 

1. Susanna, b. 1643; m. 1, J. Morse ; 2, J. Fay, 2 

2. Mary, b. Aug. 25, 1645; m. Jonathan Brown, 3 

3. John, b. Feb. 11, 1647; m. Ruth Whitney, 4 

4. Philip, b. 1648 ; m. 1, D. Barstow ; 2, R. Chamberlain, . . 5 

5. Joanna, b. d. April 4, 1673, unmarried. 

6. William, b. 1653; m. Susanna Randall, 6 

7. Rebecca, b. 1 655 ; m. Samuel Church, 7 

8. Abigail, b. 1657; m. 1, J. Morse ; 2, J. Parker, 8 

9. Benjamin, b. d. in his 20th year. 

10. Samuel, b. Feb. 28, 1666 ; m. Abigail , 9 

A petition, dated June 19, 1683, purporting to be from Philip 
Shattuck, is on the court files of Middlesex County, in which it 
is said, — " Our two youngest brothers, Benjamin and Samuel, 
were left to the care and government of our honored mother, 
unto whom our honored father did bequeath the most considera- 
ble part of his estate ; but after our mother did marry againe, she 
thought it would be beneficial for our youngest brothers to have 
trades ; and she accordingly put them out, — Benjamin to my 
brother William, and Samuel to myself. But before Benjamin 
came of age, God was pleased to visit him with a long and linger- 
ing sickness, of which he died, being in his 20th year ; and by 
reason of the long time of his sickness, the charges of the doctor, 
his attendance, and the funeral charges, were considerable." 
And he prays that they may be paid out of the estate that was 
bequeathed to him, which was probably done. 

* Richard Norcross was the son of Jeremiah Norcross, who d. in Watertown, in 1657. He 
was b. in 1621, and educated in England; was admitted a freeman, in 1653, and was the worthy 
teacher of the grammar school in Watertown about thirty-five years, from 1651 to 1687. His is 
said to have been the first and for many years the only public school in the town. His salary 
for teaching Latin, English, writing-, and other branches, was £30 per annum. He married for 
his first wife, June 24, 1650, Mary Brooks, who d. Feb. 24, 1672. By her he had seven children, 
Mary, Jeremiah, Sarah, Richard, Mary, Nathaniel, and Samuel, of whom Nathaniel m. Susanna 
Shattuck, dau. of Philip Shattuck, and granddau. of Susanna (Shattuck) Norcross. (See 
family, 14.) 



62 FIRST GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

The will of Wm. Shattuck, executed while he was on a sick 
bed, is dated August 3d, eleven days before his death, and was 
proved in court August 29th, fifteen days afterwards. This will 
and the inventory of his estate were deposited in the office of the 
Middlesex Probate Court, and still exist in its files. Copies were 
entered upon its records, (Vol. IT., pp. 24 and 26.) These doc- 
uments will undoubtedly interest the family, and faithful copies 
of the original are given below. 

" Watertown The Last Will and Testament 

Aug : 3 d : 1672. of William Shathock, aged 50 years. 

I, William Shathock, being under the afflicting hand of God, sick and weak 
but in perfect memory, not knowing how soone I may end the days of my weary 
pilgrimage, do constitute this my last will and testament, for y e disposal of what 
I shall leave behind me, as followeth : 

Item. I give my ten younger children thirty pound in money to be equally 
divided amongst them ; to them that are married, I will their parts should be 
payd a month after my disease ; that which belongs to the unmarried my will is. 
it shall be in their mothers hand to be kept for them till they come to age 
capable. 

Item. I give to my son Sam: Church six pound in money, to be payd a month 
after my disease. 

Item. I give to my son, Philip Shathock, the one half of my farm and two 
acres of meadow in pond meadow, to him and his heyers forever. 

Item. I give to my sonne, William Shathock, the other half of the s d farm and 
two acres of meadow in pond meadow, to him & his heyers for ever ; as also a 
young horse with all his trooping furniture ; also the loome and its appertinances. 

Item. I give to my four small children my mare with all her increase. 

All the rest of my moveable goods I give to my dear wife, Susanna, for her 
owne maintenance &, bringing up my younger children ; and also the use of my 
hous and land which I now dwell upon with that I bought of Edward Sanderson, 
till my two younger sons, Beniman and Samuel, arrive to twenty one years of 
age. If my s d wife marry, my will is that she receive four pound p r year out of 
my s d hous & lands ; if she marry not, I give them to her during her life. 

Item. I give to my s d Beniman & Samuel my house and land I now dwell 
upon, with that I bought of Ed: Sanderson, and my half dividend, to them and 
their heyers forever. 

Item. I give to my sonne John twenty pound, to be payd after my wifes de- 
cease by my sons, Beniman and Samuel, or their heyers, five pound per year ; 
the whole to be paid in the space of four years. 

Item. I give to my grand children living at my disease forty pound, to be 
equally divided and payd after y e death of my wife by my s d sons, Beniman & 
Samuel, within the space of ten years, four pound p r year, beginning with the 
children of my eldest children ; alway provided, that if any my legitees dy before 
marriage my will is that what I have given be divided amongst y e rest. 

I do father constitute my deare wife, Susanna Shathock, sole exectutor of this 



WILLIAM SHATTUCK. 63 

my will ; requesting my loving friends, John Coolidge, iouner, and Sam: Liver- 
more, assistant my s d wife, and to be payd for their pains. 

Signed, sealed, & delivered, Witness my hand, 

in presence of us, William Shattuck. 

John Coolledge, 

John Livermore." 

Prom the following document it seems that the appraisers of 
his estate did not understand orthography quite as well, or were 
not quite as careful in the use of it, as the writers of his will and 
other documents relating to the settlement of his estate. We 
prefer, however, to give it as written, with the exception of punc- 
tuation, which has been added. No description of ours could 
give a better idea of the domestic arrangements, the household 
economy, and the interior life, of our ancestor, than is afforded 
by a careful examination of this inventory. It will aid us in 
paying an imaginary visit to his "parler," his "ceichen," his 
" shope," his " dairy," and his farm generally, to ascertain their 
extent and the various implements in use in his daily life. 

" An Inventory of the estate of Wilyam Shathauk, late of Watertowne, who 

deceased August the 14th, in y e yeare 1672, made and taken by us whose names 

are under written, August the 23. 

£ s. d. 
Imprimis. In the Parler, his wearinge cloathes, shirts, hate, b oughts 

& shoes, 005 00 00 

It. in money, 103 17 07^ 

It. a bedstead, curtanes, a table, 2 chests, a great char, and basket, 

and some small things, 002 00 00 

It. eight napkeens, 3 pilowbers, 2 table clothes, & 3 pair of sheets, 003 00 00 

It. forten yds of coaten and woollen clooth, 002 00 00 

It. a cuple of tobacko boxes, and a pair of silver buttons, .... 000 04 00 
It. In the ceichen [kitchen] one great ketle, 2 old ketles, & 2 scillets, 003 00 00 
It. two iron potts, & a friing pane, tramell, firepane & tongs, rost 

iron, 001 00 00 

It. six puter platers, a basson, 2 puter poats, 3 poringers, seaven 

spoons, a chamber poat, 001 02 00 

It. 3 pailes, 3 tubes, and a churne, 3 wooden dishes and boule, 2 

botles, a duzen trenchers, and some earthen ware, & 2 pair of 

cards, 001 10 00 

It. a table and forme, an other small table, 2 buffit stooles, 6 chairs, 

and other smalle things, 001 05 00 

It. In the shope, a loome, warping bar and wheal, and all things 

belonging to it, 001 10 00 

It. In the dairy, five tubes, 3 keelers, 2 seives, 000 12 00 

It. 3 bush, of moult, a bush, of wheat meall, half a bushell of ry 

meall, halfe a duszen pound of hops, and other lumber, . . . 001 00 00 
It. 3 sackes, 000 06 00 



64 FIRST GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

£ s. d. 
It. In the ould seeler, a poat of butter, some pork, 2 tubs, a form 

and earthen poat, 001 00 00 

It. In the lodging roome, two bedsteeds, 2 barrells, one forme, a 

heir bage and cheese, 2 wheels, 002 10 00 

It. In the new seller, 4 barils, a small vessell, & beer stool, . . . 000 10 00 

It. In the first chamber, 3 guns, 2 pistools, and a cutlash, .... 004 00 00 

It. 2 sadles, and a paniel, 2 bridles, 3 halters, 001 10 00 

It. his geilding tools and home, , . . . 000 06 00 

It. a mate, a fane, 3 pease seeps, a wheel, 3 ould sciths, .... 000 10 00 
It. one crow of iron, a crose cut saw, one hand saw, 3 axis, 2 sikles, 
3 ougers, a plan, chaine, cap, ringle and sople, a bill hook, a 
sped, a shovel, weges and betle, and hammer, a pair storke 

cards, a pair of sheers, 002 00 00 

It. In the corn chamber, fifty bushels of indein corn, a bushell and 

ahalfeofry, 006 19 04 

It. in sheeps wool, 001 00 00 

It. 2 fether beds, a boulster, 4 pillows, 005 00 00 

It. 2 ruges, 2 blankets, 002 15 00 

It. one flock bed and bedsted and bed corde, a pair of blankets, 2 

boulsters, and 2 pillers, and a ruge, 003 00 00 

It. a carte, a yoake, an ould plow, a pair of haners, grind stone and 

sithe, and 400 bords, 002 10 00 

It. 2 pair of iron filers, and a pair of glaxes, 000 06 00 

It. a carte roupe, an ould tumberell, two horse coalers and traise, a 

dung fork, and 2 pitching forks, 2 rakes, & a hoe, .... 000 ] 5 00 

It. pease, wheat, barly, and ry, 006 00 00 

It. the hay in the barne and abrood and in the meddow, .... 006 00 00 

It. five acres of indian corn, 006 00 00 

It. a farm near stony brooke, 020 00 00 

It. four acres of meddow, at pond meddow, 004 00 00 

It. a said mare, and an ould horse, 007 00 00 

It. an ould mare, and a young horse, 007 00 00 

It. a pair of oxen, 009 00 00 

It. four cows, 012 00 00 

It. a bull, and 2 calves, 004 00 00 

It. ten sheep and 9 lambs, 006 00 00 

It. 6 hoggs, 8 piges, 004 00 00 

It. one dwelling house and barne, and also the land belonging to it, 
homestall and meddow, with the land bought of Edward San- 
derson, and halfe a divident, 180 00 00 

It. in debts, 002 02 00 



John Coollege [Total not added in original.] £434 19 11 £ 

John Livermore 
Thomas Hastings 

Some questions rose as to the proper interpretation of the will 
of Mr. Shattuck, after the marriage of his widow ; and the fol- 



WILLIAM SHATTUCK. 65 

lowing bond or order, dated April 8, 1674, was passed by the 
court at Cambridge, and entered upon its records. This docu- 
ment is given in connection with another, relating to the final 
settlement of the dowry, to illustrate the manner in which these 
matters were managed at that early day. It does not appear to 
be the result of a law suit that had been commenced, but a 
mutual agreement to avoid any occasion of one. 

" For the finishing of all controversy that has or may arise concerning the 
estate that William Shattuck's widow brought with her to her present husband, 
Richard Norcross, this court, with the mutual consent of all concerned therein, 
doe order that the said Richard Norcross shall have the use of the whole part of 
the estate that was left to her during the time of the younger children's minority, 
to wit, two boys twenty-one years, and the girl eighteen, or else at marriage, 
which of either shall first happen. And in case that he decease before his wife, 
that she shall have y e same fully made good to her again besides what he shall 
have out of his owne good will or the law will give unto him. And in case she 
decease before him, that then, unless by will she shall bequeath any part thereof 
to him, the said Richard Norcross, he shall then pay, or cause to be paid, forty- 
five pound, which is the sum y e inventory of her goods came to his hand, and the 
same he shall pay in full value to the children of his new wife, which shall then 
be living, as his said wife shall appoint, by her last will or otherwise. To the 
performance whereof the said Richard Norcross acknowledges himself, exectu- 
tors, administrators, to stand fully bound in a bond of ninety pound sterling, to be 
paid to the treasury of the county. 

" And the court do further order that y e aforesaid Richard Norcross, perform- 
ing according to the above said request, all other obligations by him made, in 
reference to person or estate, shall be null and void, to all intents and purposes 
in the law ; and the said Richard is to bring up the three young children as his 
own untill they come to age to chose guardians or be put to apprentices. 

Sworn to in Court. Richard Norcross." 

" This writing, bearing date this 29th March, 1687, testifieth, that we, Philip 
Shattuck, William Shattuck, Samuel Shattuck, Jonathan Brown, John Fay, and 
Abigail Morse, all children, natural or by marriage, of Mrs Norcross, late widow 
and relict of William Shattuck, deceased, do owne and acknowledge ourselves 
to be fully satisfied with what we have now received of our father-in-law, Mr. 
Richard Norcross, being the full of what he was to pay to us of what he received 
of our father Shattuck's estate, and agreed by bond, given into County Court, at 
Cambridge, the eighth of April, in the year of our Lord 1674. We say we have 
each and every of us received our proportion in full, according unto that bond. 
As witness our hands, the day and year above written. 

Witnessed by us, William Shattuck, 

Joseph Sherman, Philip Shattuck, 

Nathaniel Bright. Samuel Shattuck, 

Produced in Court, June 5, 1688. Jonathan Brown, 

Recorded in Register of Deeds, John Fay, 

Vol. X., p. 105. John Mors, in y e behalf of 



9 



Abigail Mors, late widow." 



66 SECOND GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

It will be perceived that neither the heirs of John Shattuck, 
nor Rebecca (Shattuck) Church, were represented in this last 
agreement. It is probable that the latter were dead at the date 
of its execution, but the former were then living in Groton. 
Why they were omitted does not appear. Perhaps their portion 
of the estate bequeathed to their father, might have been paid to 
their mother, at another time, either before or after their removal 
to Groton. 



ii. Suonb donation anb Cjjilbnn. 

2. Susanna Shattuck, dau. of William, (p. 61,) was b. in 
1643, and d. in Marlborough : the date not ascertained. 

She m. 1, April 12, 1661, Joseph Morse, b. April 3, 1637, s. 
of Joseph Morse and Hester Peirce, of Watertown. He removed 
to Groton, in 1666, where he lived until that town was de- 
stroyed by the Indians, in 1676. He then returned to Water- 
town, where he d. in 1677, se. 40. 

She m. 2, July 5, 1678, John Fay. He was an inhabitant of 

Marlborough, and had had by Mary , a previous wife, b. in 

that town:— 1, John, b. Nov. 30, 1669, m. in 1690, Elizabeth 

; 2, Samuel, b. Oct. 11, 1673, m. March 16, 1699, Tabitha 

Ward ; 3, Mary, b. Feb. 10, 1675, m. March 26, 1696, Jonathan 
Brigham. Johu Fay d. in Marlborough, Dec. 5, 1690, leaving 
Susanna again a widow, with a family of 14 children, — 7 by 
Mr. Morse, 4 by Mr. Fay, and the 3 of Mr. Fay's by his first 
wife. 

HER CHILDREN, BY JOSEPH MORSE, BORN IN WATERTOWN AND GROTON. 

1. Susanna, b. Jan. 11, 1663 ; m. in 1679, Daniel Newton. 

2. Hester, b. Sept. 11, 1664; m. Feb. 8, 1685, Nathaniel Josselyn, of Marlbo- 

rough. She d. Aug. 27, 1725, je. 60 y. 11 m. 16 d. She had, 1. Mary, m. 
James Newton, 1709 ; 2. Esther, m. Samuel Lamb, 1707. 

3. Joseph, b. Nov. 11, 1667; m. Jan. 20, 1691, Grace Warren. He d. at the 

Farms, in Marlborough. July, J 753. He had, 1. Joseph, b. Sept. 27, 1691 ; 
2. Grace, b. July 7, 1694; 3. Mary, b. Oct. 13, 1697; 4. Elizabeth, b. Jan. 
4, 1700; 5. Jonas, b. July 25, 1703; 6. Patience, b. Oct. 30, 1705. 

4. Samuel, b. Sept. 4, 1670; m. Grace . He d. July 10, 1758, at Marl- 

borough. Had 6 children. 



SUSANNA SHATTUCK MARY SHATTUCK. 67 

5. Mary, b. Feb. 11, 1672 ; m. July 23, 1694, John Barnard. 
C. Hannah, b. April 7, 1674 ; m. in 1704, John Newton of M. 

7. Jonathan, b. ; m. 1, in 1706, Mary How. She d. Dec. 10, 1727. 

2, in 1729, Mary Church. She d. Sept. 2, 1750. He d. 1754. Had 8 
children. 

HER CHILDREN,' BY JOHN FAY, BORN IN MARLBOROUGH.* 

8. David, b. April 23, 1679; m. May 1, 1699, Sarah Larkin of Marlborough, and 

had, 1. John, b. Jan. 30, 1700, d. Dec. 20, 1705; 2. Joanna, b. Dec. 7, 1701, 
d. Nov. 20, 1720 ; 3. Sarah, b. March 1, 1704 ; 4. David, b. March 25, 1707, 
d. Oct. 4, 1720; 5. Lois, b. March 11, 1709; 6. John, b. Dec. 16, 1710; 
7. Moses, b. Oct. 7, 1712; 8. Robert, b. July 30, 1715; 9. Edward, b. May 
16, 1717; 10. Aaron, b. April 18, 1719; 11. Joanna, b. July 3, 1721; 12. 
David, b. April 6, 1723. 

9. Gershom, b. Oct. 19, 1681. He d. Nov. 24, 1720; m. Mary Brigham, dau. of 

John Brigham. She was the heroine, in repelling an attack of the Indians, 
in 1707; (see Worcester Magazine, II., p. 157) They had, 1. Gershom, b. 
Sept. 17, 1703, m. Hannah Oakes, who d. March 5, 1806, se. 100 ys. ; 2. 
Mary, b. July 10, 1705, m. Geo. Smith; 3. Susanna, b. Nov. 18, 1707; 4. 
Sarah, b. Oct. 2, 1710; 5. Silas, b. Aug. 12, 1713; 6. Timothy, b. June 26, 
1716; and 7, Paul. 

10. Ruth, b. July 13, 1684 ; m. June 24, 1706, Increase Ward. 

11. Deliverance, b. Oct. 7, 1686; m. Feb. 20, 1707, Benjamin Shattuck. (See 17.) 



3. Mary Shattuck, dau. of William, (p. 61,) was b. in Water- 
town, Aug. 25, 1745 ; and d. in that part of the town now com- 
prised in Waltham. A grave-stone erected to her memory is still 
standing in the Waltham burying-ground, bearing the following 
inscription: — "Here lyes buried y e Body of M rs Mary Browne, 
Relict of M r . Jonathan Browne, who Departed this life Oct. y e 
23 d A. D. 1732, in y e 89 th year of her age. Pious in life : Re- 
signed in Death."f 

* Mr Fay, after his marriage to widow Susanna (Shattuck) Morse, took her children by her 
first husband with him to Marlborough, and this was the cause of the Morses becoming - perma- 
nent settlers in that town. On the 25th of Dec. 1G95, Samuel " Biglo," John Bemis, Joseph 
Morse, and Samuel Morse, then described as husbandmen of Watertovvn, boug-ht of Ephraim 
Hunt, Esq , of Weymouth, for £300, a tract of land in Marlborough, containing 850 acres, formerly 
granted to Dr. John Alcock, of Roxbury, and called " The Farms." Joanna, the wife of Ephraim 
Hunt, was the daughter of Alcock, and consented to the sale. (Mid. Rec. Vol XIH , p. 509.) 
" Joseph Morse settled in the house said to have been built by Alcock. Samuel built southerly, 
and their brother Jonathan afterwards bought and settled on a tract of land adjoining to the 
farm, and built a short distance west of Samuel, so that one garrison might protect the three 
families." In 1723, John Bigelow, a son of Samuel, s >ld a portion of the land, inherited from his 
father, to John Shattuck, a grandnephew of Susanna, (see Family 33,) in exchange for his farm 
in Shrewsbury, and removed to that town. The posterity of the Morses may be found in the 
"Memorial of the Morses," pp. 74 to 89, and in the articles in the Appendix, therein referred to. 
Stephen Morse, Esq., now occupying the old ancestral residence, was descended from Susanna 
Shattuck, through Joseph, Joseph. Abner and Stephen. The numerous posterity by the name 
of Fay, in Worcester County and elsewhere, were also descended principally from Susanna 
Shattuck, through her sons, David and Gershom. 

t If the record of her birth is correctly recorded, as it probably is, there appears to be an error 
here in the statement of her age. It should be 87 y. 1 m. 28 d. ; not " 89th year." 



68 SECOND GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

She m. Feb. 11, 1662, Jonathan Browne of Watertown, b. 
Sept. 15, 1635, s. of Abraham and Lydia Browne. He d. March, 
1691, se. 55| years. His will, dated Feb. 19th, was proved April 
1, 1691. Real estate, £247. 

HER CHILDREN, BY JONATHAN BROWNE, BORN IN WATERTOWN. 

1. Mary, b. Oct. 5, 1662; m. 1, March 22, 1683, John Warren, b. March 5, 

1666, by whom she had 2 children, John and Jonathan. He d. July 11, 
1703. She m. 2, March 14, 1704, Samuel Harrington, b. Dec. 18, 1666, 
by whom she had 5 children. 

2. Elizabeth, b. Sept. 19, 1664; m. March 25, 1687, Daniel Benjamin, b. Sept. 

12, 1660. She d. Aug. 8, 1740. He d. Sept- 13, 1719. Had 10 children. 

3. Jmathan, b. Oct. 25, 1666; d. young 1 . No record of the date. 

4. Patience, b. March 6, 1669; m. March 5, 1687, James Bigelow. She d. soon 

after, leaving one child, James, bap. May 6, 1688. 

5. Abraham, b. Aug. 26, 1671 ; m. Mary Hyde, b. June 21, 1673. She d. Nov. 

29, 1723. He d. Nov. 27, 1729. Lived in Watertown, and had 9 children. 

6. Samuel, b. Oct. 21, 1674; probably d. unmarried. 

7. Lydia, b. March 31, 1677; m. Jan. 18, 1699, Benj. Wellington, b. June 21, 

1676. She d. May 13, 1711. He d. Nov. 15, 1738, in Lexington. 

8. Ehenezer, b. Sept. 10, 1679; probably d. unmarried. 

9. Benjamin, b. Feb. 27, 1682; m. Feb. 27, 1703, Anna Garfield, b. June 2, 

1683. She d. Sept. 13, 1737. He d. March 11, 1753. Had 11 children. 
10. William, b. Sept. 3, 1684 ; m. 1, Jan. 10, 1704, Hannah Pease. She d. March 
10, 1718. He m. 2, Dec. 11, 1718, Sarah Bond. She d. June 10, 1777, 33. 
88. He d. Oct. 28, 1756. Had 12 children, and was father of Isaac and 
grandfather of Moses Brown, H. C. 1768.* 



4. JohnShattuck, s. of William, (p. 61,) was b. in Watertown, 
Feb. 11, 1647; and, according to the records of that town, "was 
drowned as he was passing over Charlestown Ferry, the 14th 
Sept. 1675," se. 28 y. 7 m. 3 d. He had lands granted to him in 
Groton in 1664, but it does not appear that he was an inhabitant 
of that town for any great length of time, if at all. He was a 
carpenter, and resided principally in the Middle District — the 
present village of Watertown ; where he was employed by the 
town, in 1669 and subsequently, to keep the town mill, then 
situated near the present bridge leading to Newton Corner. 

The year 1675 is well known in history as the commencement 
of the most disastrous war with the Indians that ever occurred in 
New England. It has been entitled "Philip's" war, from the 
name given to the notorious Metacom, the principal leader of the 



* In Bond's valuable " Family Memorials'' may be found an extended account of the Brown 
family, and the names of many of the descendants of Mary Shattuck down to the generation 
now existing". 



JOHN SHATTUCK. 69 

different tribes. It was undoubtedly the intention of King Philip 
to destroy all the white inhabitants ; and at one time fears were 
entertained that he would carry his designs into execution. 
Many of the frontier towns were burned and deserted by the 
new settlers. Among other places early attacked were the re- 
mote settlements on Connecticut River. As a means of protec- 
tion a military company was organized under Capt. Richard 
Beers, a distinguished citizen of Watertown. of which young 
John Shattuck was appointed sergeant,* and proceeded to Had- 
ley. Hearing that Squawkeague, now North field, had been at- 
tacked, they marched, on the 4th of September, 1675, to its 
relief; and while on their route a large force of Indians who lay 
concealed, suddenly rose and fell upon them with overpowering 
fury. Of thirty-six men of whom the company was composed, 
sixteen only escaped death. Capt. Beers was killed. Sergeant 
Shattuck, one of the sixteen whose lives were preserved, was 
immediately despatched as a messenger to the Governor of the 
Colony to announce the result of the expedition. On the 14th 
of September, ten days after the battle, as he was crossing the 
ferry between Charlestown and Boston, he was drowned. Goo- 
kin, (Trans. Am. Antiquarian Society, Yol. II., p. 466,) describes 
this event as follows : — 

" About this time a person named Shattuck, of Watertown, that was a sergeant 
under Capt. Beers, when the said Beers was slain near Squakeage, had escaped 
very narrowly but a few days before; and being newly returned home, this man 
being at Charlestown, in Mr. Long's porch, at the sign of the Three Cranes, 
divers persons of quality being present, particularly Capt. Lawrence Hammond, 
the Captain of the town, and others, this Shattuck was heard to say to this effect: 
' I hear the Marlborough Indians, in Boston in prison, and upon trial for their 
lives, are likely to be cleared by the court; for my part,' said he, ' I have been 
lately abroad in the country's service, and have ventured my life for them, and 
esciped very narrowly ; but if they clear these Indians, they shall hang me up by 
the neck before I ever serve them again.' Within a quarter of an hour after 
these words were spoken, this man was passing the ferry between Charlestown 
and Boston ; the ferry boat being loaded with horses and the wind high, the boat 
sunk ; and though there were several other men in the boat and several horses, 
yet all escaped with life, but this man only. I might mention several other 
things of remark here that happened to other persons, that were filled with dis- 
pleasure and animosity against the poor Christian Indians, but shall forbear, lest 
any be offended." 

* In ihe books of the Treasurer of the Colony, .now in the possession of the Genealogical 
Society, are several entries of payments for the services of John Shattuck as sergeant in this 
expedition. 



70 SECOND GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

It is proper to remark, in explanation of this narrative, that a 
painful suspicion was entertained at the time that some of the half 
christianized Indians in the settlements were privy to and partners 
in the conspiracy of Philip. Gookin did not share this suspicion, 
and he therefore opposed the war and those engaged in it. He had 
acted as counsel for the Indians then on trial ; and he considered 
it criminal in any one to speak against them, notwithstanding 
some of them were convicted and were afterwards executed for 
murder. Whether Mr. Shattuck made the remarks, in " effect," 
as here given, or whether they were a mere hearsay report, is 
uncertain ; but Gookin seems to have considered his accidental 
drowning a special Providence, executed upon him as a punish- 
ment for his honest but fearless expression of opinions on subjects 
which he had just discussed with '-divers persons of quality"! 
This judgment, however, if indeed it was one, did not occur 
alone ; others happened to other persons for similar acts. Mr. 
Shattuck, as an honest, independent young man, having opinions 
of his own, and not afraid to express them on a proper occasion, 
would not be very likely to speak in the most mild and friendly 
terms of an enemy that had, only ten days before, betrayed and 
killed twenty out of thirty-six of his companions in arms ; and 
he is to be commended for his conduct, and for this exhibition of 
a characteristic trait of the family. 

He m. June 20, 1664, in his eighteenth year, Ruth Whit- 
ney, b. in Watertown, April 15, 1645, dan. of John Whitney.* 
On the 6th March, 1677, eighteen months after the death of Mr. 
Shattuck, she m. 2, Enock (or Enosh as often written) Law- 
rence, b. March 5, 1649, s. of John Lawrence ; and, in 1678, 
they removed to Groton, with several of his relatives, at the re- 

* John Whitney, the ancestor of Ruth Shattuck, in April, 1G35, when 35 years old, embarked, 
at Ipswich, Eng., for New England, in the ship Elizabeth and Ann, with his wife Elinor, aged 
30 5 sons John, ae. 11 ; Richard, se 9; Nathaniel, a?. 8 5 Thomas, se. 6; and Jonathan, 02 1 year. 
He was admitted a freeman, March 3. 1636 ; was a selectman of Watertown several years, 
botween 1633 and 1655 ; and town clerk, in 1655. His wife, Elinor, d. May 11, 1659. He m. 
2. Sept. 29, 1659, Judith Clement. He d. a widower, June 1, 1673, se. 74. His will is dated 
April 3d previous. He had, beside the sons already mentioned, Joshua, Caleb, and Benjamin, 
b. in Watertown. The descendants of this family are very numerous in New England, and 
throughout the United States. [See Bond's Family Memorials.] 

John Whitney, Jr. was admitted a fieeman, May 26, 1647, then aged 23; was selectman, in 
Watertown 1673, '74, '75, '76, '78, and '79. He m. Ruth, dau. of Robert Reynolds, of Boston. 
He d. in Wat., Oct. 12, 1692. Had 10 children ; 1. John, b. Sept. 17, 1642 ; 2. Rulh b April 
15, 1645, m. John Shattuck; 3. Nathaniel, b. Feb. 1, 1647; 4. Samuel, b. July 28, 1648 ; 5. 
Mary, b. April 29, 1650 ; 6. Joseph, b. Jan 15,1652; 7. Sarah, b. March 17, 1654; 8. Elizabeth, 
b. June 9, 1656 ; 9. Hannah ; 10. Benjamin, b. June 28, 1660. The will of Robert Reynolds, 
dated April 20, 1658, mentions his dau. Ruth Whitney, his dau. Sarah Mason, and his son 
Robert. 



JOHN SHATTUCK PHILIP SHATTUCK. 71 

settlement of that town, taking with him the four young children 
by her first husband ; and they probably occupied the land 
granted to Mr. Shattuck, in 1664. From this family the Shat- 
tucks in Groton and Pepperell originated. Mr. Lawrence d. in 
Groton, Sept. 28, 1744, ae. 95 y. 6 m. 23 d. The date of her 
death has not been ascertained. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ROTH WHITNEY, BORN IN WATERTOWN. 

1. John, b. June 4, 1666; m. Mary Blood, 10 

2. Ruth, b. June 24, 1668 ; m. probably, Jonathan Farnsworth. 

3. WiUiam,b. Sept. 11, 1670; in. Hannah Underwood, 11 

4. Samuel, b. ; m. Elizabeth Blood, 12 

HER CHILDREN, BY ENOCH LAWRENCE, BORN IN GROTON. 

5. Nathaniel, b. Feb. 21, 1G78 ; m. Anna . She d. Sept. 31, 1758, ae. 73 y. 8 mo. 21 d. He 

d. Sept. 12, 1765, ae. 87 y. 6 m. 21 d. They had, 1. Nathaniel, b. May 13, 1702, m. Doro- 
thy Chamberlain ; 2. James, b. Aug-. 26, 1705, m. 1732, Mary Martin, d. in Pepperell, Jan. 
27, 1800, ae. 96— she d. 1799, ae. 87 5 3. Anna, b. July 3, 1708, m. Samuel Wright 3 4. 
Enosh, b. Nov. 15, 1710, m. Jan. 29, 1734, Sarah Stearns, and had 8 children 5 5. Sarah, b. 
March 15, 1713 ; 6. Martha, b. Dec. 7, 1715, m. Wm. Blood ; 7. Joseph, b. April 10, 17l8 ; 
8. Benjamin, b. Nov. 6, 1720, d. in Groton, 1807, ae. 873 9- Rebecca, b. April 17, 1724 3 
10. Lois, b. Sept. 6, 1726 ; 11. Eunice, b. July 25, 1728, d. Nov. 15, 1747, ae. 19. 

6. Daniel, b. March 7, 1681, m. Sarah , and had, in Groton, 1. Daniel, b. April 22, 1702 3 

2. Isaac, b. Feb. 25, 1705. 

7. Zachariah, b. July 16, 1683; m. in 1707, Abigail . He d. in Pepperell, June 18, 1754, 

ae. 71. Had, 1. Zachariah, b. May 8, 1708, d. in Pep., Nov. 30, 1790, ae. 82 ; 2. Ruth, b, 
Sept. 3, 1710, m. Dec. 18, 1729, Elias Elliot; 3. Dea. Jeremiah, b. Dec. 7, 1713, m. March 
21, 1736, Elizabeth Chamberlain. He d. in Pep , Aug. 29, 1759. She d. Feb. 1, J 774, ae. 
60; 4. Josiah, b. July 4, 1715, d. Nov. 13, 1717 ; 5. Abigail, b. May 16, 1718, m. Nov. 23, 
1737, Z. Kemp ; 6. Elizabeth, b. July 31, 1720 ; 7. Josiah, b. Oct. 11, 1723 ; 8. Rachel, b. 
1727, m. John Chamberlain, Jr., d. 1756, ae. 29. 

8. Jeremiah, b. May 1, 1686.* 



5. Dr. Philip Shattuck, s. of William, (p. 61,) was b. in 
Watertown, and d. within the present limits of Waltham, June 
26, 1722, ae. 73. His place of residence was in the vicinity of 
the Waverley Station on the Fitchburg Railroad, easterly of 
Beaver Brook ; and his estate extended northerly into Cambridge. 
He was a physician of eminence, and for a long period a leading 
man in the public affairs of the town. He was often chosen 
moderator of town meetings, and held the offices of assessor, town 
treasurer, chairman of the selectmen, and very many other im- 
portant stations of public trust and responsibility. The grave- 
stone erected to his memory was standing in the Waltham 
burying-ground, in 1852, bearing the following inscription : — 

* The Genealogy of the Lawrence Family, and Bond's Family Memorials, contain further 
information concerning these families. 



72 SECOND GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

" Here Lyes Buried 

y e Body of Doct r 

PHILIP SHATTUCK, 

who dece d June 

ye 26th, 1722, in y e 74th 

year of his Age. 

Blessed are the Dead 

that Die in the Lord" 

A new marble tablet has recently been erected, to which the 
above inscription was transferred, with the following appended : 
" The above record was transferred from a moss-grown crumbling 
head-stone of slate, to one of more enduring marble, by a descend- 
ant of the 5th Generation, A. D. 1853." 

His will, dated Jan. 29th, and proved Aug. 30th, 1722, is re- 
corded in the Middlesex Records, Yol. XVI., p. 436. He had 
two sons by the name of Philip living at the same time, one by 
each wife ; and they were distinguished from each other in his 
will, as " Philip Shattuck of Saybrook," and " Philip Shattuck, 
the younger," or as " the youngest son of my present beloved 
wife." Accounts of two living children of the same name in 
one family sometimes occur in the early history of this country 
and in England, but this is the only instance that we have 
discovered in our family. In his will Mr. Shattuck appoints his 
son Isaac Shattuck his executor; and bequeaths him "all my 
wearing apparell," and £20 in money; to son "Philip Shattuck, 
of Saybrook," 5s. ; to son Joseph Shattuck. the " New London 
Dispensatory, the English Physician, and another book entitled 
Dr. Williams ;" to son Benjamin Shattuck, son-in-law John 
Underwood, daughter Parkhurst, "each of my daughter Nor- 
cross's children," daughter Ann Sanderson, son Joseph Shattuck, 
each 5s., "to be paid in eight years after my decease ;" to grand- 
daughter Rebecca Underwood, one cow ; to sons Amos and 
"Philip Shattuck, the younger," all his books and "instruments 
of husbandry," and other estate not otherwise disposed of ; and 
they were to pay all his debts and deliver to their mother "an- 
nually, during the whole time of her remaining my widow, 
sixteen bushels of good Indian corn, and four bushels of malt, 
and one hundred weight of pork, and five barrells of cider, if the 
orchard produce fruit sufficient for it, and five cords of wood 
suitable and fit for the fire, at her door ; and a suitable beast to 



PHILIP SHATTUCK. 73 

carry her to the public worship ;" and she was to have the " use 
of the east end of his mansion house, from top to bottom." 

He m. 1, Nov. 9, 1670, Deborah Barstow, dau. of Wm. and 
Anna Barstow. She d. Nov. 24, 1679. Wm. Barstow, the 
father, d. in Dedham, Jan. 1, 1668, leaving a widow and 8 chil- 
dren. On the 29th March, 1671, Michael Barstow, a brother of 
Wm., deeds to Philip Shattuck six acres of land in Watertown, 
"for the love and affection I have and do bear unto my loving 
kinswoman Deborah, the wife of Philip Shattuck." 

He m. 2, Feb. 11, 1680, Rebecca Chamberlain, who survived 
him, and d. in 1728. She also left a will, dated Dec. 13, 1727, 
proved Nov. 19, 1728, (Mid. Rec, Vol. XVIII., p. 522,) in 
which Amos and Philip were appointed her executors. She be- 
queathed to her sons Benjamin and Joseph, 205. each : to Isaac, 
one feather bed ; to Sarah Parkhurst, " half my wearing apparell, 
and half my wearing and housell linnen, my biggest iron pot, one 
pewter platter, a brass mortar and pestle ;" to granddaughter 
Rebecca Gale, "half my wearing apparell, half my wearing and 
housel linnen, and one pewter platter ;" to daughter Ann San- 
derson "my wainscott cobbart that stands in the dwelling 
room;" to sons Amos and Philip, "all the rest and residue of 
the estate," to be equally divided between them. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY DEBORAH BARSTOW, BORN IN WATERTOWN. 

1. Deborah, b. Oct. 10, 1671 ; d. Oct. 19, 1671, se. 9 days. 

2. Philip, b. Jan. 26, 1 673 ; m. Margaret Pratt, 13 

3. Susanna, b. August 6, 1675 ; m. Nathaniel Norcross, 14 

4. Anna, b. Dec. 8, 1677 ; m. William Sanderson, 15 

HIS CHILDREN, BY REBECCA CHAMBERLAIN, BORN IN WATERTOWN. 

5. Joseph, b. Aug. 12, 1681 ; d. Nov. 7, 1683, se. 2 y. 2 m. 23 d. 

6. Rebecca, b. March 10, 1683 ; m. John Underwood, 16 

7. Benjamin, b. March 15, 1685; m. 1, Deliverance Fay; 2, M. R. Clark, 17 

8. Joseph, b. March 6, 1687; m. Mary Ladd, 18 

9. Nathaniel, b. Jan. 14,1689; m. Hepzibah Hastings, 19 

10. Isaac, b. m. Mary , 20 

11. Amos, b. March 19, 1695. He d. in 1734, probably unmarried. No 

record of any family or marriage has been discovered. 

12. Sarah, b. Oct. 26, 1696 ; m. Samuel Parkhurst, 21 

13. Theophilus, bap. April 15, 1700; probably d. in infancy. 

14. Philip, b. Oct. 19, 1699. He was published in Boston, June 4, 1734, to 

Jane McClenning, [McLelland ?] but we have found no record of marriage, 
nor of any family, if he had one. Samuel Gale was appointed administrator 
on his estate, July 29, 1754 ; and he probably d. in Waltham that year. 
10 ' 



74 SECOND GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

6. William Shattuck, s. of William, (p. 61,) was b. in Water- 
town in 1653. He lived in the easterly parish upon the old 
homestead on Common Hill, "on the highway to the pond," 
where he died Oct. 19, 1732, aged 79. He inherited from his 
father his " loom and its appurtenances," and like him was called 
a weaver ; but he followed farming, brickmaking, and other em- 
ployments. In an entry on the Watertown records, Feb. 10, 
1685, it is said — " Willyam Shattuck had liberty to dig clay this 
summer to make bricks at the clay pits near his house, provided 
that he damify not the highway, and that he pay to the town 
youse four pens per thousand for all the bricks that he selleth 
out of town ; he having promised to give true account of what 
he selleth." Subsequently this contract was several times re- 
newed. 

In Watertown, as in many other places in former years, the 
selection of a site for the meeting-house occasioned a long and 
exciting controversy. It was finally referred for settlement to a 
committee of the General Court, and in 1694, "Mr. William 
Shattuck" was chosen with four others to lay the subject before 
this committee. In a pauper case in litigation in 1695, a com- 
mittee was instructed by a vote of the town to procure " Mr. 
William Shattuck to assist them if possible in the town's behalf." 
He was often chosen "a commissioner" to take the invoice or 
valuation ; and in 1694 was one of a committee " to go down to 
Boston & pleade the town's case, the town being overrated in 
the county rates ; and they are desired to prosecute the case to 
the utmost in the towns behalf." These and many other similar 
evidences of the respect and confidence reposed in him by the 
inhabitants, and of his high social position and influence, are to 
be found upon the records. He held at different times the most 
important public town offices, and was one of the most eminent, 
wealthy, and useful citizens. In a general subscription raised for 
repairs on the meeting-house in 1694, he gave 10 shillings, the 
highest but one on the list of forty persons. In 1712 another 
subscription was raised by the " piously disposed persons, inhab- 
itants of Watertown," to purchase a parsonage "for the accom- 
modation of Rev. Mr. Gibbs, who is their present minister, and 
such as shall succeed him in the work of the ministry ;" and 



WILLIAM SHATTUCK. 



75 



William Bond, William Shattuck and Nathaniel Bright were 

chosen by the subscribers the trustees for the management of the 

fund. (Middlesex Deeds, Vol. XV., p. 599.) As late as 1723 

Mr. Shattuck was chosen by the town, with Col. Jonas Bond and 

Noble Bright, a committee to obtain from the Province 3.500 

acres of land granted to Watertown and Weston, and not then 

taken up. His grave-stone, still standing, in a good state of 

preservation, near the northwesterly corner of the ancient bury- 

ing-ground, by the side of the new tablet recently erected, has 

the following inscription : — 

" Here lyes Buried 

y e Body of Mr. 

WILLIAM SHATTUCK 

who Departed this 

Life October y e 19th 

Anno Dom u . 1732 in y e 

80th year of his age." 

His will, dated Jan. 11, 1727, and proved Dec. 4, 1732, is en- 
tered upon the Middlesex Records, Vol. XIX., pp. 446, 447, and 
448. It provides for the distribution of his estate as follows : — 
He bequeathed " to my beloved son Benjamin Shattuck and his 
heirs," £80; "to my three grandchildren, the children of my 
beloved son Robert Shattuck, deceased, the sum of £40, to be 
divided amongst them, as followeth, viz., to Robert, £20, to 
Randall, £10, and to Mary, £10; the said respective legacies to 
be paid to the sons, at their arrival at twenty-one years of age, 
and to the daughter, at her arrival at eighteen years of age or 
day of marriage ;" " to my beloved daughter Elizabeth Holland 
and her heirs, £40;" to "my beloved daughter Joanna Holden, 
£30;" to "my beloved daughter Abigail Holden, £40;" to 
"my grandchildren, the children of my beloved daughter Susanna 
Holden, deceased, £30, to be equally divided between them ;" 
to "my beloved daughter Mary Greenleaf, but 5s., I having 
already taken care for her portion out of my estate." The resi- 
due of his estate was divided into five shares, two of which were 
bequeathed to Benjamin, one to Elizabeth Holland, one to Joanna 
Holden, and one to Abigail Holden. Mr. Shattuck had loaned 
money to William Greenleaf, his son-in-law, for which he held 
his bond, dated Sept. 17, 1724 ; and a long clause is inserted in 
his will, providing for the payment of some of his specific lega- 



76 SECOND GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

cies from the proceeds of this bond. Andrew Bordman and 
Joseph Mason were executors. 

He m., about 1678, Susanna Randall. She d. May 8, 1723. 
Her father, Stephen Randall, m. Dec. 14, 1653, Susanna Barron, 
and d. Feb. 26, 1708, leaving a will, dated Jan. 13, 1698, and 
proved April 19, 1708, in which he mentions daughters Elizabeth 
Codman, Susanna Shattuck, and Mary Randall, (who was b. 
June 23, 1662, and m. Feb. 28, 1698, Abraham Chamberlain of 
Brookline. ) Stephen was probably the s. of Elizabeth Randall, 
supposed to have been the widow of John Randall. She d. in 
Watertown, Dec. 24, 1672, se. 80, a connection of the Browns. 
(Bond.) Susanna Barron was the daughter of Ellis Barron, who 
d. in Watertown, Oct. 30, 1676, and sister to Moses Barron, b. 
March 1, 1643, who m. Mary Learned, settled in Chelmsford, and 
was ancestor to Lucy Barron, the wife of Dr. Benjamin Shattuck, 
subsequently noticed. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY SUSANNA RANDALL, BORN IN WATERTOWN. 



1. Susanna, b. 

2. Joanna, b. 

3. Elizabeth, b. Nov. 23, 1684 

4. William, b. 1686 

5. Benjamin, b. July 30, 1687 

6. Mary, bap. April 13, 1690 

7. Abigail, b. 

8. Joseph, b. Oct. 9, 1694 

9. Jonathan, b. Oct. 16, 1695 

10. Robert, h. Jan. 1, 1698 

11. Moses, b. Nov. 1, 1703 



m. Samuel Holden, 22 

m. Isaac Holden. 

m. Robert Goddard and others, .... 23 

m. Hepzibah Hammond, 24 

m. Martha Sherman, 25 

m. William Greenleaf, 26 

m. Joseph Holden, 27 

d. Oct. 15, 1694, aged 6 days. 

m. Elizabeth Stearns, 28 

m. Mary Pratt, 29 

d. in Boston, unm. May 31, 1724, se. 20£ y. 



7. Rebecca Shattuck, dau. of Wm., (p. 61,) b. in 1655; m. 
Feb. 7, 1672, Samuel Church, b. in Wat. June 10, 1640, s. of 
Garret Church. They had — 
1. Rebecca, b. in Wat. Dec. 31, 1672. We have been unable to obtain the fur- 
ther history either of the child or parents. 



8. Abigail Shattuck, dau. of Wm., (p. 61,) was b. in Wat. in 
1657, and d. in Groton, in 1694. Her brother, Dr. Philip Shat- 
tuck, was appointed administrator on her estate in 1694, but it 
it was not finally settled until 1703. 

She m. 1, Oct. 17, 1678, Jonathan Morse, a brother of Jo- 
seph, (p. 66.) He was b. in Watertown, Oct. 7, 1643, and 
settled in Groton, where he d. July 31, 1686, a3. 42 y. 9 m. 24 d. 



SAMUEL SHATTUCK JOHN SHATTUCK. 77 

He was town clerk of Groton in 1679 and 1682, until his death, 
and was a highly respected citizen. 

She m. 2, Sept. 22, 1690, Joshua Parker, b. March 13, 1658, s. 
of Capt. James Parker. He d. in Groton, May 5, 1691, ee. 33 y. 
1 m. 22 d. 

HER CHILDREN, BY JONATHAN MORSE, BORN IN GROTON. 

1. Abigail, b. Dec. 15, 1679; m. April 27, 1699, her cousin James Morse, s. of 

John, b. Nov. 25, 1668. He d. April 26, 1718, ae. 49 y. 5 m. 1 d. 

2. Hannah, b. Sept. 3, 1682; m. 1, May 19, 1699, John Wellington, b. July 26, 

1678. He d. Nov. 30, 1717. She m. 2, June 13, 1727, Daniel White of 
Lexington. 

3. Ruth, b. April 15, 1684 ; m. June 19, 1706, Jonathan Robinson, settled in 

Lexington, and had 5 children. 

4. Jonathan, b. Jan. 23, 1687, about 6 months after the father's death. 

HER CHILD, BY JOSHUA PARKER, BORN IN GROTON. 

5. Abiel, b. ; m. Nov. 15, 1711, George Harrington, and lived in 

Watertown, where she d. May 25, 17 — . Had 13 children. 



9. Samuel Shattuck, the youngest child of Wm., (p. 61,) was 
b. in Wat., Feb. 28, 1666, where he lived several years. He prob- 
ably removed from thence about 1695, since his name does not 
appear after that date upon its records ; and his subsequent where- 
abouts and history I have been unable to trace. His wife Abigail 
" owned the covenant" in Watertown in 1687, and her three 
children named below were born and baptized there. He might 
have had other children. 

1. Abigail, b. Oct. 17, 1686; m. William Shattuck, 34 

2. Samuel, b. Feb. 16, 1689. 

3. Martha, b. April 11, 1694. 



in. ^(jirb dmrata aitfr Cjnlfrnit, 

ORIGIN OF THE ELDER PEPPERELL BRANCHES. 

10. John Shattuck, son of John, (p. 71,) was b. in Water- 
town, June 4, 1666, and was killed by the Indians, in Groton, 
May 8, 1709, ae. 42 y. 11 m. 4 d. He was a farmer, and occupied 
the homestead, which had before belonged to his father-in-law, 



78 THIRD GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

James Blood, and which, after his death, was set off to the widow, 
as her portion of the real estate, and by her sold to Mr. Shattuck. 
It was situated on the " Nod Road," so called, which runs north- 
easterly from the Stony-Ford- Way at Hollingsworth's paper-mills. 
The Shattucks and Bloods owned large tracts of land on both 
sides of Nashua River, in the vicinity of these mills. At the time 
of Mr. Shattuck's death he was one of the selectmen of Groton — 
an evidence of the respectability of his social standing. 

Few persons, now-a-days, can have an accurate conception of 
the toil, suffering, and danger endured by the early settlers of 
our frontier New England towns. The workmen as they went 
forth to their labors were not sure of returning again in safety to 
their homes, or, if they did, that they should find the loved ones 
they left there alive. The tomahawk, scalping-knife, and other 
deadly weapons, were in the hands of foes whose approach was 
often invisible, and when they were least expected. Groton, a 
town in Middlesex County, about forty miles northwesterly from 
Boston — which has ever been the residence of some of our family 
or their connections — was particularly unfortunate in this respect. 
It was first settled in 1660, but on the 13th March, 1676, was 
burnt by the Indians ; and such of its inhabitants as escaped 
death or captivity were compelled to abandon their estates, and 
seek protection in Concord, Watertown, and other older and more 
secure towns nearer Boston. In 1678, after the cessation of hos- 
tilities, Groton was resettled, and the Indian neighbors remained 
peaceable for several years. But about 1690 they again began to 
be troublesome, and for the subsequent fifteen or twenty years 
continued their depredations, by occasionally murdering the in- 
habitants, burning their houses, destroying their crops, or killing 
their cattle. In 1691, as a means of protection and safety, eight 
houses, in different parts of the town, were fortified and estab- 
lished as garrisons.* Into these houses the neighboring inhab- 
itants gathered at night ; and they were guarded by armed men 
as soldiers, ever wakeful as sentinels to warn the inmates of any 
approach of danger. One of these houses, situated in what is 
now the fifth School District, (the precise locality is not known) 
was occupied by Mr. Shattuck and his relatives and neighbors ; 

* The author of this work communicated to Caleb Butler, Esq an account of these garrisons 
and a considerable amount of other information, published in his History of Groton. 



JOHN SHATTUCK. 79 

and they seem to have experienced with most crushing force 
the calamities of the times. 

Oct. 13, 1692, James Blood, father-in-law of Mr. Shattuck, 
was the first victim. " He was killed," says the record, "by the 
French and Indian enemy." 

July 27, 1694, William Longley, — an uncle of Mrs. Shattuck, — 
his wife and several of his children, were killed, and three others 
of the family were carried into captivity. At the same time 
James Parker, Jr., a distant relative, and his wife and children, 
were killed or captured. < 

Enoch Lawrence, the step-father of Mr. Shattuck, in an en- 
gagement with the Indians, was wounded in the hand, and dis- 
abled for life. In consequence of which, in 1702, a pension of 
£3 per annum was granted him by the Province. 

About 1706, three of the children of Thomas Tarbell — John, 
Zachariah,and Sarah, cousins of Mrs. Shattuck, — were stolen and 
carried to Canada, where they lived, it is said, the remainder of 
their lives. Their father, in his will, executed in 1715, makes 
them the residuary legatees of his estate, "upon their return 
from captivity." 

The period of 1690 to 1710, might well be called the Reign of 
Terror, and the Dark Age of New England. The inhabitants of 
Groton became so much wearied out and impoverished, that they 
petitioned the government several times for relief. In one of 
these petitions, dated in 1703, the people say : " we spend so 
much time in watching and warding that we can do little else ; 
and truly we have lived almost two years more like soldiers than 
otherwise." In another, dated July 9, 1707, the selectmen name 
several families that had been obliged to leave the town, and 
others "that are considering of going," being "unable to subsist 
any longer," on account of the Indian troubles. Among the 
latter were the three brothers, — John, William, and Samuel 
Shattuck, — and twenty others of their connections and neighbors, 
some of whom did actually remove, either for a temporary period 
or permanently. John Shattuck, however, remained. But on 
the Sth of May, 1709, two years afterwards, he and his eldest 
son, then in his 19th year, were both murdered by the Indians. 
Tradition says that this massacre occurred while they were 
crossing the Nashua River, in the vicinity of the Stony-Ford- 



80 THIRD GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

Way, near Hollingsworth's mills, on the return of Mr. Shattuck 
from his lands on the west side of the river. 

The deaths by accident and violence in two successive genera- 
tions in this branch of the family, prematurely removing two 
worthy and respectable men, fathers and protecting guardians of 
their children, were great calamities, and materially affected their 
condition, their fortunes, and their history. And these calamities 
were magnified by the times, and under the circumstances exist- 
ing when they occurred. If these fathers had lived to the 
# ordinary age of their kindred, how much could they have done 
for their families ! 

Mr. Shattuck m. Mary Blood, b. Sept. 1, 1672, dau. of James 
Blood and Elizabeth Longley, and granddau. of Richard Blood and 
Wm. Longley.* She remained a widow 47 years, and d. March 4, 

* William Longley first settled in Lynn about 1638, where he was one of the selectmen in 
1645, and a clerk of the writs in 1655. He removed to Groton, where he was town clerk in 
1666. He d. there, Nov. 29, 1680, leaving a will dated 6 days before his death. His widow, 
Joanna m. Benjamin Crispe. She survived him and d. in Charlestown in 1698. She also left a 
will, dated April 12th, and proved Dec. 28th of that }'ear. (See Genealogical Register, Vol. 
VII., p. 188 ; Mid. Prob Rec, Vol. IV., p. 231 ; Mid. Deeds, Vol. XII., p. 77; Vol. XXX1L, 
p. 532, and Vol. XXXVII., p. 702.) Mr. Longley had the following children :— 

1. Elizabeth. She m. Sept. 7, 1669, James Blood, and d. about 1677, leaving two daughters. 
Mary, b Sept. 1, 1672, and Elizabeth, b. April 27, 1675. Neither the mother nor the daughters 
are mentioned by Mr. Longley in his will, but his wife Joanna, who styles herself, " relict of 
Benjamin Crispe of Groton, formerly widow of William Longley," remembers them in her will 
in 1698, after their marriage to the two brothers, John and Samuel Shattuck, in the following 
terms : — " I give and bequeath unto two of my granddaughters, viz , Mary Shaddock and 
Elizabeth Shaddock, three acres of meadow lying and being in New Angle Meadow, joining to 
Dunstable, and forty acres of upland out of the six score acres lying and being on the other side 
of Groton River, the said meadow and upland to be equally divided between the said Mary and 
Elizabeth Shaddock." This proves that Elizabeth, the wife of Samuel Shattuck, was the 
daughter of James Blood, not Nathaniel Blood, as was once supposed. (See notice cf the 
Bloods in the Appendix.) 

2. John. He m. Hannah ; and had, born in Groton, William, b. March 12, 1669; Mar- 
garet, b. Oct. 28, 1671 ; Mary, b. Feb 10, 1674, and perhaps others. 

3. Mary. She m. Samuel Leman, probably of Charlestown. and had issue. 
4 Sarah. She m. Thomas Rand. His history has not been traced. 

5. Lydia. She m. James Nutting of Groton, and had Sarah, b. 1681, Lydia, Joanna, Ruth, 
Elizabeth, b. 1698, William, and perhaps others. 

6. Hannah, or Anna. She m June 30, 1666, Thomas Tarbell, whose dau. Anna m. John 
Lawrence, nephew of Enoch, (p. 71,) and ancestor of Hon. Abbot Lawrence. 

7. William. He m. May 15, 1673, Lydia , and settled in Groton. He was town clerk 

in 1687, and from 1692 until his death. He lived on the east side of the " Hollis Road," on a 
knoll, a short distance northerly of William Shattuck's, and south of J. Fitch's, as marked on 
Butler's map. Here, on the 27lh July, 1694, he, and his wife, and several of his children, were 
massacred by the Indians, and three others were carried into captivit}', where they remained a 
number of years. Their grandmother Crispe, in her will, bequeathed to her " three grandchil- 
dren that are in captivity, if they return, three books ; one of them a bible, another a sermon 
book treating of faith, and the other a psalm book." 

John Longley, one of these captives, was redeemed by his friends in 1700, and afterwards 
resided in Groton, and was one of its most worthy citizens He was many years parish and 
town treasurer ; town clerk six years, 1723 to 1726, and 1728 and 1729 ; representative in the 
General Court three years. 1729 to 1731 ; and deacon in the church from 1722 until his death, 
which occurred May 25, 1750, se. 67. He m 1, Sarah Prescott, b. May 3, 1686, dau of Jonas 
Prescott. She d. March 8, 1718. He m. 2, Deborah Houghton. He had 5 children by his 
first wife, and 7 by his last, whose posterity live in Groton, Shirley, and elsewhere. Col. Ed 
mond Longley, who d. in Hawley, Nov. 29, 1842, oe 96, was a descendant. See Butler's His- 
tory of Groton, pp. 278, 417. 



WILLIAM SHATTUCK. 81 

1756, as. 83 y. 6 m. 3 d. Her husband joined the church in 
1707, and she in 1721. He died leaving her, as his own father 
had left his own mother, at a dark and perilous period, to rear 
and provide for a large family of young children, the youngest 
not then three months old. To her heroic virtues, and to her 
excellence as a woman and a mother, her posterity owe a large 
debt of gratitude. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY MARY BLOOD, BORN IN GROTON. 



1. John, b. Jan. 6, 1691 

2. Jonathan, b. June 29, 1693 

3. David, b. April 28, 1696 

4. Mary, b. April 11, 1699 

5. Sarah, b. Oct. 5, 1701 

6. Lydia, b. March 1, 1704 

7. Elizabeth,b. 

8. Hannah, bap. May 2, 1707 

9. Patience, b. Feb. 18, 1709 



killed by Indians, May 8, 1709, se. 18 y. 4 m. 2 d. 

m. Elizabeth Chamberlain, 30 

d. young before his father. 

m. John Gilson, 31 

nothing known of her history. 

m. Isaac Williams, 32 

m. Isaac Lakin, 33 

d, in infancy before his father, 
probably d. young. 



ORIGIN OF THE GROTOIV BRANCHES. 

11. William Shattuck, s. of John, (p. 71,) was b. in Wat., 
Sept. 11, 1670, and d. in Groton in 1744, in his 74th year. His 
residence was a little southerly of the house built by his grand- 
son Job Shattuck, near Wattle's Pond. The following facts 
concerning him are derived from authentic and positive evidence, 
partly from the records of Watertown and Groton, and partly 
from papers on file, but not recorded, in the Middlesex Probate 
Office. He lived in Groton with his mother and step-father, 
Enoch Lawrence, from 1678 until about the time of his marriage 
in 1688, when he returned to Watertown, where he resided the 
principal part of the subsequent fourteen years. In 1691 he was 
impressed into the public military service of the Colony ; and on 
the 4th Dec, 1691, the selectmen of Watertown 

" Agreed that Mr. William Shattuck should take care to provide for the reliefe 
of the wife and two children of his cosen [nephew] William Shattuck, during the 
time of his beeing out in the country service from the 18th November, 1691, till 
he corns home, or the town taks furder order ; and that the s d William shall be 
paid for his pains the one part out of the county assessments, as by order of the 
General Court is allowable, and the other part out of the town rate." 

This was undoubtedly the William Shattuck, the subject of 
this notice ; and his two children then born, were William and 
Hannah hereafter mentioned. After his return from the military 
11 



82 THIRD GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

campaign, as a consideration for his services, the selectmen voted 
to give him a lot of land for a dwelling-house, near " Patch 
Meadow ;" and to allow him to cut timber owned by the town, 
to build it. He probably availed himself of this grant, in part at 
least ; for we find the following entry upon the Watertown rec- 
ords, Nov. 16, 1702. At a public town meeting — 

" Voted that if William Shattuck, junior, doth deliver the house & lands & 
fences to Manings Sawin, Town Treasurer, that he did hold of the town, within 
eight days next coming, then the s d Town Treasurer is to deliver the s d four 
pounds, that he acquired of John Green, to the s d William Shattuck, as a gratuity 
from the town to help him in his removing to Groton." 

In 1702 he bought lands in and removed to Groton. In 1707 he 
was one of those already mentioned in our notice of his brother 
John, (p. 79,) who " were considering of removing" from Groton 
on account of the Indian troubles ; and his wife Hannah, and 
probably her children, did actually return to Watertown in 1707, 
and resided a short time in the family of John Barnard, Jr. 
They were afterwards, however, permanent inhabitants of Groton. 
On the 21st Sept., 1716, William Shattuck deeded to his son 
"in consideration of the paternal love and affection I bear to my 
son William Shattuck, junior," — "that he may be settled for the 
support of his family, and that he and his heirs may be forever 
debarred of making any further claim or demand of any farther 
portion out of my estate that I shall die seized of, either personal 
or real, except what I may hereafter give him," &c. This deed 
is signed by Wm. Shattuck, the father, and Anna or Hannah 
Shattuck, the mother. (Midd. Deeds, Vol. XXXVIII., pp. 33, 34.) 
His son John Shattuck administered on his estate ; and in the peti- 
tion for his appointment the widow Deliverance Shattuck calls him 
" her son-in-law," step-son, or son of her husband by a former wife. 
William is called "the eldest son of the diseased," and the others, 
children and heirs. The inventory of his property was present- 
ed June 1, 1744 ; and Wm. Shattuck's portion of the real estate 
which he had received from his father, was apprised as land " in 
his hands." The remainder was divided by commissioners ap- 
pointed for the purpose in 1747 j and the different heirs, and the 
portions assigned to each, are described in the deed of partition 
on the files of the court. " 1. To Deliverance, the widow of the 
diseased," &c. "2. To John Shattuck, one of the diseased 



SAMUEL SHATTUCK. 83 

sons," &c. " 3. To Daniel Shattuck, another of the diseased 
sons," &c. " 4. To Hannah Blood, eldest daughter of the 
diseased, wife to Nathaniel Blood," &c. "5. To Ruth Nut- 
ting, youngest daughter of the diseased, wife to Ebenezer Nut- 
ting," &c. 

William Shattuck m. 1, in Watertown, March 19, 1688, Han- 
nah Underwood. He is described in the record as then of 
Groton, and she of Watertown. There was no other William 
Shattuck then in Groton, or Watertown, excepting his uncle, 
(p. 74.) This wife was the mother of his children, and died 
about 1717. 

He m. 2, in Groton, March 24, 1719, Deliverance Pease, 
who survived him. His wives were members of the church, and 
his children were baptized. These facts, and others hereafter to 
be stated, unquestionably prove a genealogical succession and 
descent from the first William Shattuck of Watertown to the 
recent families of the name in Groton. Each consecutive link 
in the chain is unbroken, and without irregularity. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY HANNAH UNDERWOOD, ALL PROBABLY BORN IN WATERTOWN. 

1. William, b. 1689; m. 1, A. Shattuck; 2, M.Lund, 34 

2- Hannah, b. 1690 ; m. Nathaniel Blood, 35 

3. Daniel, b. 1692; m. 1, M. Serjent ; 2, R. Boltwood, 36 

4. Ruth, b. 1694 ; m. Ebenezer Nutting, 37 

5. John, b. 1696; ra. Silence Allen, 38 



ORIGJJf OF THE YOUXGKR PKPFEBEIiL BSAKCIIES. 

12. Samuel Shattuck, s. of John, (p. 71,) was b. in Wat. in 
1673, and d. in Groton, intestate, July 22, 1758, ae. 85. Samuel, 
his eldest s. administered on his estate, valued at £236 14. 7. 

He m. Elizabeth Blood, b. April 27, 1675, dan. of James 
Blood and Elizabeth Longley. (See note, p. 80.) She d. Oct. 
20, 1759, as. 84 y. 5 m. 23 d. One year before her death her 
son John, at the request of the other heirs, was appointed her 
guardian, because she was of " great age and under bodily and 
mental infirmity and not capable of caring for her own sub- 
sistence." Her separate estate was then valued at £182 16. 11, 
and consisted principally in lands, the title to most of which 
came to her by inheritance from the Bloods and Longleys. She 
united with the church in 1705, and her husband in 1709. 



84 THIRD GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ELIZABETH BLOOD, BORN IN GROTON. 

1. Samuel, b. April 7, 1696 

2. James, b. Feb. 9, 1700 

3. Jeremiah, b. June 11, 1703 

4. Elizabeth, b. July 22, 1705 

5. Ruth, b. Feb. 6, 1709 

6. John, b. Jan. 21, 1711 

7. David, b. Aug. 4, 1713 

8. Sarah, b. Dec. 11, 1717 

9. Rachel, b. June 9, 1719 
Joseph, (perhaps) b. 1707 



m. Anna Williams, . . 39 

m. Sarah Chamberlain, 40 

m. Sarah Parker, 41 

m. John Shed, 42 

m. Jacob Ames, 43 

m. Sarah Hobart, 44 

m. Dorothy Varnum, 45 

m. James Green, 46 

m. Nehemiah Hobart, 47 

m. Joanna Chandler, 48 



13. Philip Shattuck, s. of Philip, (p. 73,) was b. in Wat., 
Jan. 26, 1673, and settled in Saybrook, Conn. His subsequent 
history and that of his posterity we have been unable to obtain. 
A deed from Benjamin Pratt to Joseph Shattuck, dated March 
24, 1732, is on record in Saybrook. In 1757 Joseph Shattuck 
sells lands to Samuel Comstock ; and in 1763 William Williams 
sells lands in the second parish of Saybrook to Joseph Shattuck. 
These facts show that he or his son was at those periods an 
inhabitant of that place. The present town clerk informs us that 
the name has not appeared upon his records for many years past. 

He m. in Saybrook, Jan. 6, 1704, Margaret Pratt. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY MARGARET PRATT, RECORDED IN SAYBROOK. 

1. Margaret, b. Oct. 25, 1704. 3. Gideon, b. May 7, 1712. 

2. Philip, b. June 20, 1707. 4. Joseph, b. March 11, 1720. 



14. Susanna Shattuck, dau. of Philip, (p. 73,) b. in Wat., 
Aug. 6, 1675 ; m. about 1693, Nathaniel Norcross, b. Dec. 18, 
1665, s. of Richard, (p. 61.) She was his second wife. He m. 
1, in 1687, Mehitable Hagar, who d. April 5, 1691, leaving one 
child, Mehitable, b. Feb. 1691. He d. Dec. 1, 1717, a*. 51. y. 
11 m. 13 d. The most numerous branches of the Norcross 
posterity have descended from this Susanna Shattuck. 

HER CHILDREN, BY NATHANIEL NORCROSS, BORN IN WATERTOWN. 

1. JYathaniel, b. Dec. 20, 1695 ; m. Dec. 12, 1717, Jemima Abbot, b. Oct. 10, 1699, 

(see Abbot Genealogy, p. 149,) and had 12 children. 

2. Philip, b. March 5, 1698 ; m. Oct. 26, 1721, Sarah Jackson, b. Oct. 28, 1703, 

and had 10 children. He d. Jan. 8, 1748, re. 49 y. 10 m. 3 d. They lived 
at Newton Corner, where the Eliot Church stands. (Jackson's History of 
Newton, pp. 337, 372.) 

3. Susanna, b. Feb. 26, 1701 ; m. Feb. 1. 1720, Jonathan Benjamin, b. Feb. 18, 

1687. Had 4 children. He d. in 1731. She d. in 1735. 



ANNA, REBECCA, AND BENJAMIN SHATTUCK. 85 

15. Anna Shattuck, dau. of Philip, (p. 73, J b. in Wat., Dec. 
8, 1677 ; m. May 14, 1704, William Sanderson, b. Sept. 6, 1670, 
s. of Wm. ; his 2d wife. He m. 1, May 14, 1702, Abigail Train, 
b. June 5, 1677, who d. soon after marriage. They removed to 
Sudbury or Framingham after the birth of his 2d child by his 2d 
wife, where they died. (Bond.) 

HER CHILDREN, BY WILLIAM SANDERSON, BORN IN WATERTOWN. 

1. Lydia, b. Dec. 17, 1704. 

2. William, b. April 10, 170G, supposed to have been of Shrewsbury. 

3. dmos, b. in Sudbury; m. April 10, 1732, Ruth Hoar. 

4. Isaac, b. in Sudbury ; m. Dec. 24, ] 740, Kezia Bright, settled in Wat. 



16. Rebecca Shattuck, dau. of Philip, (p. 73,) b. in Wat., 
March 10, 1683 ; m. Nov. 19, 1701, John Underwood, b. in Wat., 
March 6, 1677. He is supposed to have removed to Charlestown 
about 1714. 

HER CHILDREN, BY JOHN UNDERWOOD, RECORDED IN WATERTOWN. 

1. John, b. July 10, 1704. 

2. Rebecca, b. March 22, 1707; m. Samuel Gale, b. Jan. 31, 1705, s. of Abraham 

Gale. He lived in Waltham, and had 8 children ; of whom Samuel, b. May 
6, 1726, m., July 17, 1755, Anna Fiske. (Bond, p. 231.) 



17. Benjamin Shattuck, s. of Philip, (p. 73,) was b. in Wat., 
March 15, 1685, and settled on a farm where Adolphus Brown, 
his great-grandson now lives, as marked on Shield's Map of 
Boston and Vicinity. Here he d. in 1767, ae. 80. Parts of his 
estate were conveyed to him by his father, in 1708 and 1714; 
(Reg. Deeds, Vol. XIX., p. 209;) and other parts were pur- 
chased from others. He was a constable in Cambridge in 1732, 
and other years. His will, dated Sept. 28, 1730, contains a 
codicil, dated Dec. 29, 1754, and proved Dec. 8, 1767. (Midd. 
Prob. Rec. Vol. XXXIX., p. 340.) He bequeathed all his estate 
to his wife Rachel, "so long as she remains my widow," and 
after her marriage or death, to his son Josiah ; he to pay to his 
son Benjamin, 5s. ; to daughter Deliverance Fay, 5s. ; to Sarah, 
£30, "at marriage, or when she is of age;" and to Susanna, 
£30, upon the same conditions. And the last two named daugh- 
ters " shall have the privilege of a convenient fire room, and a 
privilege in the cellar, and likewise the liberty of the well at my 
house, so long as they or either of them shall remain unmarried." 
Before 1754, when the codicil was executed, Benjamin and De- 



86 THIRD GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

liverance Fay had died ; and he then annulled their legacies : 
and, instead, he bequeathed to the children of Deliverance, £13 
65. 8d. His estate was prised at £309 5s. 80?. 

He m. 1, Feb. 20, 1707, his cousin, Deliverance Fay of Marl- 
borough, b. Oct. 7, 1686, (see p. 67.) She d. in Wat., Jan. 22, 
1711, se. 24 y. 3 m. 15 d. 

He m. 2, March 27, 1712, Rachel Clark, b. April 17, 1683, 
dau. of Samuel Clark of Cambridge. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY DELIVERANCE FAY, RECORDED IN WATERTOWN. 

1. Deliverance, b. Dec. 22, 1707 ; m. Dec. 15, 1726, Samuel Fay of Westborough. 

She d. before 1754, leaving children. 

2. Benjamin, b. Jan. 23, 1709; d. unmarried before 1754. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY RACHEL CLARK, RECORDED IN WATERTOWN. 

3. Sarah, b. Jan. 15, 1713; d. Dec. 7, 1713, a?. 10 m. 22 d. 

4. Josiah, b. Feb. 10, 1715 ; m. 1, A. Stone; 2, M. Hastings, 49 

5. Susanna, b. ; m. Jan. 2, 1741, John White of Boston, and had 

1. Susanna, who m. Nehemiah Somes, father of John Somes ; and 2. Hannah, 
who m. Redford Webster. 

6. Sarah, b. Dec. 27, 1719 ; m. Dec. 12, 1739, Jeduthan Fay of Westborough. He 

sold his part of his father Shattuck's estate to Josiah Shattuck. Jan. 31, 1770. 



18. Dr. Joseph Shattuck, s. of Philip, (p. 73,) wasb. in Wat., 
March 6, 1687. He was a physician, and resided in Boston from 
1708 to 1715. He afterwards removed to Wat., and assumed 
the medical practice of his father, where he d. in the full vigor of 
life, May 19, 1729, es. 42 y. 2 m. 13 d. 

He m. in Boston, Oct. 12, 1708, Mary Ladd of that town. 
His first 3 or 4 children were born in Boston, and were baptized 
in the Brattle Street Church, of which the parents were members. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY MARY LADD, BORN IN BOSTON AND WATERTOWN. 

1. Joseph, b. Dec 22, 1709; d. in Boston, Jan. 16, 1710, se. 24 days. 

2. Rebecca, b. Jan. 10,1711; m. Alexander Sampson, 50 

3. Joseph, b. Sept. 22, 1712 

4. Mary, bap. Feb. 5, 1716; d. in Wat, April 17, 1731, 33. 18 years. 

5. Samuel, b. May 29, 1716; m. Sarah Clesson, 51 

6. Sarah, b. Sept. 20, 1718 ; m. June 20, 1737, Robert Collins of Boston. 

7. Nathaniel, b. Dec. 15, 1721 ; Robert Murdock was his guardian in 1735. 

8. John, b. July 6, 1723 ; m. Martha Hammond, 52 

9. William, b. 1725 ; Samuel his brother was his guardian in 1737. 



19. Nathaniel Shattuck, s. of Philip, (p. 73,) was b. in Wat., 
Feb. 14, 1689, where he d. Jan. 13, 1718. A grave-stone is still 
standing in the Waltham burying-ground, near his father's, having 



ISAAC, SARAH AND SUSANNA SHATTUCK. 87 

the following inscription: — "Here lyes y c Body of Nathaniel 
Shattnck, aged 29 years, who Deceased Jan. 13th, 1717-18." 

He m. April 14, 1714, Hepzibah Hastings, bap. Dec. 4, 1687, 
dan. of John Hastings. She m. 2, Sept. 6, 1721, Benjamin 
Stearns of Lexington. (Bond, p. 558.) She had one son by 
Mr. Shattuck. 
1. Nathaniel, b. March 15, 1716 ; bap. March 18, 1716. History not known. 



20. Isaac Shattuck, s. of Dr. Philip, (p. 73,) was b. in Wat., 
and d. in, Westborongh, about 1727, leaving an estate valued at 
£411 13, which was a long time in the probate court, but which 
was finally settled in 1743, and divided between his two daugh- 
ters. 

He m. Mary . She m. 2, Josiah Walker of Westborongh, 

and probably removed to Sutton. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY MART , BORN IN TVESTBOROUGH. 

1. Sybil, b. April 15, 17*24; m. Jonas Child of Westborough. 

2. Mary, b. Aug. 10, 1726; m. Ebenezer Kimball. 



21. Sarah Shattuck, dau. of Dr. Philip, (p. 73,) was b. in 
Wat., Oct. 26, 1696, and died in Waltham in 1745, as. 49. 

She m. May 29, 1716, Samuel Parkhurst, b. April 11, 1688, 
s. of John Parkhurst and Abigail Garfield. He was a selectman 
of Waltham in 1746 and 1747. 

HER CHILDREN, BY SAMUEL PARKHURST, BORN IN WATERTOWN. 

1. Sarah, b. April 15, 1717; m. Nov. 11, 1742, Jonas Wier of Wat. 

2. Samuel, b. Feb. 6, 1719 ; m. Feb. 6, 1744, Kezia Bemis. 

3. John, b. July 15, 1722; d. in 1743, se. 21 years. 

4. Nathaniel, b. Sept. 15, 1724 ; m. Feb. 6, 1745, Eunice Harrington, lived in 

Waltham, and had 15 children. (See Bond, p. 390.) 

5. Lydia, b. Dec. 18, 1725; d. unm., June 22, 1761, ee. 35 y. 6 m. 4 d. 

6. Ruth, b. Jan. 27, 1729 ; m. McMarrow. 

7. Isaac, b. April 2, 1731 ; m. Dec. 4, 1755, Sarah Corey of Lexington. 

8. Abraham, b. June 9, 1732. 

9. Susanna, b. Jan. 1738; d. 1741. 



22. Susanna Shattuck, eldest dau. of William, (p. 76,) m. 
Samuel Holden, who was b. in Wat., April 28, 1674, and d. 
about 1726, his wife surviving him. His father, Justinian Hol- 
den, m. Mary Rutter, dau. of John Rutter of Sudbury, and d. 
Sept., 1671, leaving an estate prised at £1,153 175. He was 
probably the son of Justinian Holden, who, in 1634, at the age 



88 THIRD GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

of 23, embarked at Ipswich, England, for America, and was 
an early proprietor of Watertown, and a freeman in 1657. This 
family lived near Fresh Pond, and owned the place now occu- 
pied by the Fresh Pond Hotel. Three brothers — Samuel, Isaac 
and Joseph Holden, sons of Justinian Holden and Mary Rutter, 
— married three sisters, Susanna, Joanna, and Abigail Shattuck, 
daughters of William Shattuck. 

HER CHILDREN, BY SAMUEL HOLDEN, BORN IN WATERTOWN. 

1. Lydia, bap. Oct. 8, 1699 ; m. May 8, 1721, Benjamin Clark. 

2. Susanna, bap, Oct. 8, 1699. 

3. Samuel, b. Sept. 29. 1701 ; probably d. early. 

4. Mercy, b. March 26, 1704; m. John Strattan. 

5. Mary, b. ; m. April 7, 1730, Reuben Farnsworth. 

6. Abigail, b. May 30, 1710 ; m. Feb. 13, 1734, Samuel Jennison. 

7. William, b. March 4, 1712 ; probably d. early. 

8. Phineas, b. May 12, 1715. 

9. Joseph. 



23. Elizabeth Shattuck, dau. of William, (p. 76,) was b. in 
Wat., Nov. 23, 1684, and probably d. in Marlborough. 

She m. 1, Feb. 23, 1714, Robert Goddard, a weaver of Wat., 
b. in London. He d. in 1716, leaving one child, Elizabeth, b. 
Nov. 5, 1714. 

She m. 2, April 13, 1717, Ephraim Angier, s. of Rev. Samuel 
Angier of Wat. He was a saddler, and d. in Wat., Oct. 19, 
1724, se. 34. 

She m. 3, April 26, 1726, John Holland of Marlborough, and 
they probably afterwards resided in that town. 



24. William Shattuck, s. of William, (p. 76,) was b. in 
Watertown in 1686, and settled near his father. He bought of 
the town a portion of the common land near " King's Common." 
He d. in the prime of life, without issue, leaving a will, dated 
Dec. 10, 1723, eleven days before his death j and an estate, 
which was settled by his father, valued at £436 4s. 6d. His 
grave-stone, standing near the centre of the ancient burying- 
ground, says: — "Here lyes y e Body of Mr. William Shattuck, 
Jun r . who dec d . December y e 21 st 1723, in y e 46 th year of his 
age." He was a worthy man, had held several public offices, 
and was constable and collector of the town on the year of his 
death, then a very responsible and respectable office. 



REV. BENJAMIN SHATTUCK. 89 

He m. Sept. 23, 1708, Hepzibah Hammond, dau. of Lieut. 
John Hammond, who, in 1690, paid the highest tax in the town. 
She m. 2, Sept. 10, 1724, John Robbins of Cambridge. 

ORIGIN OF THE IiITTLrETOIV BRANCHES. 

25. Rev. Benjamin Shattuck, s. of William, (p. 76,) was b. 
in Watertown, July 30, 1687, and d. in Littleton, about 1763, 
the precise date not ascertained. On the 17th Jan., 1709, the 
year in which he was graduated at Harvard College, he engaged 
to keep the "Grammar and English School," at the rate of £30 
per year ; and the town agreed to build a new school-house for 
his accommodation.* He continued the teacher for six years, 
until 1715 ; and in the mean time studied divinity. He was or- 
dained the first minister of Littleton, Dec. 25, 1717. On the 
13th May, 1719, a committee of the proprietors of Littleton, con- 
sisting of Major Jonathan Prescott and Capt. Joseph Bulkley of 
Concord, Capt. Israel Powers of Littleton, Nathaniel Wilder of 
Lancaster, and Ebenezer Lawrence of Groton, "for divers good 
reasons and weighty considerations moving thereto," conveyed 
to him the " ministerial lot, so called," consisting of about one 
hundred acres of upland and mowing, lying on both sides of 
" King Street," now running southerly from the centre of the 
town to the railroad station. His dwelling-house was the first 
on the right of that highway south of the burying-ground, where 
Hay ward Hart well now (1853) lives. His connection with the 
town, as their minister, was dissolved Aug. 30, 1730, though his 
salary was continued until May, 1731. No reasons for the disso- 
lution are given upon the records ; but it appears to have been 
done in mutual good will. He continued to reside there until 
his death, much respected by his townsmen. In 1742, some 
pews were erected in the meeting-house, and the town " voted 
that Mr. Shattuck and his wife set in the front seat." A marble 
monument, erected to his memory in the Littleton burying- 
ground, bears the following inscription :^-" Here sleeps until the 

* According to the Watertown Records, this house was "twenty and five foots in length, and 
twenty foots in breadth, and six foots & a half between joints." " Mr. Caleb Church, docter 
Philip Shattuck, Sam 11 Biglow, Mr. William Shattuck, sen r: and Mr. Joseph Sherman'*' were 
appointed a " committee to cary on the work of building and furnishing the school house." It 
was furnished with " three tables & all so three foorms. 7 ' The whole cost was £35. It was 
situated "within about twenty rods of the middle meeting -house in the town,'"' which, according 
to Dr. Francis, (Hist. Wat., p. 142.) stood "in one of the angles now (1830) formed by the 
intersection of the roads near the houses of Charles Whitney and Joel Pierce — a place some- 
times called the Four Corners." 

12 



90 THIRD GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

resurrection morn, the Rev. Benjamin Shattuck, son of Dr. Philip 
Shattuck of Watertown, the first ordained minister of Littleton. 
Born May 15 ; 1685. Died A. D. 1763, aged 78."* 

He m. Martha Sherman, bap. Sept. 1, 1689. She d. in Lit- 
tleton, but at what date is unknown. Her father Joseph Sher- 
man, Esq., a blacksmith by trade, was a noted public man in 
Watertown. He m. Nov. 18, 1673, Elizabeth Winship, dau. of 
Edward Winship of Cambridge, and was father of William 
Sherman, a shoemaker of Watertown, and grandfather to Hon. 
Roger Sherman, the eminent United States senator from Con- 
necticut. The father of Joseph, Esq. was Capt. John Sherman,f 
a most distinguished citizen of the Colony. He was b. in 1613, 
in Dedham, Essex County, England ; came to America in 1634 : 
was a freeman in 1637 ; a selectman many years ; town clerk 
1648, and in other years ; a noted land surveyor ; steward of 
Harvard College in 1662 ; and was otherwise useful in public 
life. He m. Martha, dau. of Roger Porter, and Grace Cooledge. 
He d. Jan. 25, 1691, ae. 76. She d. Feb. 7, 1701. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY MARTHA SHERMAN; FOUR ELDEST BORN IN WATERTOWN, 
THE OTHERS IN LITTLETON. 

1. Stephen, b. Feb. 10, 171 G; m. Elizabeth Robbins, 53 

2. Martha, b. Jan. 7, 1712 ; m. Samuel Tuttle, 54 

3. Benjamin, b. Dec. 8, 1713 ; m. Dinah Hunt, 55 

4. Timothy, b. ; m. Desire Hall, 56 

5. William, b. Jan. 1, 1718 ; m. Abigail Reed, 57 

6. Sarah, b. Dec. 13, 1719 ; m. Jonathan Dix, 58 

7. Ebenezer, b. Feb. 22, 1722. A tradition has existed, that he went to 

the south part of the State, or to Connecticut, but we have been unable 
to learn his whereabouts. He may have been the one who lived awhile 
in Oxford. 

8. Susanna, b. April 8, 1724; m. Caleb Taylor, 59 

9. Elizabeth, b. Feb. 13, 1726; m. Elias Taylor, 60 

10. Jonathan, b. July, 1728 ; d. Feb. 19, 1745, a?. 16 y. 7 m. 

11. Moses, b. June, 1733; d. Dec. 13, 1737, a). 4 y. 6 m. 

* A tradition has prevailed that Philip Shattuck was the father of Rev. Benjamin Shattuck, as 
stated in this inscription, but evidence has recently been discovered which proves a different 
relationship. The Worcester Registry of Deeds, vol. XXXV., p. 439, contains a conveyance, 
dated Jan. 12, 1748, of a lot of land in " Naragansct township, No. 2," (Westminster.) to Abncr 
Ilolden, from "Benjamin Shattuck of Littleton/' belonging to the " heirs of his honored father, 
Mr. William Shattuck, late of Watertown, deceased. ;; And from old papers in the possession 
of the late David Kendall of Wallham, it appears that his real estate descended to him from 
Philip Shattuck through his son Benjamin Shattuck, and grandson Josiah Shattuck. These 
facts prove that Benjamin ihe son of Philip, resided in Cambridge, and that Benjamin the son of 
William was the minister of Littleton. Sec also the conveyance of the heirs of William Shattuck 
to William Greenleaf, referred to, on the next page, as additional evidence. 

t The American Medical Biography, (Vol. 11., p. 16,) states incorrectly, probably founded 
on tradition, that Martha Sherman was granddaughter of Rev. John Sherman, the first minister 
of Watertown. 



MARY, ABIGAIL. AND JONATHAN SHATTUCK. 91 

26. Mary Shattuck, dau. of Wm., (p. 76,) b. in Watertown, 
d. in Boston, Aug. 18, 1732, se. 43, thirty-nine days after the 
birth of the 9th child. 

She m. June 10, 1714, William Greenleaf, b. in Maiden, 
Feb. 5, 1693, youngest s. of Enoch Greenleaf and Catherine 
Truesdale. He was a hatter in Boston. He m. 2, May 9, 
1733, Ruth Ruggles, by whom he had 3 children — 2 d. in 
infancy. Oliver, the youngest, was father to Oliver Cromwell 
Greenleaf, a bookseller in Boston, who d. Dec. 16, 1843, se. 66. 
In 1733 William Greenleaf bought of the other heirs the home- 
stead of Mr. Shattuck, his father-in-law. (Midd. Deeds, Vol. 
XXXIII., p. 422.) 

HER CHILDREN, BY WILLIAM GREENLEAF, BORN IN BOSTON. 

1. William, b. Sept. 1, 1716 ; d. Sept. 20, 1759, m. 43 y. m. 19 d. 

2. Joseph, b. June 20, 1718; d. in infancy, in 1718. 

3. Joseph, b. Nov. 30, 1720 ; m. Oct. 17, 1749, Abigail Payne, dau. of Rev. 

Thomas Payne of Weymouth ; and had Abigail, Abigail, Joseph, Thomas, 
Mary, Catharine, and Eunice Payne. (See " Greenleaf Family," p. 111.) 

4. Mary, b. May 9, 1722; m. Dec. 19, 1757, John Leverett of Windsor, Vt. 

5. Catherine, b. Nov. 20, 1723. 

6. Susanna, b. Sept. 1, 1725. 

7. Abigail, b. Oct. 29, 1726. History of these 5 daus. unknown. 

8. Elizabeth, b. Oct. 7, 1727. 

9. Hannah, b. Aug. 6, 1729. 

10. Enoch, b. July 9, 1732 ; m. in 1760, Judith Gridley. No issue. 



27. Abigail Shattuck, dau. of William, (p. 76,) m. Feb. 17, 
1715, Joseph Holden, b. Sept. 6, 1683, s. of Justinian Holden. 

HER CHILDREN, BY JOSEPH HOLDEN, BORN IN WATERTOWN. 

1. Joseph, b. Jan. 31,3716. 4. Abner, b. Nov. 2,1722. 

2. Stephen, b. Oct. 21, 1717. 5. Jonathan, b. June 6, 1725. 

3. Abigail, b. Oct. 19,1719. 6. Elizabeth, b sup. April 26, 1730. 



28. Jonathan Shattuck, s. of William, (p. 76,) was b. in 
Watertown, Oct. 16, 1695, where he d. July 17, 1724, <<z. 28 y. 9 
m. 1 d. 

He m. Elizabeth Stearns, b. Sept. 26, 1697, dau. of Na- 
thaniel Stearns. She m. 2, Daniel Bond of Watertown, and d. 
before 1742. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ELIZABETH STEARNS, BORN IN WATERTOWN. 

1. Jonathan, b. May 16, 1721 ; d. July 2, 1724, se. 3 y. 1 m. 16 d. 

2. Elizabeth, b. Oct. 19, 1722 ; d. Feb. 19, 1724, se. 1 y. 4 m. 



92 FOURTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

29. Robert Shattuck, s. of William, (p. 76,) was b. in 
Watertown, Jan. 1, 1698, and settled in Plymouth. He d. at his 
father's in Watertown while on a visit, Dec. 13, 1723, ee. 25 y. 
11 m. 12 d. 

He m. in Plymouth, July 9, 1719, Mary Pratt, b. April 8, 
1695, dau. of Bennajah Pratt and Mary of Plymouth. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY MARY PRATT, BORN IN PLYMOUTH. 

1. Mary, b. March 9, 1720 ; said to have m. a Moulton or Morton. 

2. Robert, b. June 3, 1721 ; m. Ruhamah Cook, 61 

3. Randall, b. April 23, 1723 ; said to have d. unm., or without issue.* 



iv. Jwtjr §tutxnt'wx m)$ Cjnlknt. 

ORIGIN OF THE ELDER PEPPEREIiLi BRANCHES. 

30. Jonathan Shattuck, s. of John, (p. 81,) was b. in 
Groton, June 29, 1693, and d. in Pepperell, Sept. 18, 1771, as. 
78 y. 2 m. 19 d. After the massacre of his father and elder 
brother, already mentioned, he was left, at the early age of six- 
teen, an only son, to take the place of a parent in providing for 
his mother and his six younger sisters ; and he seems to have 
performed the duty with fraternal faithfulness and affection. His 
father's estate was finally settled by him in court, March 26, 
1719 — ten years after his death. The following is an abstract of 
his account on file in the probate office : — 

He charges himself with the inventory, as appraised, £77 04 00 

Payments allowed, viz., — 

" The deceased funeral expenses, £1 00 00 

Administration, 10s. Other expenses, 10s., 1 00 00 

A cow eat in the family, 5 00 00 

2 steers lost in the woods, 3 00 00 

* These children were residents of Plymouth during- their minority. In 1733 Josiah Carver 
was appointed their guardian. The ancestors of their mother were among the original Pilgrims. 
Her grandfather, also named Bennajah Pratt, m. Nov. 29, 1655, Persis Dunham. He was 
probably the son of Phineas Pratt, who d. April 19, 1G80, oe. 90, and grandson of Joshua Pratt, 
one of the third freight of Pilgrims who in 1623 came over in the ships Ann and Little James. 
Phineas Pratt m. in Plymouth in 1630, a daughter of Cuthburt Cuthburtson, — "an intelligent 
Dutchman that understood the English tongue," who had united with the Puritan churcYi in 
Lcyden. Cuthburtson m. Sarah Allerton, a sister of Isaac Allerton, who came in the same ship with 
Pratt Ephraim Pratt, said to have been a grandson of Joshua, d, in Shrewsbury in 1804, se. 
116 years, (Ward.) Persis Dunham was the daughter of John Dunham, who d. March 6, 1668, 
re. 80; and of whom the church records say, "he was an approved servant of God, and a useful 
man in his place, being a deacon in the church at Plymouth/' chosen in 1634. His son John 
d. in 1692, je. 79. 



JONATHAN SHATTUCK. 93 

House built since his death, and other accommodations, . £20 00 00 

Administrator's trouble now, 17 00 

Small children bring up, 10 00 00" 

£40 17 00 

Balance divided, £36 07 00 

One third part to the widow, £12 02 04 

Son a double portion, 6 18 06 

5 daughters, each £3 9 3,. . . 17 06 02 

£36 07 00" 

The account for erecting the house stands thus : — 

" To the frame and boarding, £7 00 00 

To the Chimney, 5 00 00 

The Cellar, 2 00 00 

Shingles, 1 10 00 

Nayles (shingle) 1 00 00 

Shingling the house, 1 04 00 

To carting stones, 09 00 

£18 03 00" 
In the meantime he had built a new house near the Stony- 
Ford- Way, for the accommodation of his mother and her family ; 
and he subsequently bought of the other heirs all their rights in 
their father's estate. This estate he held until 1751, when he 
sold it to Abel Parker, his son-in-law. In 1725 he bought a 
tract of land westerly of the present meeting-house in Pepperell, 
and built upon " Windfall Plain," where the late Capt. Abijah 
Shattuck, his great-grandson, lived. He afterwards made several 
additional purchases, until he possessed 400 to 500 acres, com- 
prising the farm now owned by the town, and those owned by 
Jonathan Shattuck, Thomas C. Shattuck, Henry Jewett, and 
others. Here he acquired a considerable estate as a farmer. He 
was held in high estimation by his fellow-townsmen, and was 
often chosen into public office. He and his wife were both 
members of the church. 

He m. June 25, 1719, Elizabeth Chamberlain, b. May 26, 
1700, dau. of Thomas Chamberlain by Abigail Nutting, half 
sister of John Chamberlain, the hero of Pigwacket fight. (See 
Appendix.) 



94 FOURTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ELIZABETH CHAMBERLAIN, THREE ELDEST BORN IN GROTON, 

THE OTHERS IN PEPPERELL. 



1. Jonathan, b. April 2, 1720 

2. Elizabeth, b. Jan. 12, 1722 

3. John, b. March 12, 1724 

4. Esther, b. May 21, 1726 

5. Kezia, b. June 19, 1728 



m. Kezia Farnsworth, 62 

m. Jedediah Jewett, 63 

m. Elizabeth Shattuck, 64 

m. Abel Parker, 65 

m. July 16, 1747, John Green of Pepperell. 
She d. in childbirth, Dec. 7, 1747, se. 19 y. 5 in. 18 d., leaving no liv- 
ing issue. 

6. Mary, b. Sept. 22, 1730 ; m. Simeon Green, 66 

7. Zaccheus, b. May 26, 1734 ; m. Azubah Chamberlain, 67 

8. Eunice, b. March 5, 1736; m. 1, D. Turner ; 2, E. Perham, . ... 68 

9. Timothy, b. Aug. 8, 1738 ; m. Hannah Nutting, 69 



31. Mary Shattuck, dau. of John, (p. 81, )b. April 11, 1699; 
m. Dec. 8, 1722, John Gilson, b. March 7, 1697, s. of John and 
Sarah, and grandson of Joseph and Mary Gilson, one of the 
original proprietors of Groton. 

HER CHILDREN, BY JOHN GILSON, BORN IN GROTON. 



1. Mary, b. Nov. 17, 1723 

2. John, b. May 12, 1726 

3. David, b. May 7, 1728 

4. Jonathan, b. Aug. 26, 1729 

5. Jeremiah, b. Aug. 1, 1731 

6. David, b. Dec. 7, 1732 

7. Amasa, b. Aug. 25, 1735 

8. Solomon, b. July 17, 1737 

9. Sarah, b. Dec. 22, 1743 



m. Feb. 4, 1742, James Blood, Jr. 

m. 1, Hannah Lawrence ; 2, Prudence Lawrence. 

d. Sept. 1, 1728, a3. 3 m. 24 d. 

d. Oct. 22, 1744, ee. 15 y. 1 m. 26 d. 

d. Oct. 11, 1731, Ee. 2 y. 10 d. 

m. Jan. 15, 1754, Annis Gilson, his cousin. 

m. July 11, 1759, Bulah Phelps. 

m. Mary . Had 10 children. 

m. Nov. 9, 1769, Richard Williams. 



32. Lydia Shattuck, dau. of John, (p. 81,) was b. March 1, 
1704, and d. in Pepperell, Oct. 23, 1783, ae. 79 y. 7 m. 22 d. 

She m. May 22, 1723, Isaac Williams, b. June 19, 1699, s. of 
Thomas and Elizabeth, and grandson of Thomas and Mary Wil- 
liams, one of the first settlers of Groton. He d. in Pepperell, 
May 14, 1773, ae. 75 y. 10 m. 25 d. 

HER CHILDREN, BY ISAAC WILLIAMS, BORN IN GROTON AND PEPPERELL. 

1. Thomas, b. Oct. 24, 1724; m. Jan. 29, 1746, Mary Rolfe. 

2. Lydia, b. Oct. 26, 1726 ; m. March 19, 1745, Phineas Chamberlain. 

3. Jerusha, b. Dec. 29, 1728. 

4. Elizabeth, b. April 23, 1730; m. March 19, 1752, William Eliot. 

5. Isaac, b. May 22, 1732 ; m. May 19, 1757, Elizabeth Tucker. 

6. Sarah, b. Oct. 12, 1734; m. Jan. 21, 1768, Lemuel Lawrence. 

7. Jonathan, b. May 25, 1736. 

8. Anna, b. June 15, 1738 ; m. March 10, 1763, Joseph Sanderson. 

9. Benjamin, b. ; m. Prudence Hardy. 



ELIZABETH SHATTUCK WILLIAM SHATTUCK. 95 

33. Elizabeth Shattuck, dau. of John. (p. 81,) m. Jan. 2, 
1726, Isaac Lakin, b. Dec. 11, 1702, s. of William, and grandson 
of Ensign John Lakin. Isaac was one of the six companions of 
John Chamberlain, from Groton, in the Pigwacket Fight, and 
was wounded on that occasion. # 

HER CHILDREN, BY ISAAC LAKIN, BORN IN GROTON. 

1. Isaac, b. Dec. 6, 1727; m. March 19, 1754, Mary Lawrence. Had 11 

children. 

2. Josiah, b. April 9, 1730. 

3. Simeon, b. Nov. 24, 1732. 

4. Sarah, b. Oct. 22, 1735. 

5. Levi, b. Jan. 7, 1747. 



DESCENDANTS OF T2IE CROTON BRANCMES. 

34. William Shattuck, eldest s. of William, (p. 83,) was b. 
in Watertown in 1689, and d. in Groton, Aug. 1757, ae. 68. He 
lived near Watle's Pond, on a farm partly given to him by his 
father, but enlarged by several purchases made by himself. 
During his lifetime he gave to his children by his first wife what 
he considered their proportion of his estate, and took their quit- 
claim as heirs ; but he made a will dated Aug. 13th, and proved 
Sept. 8, 1757, disposing of his personal property, in which his 
son Ezekiel was made executor, and he and his brother Job were 
the principal heirs. The other children received merely a nom- 
inal sum. (Midd. Rec, Vol. XXVII., p. 4,55.) Ezekiel d. with- 
out issue soon after, and the estate was settled by Job without 
the aid of the probate court. He was baptized upon his own 
profession, April 14, 1717. 

He m. 1, March 15, 1711, Abigail Shattuck. She was the 
dau. of his great uncle Samuel Shattuck, (p. 75,) and was b. in 
Watertown, Oct. 17, 1686, and baptized in that town. She united 
with the church in Groton, Dec. 2, 1716, and d. about 1727. 

* William Lakin, ancestor of the Lakin families, d. in Groton, Dec. 10, 1672, ee. 91. He 
emigrated in his old age from Redington, England, with two of his grandsons — Wm, and John, 
(whose father, Wm., Jr., had d. in England,) and their mother, his daughter-in-law, who had m. 
Wm. Martin for her second husband. They first settled in Reading, but removed to Groton 
and lived near Martin's pond. The eldest, known as Lieut. Wm. Lakin, d. Feb. 22, 1700. He 
m. Lydia Brown of Watertown, sister of Jonathan Brown, who m. Mary Shattuck, (p. 68,) and 
had Jonathan, William, Abraham. Eliab, and Abigail. The youngest, known as Ensign John 

Lakin, lived at " Nod," and d. March 21, 1G97. By his wife Mary he had,— 1. Sarah, b. 

Feb. 4, 16G1, m. Benjamin Willard of Sudbury ; 2. William, b. May 12, 1664, m. Elizabeth , 

(who was father of Isaac, above mentioned, and grandfather of David, who d. in Groton, March 

3, 1846, oe. 92, the oldest man then in town ;) 3. Abigail, b. March 13, 1667, m. Samuel Parker ; 

4. Joseph, b. April 14, 1670, m. May 15, 1695, his cousin Abigail Lakin, above mentioned; 5. 

Benjamin, b. Nov. 6, 1672, m. Elizabeth ; 6. Josiah, b. Sept. 14, 1675; 7. Lydia, m. John 

Sheple. 



96 FOURTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

He m. 2, in 1729, Margaret Lund, said to have been b. in 
Merrimac, N. H., probably a descendant of Thomas Lund, one of 
the earliest settlers of Dunstable. She d. June 13, 1764. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ABIGAIL SHATTUCK, BORN IN GROTON. 

1. William, b. Jan. 25, 1712; m. 1, Ruth ; 2, Experience , . 70 

2. Abigail, b. Nov. 11, 1718; m. June 26, 1739, Isaac Colburn of Dun- 

stable. 

3. Jeremiah, b. Oct. 2, 1721 ; d. in the army, before his father, unm. 

4. Zachariah, b. March 16, 1724; m. Elizabeth Fiske, 71 

5. Sarah, b. Jan. 13, 1726; m. Samuel Lamson ; d. in Saco, Me. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY MARGARET LUND, BORN IN GROTON. 

6. Ezekiel, b. June 12, 1730; d. about 1758, in the French war, unm. 

7. Margaret, b. July 4, 1732; m. 1, J. Bennet; 2, J. Metcalf, . ... 72 

8. Job, b. Feb. 11, 1736; m. 1, S. Hartwell; 2, E. Gragg, ... 73 



35. Hannah Shattuck, dau. of William, (p. 83,) b. in Water- 
town in 1690, m. Dec. 25, 1710, Nathaniel Blood, b. Jan. 16, 
1679, s. of Nathaniel Blood and Hannah Parker. 

HER CHILDREN, BY NATHANIEL BLOOD, BORN IN GROTON. 

1. William, b. Dec. 13, 1711; m. Feb. 11, 1736, Martha Lawrence, (p. 71.) 

Had Martha, b. Jan. 25, 1737. He d. at Crown Point, Nov. 6, 1759, ee. 47. 

2. Nathaniel, b. May 9, 1714. 6. Sarah, b. Jan. 29, 1724. 

3. Jonathan, b. Sept. 5, 1717. 7. Daniel, b. Aug. 5, 1727. 

4. Benjamin, b. Aug. 22, 1719. 8. Mary, b. Jan. 28, 1730. 

5. Hannah, b. Feb. 5, 1721. 9. Shattuck, b. Nov. 21, 1733. He 

was a Lieutenant in a company of Minute Men in the revolution ; m. March 
1, 1756, his cousin Lydia Nutting, b. April 28, 1721. 



ORlGitf OF THE IIHVSDAL.E EJItxlNCIIES. 

36. Capt. Daniel Shattuck, s. of William, (p. 83,) was b. in 
Watertown in 1692, but spent the period of his minority chiefly in 
Groton. From 1719 to 1723 he lived in Worcester, but removed 
about the latter date to Northfield, and about 1736 to Hinsdale, 
within the present bounds of New Hampshire, where he d. March 
17, 1760, aged, as his grave-stone says, " about 67." He was a 
large landholder and a wealthy farmer. He had 215 acres in the 
division of the Northfield Commons, — a larger proportion than 
a majority of the proprietors. His dwelling-house was in the 
southerly part of " Mary's Meadow," so called — about one hun- 
dred rods east of Connecticut River, one mile south of Port 
Hinsdale, one mile southeast of Fort Howe on the west side of 
the river now within the limits of Yernon, and three miles south 
of Fort Dummer within the limits of Brattleboroush. He built 



DANIEL SHATTUCK. 97 

two houses with hewn timbers on either side of a small brook. 
In the upper part were posts for sentinels, and holes to fire through. 
These houses were enclosed with a strong palisade, built with 
timbers and thick plank, surmounted with pickets ; and the en- 
closure was called " Shattuck's Fort." (Doolittle's Narrative.) 
During the wars in 1745, and subsequently, the whole people of 
the neighborhood came to this fort to live. When the men 
labored on their farms or went to church, they carried their guns 
with them, and were always guarded by sentinels. On the 15th 
Aug., 1746, during the absence of Capt. Shattuck at Fort Dum- 
mer, the Indians fired upon four men near the fort, but hurt none. 
March 30, 1747, about thirty or forty Indians came to the fort 
silently in the night, "with fagots of dried spruce with the ends 
dipped in brimstone, and set it on fire. That part of it which 
stood on one side of the brook was burnt ; but owing to a strong 
wind the other part was saved." (Doolittle, pp. 8, 10.) The 
English fired upon and disabled some of the Indians, but they 
made their escape. 

Capts. Shattuck, senior and junior, were large athletic men 
over six feet high, and of great commanding presence. Their 
children were also above the medium size. It is said the Indians 
regarded them with fear, love and veneration, as superhuman 
beings. They generally lived on friendly terms with the savages, 
and their influence over them was always very great. The In- 
dians probably did not design to kill them in this attack, but to 
take them alive and make them chiefs and leaders. 

He m. 1, in Marlborough, April 16, 1719, Martha Serjent, 
then said to have been of Westborough. She d. in Worcester in 
1722. She was the dau. of Digory Serjent, the unfortunate 
pioneer settler of Worcester, who with his wife was killed by the 
Indians in 1704, while his children were carried into captivity. 
(Lincoln's Hist. Worcester, pp. 35-38.) Serjent's will, dated in 
1696, was proved in 1707, but his estate was not settled until 
1721, when parts were assigned to Thomas and John Serjent, to 
Daniel Shattuck, and to Daniel and Mary Serjent, then in Canada. 
Mr. Shattuck was allowed £20 for building a house or "hovel," 
— as log-houses were sometimes called — on lands set off to John 
Serjent. On the 20th Dec, 1721, Mr. Shattuck sold his right in 
the common land in Worcester to Moses Leonard. 
13 



98 FOURTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

He m. 2, in Northfield, May 7, 1724, Rebecca Boltwood, b. 
Aug. 1, 1691, dau. of Sergeant Samuel Boltwood of Hadley and 
Sarah Lewis, dau. of Capt. Wm. Lewis of Farmington, Conn. 
Sergeant Boltwood was killed at the sacking of Deerfield, Feb. 
28, 1704. Mrs. Shattuck d. in Hinsdale, March 16, 1757, ae. 65 
y. 7 m. 15 d. She was interred with her husband in the family 
burying-ground located on the old Shattuck farm, where have 
been buried several successive generations of the race ; and 
where there are now existing several monuments erected to their 
memory. 

CAPT. SHATTUCK'S CHILD, BY MARTHA SERJENT, BORN IN WORCESTER. 

1. Sarah, only child by his first wife, was a single woman of Westborough in 

1744, and then sold to Benj. Flagg " one fourth part of the land in Worcester 
set off to her uncle Daniel Serjent, late of Canada deceased, which land 
descended to my said uncle from my grandfather Digory Serjent, late of 
Worcester, deceased." (Worcester Deeds, Vol. XVIII., p. 230.) 

HIS CHILDREN, BY REBECCA BOLTWOOD, BORN IN NORTHFIELD. 

2. Martha, b. April 2, 1725 ; m. David Rider, 74 

3. Daniel, b. April 11, 1727; m. 1, M. Smith; 2, L. Smith, 75 

4. Phebe, b. Dec. 27,1729; m. Reuben Ingram, 76 

5. Gideon, b. Oct. 20, 1732 ; m. Lois Brown, 77 



37. Ruth Shattuck, dau. of William, (p. 83,) b. in Groton, 
Oct. 1694; m. Dec. 13, 1711, Ebenezer Nutting, b. Nov. 20, 
1686, s. of John and Mary Nutting, and grandson of John and 
Sarah Nutting, one of the original proprietors of Groton. 

HER CHILDREN, BY EBENEZER NUTTING, BORN IN GROTON. 

1. James, b. April 10, 1713. G.David, b. Aug. 20, 1724. 

2. Ruth, b. May 12, 1715. 7. Jacob, b. Feb. 9, 1728. 

3. Abigail, b. Feb. 8,1718. 8. Benajmin, b. Dec. 30,1730. 

4. Ebenezer, b. Nov. 24, 1719. 9. Aaron, bap. Sept. 1734. 

5. Lydia, b. April 28, 1721. 10. Phebe, b. May 28, 1737. 



ORIGIN OF THE MARLBOROUGH BRANCHES. 

38. John Shattuck, s. of William, (p. 83,) was b. in Water- 
town in 1696. He was a mason and farmer, and first settled in 
Shrewsbury, but exchanged places in 1723, with John Bigelow of 
Marlborough, and removed to the latter town and occupied the 
" Farms," (see note, p. 67,) where he d. about 1759. He admin- 
istered on his father's estate in Groton, and was a highly intelli- 
gent man. 



SAMUEL SHATTUCK JAMES SHATTUCK. 99 

He m. 1, Dec. 24, 1716, Silence Allen of Marlborough. 

He m. 2, Oct. 23, 1754, Mary Newton, widow, of South- 
borough. She d. June 4, 1760, bequeathing her property to her 
ten children by her first husband. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY SILENCE ALLEN, BORN IN SHREWSBURY AND MARLBOROUGH. 

1. Abigail^ b. Oct. 27, 1717; b. in Marlborough. 

2. John, b. Feb. 7, 1722 ; b. in Shrewsbury ; m. Abigail Morse, . . 78 

3. Thomas, bj March 3, 1724 ; m. Elizabeth Parmenter, 79 

4. Samuel, b. May 22, 1726. 

5. Ephraim, b. April 8,1728; m. Elizabeth Jackson, 80 

6. Silas, b. Aug. 21, 1738; m. Sarah Jackson, 81 



DESCENDANTS OF THE YOUNGER PEPPERELL BRANCHES. 

39. Samuel Shattuck, s. of Samuel, (p. 84,) was b. in Groton, 
April 7, 1696, and d. intestate in Pepperell, March 4, 1775, se. 
78 y. 10 m. 27 d. He was a farmer, and settled on the west side 
of Nashua River, where Walter Spaulding now (1853) lives. 
His brothers and sisters all (with one exception, perhaps,) settled 
in that town, and were extensive owners of real estate. He was 
one of the first assessors in Pepperell after its separate incorpora- 
tion, and was otherwise distinguished in its public affairs. He 
and his first wife were members of the church in Groton ; and 
from thence were dismissed at the organization of the church in 
Pepperell, and were amongst its original members. It is stated 
upon the records that his eldest son was the first white child 
born on the west side of Nashua River. 

He m. 1, Jan. 27, 1726, Anna Williams, b. April 1, 1702, dau. 
of Thomas Williams, and sister of Isaac, (p. 94.) She d. Aug. 
19, 1757, as. 55 y. 4 m. 18 d. 

He m. 2, March 12, 1761, Sarah Pierce. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ANNA WILLIAMS, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Samuel, b. Sept. 25, 1726; m. Elizabeth Wesson, 82 

2. Benjamin, b. Dec. 9,1728; m. Abigail Farnsworth, 83 

3. Anna, b. April 13, 1731 ; m. Simon Blood, 84 

4. Elizabeth, b. Jan. 11, 1734; m. Isaac Baldwin, 85 

5. Isaac, b. Sept. 1,1736; m. Hannah Hall, 86 

6. Rachel, b. Aug. 21, 1738 ; m. Sampson Farnsworth, 87 

7. Philip, b. Jan. 18, 1745 ; m. Mercy Butterfield, 88 



40. James Shattuck, s. of Samuel, (p. 84,) was b. in Groton, 
Feb. 9, 1700, and was a farmer in Pepperell, where he d. May 1, 



100 FOURTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

1769, £e. 69 y. 2 m. 22 d. He left a will, proved Sept. 20, 1769, 
but the final settlement of his estate was dated Sept. 8, 1787. 
He lived southerly of his brother Samuel ; and it is said his 
house was burnt while the family were absent at church. 

He m. Nov. 22, 1726, Sarah Chamberlain, b. Aug. 4, 1709, 
dau. of Thomas C. and sister of Elizabeth, (p. 93.) She d. Aug. 
3, 1781, ee. 72. 

HIS CHILDREN, BT SARAH CHAMBERLAIN, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Sarah, b. Sept. 16, 1727; m. Moses Spaulding, and is said to have 

had one child ; but neither are mentioned in her father's or brother's 
wills. They probably d. before 1769. She united with the church 
in 1758. 

2. James, b. Sept. 26, 1730 ; m. Phebe Tucker, 89 

3. Ruth, b. Jan. 7, 1733 ; m. Nathaniel Parker, Jr., 90 

4. Thomas, b. Jan. 29, 1736 ; m. Dec. 30, 1762, Rebecca Farmer. He d. 

suddenly while sitting at the dinner- table with his wife, July 21, 1807, 
a3. 71 y. 5 m. 22 d. No issue. His will, proved Oct. 21, 1807, gives 
his property to his four brothers and three sisters then living. His wife 
joined the church in 1785; and in 1811 presented to it two silver cups 
for the communion service. She d. June 16, 1815, se. 80. 

5. Jemima, b. July 6, 1738 ; m. in 1777, Josiah Spaulding. 

6. Reuben, b. April 21, 1741 ; m. Lydia Parker, 91 

7. Abigail, b. May 8, 1744; m. in 1778, Moses Blood, b. April 29, 1750. 

She d. Sept. 11, 1810, having had, 1. Moses, b. Oct. 21, 1781, m. 

llildreth of Westford ; 2. Abigail, b. March 14, 1786, m. Leonard 
Blood. 

8. Joseph, b. Oct. 1, 1747; m. Mary Lamson, 92 

9. Moses, b. Jan. 24, 1752 ; in. Abigail Woods, 93 



41. Capt. Jeremiah Shattuck, s. of Samuel, (p. 84,) was 
b. in Groton, June 11, 1703, and settled in the centre of Pep- 
perell as a blacksmith, where he d. Aug. 2, 1798, se. 95 y. 
1 m. 21 d. He was often chosen a selectman, and to other 
town offices ; commanded a military company ; and was other- 
wise distinguished as a leading public man, and as a valuable 
citizen. 

He m. 1, July 2, 1723, Sarah Parker, b. April 12, 1705, 
dau. of Nathaniel and Lydia Parker, granddau. of Joseph, and 
great-gran ddau. of Joseph Parker, one of the original proprietors 
and settlers of Chelmsford and Groton. She d. June 8, 1789, 
having lived in the marriage state nearly 66 years. Her grave- 
stone bears the following inscription : — 



JEREMIAH SHATTUCK ELIZABETH SHATTUCK. 101 

"In memory of 
Mrs. SARAH SHATTUCK, 
wife of Capt. JEREMIAH SHATTUCK, 
who after a lengthy course of 
industry, prudence and sobriety 
died June y e 8th 1789 in the 85th 
year of her age. 
From her descended 10 children 60 
grandchildren and 54 great- 
grandchildren. 
The days of our years are three score years and ten ; 
and if by reason of strength they be fourscore years, yet is 
their strength labor and sorrow, for it is soon cut off 
and we fly away.* 
He m. 2, Feb. 28, 1792, Ruth Bixby. The Columbian Centinel 
newspaper of March 10th following, chronicles his second marriage 
thus : — " In Pepperell, Capt. Jeremiah Shattuck, aged 90, to Mrs. 
Ruth Bixby, aged 75." 

HIS CHILDREN, BY SARAH PARKER, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Nathaniel, b. Aug. 12, 1724; m. Hannah Symonds, 94 

2. Jeremiah, b. April 11, 1726; m. 1, L. Lakin; 2, R. Shattuck, ... 95 

3. Elizabeth, b. May 17, 1728; m. John Shattuck, (Family 64) 

4. Oliver, b. Aug. 15, 1730. He was a farmer on "Oak Hill," where 

he d. without issue, July, 1827, se. 96 y. 11 m. He m. Mary Reed, 
who d. Aug. 13, 1822, se. 89. 

5. Sarah, b. Dec. 8, 1732; m. Patrick White, 96 

6. David, b. Feb. 19, 1735; m. 1, S. Burt; 2, L. Sawtell, .... 97 

7. Solomon, b. June 9,1737; m. Hep/ibah Perkins, 98 

8. Mhemiah, b. Feb. 21, 1740 ; m. Betsey Hosley, 99 

9. Sybil, b. 1743; m. John White, 100 

10. Parker, b. ; d. unm. Date of birth and death unknown. 



42. Elizabeth Shattuck, dau. of Samuel, (p. 84,) was b. July 
22, 1705, and d. in Pepperell, July 11, 1784, se. 78 y. 11 m. 19 d. 

She m. Nov. 14, 1732, John Shed, b. in Grot., Dec. 21, 1706, s. 
of Sam. Shed. He d. in Pep. of a fever, Oct. 21, 1764, se. 57 y. 10 m. 

HER CHILDREN, BY JOHN SHED, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Elizabeth, b. Sept. 1, 1733 ; m. Feb. 20, 1752, Samuel Gilson of Pep. : 8 chil. 

2. Rachel, b. Jan. 29, 1736; m. April 5, 1757, Oliver Farmer of Billerica. 

3. Sarah, b. July 17, 1738; m. Dec. 21, 1758, James Hosley of Townsend. 

4. John, b. Dec. 20, 1740; m. Dec. 20, 1764, Esther Wright of Hollis. 

5. David, b. March 1, 1742; m. Feb. 4, 1773, Lucy Blood of Groton. 

6. Samuel, b. July 22, 1745. 7. Joseph, b. May 19, 1748. 

* It has been stated, (Butler's History of Groton, pp. 285, 421,) that Sarah Parker was the 
daughter of Capt. James Parker, born after he was 80 years of age ; but evidence has been dis- 
covered which proves a different ancestry. See some notice of the Parkers in the Appendix. 



102 FOURTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

43. Ruth Shattuck, dau. of Samuel, (p. 84,) b. in Groton, 
Feb. 6, 1709; m. Nov. 14, 1727, Jacob Ames, b. 1703, and lived 
on the west side of Nashua River, below Stony-Ford- Way. He 
is supposed to have been the one killed by the Indians about 

1757.* 

HER CHILDREN, BY JACOB AMES, RECORDED IN GROTON. 

1. Jacob, b. Dec. 12, 1728; m. Jan. 24, 1751, Sarah Parker, and had, 1. Sa- 

rah, b. Aug. 14, 1754 ; 2. Jacob, b. Dec. 14, 1756. 

2. Samuel, b. Feb. 11, 1732. 6. Jonathan, b. July 5, 1743. 

3. Ruth, b. April 23, 1735. 7. John, b. May 15, 1746. 

4. James, b. March 21, 1739. 8. Elizabeth, b. June 13, 1749. 

5. Elijah, b. March 27, 1741. 9. David, b. Oct. 7, 1752. 



44. John Shattuck, s. of Samuel, (p. 84.) was b. Jan. 21, 
1711. He was a farmer, and settled on the road leading north- 
erly from the meeting-house in Pepperell, where he d. Dec. 15, 
1785, 3d. 74 y. 10 m. 24 d. He left a will, and property valued 
at $997 17. He was one of the selectmen in 1760, 1767, and 
1768, and was otherwise useful as a public man, and respected as 
a private citizen. His house was one of the garrison houses 
which were maintained even after 1750. Rev. Mr. Emerson, 
who was ordained in 1747, says, in a manuscript sermon now 
before us: "This was a frontier place. Since my residence here 
we have had garrisons and soldiers allowed by government ; and 
have been obliged to carry our arms to the house of God, when 
we assembled for worship." It is said that Mr. Emerson, in one 
of his pastoral visits to Mr. Shattuck. urged him to set up family 
worship, and said "he should not leave him until he began the 
duty." From this or some other cause it was commenced and 
continued through life. 

He m. 1, Dec. 11, 1739, Sarah Hobart, b. March 4, 1718. 

* Mr. Butler, (History of Groton, p 111,) says, "An Indian had been seen, for several days, 
larking' about the town, it was conjectured, upon some evil design. Mr. Ames, who lived on 
the intervale, on the west side of Nashua River, now owned by John Boynton, Esq., went into 
his pasture to catch his horse. Discovering the Indian, he ran for his house 3 the Indian pursued 
and shot him as he entered his gate. The dead body prevented the gate's closing, as it would 
otherwise have done of itself, and the Indian pressed in to enter the house, v. here Ames had a 
son and daughter. The son seized his gun, and shot at him as he entered the gate. The ball, 
striking the latch of the door, split, and one part of it wounded the Indian, but not severely. As 
the son attempted to close the door against the enemy, after the shot, the Indian thrust his foot 
in, and prevented. The son called to his sister to bring his father's gun from the bedside, and a*, 
the same time striking the Indian's foot with the breach of his gun, compelled him to withdraw 
it, and closed the door. While the Indian was in the act of reloading his gun, the young man 
found means to shoot through a crevice and killed him. Two men, at work, about a mile distant 
in a mill, Ezra and Benjamin Farnsworth, hearing the reports of the guns, and suspecting the 
cause thereof, were soon at the place, and found the bodies of Ames and the Indian both weltering 
in their blood. This is the last man killed by an Indian in the neighborhood of Groton." 



JOHN SHATTUCK DAVID 6HATTUCK. 103 

She d. April 6, 1755, 27 days after the birth of her seventh child, 
a3. 37 y. 1 m. 2 d. 

He m. 2, Dec. 28, 1757, Lydia Hobart, b. Nov. 12, 1729. 
She d. May 29, 1814, se. 84 y. 6 m. 17 d. These two wives 
were cousins, the former the dau. of Peter Hobart and Sarah 

; and the latter the dau. of Gershom Hobart and Lydia 

Nutting, (dau. of James Nutting and Lydia Longley, page 80,) 
and both granddaus. of Rev. Gershom Hobart, minister of Groton, 
and great-granddaus. of Rev. Peter Hobart of Hingham. Both 
were members of the church. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY SARAH HOBART, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Maria, b. Sept. 26, 1740 ; d. unm., April, 1826, se. 85 y. 7 m. 

2. Martha, b. June 29, 1745 ; m. James Blood, Jr., 101 

3. Peter, b. April 2, 1748 ; d. unm., of consumption, June 17, 1774, se. 

26 y. 2 m. 15 d. 

4. Abel, b. Feb. 15, 1750; m. Hannah Hobart, 102 

5. Jonas, b. July 23, 1751 ; m. Bridget Colburn, 103 

6. Lucy, b. May 4, 1753; m. Dec. 14, 1786, Daniel Tenney of Marl- 

borough, and lived in Hancock, N. H. Had Shadrach and Meshach. 

7. Asa, b. March 3, 1755 ; d. Aug. 2, 1757, je. 2 y. 4 m. 29 d. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY LYDIA HOBART, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

8. Lydia, b. May 9, 1760 ; m. Isaac Blood, 104 

9. Asa, b. May 21, 1762; m. Anna Wright, 105 

10. Israel, b. June 17, 1764 ; m. Edith Patch 106 



45. Ensign David Shattuck, s. of Samuel, (p. 84,) was b. in 
Groton, Aug. 4, 1713, and settled as a farmer about a mile north 
of the meeting-house in Pepperell, on the place now occupied by 
J. Hovey, where he d. of consumption, April 29, 1774, ae. 60 y. 
8 m. 25 d. He left a will, proved July 5, 1774. He held a very 
reputable social position among his fellow-townsmen. 

He m. 1, Feb. 25, 1736, Dorothy Yarnum, b. 1715. She d. 
Dec. 23, 1756, as. 41, on the 20th day after childbirth. She 
united with the church in 1756. 

He m. 2, Jan. 10, 1758, Esther Woods, widow of Moses 
Woods. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY DOROTHY VARNUM, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. David, b. Oct. 11, 1736; d. Oct. 1, 1758, in the army, at Albany, 

N. Y., ge. 22. 

2. Simeon, b. Sept. 12, 1738 ; m. Lydia Jewett, 107 

3. Dolly, b. Sept. 28, 1740 ; m. Josiah Wright, 108 

4. Levi, b. Aug. 17, 1742 ; m. Margaret Robbins, 109 

5. Phebe, b. June 22, 1744; m. March 10, 1774, John Needham; lived 



104 FOURTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

in Billerica, Townsend, and other places. Had John, Varnum, Claris- 
sa, and Dolly. 

6. Hannah, b. May 16, 1746; drowned at Patucket Falls, aged about 19. 

7. Lydia, b. Aug. 3, 1748 ; m. Timothy Hosley, 110 

8. Sarah, b. Sept. 22, 1750 ; m. Isaac Boynton, Ill 

9. Mary, b. April 13, 1752; m. John Parker, 112 

10. Elijah, b. Oct. 3, 1754 ; m. Olive Reed, 113 

11. Jonas, b. Dec. 2, 1756; m. Anna Robbins, 114 

46. Sarah Shattuck, dau. of Samuel, (p. 84,) b. Dec. 11, 
1717 ; m. April 26, 1739, James Green, b. Jan. 20, 1709, s. of 
Eleazer and Elizabeth Green. 

HER CHILDREN, BY JAMES GREEN, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Sarah, b. Dec. 20, 1739; m. March 16, 1762, Nehemiah Jewett. 

2. James, b. Sept. 5, ; m. Sept. 9, 1766, Priscilla Hartwell. 

3. Mary, b. March20, 1748 ; m. March 22, 1774, Caleb Jewett. She d. 1782. 

4. Elizabeth, b. Oct. 11, 1750. (See Butler, pp. 404, 472, 473.) 

47. Rachel Shattuck, dau. of Samuel, (p. 84,) was b. June 
9, 1719, united with the church in 1758, and d. in Ashburnham, 
Dec. 12, 1796, se. 77 y. 6 m. 3 d. She m. about 1741, Nehemiah 
Hob art, b. March 13, 1717, son of Shebuel, and grandson of 
Rev. Gershom Hobart, a cousin of Sarah and Lydia, (p. 103.) 
He was a leading man in public matters in Pepperell ; many 
years one of the selectmen, and town clerk from 1774 to 1777, 
and 1779. The church records say he was "killed by a fall or 
by apoplexy," Jan. 5, 1789, se. 71 y. 9 m. 22 d. 

HER CHILDREN, BY NEHEMIAH HOBART, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. JVehemiah,b. Oct. 4, 1742; d. March 7, 1758, a?. 15 y. 5 m. 3 d. 

2. Caleb, b. April 16, 1744. 6. Elizabeth, b. June 18, 1753. 

3. Shebuel, b. Dec. 15,1746. 7. Joel, b. March 31, 1756. 

4. Daniel, b. Feb. 24,1749. 8. Huldah, b. Aug. 8, 1759; d. 

5. Rachel, b. April 1,1751. 9. Huldah, b. Dec. 10,1761. 

ORIGIN OF TBIE AKDOVER BRANCHES. 

48. Joseph Shattuck settled upon a farm which he bought 
partly in 1728 of Stephen Barrett, and partly in 1731 of Zebadiah 
Chandler, in the west parish of Andover, near the Merrimac 
River, where he resided during the remainder of his life. His 
parentage is involved in some doubt. Some have conjectured 
that he might have been descended from Samuel Shattuck of 
Salem ; but a more careful examination has showed that the 
name in that line became extinct, and that this conjecture is not 



JOSEPH SHATTUCK — JOSIAH SHATTUCK. 105 

well founded. The similarity of family names and other facts 
render it highly probable that he descended from William Shat- 
tuck, our own progenitor, though we have been unable from 
records to prove the exact relationship. He might have been the 
son of Samuel of Watertown, (p. 77,) or more probably of Sam- 
uel of Groton, (p. 84,) though his birth in either case may not 
have been recorded. According to his age at death, if stated 
correctly upon the records, he must have been born about the 
beginning of the year 1707. There was an interval of four 
years from 1705 to 1709, between the births of Elizabeth and 
Ruth, daughters of Samuel Shattuck, during which this Joseph 
was born. Upon this probability we have placed his family and 
descendants in this connection, as part of these Memorials. He 
d. March 21, 1772, in the 66th year of his age, leaving a will, 
dated June 6, 1761, and proved April 7, 1772. Estate appraised 
at £232 10. (Essex Records, Vol. XLVIL, p. 189.) 

He m. June 3, 1728, Joanna Chandler, dan. of Zebediah and 
Sarah Chandler. She was b. in Andover in 1710, and d. there, 
Aug., 1792, as. 82. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY JOANNA CHANDLER, BORN IN ANDOVER. 



1. Hannah, b. July 14, 1729 

2. Joseph, b. Nov. 27, 1731 

3. Isaac, b. Mar. 24, 1733 

4. Zebediah, b. Oct. 26, 1736 

5. Sarah, b. May 9, 1739 

6. Abiel, b. Nov. 27, 1741 

7. Elizabeth, b. Oct. 7, 1743 

8. Mary, b. July 13, 1746 

9. Elizabeth, b. Oct. 9, 1749 



m. Samuel Stevens, 115 

m. Anna Johnson, 116 

m. Mary Barnard, 117 

m. 1, E. Abbott; 2, S. Chandler, ... 118 

m. John Barnard, 119 

d. Nov. 12, 1742, Ee. 11 m. 15 d. 
d. Dec. 16, 1747, se. 4 y. 2 m. 9 d. 
m. Thomas Phelps, 
d. March 11, 1753, se. 3 y. 5 m. 2 d. 



49. Josiah Shattuck, only surviving s. of Benjamin, (p. 86,) 
was b. in Watertown, Feb. 20, 1715, and d. in West Cambridge, 
about 1779 or 80, ae. 64. He was a farmer, and become possessed 
by inheritance or purchase of the real estate of his father north- 
erly of the Waverley station on the Fitchburg Railroad, now oc- 
cupied by Adolphus Brown, David Kendall, and others. He was 
also extensively engaged in the business of a butcher. In these 
different occupations he acquired a large estate in this neighbor- 
hood and elsewhere. 

He m. 1, March 28, 1744, Abigail Stone of Lexington, b. Sept. 
26, 1716, dau. of Joseph and Mary Stone. She d. about 1750. 
14 



106 FOURTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

He m. 2, Jan. 11, 1753, Mary Hastings, — a twin child. She 
d. suddenly, date unknown. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ABIGAIL STONE, BORN IN CAMBRIDGE. 

1. Josiah, b. Oct. 13, 1744; d. in infancy. 

2. Benjamin,b. Feb. 19, 1746; d. unm., said to be 25 years old. 

3. Susanna, b. Feb. 28, 1748 ; d. young. 

HIS CHILD, BY MARY HASTINGS, BORN IN CAMBRIDGE. 

4. Susanna, b. Dec. 2, 1756 ; m. Joshua Kendall, 120 



50. Rebecca Shattuck, dau. of Dr. Joseph, (p. 86,) was b. in 

Boston, Jan. 10, 1711, and m. Oct. 6, 1724, at the early age of 13 

y. 8 m. 26 d., Alexander Sampson. Tradition represents her to 

have been of a precocious development and of remarkable beauty. 

" Twice seven consenting years had shed 

Their utmost bounty on her head." 

Mr. Sampson is said to have been a reputable gentleman from 
London, who had visited this country for the benefit of his 
health, with an intention of a speedy return ; but meeting with 
the beautiful Miss Shattuck, her attractions were too irresistible to 
allow him to carry out his purpose. He married and remained here ; 
but while upon a pleasure excursion in Boston harbor, his boat was 
attacked by a shark, and he was tipped overboard and devoured. 

HER CHILDREN, BY ALEXANDER SAMPSON, BORN IN BOSTON. 

1. Elizabeth, b. April 9, 1728 ; m. Oliver Richards of Providence, R. 1. 

2. Alexander, b. April 29, 1729; m. May 23, 1754, Hepzibah Hastings, b. April 

1, 1737 ; dau. of Samuel Hastings of Newton. He first settled in Cambridge, 
but removed to Providence. He had eight children, whose baptisms are 
entered upon the records of Christ Church in Boston ; of whom Stephen, b. 
March 7, 1767, m. Nov. 19, 1787, Mehitable Morse, and had nineteen chil- 
dren- George Sampson of Cincinnati is one of them.* 

3. John, b, ; d. leaving two daughters. One m. Skinner of Roxbury 

and Dedham ; the other m. Tyler of Foxborough. 

4. % m. Billings of Providence. 

* Mr. Sampson of Cincinnati supposes himself to be one of the heirs to a large property in 
London, once called Sampson's Gardens. This estate was appropriated by Act of Parliament 
to the London Dock Company ; and the payment therefor deposited in the Bank of England 
for the absent heirs. But it cannot be obtained unless they can legally trace their ancestry, and 
show an exact connection with the last possessors of the property. This evidence he attempted 
to obtain in London in 1343, but without success. " Mr. Wm. Thompson, a merchant of 
London, formerly paying clerk of the London Dock Company, told me when I was in London,*' 
says Mr. Sampson, " that he had paid into the bank in instalments the amount of the appraise- 
ment for the heirs of the property — that the amount was large ; and, continued he, it is there 
now for you with forty years' interest attached to it."' It is very probable that the descendants 
of the beautiful Rebecca will be none the richer for this estate. So far as they are concerned 
it may be a "castle in the air/' like most other similar traditionary legacies. But if there be 
really any substance to it, and there seems to be a strong presumption in its favor, they had 
better be content as they are ; for the longest life is hardly long enough, and the largest purse is 
hardly rich enough, to commence and to terminate a chancery suit at law in the English courts 
for its recovery. Every one should be assured that, no estate can be obtained from England 
except in a legal way. and upon legal proof} and the difficulty or impossibility of obtaining 
such evidence should prevent such claims being made. 



SAMUEL SHATTUCK JOHN SHATTUCK. 107 

ORIGIN OF THE DEERFIELU BRANCHES. 

51. Samuel Shattuck, s. of Dr. Joseph, (p. 86,) was b. in 
Watertown, May 29, 1716, and d. in Montague, Dec. 29, 1760, 
ae. 44 y. 7 m. He was probably the Samuel Shattuck who was 
a proprietor of Petersham at its first incorporation, (Wilson's Ad- 
dress, pp. 15, 88.) He afterwards settled in Deerfleld. His eldest 
son served a campaign in the French war ; and on his return 
brought home the small pox, and gave it to both his parents. 
The mother and son recovered, but the father died. So far as 
the information contained in this volume shows, the name of Shat- 
tuck, among the descendants of Dr. Philip, his grandfather, has 
been preserved only in the line of this Samuel. In the other 
branches it appears to have become extinct. 

He m. Dec. 4, 1740, Sarah Clesson, b. Jan. 10, 1722, dau. of 
Joseph Clesson and Hannah Arms of Northampton, and granddau. 
of Matthew Clesson and Mary Phelps, who were m. in 1670. Her 
will, dated Sept. 14, 1785, appoints her kinsman Eliakim Arms her 
executor, and leaves legacies to 10 children or their representatives. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY SARAH CLESSON, BORN IN DEERFIELD. 

1. Samud, b. Sept. 18, 1741 ; m. Chloe Field, 121 

2. Sarah, b. Jan. 17, 1743 ; m. Daniel Smith of Sunderland. 

3. Joseph, b. Oct. 6, 1745; d. Feb. 11, 1746, se. 4 m. 5 d. 

4. William, b. Aug. 31, 1747; m. Lydia Allis, 122 

5. Joseph, b. Sept. 29, 1749; m. Chloe Scott, 123 

6. Oliver, b. July 29, 1751 ; m. Lucy Parker, 124 

7. Hannah, b. Feb. 22,1753; m. Barnas Cooley. She had d. before 1785, 

leaving two children, — Benjamin and Tirza. 

8. Mary, b. May 22. 1755; m. Barzillia Wood. She had d. before 1785, and 

had then living, Samuel, Cynthia, and Mary. 

9. Joanna, b. May 20, 1757. She was unmarried in 1785. 

10. Lucinda,b. Mar. 30, 1759; m. Seth Clark. 

11. Submit, b. May 8, 1761 ; a posthumous child. She m. Joseph Goodrich, 

and d. in Hanover, N. H., about ]800, leaving two children, Oliver and Han- 
nah. The latter m. R. K. Hutchins and lives in Ohio. Mr. Goodrich was 
b. Dec. 22, 1761, and d. in Hanover, Jan. 28, 1840, se. 78. He m. 2, Lucy 
Bishop, by whom he had Charles Bishop Goodrich, now a counsellor at law 
in Boston. 



52. John Shattuck, s. of Dr. Joseph, (p. 86,) was b. in Wat., 
July 6, 1723, and resided in Roxbury, near Brookline, where he 
d. about 1788, se. 65. 

He m. in Newton, Aug. 29, 1749, Martha Hammond, b. April 



108 FOURTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

27, 1721, a twin dau. of Lt. Thomas Hammond and Sarah Grif- 
fin of Newton. She d. in Boston in 1798, ae. 77. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY MARTHA HAMMOND, BORN IN NEWTON AND BROOKLINE. 

1. William, b. Dec. 24, 1749 ; m. Martha Parker, 125 

2. Martha, b. ; m. Daniel Star, who was b. in Dedham, and re- 

sided in Roxbury, where he d., leaving 1. Martha, who m. Amos Fitch, and 
d. without issue ; and 2. Mary, who m. Benjamin May. 

3. John, b. He was a partner with his brother Wm. in a mer- 

cantile house in Martinique, W. Indies, where he d. unm. in 1783. 

4. Polly, b. ; m . Dr. Gridley Thatcher of Abington, and d. 

March 4, 1825, without issue. 

DESCENDANTS OP THE IilTTJLB TOiV BRANCHES. 

53. Stephen Shattuck, s. of Rev. Benjamin, (p. 90,) was b. in 
Watertown, Feb. 10, 1710, and settled as a farmer in Littleton. 
Near the close of life he removed to Templeton and resided with 
his son. He d. suddenly, June, 1801, ae. 91 y. 5 m., in a by-way, 
while going from thence to Westminster, probably by apoplexy. 
His body was found and buried July 4th. He was a man of great 
physical and mental powers, and a warm patriot. On the memo- 
rable 19th of April, 1775, after he was sixty-five years of age, he 
shouldered his gun and marched to Concord, to share the dangers 
of that eventful day, and followed the retreating enemy to Cam- 
bridge. 

He m. Sept. 3, 1734, Elizabeth Robbins of Westford. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ELIZABETH ROBBINS, BORN IN LITTLETON. 

1. Stephen, b. May 14, 1736; graduated at Harvard College in 1756; and d. 

unm. in Littleton, Sept. 20, 1799, se. 63 y. 4 m. 6 d. He kept school occa- 
sionally, and studied divinity, but was never ordained. 

2. Benjamin, b. Nov. 11,1742; m. Lucy Barron, 126 

3. Elizabeth, b. ; m. Nathan Kinsman, 127 

4. Hannah, b. March, 1747 ; m. Solomon Cook, 128 

5. Timothy, b. May 21, 1749; m. Elizabeth Fletcher, 129 

54. Martha Shattuck, dau. of Rev. Benjamin, (p. 90,) was 
b. Jan. 7, 1712, and d. in Littleton, Oct. 5, 1768, as. 56 y. 8 m. 28 d. 

She m. in 1729, Lieut. Samuel Tuttle, a leading man of Lit- 
tleton, who d. in that town Dec. 11, 1780, ae. 71 y. They both 
have grave-stones erected to their memory, now in good condition. 

HER CHILDREN, BY SAMUEL TUTTLE, BORN IN LITTLETON. 

1. Samuel, < b. Sept. 1, 1730 ; ? both ^ whhin 5 dayg rf birth> 

2. Stephen, ( Twins. > 

3. Susanna, b. Oct. 1, 1731 ; m. March 14, 1764, JothamBennet of Leominster. 

4. Martha, b. Dec. 11, 1733. 



MARTHA SHATTUCK BENJAMIN SHATTUCK. 109 

5. Samuel, b. June 5, 173G. He was a farmer in Littleton; m. 1, Mary . 



She d. March 27, 1772, ae. 32. He m. 2, Aug. 4, 1772, Rebecca Robbins of 
Westford. He d. Jan. 1813, 83. 77. He had twenty-three children, 9 by his 
first and 14 by his second wife, as follows : — 1. Mary, b. July 16, 1757 ; 
2. Samuel, b. Dec. 4, 1758 ; 3. Martha, b. March 21, 17b*] ; 4. Elizabeth, b. 
Dec. 25, 1762; 5. Naomi, b. Sept. 23, 1764; 6. Matilda, b. May 26, 1766; 
7. William, b. Feb. 23, 1768, d. May 3, 1794; 8. Thomas, b. Dec. 14, 1769; 

9. a son, d. unnamed; 10. Nathan, b. June 1, 1773; 11. Joseph, b. Feb. 4, 
1775, d. June 11, 1777; 12. Rebecca, b. Nov. 19, 1776; 13. Joseph, b. March 
19, 1779; 14. Sally, b. Feb. 18, 1781; 15. Eusebia, b. June 30, 1783 ; 16. 
Lucy, b. Sept. 2, 1785 ; 17. Henry, b. Feb. 5, 1788 ; 18. Lucinda, b. March 
23, 1790; 19. Sukey, b. Feb. 8, 1792; 20. Augustus, b. May 8, 1794 ; 21. 
Candace, b. Aug. 21, 1796; 22. Maria, b. Feb. 21, 1799; 23. Rachel Good- 
hue, b. Aug. 11, 1803. 

6. Sampson, b. Aug. 29, 1738. He was a farmer in Littleton, a selectman, mod- 

erator of town meetings, justice of the peace, representative in the legis- 
lature, and otherwise distinguished. He d. Jan. 7, 1815, 93. 76 y. 9 m. 8 d. 
He m. 1, April 21, 1761, Submit Hazen. She d. July 24, 1797. He m. 

2, Rebecca . She d. Nov. 11, 1823. He had 14 children. 1. Submit, 

b. Jan. 9, 1762; 2. Lydia, b. Aug. 16, 1763; 3. Sampson, b. April 9, 1765; 

4. Jacob, b. Feb. 6, 1767 : 5. Susanna, b. Feb. 20, 1769 ; 6. Rebecca, b. March 
2, 1771 ; 7. Lewis, b. Feb. 9, 1773 ; 8. Mehitable, b. April 25, 1775, d. Oct. 31, 
1778 ; 9. Lucy, b. Oct. 6, 1776, d. Sept. 1, 1777 ; 10. Lucy, b. Aug. 23, 1778 ; 
11. Mehitable, b. Nov. 29, 1780 ; 12. Benjamin, b. April 4. 1783; 13. Martha, 
b. July 30, 1787 ; 14- Mary, b. July 11, 1800— the last by his second wife. 

7. Mary, b. Aug. 15, 1740; m. Joseph Fox of Fitchburg, where she died. 

8. Lucy, b. Dec. 10, 1742; m. Aug. 30, 1762, Isaac Fellows of Woodstock,Vt. 

9. William.h. Jan. 21, 1744, and d. in Littleton, Jan. 3, 1831. He m. 1, Dec. 

14, 1775, Mary Lawrence of Salem. She d. Sept. 27, 1787. He m. 2, 

. He had 1. Polly Lawrence, b. May 24, 1776 ; 2. Nancy, b. 

Sept. 6, 1778; 3. Sophia, b. Feb. 20, 1780; 4. Harriet, b. Dec. 11, 1781; 

5. William, b. Nov. 9, 1783; 6. Charlotte, b. June 8, 1785; 7. Charles, b. 
Sept. 7, 1787; 8. Lucretia, b. Oct. 24, 1791 ; 9. Thomas S., b. Feb. 22, 1796 ; 

10. Lovell Emerson, b. Oct. 14, 1797; 11. George, b. May 12, 1800. 



55. Dr. Benjamin Shatttjck, s. of Rev. Benjamin, (p. 90,) was 
b. in Watertown, Dec. 8, 1783. He was a physician in Littleton, 
but removed just before his death to his son's in Groton, N. H., 
where he d. Oct. 1790, ee. 66 y. 10 m. 

He m. Nov. 13, 1740, Dinah Hunt of Littleton, probably a 
descendant of Wm. Hunt, one of the early settlers of Concord. 
She was buried in Littleton, Jan. 17, 1791, ae. 78. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY DINAH HUNT, BORN IN LITTLETON. 

1. Moses, b. Aug. 10, 1741. He kept for many years the public house, known 
as the General Stage House, in Portland, Me., where he d. Feb. 1. 1801, se. 
59 y. 5 m. 21 d. He m. Hannah, widow of Joseph Golding, dau. of John 
Waite, formerly of Newbury, Mass. She d. Dec. 22, 1800, 83. 73, without 
issue. 



110 FOURTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

2. Edmond, b. July 20, 1744 ; m. Abigail Chamberlain, 130 

3. Jonathan, b. Aug. 9,1746; m. Huldah Curtis, 131 

4. Somers, b. July 6, 1749; m. Esther Rogers, 132 

5. Arthur, b. Nov. 29, 1751. He was "rated" in Pepperell in, 1774, but his 

tax was abated for non-residence. His subsequent history is not positively 
known. It is said he went into the naval service in the revolution, under 
Capt. Manley, and was lost at sea. 



56. Timothy Shattuck, s. of Rev. Benjamin, (p. 90,) was b. 
in Watertown, about 1715. He first settled in Middletown, Ct., 
where he bought and sold real estate from 1740 to 1762. The 
last transaction recorded was at the latter date, and his name does 
not subsequently appear upon the records of that town. The date 
and place of his death have not been ascertained. In the records 
of New Haven, now North Haven, his son, in 1773, is styled 
" Timothy Shattuck, Jr.," and in 1777, " Timothy Shattuck, late 
Timothy Shattuck, Jr.," from which it is inferred that Timothy, 
sen., d. about 1775 or 6. 

He m. Nov. 5, 1740, Desire Hall, b. June 19, 1719, dau. of 
Nathaniel and Elizabeth Hall of Wallingford, Ct. 

HiS CHILDREN, BY DESIRE HALL, RECORDED IN MIDDLETOWN. 

1. Elizabeth, b. Dec. 12, 1741. 

2. Susanna, b. Aug. 7, 1743 ; m. Jan. 28, 1762, Wm. Clark of Middletown, and 

had born there— 1. Charles, b. July 14, 1763; 2. James Ward, b. Feb. 22, 
1765; 3. Asher, b. Feb. 22, 1767. " 

3. Martha, b. April 15, 1746. 

4. Desire, b. Feb. 7, 3748. 

5. Timothy, b. April 9, 1750; m. Deborah , 133 

6. Luranda, b. Feb. 3, 1752. 

7. Caroline, b. July 30, 1756. 



57. William Shattuck, s. of Rev. Benjamin, (p. 90,) was b. 
in Littleton, Jan. 1, 1718, and first settled in Middletown, Ct., 
where he owned considerable real estate. He returned to his 
native town about the time of his marriage, and there united with 
the church, and became a leading man in its public affairs ; was 
chosen for several years one of the selectmen, often moderator of 
town meetings, and held other public positions. The following 
very unusual, but highly complimentary vote, appears upon the 
records of Littleton, passed March 6, 1769, when he declined a 
reelection to public office : — " Voted, That the thanks of the town 
be given to Mr. William Shattuck for his past services as town 



WILLIAM SHATTUCK SARAH SHATTUCK. 111 

officer." In 1769 he removed to New Ipswich, N. H., and set- 
tled on a farm near the south burying-ground, beyond the " Mill 
Village." It is said that a sister of his wife married Capt. Eleazer 
dimming, who had previously settled in New Ipswich, which 
might have induced his removal. He became there, as he had 
been in Littleton, one of the most prominent citizens. In 1774, 
he paid the highest tax except three of 111 persons in the " South 
List" of the town. He was an ardent, influential patriot, and 
spent much time and money in the revolutionary struggle. He 
was chosen one of the selectmen in 1770, '72, '73, '75, '76, '78, 
'79, and '86 ; moderator of town meeting in 1775 ; member of 
the Committee of Correspondence in 1775, and the same year a 
Delegate to the Provincial Congress ; a representative in the 
Legislature in 1776 ; and was otherwise distinguished as a public 
man and worthy citizen. About 1794 he bought a farm in Jaf- 
frey, N. H., and removed to that town, where he d. Jan., 1806, 
se. 88. His farm was sold after his death for $700, which went 
to his heirs. 

He m. in Littleton, Nov. 20, 1750, Abigail Reed, dau. of Peter 
and Abigail Reed of that town. She was b. in 1733, and was 
nearly 16 years younger than her husband. She d. at her son 
Sherman's in Bethlehem, N. H., Feb., 1820, ae. 87. No record 
of their children has been found, but as far as they can be ascer- 
tained they were as follows : — 

d. in infancy. 

m. Mary Dustin, 134 

m. Polly Farley, 135 

d. in infancy. 

m. three wives, 136 

d. in infancy. 

m. Hannah Putnam, 137 

m. Sally Acres, 138 



1. 


Abigail, b. 




2. 


William, b. 


1755 


3. 


John, b. 


1757 


4. 


Oliver, b. 




5. 


Peter, b. 


1762 


6. 


Oliver, b. 




7. 


Sherman, b. Mar. 26, 1768 


8. 


Benjamin,b. 





58. Sarah Shattuck, dau. of Rev. Benjamin, (p. 90,) was b. 
Dec. 13, 1719, and d. in Lit., Sept. 30, 1775, Ee. 55y. 9 m. 17 d. 

She m. in Reading, June 28, 1739, Jonathan Dix, b. in Read- 
ing, April 11, 1710, s. of John Dix, who d. March 12, 1745, and 
grandson of Ralph Dix, one of the early settlers of Ipswich, who 
d. in Reading, Sept. 24, 1688. Jonathan was a tanner in Little- 
ton. He d. at his son's residence in Boscawen, N. H., Dec. 24, 



112 FOURTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

1804, sb. 94 y. 8 m. 13 d. He m. 2, in Hollis, N. H., Jan., 1779, 
Miriam Leland, who d. in Hollis, about 1833, ee. nearly 90. 

HER CHILDREN, BY JONATHAN DIX, BORN IN LITTLETON. 

1. Sarah, b. June 27, 1740; m. Nov. 20, 1763, Richard Goldsmith, then of Lit- 

tleton, but afterwards of Harvard. They had, 1. Sarah, d. in Littleton, Dec. 
29, 1766, se. 2 y. ; 2. Richard; 3. Sarah; 4. Timothy; 5. Sherman; 6. 
Theodore ; 7. Ann ; 8. Mary, (m. Alonzo Hill, father of Alonzo Hill, who 
graduated at Harvard College in 1822, and is now a minister in Worcester ;) 
9. Thomas; 10. John. 

2. Jonathan, b. April 13, 1742; m. Nov. 20, 1767, Anna Kimball of Fitchburg. 

She d. having had two children. One d. in infancy, and Jonathan the other 
d. in the West Indies, about 1796. He m. 2, Joanna Foss of Portsmouth. 
He d. in Nova Scotia. Left no issue. 

3. Timothy, b. Dec. 7, 1743. Settled in Boscawen, N. H., where he d. April 

13, 1793, a3. 49 y. 4 m. 6 d. He m. 1, Aug. 13, 1769, Rachel Burbank of 
Concord, who was b. Nov. 14, 1747, and d. in Pembroke, April 13, 1793. 
He m. 2, widow Brown of Boscawen ; and 3, widow Eliza Cunningham of 
Pembroke. He had 2 children, — 1. Timothy, b. Aug. 16, 1770, merchant of 
Boscawen, and father of John Adams Dix r the Senator in Congress from 
New York ; and 2, Josiah Brown, b. March 2, 1772, and d. in childhood. 

4. Martha, b. Jan. 4, 1745 ; m. Nov. 25, 1762, Peter Fletcher of Littleton. She 

d. Jan. 19, 1793, sb. 48 y. m. 15 d. He had, 1. Lucy, m. John Saunders 

of Littleton ; 2. Peter, m. Lucy Wood of Lit. ; 3. Samuel, m. of 

Amherst, N. H. ; 4. Jonathan, m. White of Philipston ; 5. Solomon, m. 

Dorcas Fletcher of Lit. ; 6. Martha, m. Jonathan Knights of Phillipston. 

5. .Anna, b. March 25, 1748; m. Nov. 7, 1779, Joseph Baker. In 1795 she 

went to Boston, and d. there in July, 1803. She was the first female em- 
ployed as an instructor at the Orphan Asylum. She had, 1. Anna, who m. 
John Allen ; and 2. Sarah, who m. Jonathan Goodwin. 

6. Mary, b. Feb. 10, 1751 ; m. Aug. 24, 1772, Dea. John Hartwell, s. of Dea. 

Josiah Hartwell. He d. in Littleton. Had, 1. Mary, m. Ephraim Pollard of 
Harvard ; 2. Lucy, m. her cousin Timothy Dix ; 3. Josiah, drowned, se. 14 ; 
4. Anna, m. Samuel Hoar of Lit. ; 5. John, m. Anna Wheeler of Lit. ; 
6. Jonathan, m. , (father of Josiah Shattuck Hartwell, who grad- 
uated at Harvard College in 1844, and is now in Cincinnati ;) 7. Rachel, m. 
James Kimball of Lit.; 8. Lydia, m. John Whitcomb of Hancock. (Had 2 
sons, who graduated at H. C. — Charles A., in 1844, now dead, and Adol- 
phus C, in 1847, now in California ;) 9. Sophia. 

7. John, b. March 30, 1753 ; m. June 21, 1792, Huldah Warren of Littleton. 

He d. Nov. 27, 1811, se. 58 y. 7 m. 27 d. Had John, Lucy, Mary, and two 
others who d. in infancy. His widow m. 2, Joseph Blake ; and 3, Mr. 
Benedict of Clinton, N. S., where she d. March 31, 1832. 

8. Samuel, b. Aug. 12, 1755; d. April 7, 1768, 89. 12 y. 7 m. 25 d. 

9. Benjamin, b. Oct. 24, 1757; d. Oct. 14, 1764, 83. 6 y. 11 m. 20 d. 

10. Lucy, b. Jan. 7, 1760 ; d. July 15, 1762, as. 2 y. 6 m. 8 d. 

11. Elizabeth, b. Mar. 20, 1762 ; m. Jacob Wheeler of Hollis, N. H. Had one 

child, who m. Worthing of Concord, N. H. Both dead. 



SUSANNA SHATTUCK ELIZABETH SHATTUCK. 113 

12. Benjamin, b. Nov. 6, 1766 ; m. April 7, 1792, Sarah Russell of Littleton 
He is a tanner, and is still living upon the old paternal homestead, enjoying 
a vigorous old age. Children, 1. Benjamin P., b. Aug. 26, 1793, boot and 
shoe dealer in Groton; 2. Thomas R., b. Feb. 27, 1798, d. Jan. 11, 1804; 
3. Sarah, b. Oct. 2, 1800 ;' 4. Thomas R., b. April 20, 1805 ; 5. Sherman D., 
b. April 13, 1810. 



59. Susanna Shattuck, dau. of Rev. Benj., (p. 90,) was b. April 
8, 1724, and d. in Lunenburg, Sept. 25, 1789, eg. 65 y. 5 m. 17 d. 

She m. Jan. 22, 1750, Caleb Taylor, b. in Littleton, March 
24, 1724. He was a farmer, and settled in Lunenburg, where he 
d. Aug. 27, 1791, ee. 67 y. 5 m. 3 d., s. of Dea. Caleb Taylor, who 

d. July 11, 1762, Ee. 72, and of Mary , who d. Nov. 1, 1770, 

Ee. 90, very worthy citizens of Littleton. 

HER CHILDREN, BY CALEB TAYLOR, BORN IN LUNENBURG. 

1. Mary, b. 1751 ; d. in Lunenburg, unmarried, Oct. 23, 1821, ee. 70. 

2. Caleb, b. Dec. 1, 1754 ; m. June, 1792, Margaret Whiting. He d. Dec. 3, 

1727, se. 73. Had Caleb, who d. in infancy; and Susanna, who m. 1, Timo- 
thy Howard ; and 2, Obed Houghton ; and is now (1854) living in Lunen- 
burg. No issue. 

3. Arthur, b. May 1, 1758 ; m. in Jaffrey, N. H. in 1788, Rebecca Wilder, b. 

July 26, 1769, dau. of Joseph Wilder of Leominster. He was a farmer, and 
settled in Jaffrey, where he d. Feb. 26, 1826, se. 68 y. 9 m. 25 d. She d. 
Jan. 22, 1848, m. 78 y. 5 m. 26 d. They had, 1. Arthur, b. Nov. 9, 1788, m. Mar. 
17, 1835, Nancy Gilmore; 2. Susanna, b. Sept. 22, 1789; 3. Rebecca, b. 
Nov. 18, 1791, (has been a nurse 20 years in the Massachusetts General 
Hospital;) 4. Caleb, b. Dec. 21, 1793; 5. Mary, b. March 7, 1796; 6. Elias, 
b. Dec. 7, 1797, m. March 17, 1831, Abby B. Ballard; 7. Joseph Wilder, b. 
Sept. 14, 1799, d. Feb. 1800; 8. Samuel, b. May 5, 1802, d. Aug. 1802; 
9. Luke, b. March 17, 1804, m. Oct. 11, 1827, Julia F. Hemmenway; 10. 
Elizabeth, b. Sept. 20, 1807, m. Jan. 17, 1832, Moody Colby. 

4. Martha, b. ; m. 1, Jonathan Piper of Ashby ; and 2, Daniel Holt 

of Fitchburg. She d. in 1831, se. 68, without issue. 



60. Elizabeth Shattuck, dau. of Rev. Benjamin, (p. 90,) 
was b. Feb. 13, 1726, and d. Dec. 1, 1808, ge. 82 y. 9 m. 18 d. 

She m. Feb. 26, 1746, Dea. Elias Taylor, b. Feb. 23, 1722, 
a brother of Caleb, above mentioned. He d. Nov. 22, 1797, ae. 
75 y. 8 m. 29 d. He was much employed in public business, 
was a deacon of the church, and a very worthy citizen. 

HER CHILDREN, BY ELIAS TAYLOR, BORN IN LITTLETON. 

1. Jedediah, b. Nov. 2, 1747; d. Sept. 13, 1753, se. 5 y. 10 m. 11 d. 

2. William,, b. Feb. 2, 1749 ; d. Sept. 1, 1753, fe. 4 y. 6 m. 29 d. 

3. Elizabeth, b. July 2, 1752 ; d. April 2, 1753, ee. 9 m. 

15 



114 FOURTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

4. Elizabeth, b. May 10, 1753; m. June 4, 1774, Solomon Rogers of Pepperell. 

5. Jedediah, b. May 3, 1756 ; m. Jan. 8, 1782, Mary Russell. He d. Oct. 16, 

1791, re. 35. 

6. William, b. Sept. 30, 1760. 



ORIGIN OF THE CONNECTICUT BRANCHES. 

61. Robert Shattuck, s. of Robert, (p. 92,) was b. in Plym- 
outh, June 3, 1721, and settled as a cooper and farmer in East 
Hampton parish, Chatham, Ct. He d. in Middletown, Feb. 12, 
1802, a3. 80 y. 8 m. 9 d. ; the records of Dr. Crane's church say, 
" in the morning suddenly at Oliver Prout's," probably while he 
was on a visit to that town. His numerous descendants have the 
satisfaction of tracing their ancestry through their father Shat- 
tuck to the founders of the Massachusetts Colony, and through 
their mother Cook, and their grandmother Pratt, (note, p. 92,) to 
the founders of the still older Colony of Plymouth — the Pilgrims 
of the May Flower. The blood that once flowed through the 
good old Puritan stock of both Colonies, which were united in 
1692 to form the Old Bay State, still courses through their veins. 
May they ever strive to maintain the principles of their forefathers, 
and render themselves worthy of their origin ! 

He m. 1, in Plymouth, Sept. 9, 1744, Ruhamah Cook.* 

He m. 2, widow Hannah Blake. 

HIS CHILDREN, ET RUHAMAH COOK, BORN IN CHATHAM. 

1. Randall, b. June 11, 1748 ; m. Comfort Tyler, 139 

2. William, b. Aug. 13, 1750; m. Hannah Spencer, 140 

3. Thomas, b. July 1, 1752 ; m. 1, O. Phelps; 2, R. Wells, .... 141 

4. Patience, b. June 12, 1754 ; d. in infancy. 

5. Robert, b. Oct. 1,1756; m. Anna Loomis 142 

6. David, b. Sept. 12, 1758 ; m. Dorothy Olcott, 143 

7. Patience, b. July 19, 1761; m. Lemuel Mitchel, 144 

8. Moses, b. Dec. 29, 1763 ; m. Betsey Vaughn, 145 

9. Polly, b. Nov. 17, 1766; m. Ozias Spencer, 146 

HIS CHILD, BY HANNAH BLAKE, BORN IN CHATHAM. 

10. Jonathan, b. July 12, 1776. At the age of 18 he went to sea, but has not 
since been heard from by his relatives. 

* She was probably a descendant of Francis Cook who d. in Plymouth, April 17, 1663. He 
was one of the original Company of Pilgrims who came over in the May Flower in 1620. He 
m. Hester , a French lady — " a Wolloon"— as the inhabitants of the southern part of Bel- 
gium, bordering on France, were called. Belonging to the protestants of that country she had 
united with the Puritan Church at Lcydcn, and emigrated with them to America. Francis 
Cook's children were John, Jacob, Jane, and Mary; of whom John m. in 1634, Sarah Warren, 
dau. of Nathaniel Warren, senior. Jacob m. in 1646, Dcmaris Hopkins, clau. of Stephen Hop- 
kins. He d. in 1676, leaving a will, dated March 8, 1676, and had Jacob, Caleb, Francis, and 
several daughters. Jacob, Jr., b. March 21, 1653, had by Lydia his wife eight children, b. in 
Plymouth. Caleb had by Jane his wife nine children, one of whom was probably the grand- 
failicr of Ruhamah (Cook) Shattuck. 



JONATHAN SHATTUCK ELIZABETH SHATTUCK. 115 



v. Jfifij §tntxnthn anb Cjpftrrtn. 

DESCENDANTS OF THE ELDER PEPPERELL BRANCHES. 

62. Jonathan Shattuck, s. of Jonathan, (p. 94,) was b. in 
Groton, April 2, 1720. At an early age he removed with his 
father to Pepperell, and afterwards settled as a farmer on the pa- 
ternal homestead on Windfall Plain, about half a mile westerly of 
the meeting-house, where he d. Sept. 20, 1804, se. 84 y. 5 m. 18 d. 

He m. Jan. 27, 1743, Kezia Farnsworth, b. April 17, 1723, 
dau. of Ebenezer Farnsworth, who m. April 17, 1707, Elizabeth 
Whitney of Groton, and granddau. of Matthias Farnsworth, Jr. 
She d. May 8, 1809, se. 86 y. m. 21 d. They were both members 
of the church. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY KEZIA FARNSWORTH, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Kezia, b. Feb. 4, 1745 ; m. Jeremiah Shattuck, Jr., . . . (Family 95) 

2. Jonathan, b. Mar. 16, 1747; m. Abiah Chamberlain, 147 

3. Annis, b. Oct. 2, 1749 ; m. Jonas Fitch, 148 

4. Eleazer, b. Oct. 26, 1752; m. Mary Blood, 149 

5. Alice, b. May 8, 1754 ; m. Abel Wright, 150 

6. Joshua, b. Feb. 4, 1756; d. Sept. 10, 1776, in the army at Ticondero- 

ga, se. 20. 

7. Ebenezer, b. Dec. 25, 1760 ; m. Lucy Woods, 151 

8. Joel, b. Nov. 23, 1763. He entered the marine service of the Revolu- 

tion, on board the frigate Hague, commanded by Capt. Manly, and d. in the 
West Indies, March 16, 1782, se. 18 y. 3 m. 23 d. 



63. Elizabeth Shattuck, dau. of Jonathan, (p. 94,) was b. 
Jan 12, 1722, and d. in Pep., July 25, 1782, se. 60 y. 6 m. 13 d. 

She m. Jan. 17, 1745, Jedediah Jewett, b. Sept. 8, 1719, s. of 
Joseph and Jane Jewett. He d. in Pep., May 12, 1804, ae. 84 y. 
8 m. 4 d. They both united with the church in 1756, of which 
his son Edmond, and grandson Henry Jewett were deacons. 

HER CHILDREN, BY JEDEDIAH JEWETT, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Elizabeth, b.'Jan. 25, 1746; m. Jan. 12, 1769, James Blood, Jr. She d. in 

Pep., April 9, 1773, se. 27 y. 2 m. 14 d., having had Eber, b. Dec. 21, 1769. 
He m. 2, Martha Shattuck, daughter of John, (p. 103.) 

2. Kezia, b. Oct. 6, 1748 ; m. Nov. 26, 1767, Joshua Blood, b. June 26, 1744, s. of 

Dea. David Blood. They had, 1. Ezra, b. May 29, 1770 ; 2. Nathan, b. Oct. 
26, 1773; 3. Kezia, b. March 12, 1775; 4. Joshua, b. March 7, 1778; 5. 
Jonathan, b. Nov. 11, 1781. 

3. Edith, b. Jan. 4, 1752 ; m. Oct. 15, 1777, Abel Parker, b. March 25, 1753, s. ot 



116 FIFTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

Samuel Parker. He was Judge of Probate for Cheshire Co., N. H., for 20 
years ; lived in JarFrey, where he d. May 2, 1831, se. 75 y. 1 m. 7 d. She d. 
in Jaffrey, Oct. 23, 1848, se. 96 y. 9 m. 19 d. They had 9 children:— Edith, 
who d. 83. 5 y. ; Silas, Calvin and Luther, who d. in infancy ; Abel, d. in 1807, 
89. 27 ; Asa, in 1833, 83. 47 ; and Edmond, of Nashua, N. H. ; Isaac of Bos- 
ton, and Joel of Cambridge, last three now (1855) living. 

4. Jedediah, b. April 22, 1754 ; d. in Pepperell in 1840, 83. 86. 

5. Edmond, b. Feb. 11, 1757 ; m. Maria Blood, dau. of James Blood. He was a 

deacon in the church ; d. May 19, 1835, 83. 78 y. 3 m. 8 d. She d. May 2, 
1853. They had, 1. Susa, b. Dec. 3, 1786; 2. Edmond, b. Oct. 10, 1788, m. 
Phebe Sheple ; 3. Henry, b. Oct. 28, 1792, (now deacon;) 4. Lucy, b. April 
2, 1795 ; 5. Ralph, b. March 6, 1797, d. Jan. 29, 1850. 

6. Hepzibah, b. Jan. 24, 1760 ; m. May 9, 1786, Ezekiel Perham. . (Family 68) 



64. John Shattuck, s. of Jonathan, (p. 94,) was b. March 12, 
1724, and d. in Pepperell, Dec. 31, 1807, ae. 83 y. 9 m. 19 d. 
His name appears upon the records as John Shattuck, Jr., (p. 102.) 
He was a farmer, and built and first occupied the house now 
owned by Henry Jewett, about a mile southwesterly of the meet- 
ing-house.* He was one of the selectmen in 1769, '70, '71, '78, 
and '79 ; one of the Committee of Correspondence, Inspection 
and Safety in 1774, and was otherwise respected for his worth 
as a man and a citizen. He left a will, dated April 6, 1805, but 
his estate was settled without the aid of the probate court. His 
son Nathaniel inherited the principal part of his property left at 
his decease. He educated his youngest son, Caleb, at Dartmouth 
College. 

He m. Aug. 16, 1750, Elizabeth Shattuck, b. May 17, 1728, 
his second cousin, dau. of Jeremiah Shattuck, (p. 101.) She d. 
suddenly of apoplexy, April 9, 1805, as. 76 y. 10 m. 22 d. She 
and her husband were both exemplary members of the church. 
She was a woman of remarkable intelligence, industry, and ex- 
cellence of character ; performed the usual household labors and 
duties ; brought up her family of nine children respectably, with- 
out a death before their marriage ; and spun and wove the cloth 
for their clothing, without assistance. Girls and wives of our 
day, look at this picture ! 

* Near his house was a shallow pond or swamp, the waters of which were raised to kill the 
bushes. When drained the miasma that arose was supposed to have been the cause of the 
great fever in 1755 to 1758, known, from its peculiar severity, as the u Pepperell Fever.' 7 Rev. 
Mr. Emerson, in a sermon in reference to this fever, says, that in four years 540 persons were 
sick, 103 died, of whom 43 were heads of families, G4 grown persons, 21 (including 3 deacons) 
members of the church ; and all this in a population of about 700! 



ESTHER SHATTUCK MARY SHATTUCK. 



117 



HIS CHILDREN, BY ELIZABETH SHATTUCK, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 



1. Elizabeth, b. June 11, 1751 

2. Olive, b. Jan. 27, 1753 

3. Sarah, b. Feb. 23, 1755 

4. John, b. July 7, 1757 

5. Sybil, b. Sept. 23, 1759 

6. Emerson, b. Oct. 12, 1761 

7. JYathaniel,b. Jan. 5,1764 

8. Eunice, b. July 23, 1767 

9. Caleb, b. April 26, 1770 



m. Simeon Blanchard, 152 

m. James Bennett, 153 

m. Ebenezer Ball, 154 

m. Betsey Miles, 155 

m. Nathaniel Sartell, 156 

m. Susanna Shattuck, 157 

m. Hannah Ball, 158 

m. Nehemiah Jewett, 159 

m. Martha Kelley, 160 



65. Esther Shattuck, clau. of Jonathan, (p. 94,) was b. May 
21, 1726, and d. in Groton, April 5, 1759, as. 32 y. 10 m. 14 d. 

She m. May 10, 1750, Abel Parker, b. Jan. 17, 1724, s. of 
John Parker and Mary Bradstreet. He lived in Groton ; and in 
1751 bought of his father-in-law, for £333, the house he built 
for his grandmother Shattuck, in the vicinity of the Stony-Ford- 
Way, (p. 93.) He m. 2, Sarah , and had 5 other children. 

He was wounded in the battle of Bunker Hill. 

HER CHILDREN, BY ABEL PARKER, BORN IN GROTON. 

1. Esther, b. Sept. 12, 1750. 3. Mel, b. Nov. 18, 1754. 

2. Mary, b. Sept. 21, 1752. 4. John, b. April 15, 1757. 



66. Mary Shattuck, dau. of Jonathan, (p. 94,) was b. Sept. 
22, 1730, and d. in Townsend, June 27, 1810, se. 79 y. 9 m. 5 d. 

She m. Sept. 12, 1753, Simeon Green, b. Sept. 15, 1729, s. of 
William Green and Hannah Holden, of Groton. He and his 
wife united with the church in Pep. in 1768, and were dismissed 
from thence to the church in Townsend, in 1793, where he after- 
wards resided. He d. Sept. 16, 1813, as. 84. He was wounded 
in the battle of Bunker Hill. 

HER CHILDREN, BY SIMEON GREEN, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Oliver, b. March 24, 1754 ; m. July 15, 1781, Dorothy Hildreth. He first set- 

tled in Pep., but removed to Ashby ; thence to Westford, and thence to 
Ashburnharn, where he d. May 16, 1834, a?. 80 y. 1 m. 22 d. She d. March, 
1845, se. 88. They had 9 children, Oliver, Dolly, Polly, Annis, Asa, Betsey, 
Sally, Rebecca, and Hosea. 

2. Simeon, b. April 24, 1 755 ; d. in the army, date unknown. 

3. Hannah, b. Sept. 23, 1757 ; m. Amaziah Blood. He d. in Groton, May 27, 

1798, 83. 41. She d. in Mason, N. H., June 21, 1835, ee. 77 y. 8 m. 28 d. 
They had Amaziah and Calvin. 

4. Mary, b. Nov. 16, 1759; m. Richard Holden of Charlestown, and had Mary 

and Richard. 

5. Solomon, b. in 1764 ; m. in 1786, Sarah Hilton. He d. May 31, 1803, as. 39. 



118 FIFTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

She d. Sept. 2, 1850, se. 82. They had 9 children, Simeon, Solomon, Ralph, 
Samuel, Sally, Asahel, Asher, Rebecca, and Alvin. 

6. Jonathan, b. ; m. Shipley of Pep. He d. in Pep., Sept. 25, 1802. 

Had 4 children, Jonathan, Abigail, Mary, and Zoah. 



67. Zaccheus Shattuck, s. of Jonathan, (p. 94,) was b. March 
26, 1734, and first settled on the farm now owned by the town, 
but subsequently removed to the westerly part of Pepperell, where 
he d. March 29, 1819, se. 85. He was sometimes subject to de- 
pression of spirits ; and some peculiar traits of character in a few 
branches of his family seem to have originated with him. 

He m. July 12, 1759, his cousin Azubah Chamberlain, dau. 
of Thomas Chamberlain, and niece of Elizabeth Chamberlain, 
(p. 93.) She was a worthy woman, a member of the church, 1795. 
Died Jan. 8, 1815, se. 81. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY AZUBAH CHAMBERLAIN, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Jlzubah, b. Aug. 2, 1760 ; m. Wm. Blood, s. of Wm. ; d. without issue. 

2. Zaccheus, b. Sept. 8, 1761 ; m. April 29, 1798, Hala Parker; lived in 

Townsend ; had Edmund, who d. unm. She d. June 21, 1853, se. 91. 

3. Jacob, b. Mar. 19, 1763 ; d. July 6, 1786, unm., insane, se. 23 y. 3 m. 17 d. 

4. Esther, b. May 10, 1764 ; d. unmarried, se. about 70. 

5. Noah, b. Feb. 21, 1766; m. Sarah Spaulding, 161 

6. Susanna, b. April 7, 1768 ; m. Emerson Shattuck, . . . (Family 157) 

7. Silas, bap. Jan. 3, 1770 ; m. Polly Baily ; d. insane. 

8. Tliomas, bap. Sept. 29, 1771 ; d. unmarried, insane. 

9. Ezra, bap. June 6, 1773; d. unmarried, of the dysentery. 

10. Rachel, bap. April 14, 1776; m. Jan. 29, 1807, Jonathan Perham, a cousin 
of Jonathan, (p. 119.) She d. about 1849. 

68. Eunice Shattuck, dau. of Jonathan, (p. 94,) was b. March 
5, 1736, and d. in Athens, Vt., Dec. 13, 1815, se. 79 y. 9 m. 8 d. 

She m. 1, David Turner. He and his only dau. d. about 1756. 

She m. 2, Feb. 15, 1759, Ezekiel Perham, s. of John Perham. 
He was a farmer in Pepperell until 1800, and afterwards in Athens, 
Vt., where he d. Dec. 14, 1807. 

HER CHILDREN, BY EZEKIEL PERHAM, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Eunice, b. May 25, 1762; d. unm. Feb. 17, 1830, 03. 67 y. 8 m. 22 d. 

2. Ezekiel, b. May 27, 1764 ; m. 1, March 9, 1786, Hepzibah Jevvett, his cousin, 

(p. 116.) She d. in 1816. He m. 2, Phebe Oak. He lived in Athens about 
40 years, and then removed to Perrysburg, Cattaraugus Co., N. Y., where he 
d. in 1843, se. 79. His children by his first wife, 1. Asa, m. Cynthia Forbes, 
had 5 children, and d. in Athens; 2. Betsey, m. David Robbins, d. Oct. 19, 
1854; 3. Edith, m. Kendal Ober of Southampton, Mass.; 4. Hepzibah, m. 
Jonathan Robbins ; 5. Frederick, d. ; 6. Submit, m. Jabez Chapman of Wind- 
ham, Vt. ; 7. Ezekiel. He had by his second wife, 8. Livera, m. ; 9. Melinda, 



EUNICE SHATTUCK TIMOTHY SHATTUCK. 119 

3. David, b. Dec. 8, 1766; d. in Pepperell, April 20, 1800, m. 33 y. 4 m. 12 d. 

He m. Lovena Dudley, and had Sally, Polly, John, and Orpha-Serena. 

4. John, b. March 25, 1769; m. April 18, 1796, Lydia Lawrence, b. May 15, 

1777, dau. of Joseph Lawrence. (Family 219.) In 1801 he removed from 
Pepperell to Athens, where he d. July 19, 1842, se. 73 y. 3 m. 24 d. She d. 
July 22, 1851, se. 74 y. 2 in. 7 d. Had, 1. John, b. Feb. 9, 1797, d. Oct. 9, 
1812; 2. Phebe, b. Oct. 9, 1798, m. April 2, 1852, Moses Bennett; 3. Lydia, 
b. Dec. 26, 1799, d. Dec. 8, 1801 ; 4. Lydia, b. Oct. 31, 1801, m. Feb. 29, 1820, 
David Skinner, has 12 children ; 5. David, b. April 3, 1803, m. Wealthy T. 
Root, d. in Newfane, April 27, 1834; 6. Levi, b. April 10, 1805, m. Martha 
Soule— 6 children; 7. Abraham L., (of N. Y.,) b. Sept. 11, 1806, m. May 30, 
1833, Jennette Creighton,— she d. Sept. 1, 1850, se. 36; 8. Mary, b. Dec. 25, 
1807, m. Sept., 1830, John S. Hubbard; 9. Rhoda, b. Sept. 7, 1809, m. Jan. 

1, 1833, Julius S. Hitchcock; 10. Joshua, (of N. Y.,) b. June 29, 1811, m. 
Aug. 9, 1838, Sarah Underhill; 11. John H., b. Oct 16, 1812, m. Sarah 
Maguire; 12. Daniel, b. Sept. 8, 1814, m. Oct. 24, 1843, Harriet Kidder; 
13. Lucy Ann, b. Oct. 20, 1816, m. Sept. 24, 1840, Dustin C. Ball ; 14. 
Lorin W., b. Oct. 1, 1818, m. 1, Lydia K. Rice, she d. Oct. 26, 1851, and 

2, Dorothy Clapp. 

5. Jonathan, b. July 4, 1773, m. May 5, 1794, Eunice Shattuck, b. Oct. 28, 1761, 

dau. of Jeremiah S. (Family 95.) He d. in Athens, Vt, Oct. 20, 1848, 63. 
74 y. 3 m. 16 d. She d. in Athens, April 17, 1850, 89. 48 y. 5 m. 19 d. Had 
1. Oliver S., b. Aug. 15, 1795, m. Oct. 23, 1821, Melinda Wells; he d. Dec. 
16, 1850 ; she d. Feb. 24, 1852 ; 2. Jeremiah L., b. March 29, 1797, m. Sarah 
Shattuck, dau. of Noah, (see Family 161 ;) 3. Sally, b. Aug. 26, 1800, m. Dec. 
8, 1829, Barzillia Stickney ; lived in Brookline, Vt. ; 4. Nancy, b. March 31, 
1802; 5. Fanny S., b. Aug. 21, 1806, m. March 27, 1828, Hiram Whitney of 
Athens. 

6. Elizabeth, b. Oct. 23, 1774 ; m. Sewall Shattuck, (Family 243) 

7. Submit, b. Dec. 8, 1775 ; m. 1, Cyrel Green, and had Parley, Calvin, Eliza, 

Asa, and Lavina. She m. 2, Brown, and had Hannah and Mary. She 

d. in Bernard, Vt. 

8. Kezia, b. Sept. 27, 1778 ; m. Dr. Ebenezer Williams, settled in Bakersfield, 

Vt., and had George, David, Betsey, Joseph, Lavina, and Frederick. 



69. Timothy Shattuck, s. of Jonathan, (p. 94, ) b. Aug. 8, 
1738 ; first settled in Pepperell, but in 1769 removed to Conway, 
Franklin Co. ; in 1778 he returned to Townsend, where his son 
David was born ; and afterwards is said to have removed to 
Lynesborough, N. H., where he died. He was dismissed from 
the church in Pepperell in 1769, and the next year united with 
that of Conway, where four of his children were baptized. The 
history of this family is imperfectly known. 

He m. Jan. 7, 1762, Hannah Nutting, b. Sept. 4, 1738, dau. 
of Nathaniel N. 



120 



FIFTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 



HIS CHILDREN, BY H. NUTTING, BORN IN PEPPERELL, CONWAY, AND TOWNSEND. 

1. Timothy, b. Nov. 21, 1762. He was a soldier in the Revolution. 

2. Caleb, b. March 1, 1764 ; d. of rickets, Aug. 1, 1766, se. 2 y. 5 m. 

3. Silas, b. April 21, 1765; d. April 27, 1765, m. 6 days. 

4. David, bap. Nov. 24, 1771 ; d. in Conway, Aug. 28, 1775, se. 4 y. 

5. jYathaniel, bap. Nov. 14, 1773. 7. Joel, bap. Aug. 3, 1777. 

6. Elizabeth, bap. Oct. 15, 1775. 8. David, b. Jan. 29, 1780. 



ORIGIN OF THE HOIi&IS BRANCHES. 

70. William Shattuck, s. of Wm„ (p. 96,) b. Jan. 25, 1712; 
was a farmer in Hollis, N. H., where he d. March 13, 1761, se. 
49 y. 1 m. 18 d. ; it is said soon after his return from a campaign 
in the French war. 

He m. 1, Ruth . She d. Nov. 4, 1744. He m. 2, Ex- 
perience Spaulding. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY RUTH , BORN IN HOLLIS. 

1. Ruth, b. Feb. 1, 1739; m. Sept. 23, 1761, Robert Rankin. 

2. William, b. Feb. 26, 1741 ; m. Zilpha Turner, 162 

3. Mary, b. Nov. 4, 1743; m. Dec. 9, 1763, Joseph Stearns of Groton. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY EXPERIENCE SPAULDING, BORN IN HOLLIS. 

4. JYathaniel, b. ; m. Eunice Hazen, 163 

5. Experience, b. ; m. Aug. 13, 1772, Benjamin Simpson. 



71. Zachariah Shattuck, s. of Wm., (p. 96,) was b. March 
16, 1724, and was a farmer in Hollis, N. H., where he d. March 
20, 1809, 8B. 85. His will is recorded in the Hillsborough Regis- 
try, (Yol. XVI., p. 241.) He was a member of the church, and 
a useful citizen of the town. 

He m. March 3, 1747, Elizabeth Piske of Groton, b. Aug. 13, 
1727, dau. of Samuel Fiske and Elizabeth Parker, and granddau. 
of James Fiske and Eleazer Parker. She d. in Hollis, Nov. 8, 
1815, &. 88 y. 2 m. 25 d. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ELIZABETH FISKE, BORN IN HOLLIS. 



1. Zachariah, b. Dec. 7, 1747 



2. 


Elizabeth, 


b. 


3. 
4. 
5. 


Mary, 

Abigail, 

Isaac, 


b. 1753 
b. June 10, 1755 
b. 


6. 


Samuel, 


b. 


7. 
8. 


Sybil, 
Hannah, 


b. March, 1760 
b. 


9. 


Abel, 


b. 


10. 


JYathan, 


b. 


11. 


Daniel, 


b. 



m. Elizabeth Farley, 164 

m. Timothy Wyman, 165 

m. Stephen Farley, 166 

m. Nathan Colburn, 167 

d. unmarried, in the army. 

m. Louis Wheat, 168 

m. Phineas Hardy, 169 

m. Jacob Moore, 170 

m. Sally Blood, 171 

m. Susanna Woods, 172 

m. Betsey Corey, 173 



MARGARET SHATTUCK JOB SHATTUCK. 121 

DESCENDANTS OF THE GROTON BRANCHES. 

72. Margaret Shattuck, dau. of William, (p. 96,) was b. in 
Groton, July 4, 1732, and d. after a short illness, in her native 
town, while visiting her brother, Jan. 29, 1802, ae. 69 y. 6 m. 25 d. 

She m. 1, May 26, 1752, Joseph Bennett, by whom she had 
one child. The father and child d. soon after in Groton. 

She m. 2, Jan. 24, 1759, Joseph Metcalf. They lived with 
her parents during their lifetime ; but about 1770 they sold to 
Job Shattuck their rights in the estate of their father and brother 
Ezekiel, and removed to Ashburnham, where he d. March 19, 
1793, £e. 59. In 1771 they were dismissed from the church in 
Groton to that of Ashburnham. 

HER CHILDREN, BY JOSEPH METCALF, BORN IN GROTON AND ASHBURNHAM. 

1. Ezekiel Shattuck, b. Oct. 13, 1759; m. Jan. 10, 1780, Eunice Brooks; and set- 

tled about the same time in Groton, N. H., as a farmer ; and had Eunice, 
Ezekiel, Joseph, Dinah, Jeremiah, Lucy, Rhoda. 

2. Samuel, b. March 15, 1761. He settled with his brother in Groton, N. H., 

where he was killed by the falling of a barn door. He was twice married, 
and had 10 sons by his first wife, and 1 son and 2 daughters by his second. 

3. Margaret, b. March 19, 1763 ; m. Nov. 5, 1782, Reuben Townsend, and set- 

tled in Ashburnham, as a farmer. Had Dolly, Eunice, Emma, Reuben, 
Joshua, Joseph, Lucy. 

4. Sarah, b. Sept. 7, 1765 ; m. Jan. 5, 1784, Reuben Rice, a farmer in Ashburn- 

ham. Had Sarah, Reuben, Joseph, Anna, Eunice, Amos, Zebulon, Lucy, 
Matilda, Emma. 

5. Rebecca, b. Aug. 14, 1767; m. Oct. 30, 1788, Wm. Meriam, a blacksmith; 

settled in Ashburnham ; had William, Ezekiel, Rebecca, Bradford, Margaret, 
Joel, James, Asa. 

6. Thankful, b. Sept. 29, 1769 ; probably d. in infancy, in Groton. 

7. Joseph, b. 1772; d. unmarried, March 29, 1791, se. 19 years. 

8. Thankful, b. May 18, 1775 ; m. March 21, 1797, James Laws, a farmer, set- 

tled in Westminster. Had James, David, Joseph, Thankful, Hosea, Ann, 
Harvey, Sylvia, Newell. 



73. Capt. Job Shattuck, s. of William, (p. 96,) was b. in 
Groton, Feb. 11, 1736, and d. at the residence of his son Noah 
Shattuck, Esq., Jan. 13, 1819, se. 82 y. 10 m. 2 d. His name 
has been handed down in the historical annals of the country in 
connection with the insurrection of 1786, known as " Shays' Re- 
bellion ;" and since he was one of the greatest sufferers in that 
movement, it is deemed proper in this place to give more in de- 
tail the leading facts of his life and character. Many of these 
16 



122 FIFTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

facts are not now matters of published history, or have been un- 
fairly presented or imperfectly understood. 

He was bred a farmer, and came into possession, by inheritance 
or purchase, of the real estate previously owned by his father. To 
this he made large additions, until he acquired more than 500 
acres of land bordering on Nashua River. For several years 
prior to 1786 he was the largest farmer in Groton. In 1779 he 
had 40 acres of rye in one field, which was then of unusual ex- 
tent. On his father's farm were two dwelling-houses. The one 
which he first occupied stood a little south of the house which 
he built about 1782, now standing near Wattle's Pond, and oc- 
cupied by H. Holmes ; the other stood on the high ground west- 
erly towards the river, and was occupied by his brother Metcalf. 

He was one of the selectmen of Groton in 1778, 1779, and 
1781; often chosen on important committees; and otherwise 
received public evidence of his respectable social standing among 
his fellow-townsmen. 

His first public military service was in 1755, at the age of 19, 
as a soldier in a company of Col. Monkton's troops in the French 
War in Nova Scotia. He was one of the Minute Men under 
Capt. Asa Lawrence, engaged on the 19th of April, 1775, at Concord 
and Lexington, and on the 17th of June at Bunker Hill. He was 
afterwards first Lieutenant in a Groton company, of which Josiah 
Sawtell was Captain, and Shattuck Blood was second Lieutenant, 
{p. 96.) In 1776 he commanded a company which went to Bos- 
ton, when that town was evacuated by the British troops. In 
1777 he commanded a company raised in Groton and its vicinity, 
which marched to Ticonderoga at the surrender of Burgoyne. 
In 1779 he was appointed Captain of the military company in 
Groton, and continued in office until after peace was declared. 
He was at the head of the committee to raise men and money for 
the war. During the whole period of the revolution he spent 
much time and money, performed very important public services, 
and at all times exhibited great bravery, energy, and self-sacri- 
ficing patriotism. On one occasion, in 1780, finding it difficult 
to obtain men, he consented that his two sons should volunteer 
for the service, notwithstanding the demand for labor upon his 
farm. Ezekiel went to Rhode Island ; Job, Jr. went to West 
Point, and was there when Arnold deserted and Andre was exe- 



JOB SHATTUCK. 123 

cuted. The father's conduct on this occasion was so highly ap- 
proved, that his townsmen " made a bee," by which some thirty 
men reaped and gathered about 400 bushels of rye in one day. 

The five years immediately succeeding the close of the revolu- 
tionary war was a most gloomy and trying period in the history 
of Massachusetts. A great amount of personal service, of treas- 
ure, and of blood, had been expended in the war to gain inde- 
pendence ; the soldiers who had served their country long and 
faithfully had returned home penniless ; the continental paper 
money issued to pay continental debts had become worthless ; 
the public credit was destroyed ; the State, and every town in 
the State, were deeply in debt ; and contracts between individ- 
uals, entered into on the basis of paper money, had to be exe- 
cuted on that of silver or its equivalent — then an article of ex- 
treme scarcity. These and other causes produced embarrass- 
ments unparalleled in the history of the country, and threatened 
universal bankruptcy and ruin. The fond anticipations of those 
who had pledged everything for liberty had not only not been 
realized, but a worse state of affairs was produced than had ever 
before existed. " The hearts of all were filled with dismay." 
At this juncture too a State tax of £140,000 was imposed in one 
year, equal to nearly $500,000, and payable in currency valued 
as silver — a tax enormously large at any period, and particularly 
at that time, when the State contained only about one third of 
its present inhabitants, and those were comparatively poor. To 
fulfil private contracts and satisfy public demands was to all in- 
convenient, and to many impossible ; and the burdens fell with 
their most crushing weight upon farmers and mechanics. The 
consequence was a great multiplication of lawyers and expensive 
lawsuits, and the additional burdens they imposed ; and the at- 
tachment and sacrifice, by public sales of property, to discharge 
heavy, distressing executions. Many were reduced to utter desti- 
tution. The last acre of land, the last cow, and the last necessity 
of life, were often taken to satisfy the demands of the public tax- 
gatherer. Often, too, the body itself was incarcerated for unsatis- 
fied debts. It was then thought by many persons that the meas- 
ures of the government and of its executive officers were arbitrary, 
oppressive, and an "infringement of injured rights and privileges;" 
as well as unwise, impolitic, and unnecessary. Town-meetings 



124 FIFTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

and county conventions were held, and earnest petitions from in- 
dividuals and from public bodies, for relief from their " grievances" 
as they were then called, went up to the Executive and to the 
Legislature, but with unsatisfactory results. 

As early as the 27th of June, 1786, a town-meeting was held 
in Groton, called at the written request of sixty-eight — a very 
large majority of its legal voters — to take into consideration the 
condition of the country. The warrant for the meeting con- 
tained fifteen articles to be acted upon '* and they were all 
referred to a Committee, chosen for the purpose, consisting of Dr. 
Benjamin Morse, Capt. Job Shattuck, Ensign Moses Childs, Capt. 
Asa Lawrence, and Capt. Zachariah Fitch, to whom "discretion- 
ary powers" were given to act as they pleased; and "to cor- 
respond with other Committees of any towns in the Common- 
wealth relative to our public grievances ; and to draw up a pe- 
tition to lay before the General Court for a redress of the same." 

At length the people in the western counties of the State met, 
organized under Daniel Shays,f and resolved to resist, under 
arms if need be, the further issue and the legal enforcement of 
executions originating under the circumstances to which we have 
referred. The Court of Common Pleas, the principal source from 
which these executions were derived, had become particularly ob- 
noxious ; and it was determined to prevent its sessions, until some 
relief could be obtained ; and the courts in Hampshire and Wor- 
cester counties were actually stopped. The excitement was not, 
however, confined to those counties, but extended to every other 
part of the Commonwealth. Many of the suffering people every- 
where sympathized in the movement. In Middlesex, the discon- 
tent was particularly manifest in Groton and its neighborhood. 
A considerable number of persons organized under Capt. Nathan 
Smith of Shirley and Benjamin Page of Groton, and on the 12th 
of September proceeded to Concord, partly under arms, to pre- 

* Four of these articles ran thus : — "6. To see if the town will vote not to have any Inferior 
Court. 7. To see if the town will vote not to have more than one attorney in a county to draw 
writs, and that he be paid the same as the State's Attorney. 8. To see if the town will vote 
that there be a stop put to all law suits of a civil nature, until there is a greater circulation of 
money than there is at present.' — '15. To see if the town will vote to choose a Committee of 
Safety, to sec that there are no more infringements made on our injured rights and privileges, and 
transact any thing relative to the above articles, or any other things which may be necessary for 
the good of the public at large." 

t Gen. Shays, the leader in this rebellion, died in Sparta, N. Y., Sept. 29, 1825, ce. 84. Not- 
withstanding the prominent part he acted, he was never arrested, having fled from the State. 
He, however, received a general pardon, and was afterwards a pensioner of the United States 
government. Several others, convicted of" Treason" and under sentence, were also pardoned. 



JOB SHATTUCK. 125 

vent the usual September session of the Court. The number at 
11 o'clock was about seventy, but increased in the afternoon to 
about two hundred and fifty, by the arrival of others from Wor- 
cester county ; and from other towns in Middlesex, among whom 
Col. Robinson of Westford was conspicuous. Capt. Shattuck, 
who had been chosen their principal leader and commander, 
drew up and presented to the Court the following paper : — 

" To the Honorable Justices of the Court of General Sessions of the Peace and 
the Court of Common Pleas for the County of Middlesex. 

" The voice of the people of this County is that the Court of General Sessions 
of the Peace and Court of Common Pleas, shall not enter this court-house until 
such time as the people shall have a redress of a number of grievances they 
labor under at present, which will be set forth in a petition or remonstrance to the 
next General Court. Job Shattuck. 

" Concord, September 12th, 1786." 

A " Pacific Committee," composed of delegates from several 
towns in the county, were then in session in Concord, and a 
consultation took place between the different parties and the 
Court, which resulted, by way of compromise, in entering upon 
the back of this paper the following endorsement : — 

" i past 3 o'clock. 
" Since writing the within, it is agreed that the Court of Sessions may open 
and adjourn to the last Tuesday of November next, without going into the court- 
house. Job Shattuck." 

The Court was accordingly opened and adjourned. Having 
accomplished their object ; and stayed the further issue of execu- 
tions by this Court to be levied upon property and to increase the 
general distress, the people returned peaceably to their homes, to 
await the result of their petition to the General Court. Some 
plans were devised to prevent the adjourned session of the Court 
in November, at Cambridge, but they were never executed. 
This act, then, constituted Capt. Shattuck's principal, if not his 
only public offence. 

Two months and a half later, on the 28th of November, Oliver 
Prescott of Groton — from what cause does not appear — presented 
a paper to the Governor and Council, certifying that Job Shat- 
tuck, Oliver Parker, and Benjamin Page, of Groton, and Nathan 
Smith and John Kelsey (town clerk) of Shirley, "have been 
active in the late rebellion, and stirring up the people to oppose 
government, and are therefore dangerous persons, and pray a 



126 FIFTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

warrant may be issued to restrain them of their personal liberty." 
In consequence of this communication, an Executive warraut 
for their arrest was issued the same day to Aaron Brown and 
Wm. Scott. For their assistance a volunteer company of horse- 
men, under command of Col. Benjamin Hitchborn, left Boston 
the next day, Nov. 29th, and were joined at Concord by another 
party under Capt. Henry Woods of Pepperell, and proceeded im- 
mediately to Groton. The whole numbered about one hundred 
men. They searched Capt. Shattuck's house, but did not suc- 
ceed in finding him. They however took Parker and Page, and 
sent them to Boston jail. The search was renewed the next 
morning, but being again unsuccessful they were about to return, 
when twelve men under Sampson Reed of Boston went to the 
house of Samuel Gragg, where it was supposed Capt. Shattuck 
had spent the night, and by threats and the offer of money, as- 
certained that he had been there, but had just left. By tracks in 
a light snow, which had fallen the previous night, he was traced 
about two miles to the river in sight of his own house. Here, 
while hesitating whether to go home, he discovered the twelve 
men on horseback, in full speed, near him. He retreated to the 
river, and they pursued and overtook him. Some resistance hav- 
ing been made, F. C. Varnum of Boston gave Capt. Shattuck a 
terrible blow with his sword, making a wound about twelve 
inches long, diagonally, across his knee and leg, dividing the 
knee-pan into two parts. His own sword was not arrested 
from his strong muscular grasp until his pursuers had cut the 
fingers of the hand in which it was held nearly off. These acts 
effected his surrender and capture. 

He was taken, delivered to Loammi Baldwin, sheriff of the 
county ; and the next day, Dec. 1st, was committed to prison in 
Boston, with Parker and Page. The governor gave directions to 
the jailer "not to suffer any person to speak to them or to have 
any communication with them, and not to permit them the use 
of pen, ink, or paper, without the special leave of the governor." 
He continued in jail over four months, during the winter and 
spring; his wounds in the meantime, owing to their severity, to 
bad accommodations and bad attendance, threatened the extinc- 
tion of his life. They made him so lame for the remaining 
thirty-three years of his life as to require the use of crutches to 



JOB SHATTUCK. 127 

assist his locomotion. On the 2d of April, 1787, he petitioned 
" to be admitted to bail," saying, "his wounds have never been 
healed, and his bodily health is greatly impaired for want of ex- 
ercise and fresh air ; and he is fearful of the consequences, if he 
is not soon liberated." On the back of this petition the select- 
men of Groton, on the 3d of April, indorsed — " We have no ob- 
jection to the prayer of the within petition being granted, as we 
believe the public will not be injured thereby." He was lib- 
erated April 6th, under bonds of £200, with two sureties of £100 
each, for his appearance at Court, and returned to his family in 
Groton. 

At the term of the Supreme Court, commencing at Concord, 
Tuesday, May 9, 1787, he was indicted for the " Crime of Trea 7 
son." The Governor had previously instructed the several towns 
to permit the name of no man who had spoken against the gov- 
ernment to be put into the jury box ! The consequence was, a 
packed jury was empanneled. On his trial, feeling conscious of 
the integrity of his purpose, and of having committed no intentional 
crime, and certainly not the one charged upon him, he employed 
no counsel himself, and made no defence. The Court, however, 
directed that Christopher Gore and Thomas Dawes, Esqrs., attor- 
neys, should appear in his behalf. He was tried on the 23d of 
May, and convicted, of course, under the circumstances ; and his 
offence being by law a capital one, the sentence of death was 
pronounced upon him. He was remanded to the jail in Con- 
cord. Five days later, on the 28th of May, the proceedings of 
the Court were laid before the Governor and Council, and an 
Executive warrant, dated the same day, was issued for his execu- 
tion, to take place "on Thursday, the twenty-eighth of June 
next, between the hours of twelve and three o'clock" ! — In one 
month ! ! This was one of the last acts of Bowdoin's adminis- 
tration ; and he seems to have made haste to accomplish it before 
the term of his official life expired, which took place two days 
afterwards. On the 27th of June, Capt. Shattuck was reprieved 
to the 26th of July ; on the 25th of July, to the 20th of Septem- 
ber ; and on the 12th of September, he received from Governor 
Hancock an unconditional, "full, free and ample pardon" for all 
his offences. 

Whatever opinion may be entertained as to the conduct of 



128 FIFTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

Capt. Job Shattuck in the movement of 1786, there is no doubt 
that he was moved by conscientious, honest and patriotic mo- 
tives. He was a man of great physical abilities, possessed more 
than usual strength and athletic power, had strong common sense, 
sagacious, energetic business habits, and was highminded and just 
in all his dealings. He was independent in his feelings ; relied 
upon himself; and made others feel that they might rely safely 
upon him. Though his educational privileges had been scanty, 
yet he could express his ideas effectively before an assembly of 
his townsmen, and was well qualified to be conspicuous and in- 
fluential as a popular leader. In political principles he was thor- 
oughly democratic. He was also a member of the church, and 
an habitual attendant on religious worship. His offence, so far 
as it was an offence, was a political, not a moral one ; and it was 
not more nullifying, revolutionary, or treasonable, than many 
that are committed with impunity in our own day, and in our 
own State. He felt that the crisis and the occasion justified 
what he did : and he never regretted it himself, but often said he 
looked upon no act of his life with more satisfaction. Honest, 
respectable and patriotic men were on opposite sides on questions 
which then engaged public attention. Each party thought it 
was doing the very best thing it could for the good of the coun- 
try ; but either might have been mistaken in some of its meas- 
ures. Much might have been said at the time and under the 
circumstances in favor of both. A very large majority of the 
citizens of Groton agreed with Capt. Shattuck in opinion, and 
advised to the course he took. He acted as their agent to car- 
ry into effect their wishes, expressed in public town meeting. 
Though more prominent, he was not more guilty than Parker and 
Page who were acquitted, nor than many others who were not ar- 
rested ; but he was convicted under the forms of a legal trial ; and 
made a victim to be held up under sentence, by the Executive 
of the State, as a warning to others, until tranquillity should be 
restored. Though his family were apprehensive, owing to the 
highly excited state of public opinion, and the animosity that ex- 
isted between the different parties, that extreme measures might 
be resorted to, yet we can scarcely believe that even Bowdoin 
and his advisers, much less Hancock and his advisers, ever en- 
tertained a serious determination to push them so far as his 



JOB SHATTUCK. 129 

execution. Capt. Shattuck, however, ever felt that he was 
greatly indebted to Hancock for the preservation of his life. 

The harsh and brutal treatment he received was justly con- 
demned by a large majority of the people ; and, combined with 
other causes, produced a great popular excitement. Parties were 
formed of " Bowdoin Men," and " Opposition ;" and a political 
tornado, such as never swept over the Commonwealth, and has 
scarcely any counterpart even in modern party changes, com- 
pletely revolutionized the government. 

In 1786, the whole vote of the State was 8,234; and Bowdoin 
was reelected by 6,001, or 72 per cent, of these votes. In the 
next year, 1787, the whole vote of the State was 24,588, of which 
Bowdoin received 5,395, only, or 21 per cent. ! and Hancock, 
the candidate of the "Opposition," was elected by 18,459 votes! 
In the aggregate votes of Groton, Pepperell, and Shirley, Bowdoin 
received 30 and Hancock 159 votes ! A most emphatic demon- 
stration that public opinion was in condemnation of the policy 
and measures of Bowdoin's administration, and in favor of the 
party that sympathized with Capt. Shattuck, coincided in his 
views, and approved his doings. The returns to the Legislature 
were equally decisive. Three fourths of the House of Repre- 
sentatives, and two thirds of the Senate and Council were new 
members, and belonged to the Opposition, "some of whom," 
says Minot, the historian of the Insurrection, "had been thrown 
into prison as dangerous to the Commonwealth, or had fled from 
State warrants into neighboring states, or had presided at county 
conventions, or otherwise manifested their opposition to the rul- 
ing authority." Dr. Benjamin Morse was chosen a Representa- 
tive from Groton, though eleven individuals — a very small minor- 
ity indeed of the voters — were found in town who entered their 
protest against his election, on account of the prominent part he 
had acted as Chairman of the Committee of Correspondence in the 
Insurrection. Even Capt. Shattuck, himself, at the first public 
town meeting held after his conviction and pardon, was chosen 
the grand-juryman of the town, then an elective officer of honor 
and responsibility. This is an additional evidence that his acts 
were not disapproved by the citizens of Groton ; and it was 
highly complimentary to him, especially under the circumstances 
in which it was conferred. 
17 



130 FIFTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

The peculiar crisis in the affairs of Massachusetts which orig- 
inated the movement here referred to, was an extraordinary one 
in the history of the State ; and it was not without its influence 
upon the country generally. It impressed upon the people many 
useful lessons. While it taught the hazards and futility of resist- 
ing public law and authority, it taught also the necessity of ad- 
ministering this law and authority wisely for the welfare and hap- 
piness of the people. And that this might be done effectually, it 
taught, furthermore, the necessity of a more efficient national 
government. The State Constitution adopted six years before, 
though excellent in itself, was insufficient for the general protection. 
Public tranquillity was soon, however, restored; and the people 
became more and more contented under returning individual 
prosperity, milder and wiser State measures, a better understand- 
ing of the mutual rights and duties of the governed and the gov- 
ernment, and the adoption, in 1787, one year later, by the several 
United Colonies, of the Federal Constitution.* 

Capt. Shattuck m. 1, in Pepperell, May 25, 1758, Sarah 
HARTWELL.f She was b. in Groton, March 19, 1738, and d. 
May 5, 1798, as. 60 y. 1 m. 16 d., after a long confinement by 
sickness. She was a member of the church, and, like her parents 
and brother, eminently worthy and pious. She was one of those 
patriotic women known in her neighborhood as " Mrs. David 
Wright's Guard." A few days after the 19th of April, 1775, it 
was expected that Leonard Whiting of Hollis, N. H., a noted 
tory, would pass through Pepperell to Groton ; and a number of 
noble women, partly clothed in their absent husbands' apparel, 
and armed with muskets, pitchforks, and such other weapons as 
they could find, collected at the bridge over the Nashua River, 
between these two towns, now known as Jewett's Bridge. They 

* The facts here stated are derived principally from the records and papers on file in the 
■otfice of the Secretary of State. 

t Her father Samuel Hartwell, s. of John and Sarah, a descendant of William Hartwell of 

Concord, was b. April 30, 1702, and d. May 26, 1782, se. 80. He m. 1, in 1728, Sarah , 

who d. in 1733, leaving one child, Sarah, b. July 29, 1733. He m. 2, June 9, 1737, Sarah Hol- 
den, b. Sept. 5, 1717, and d. March 5, 1798, oe. 80, the eldest of ten children of John Holdcn, 
who d. Dec. 27, 1753, probably a descendant of Justinian Holden, (p. 87.) He m. Nov. 26, 
1715, Sarah Davis, who d. Doc. 21, 1753. Samuel Hartwell had 10 children, the youngest born 
when ho was 60, and his wife 4k — 1. Sarah, b. March 19, 1738, m. Job Shattuck; 2. Rachel, 
b Doc. 19, 1739, d. Aug. 16, 1758; 3. a dau. b. May 21, 1742, d. oe. 6 d. ; 4. Priscilla, b. Feb. 
20 1715; m. Sept. 9, 1766. James Green, Jr. ; he d. Feb. 23, 1825; 5. Samuel, b July 11, 1718, 
d. Oct. 22, 1753; 6 Hannah, b. Sept. 27, 1751 ; 7. Mary, b. July 7, 1751, d. Oct. 2, 1758; 8. 
Levi, b. Doc. 19, 1758 ; 9. Samuel, b. Aug. 7, 1761, m. Aug. 15, 1791, Caroline Matilda Wright, 
b. Au°\ 21, 1772, dau. of David Wright and Prudence Ciuninings, an. I had 8 children. 



JOB SHATTUCK MARTHA SHATTUCK. 131 



elected Mrs. Wright as their commander ; and resolved that no 
foe to freedom should pass that bridge. Soon Whiting appeared, 
and he was immediately arrested and searched ; and despatches 
from Canada to the British in Boston were found in his boots. 
He was taken to the house of Solomon Rogers in the neighbor- 
hood, and there detained, securely guarded by the women over 
night. He was afterwards conducted to Groton, and the treason- 
able correspondence was forwarded to the Committee of Safety. 
Mrs. Wright had named her son, born in 1774, ''Liberty." It 
had just then died ; but, to perpetuate the noble sentiments she 
entertained, she gave the same name to another son born three 
years later.* 

He m. 2, May 26, 1800, Elizabeth, widow of John Gragg, and 
dau. of William Lakin. She d. June 1, 1824, as. 81. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY SARAH HARTWELL, BORN IN GROTON. 

1. Job, b. Dec. 10, 1758 ; m. Elizabeth Blood, 174 

2. Sarah, b. Dec. 27, 17G0; m. Benjamin Simpson, 175 

3. Ezekiel, b. April 12, 1763 ; m. Prudence Blood, 176 

4. William, b. March 8, 1765 ; m. Eunice Blood, 177 

5. Rachel, b. July 12, 1767 ; m. Oliver Hartwell, 178 

6. Daniel, b. Feb. 11, 1770; m. Abigail Sheple, 179 

7. Noah, b. Aug. 30, 1772 ; m. Anna Sheple, 180 

8. Margaret, b. Mar. 13, 1774 ; m. Jonathan Bennett, 181 

9. Anna, b. Feb. 6, 1779; m. Thomas Bennett, 182 



74. Martha Shattuck, dau. of Daniel, (p. 98,) was b. in 
Northfield, April 2, 1725, and d. in Bernardston, Nov. 12, 1802, 
se. 77 y. 7 m. 10 d. 

She m. about 1745, Lieut. Daniel Rider, who first settled as 

* Samuel Wright, the father of David, m. Jan. 13, 1733, Hannah (or Anna) Lawrence, b. 
July 3, 1703, dau. of Nathaniel, (p. 71.) They lived in Pepperell, and had 

1. Samuel, b. Oct. 15, 1733 ; m. March 15, 1757. Abigail Flagg, and had, 1. Samuel, b. Aug-. 

10, 1757; 2. Edmond, b. Aug. 9, 1760; 3. Abigail, b. Sept. 12, 1762; 4. Elizabeth, b. May 
28, 1764; 5. Winslow, b. Oct. 3, 1766. 

2. David, b. Aug. 19, 1735 ; m. Prudence Cummings of Hollis, the heroine above mentioned. 

They lived and d. in Pep., and had, 1. David, b. March 28, 1763, m. Polly Lowell, dau. of 
John Lowell of Dunstable ; 2. Prudence, b. Aug.29, 1764, d. unm., ep. 85; 3. Cummings, b. 
March 17, 1766, went to Thompson, Ct. ; 4. Mary, b. Dec. 27, 1767, d. July 1, 1774; 5. 
Wilkes, rn. a Coffin of Newbury, went to sea and d. without issue ; 6. Caroline Matilda, b. 
Aug. 21, 1772. m. Aug. 15, 1791, Samuel Harlwell. (p. 130;) 7. Liberty, b. July 19, 1774, d. 
March 11, 1775; 8. Devera, b. Feb. 10, 1776, m. Nathan Corey of Brookline, N. H.; 9. 
Liberty, b. May 30, 1778, m. Betsey Blanchard of Pep., and d. in Nashua ; 10. Artemas, b. 
Aug. 4, 1780, m. Prudence Corey, and d. in Milford, N. H. ; 11. Daniel, b. April 26, 1783, 
went to Norfolk, Va , where he m. ; d. at sea. 

3. Josiah,b. July 31,1737; m. Dolly Shattuck, (See Family 108) 

4. Jonas, b. Aug. 12, 1739 ; m. Feb. 12, 1770, Anna Parker, and had, born in Pepperell, 1. Anna. 

b. Dec. 1, 1770, m. Asa Shattuck, (Family 105;) 2. Jonas, b. Oct. 26, 1772. 

5. Nathaniel, b. Aug. 5. 1741 ; d. March 6. 1743. 

6. Daniel, b. Sept. 20, 1743. 7. Nathaniel, b. Sept. 26, 1746. 



132 FIFTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

a farmer in Northfield, but in 1747 removed to Hadley, and in 
1750 to Bernardston, where he d. June, 1804, as. 84. Both were 
members of the church. 

HER CHILDREN, BY DANIEL RIDER, SEVEN YOUNGEST BORN IN BERNARDSTON. 

1. Hannah, b. May 10, 1746; m. Jan. 7, 1766, Ichabod Warren of Bernardston. 

2. Daniel, b. Sept. 10, 1747; d. young-. 

3. Peter, b. Nov. 23, 1749; was drowned May 24, 1771, m. 21 y. 6 m. 1 d. 

4. Hophnius,b. Aug. 2, 1751 ; m. March 6, 1773, Sarah Cunnable. He d. June 

13, 1776, in the army at Lake Champlain. Had 2 sons. 

5. Rebecca, b. May 23,1753; m. 1, Nov. 13, 1770, Samuel Cunnable, Jr. 

She m. 2, Bridgman of Guilford, Vt. ; d. April 20, 1837. Left many 

descendants. 

6. Martha, b. April 7, 1755; m. July 25, 1775, John Hunt. They resided in 

Leyden. She d. March 19, 1831, re. 75 y. 11 m. 12 d. He d. Feb. 14, 1819. 

7. Daniel, b. Mar. 15, 1758; m. 1, Jan. 3, 1782, Zurirah Smalley. She d. 

March 4, 1813. He m. 2, widow Abigail Starkweather. She d. March 4, 
1827. He d. Jan. 11, 1831, re. 73. 

8. John, b. Feb. 14, 1760 ; d. Sept. 30, 1767, re. 7 y. 7 m. 16 d. 

9. Anna, b. Aug. 24, 1763 ; d. Oct. 30, 1765, re. 2 y. 2 m. 6 d. 

10. Esther, b. Nov. 9, 1765 ; d. Sept. 30, 1767, re. 1 y. 10 m. 21 d. 

11. Gideon, b. Nov. 28, 1768; grad. at Dartmouth College in 1790; studied 

medicine, and settled in his profession in Bernardston, where he d. Sept. 14, 
1839, re. 70 y. 9 m. 16 d. He was town clerk from 1798 (except 1801) to 
1810 ; town treasurer, 1802 to 1810 ; selectman, 1801 to 1804, '5, '6, and '9 ; 
and representative in 1806. He m. Oct. 10, 1791, Sylvia Alexander of 
Northfield; b. Nov. 16, 1764; d. May 25, 1850, re. 85 y. 6 m. 9 d. Had 
1. Alpha, b. Feb. 3, 1792; 2. Patty, b. Oct. 6, 1793, m. Joseph Picket; 3. 
Alexander, b. Aug. 1, 1795, m. Electa Remington ; 4. Sophia, b. March 12, 
1797, unm. ; 5. Charles Jarvis, b. Feb. 26, 1799, m. , d. May 17, 1750 ; 

6. Dwight Lyman, b. April 9, 1801, d. unm. at Columbia, Ga., Sept. 3, 1804 ; 

7. Sylvia, b. Feb. 17, 1803, m. 1, Thomas A. Snow, 2, Holton of 

Northfield ; 8. Wm. Eaton, b. April 5, 1807, editor and publisher of the 
" Vermont Phoenix" at Brattleborough ; m. Delia Jewett of Guilford. Dr. 
Ryther, sometime previous to 1800, altered the name from Rider to Ruyther 
or Ryther as now written. 



75. Capt. Daniel Shattuck, s. of Daniel, (p. 98,) was b. in 
Northfield, April 11, 1727; and was a farmer upon the old pater- 
nal estate in Hinsdale, where he d. April 7, 1809, ae. 82. He was 
a large landholder, and a man of property, distinction and influ- 
ence in the town. He commanded a company in the battle of 
Stillwater, where his horse was shot under him. He was a re- 
markable sportsman, and had the reputation of being " The Great 
Hunter." Catamounts, bears, and other ferocious wild animals, 
were no terror to him, as he was sure of his prey when they 
came within his reach. 



DANIEL SHATTUCK PHEBE SHATTUCK. 133 

He m. 1, in 1753, Mary Smith, then of Amherst, Mass. She 
d. Sept. 3, 1788, in her 61st year. Her father, Stephen Smith, 
(sometime of Amherst, but d. in Sunderland in 1760,) m. proba- 
bly, Mary Ingram, b. July 10, 1702, dau. of John Ingram and 
Mehitable Dickinson. (Foot Genealogy, p. 275.) Her grand- 
parents were Jonathan and Abigail Smith of Hartford. 

He m. 2, Lucy Clapp, b. Nov. 10, 1737, dau. of Preserved 
Clapp, and widow of Martin Smith, a cousin of Mary Smith, his 
first wife, and a son of Joseph Smith of Hatfield. After Capt. 
Shattuck's death she lived and d. with her son Phineas Smith, 
in Randolph, Vt. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY MARY SMITH, BGRN IN HINSDALE. 

1. Cyrus, b. Sept. 30, 1754 ; m. Tirza Evans, 183 

2. Makepeace, b. Aug. 6, 1756 ; m. Lydia Grandy, 184 

3. Mary, b. Nov. 4, 1758 ; m. in 1780, Elijah Barrett. Se d. in Le Roy, 

N. Y. ; had 1. Roswell ; 2. Mary, ra. Burt ; 3. Charles, d. in Le Roy, 

leaving a family ; 4. Francis, m Pote of Belfast, Me. ; 5. Silas of 

of Youngstown, N. Y. 

4. Gideon, b. Aug. 27, 1761 ; m. Experience Ingram, 185 

5. Phena, > b. Dec. 12, 1764 ; d. in infancy. 

6. Thena, S Twins. m. Jan. 30, 1781, Benjamin Sanger. He d. in 

Hinsdale in 1812. She d. in Brownington, Vt., in 1833. They had one 
dau. who m. Dr. James R. Grow from Hartland, Vt., who had 12 children, 
some of whom are now (1853) living in Montpelier. 

76. Phebe Shattuck, dau. of Daniel, (p. 98,) was b. in North- 
field, Dec. 27, 1729, and d. in Amherst, May 4, 1806, se. 76 y. 
4 m. 7 d. Her age is stated upon her grave-stone as 66, but it 
is probably a mistake for 76, unless there is an error in the record 
of her birth, which is unlikely. 

She m. in 1755, her cousin, Reuben Ingram, b. in Amherst, 
then Hadley, Nov. 18, 1732 ; d. June 16, 1791, se. 58 y. 6 m. 28 
d. ; s. of John Ingram 3d and Lydia, dau. of Samuel Boltwood, 
(p. 98.) 

HER CHILDREN, BY REUBEN INGRAM, BORN IN AMHERST. 

1. Joanna, bap. May 23, 1756; d. April 9, 1783, as. 27. 

2. Phebe, bap. about 1759; d. Oct. 25, 1767, se. 8. 

3. David, bap. March 6, 1763 ; d. Jan. 22, 1827, ss. 64. 

4. Jonathan, ) b. April 21, 1765; d. Oct. 22, 1767, se. 2. 

5. Nathaniel, S Twins ; d. March 20, 1776, ee. 11. 

6. JVathan, bap. July 30, 1769; d. Feb. 24, 1818, m. 49; m. 

7. Phebe, \ These not recorded. An account of a reference in regard to 

8. JYathaniel, > the settlement of the father's estate in 1796, mentions widow 

9. Sarah, J Phebe, sons David, Nathan, and Nathaniel, and daus. Phebe 

and Sarah. 



134 



FIFTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 



77. Gideon Shattuck, s. of Daniel, (p. 98,) was b. in North- 
field, Oct. 20, 1732. He was a farmer in Northampton, where 
he d. suddenly by bleeding at the lungs, Oct, 21, 1757, a3. 25. 

He m. Aug. 11, 1757, Lois Brown, one of 12 children, b. in 
Northfield and Hinsdale. Their father d., and the mother re- 
moved, on account of the Indian wars, to East Hampton. Mrs. 
Shattuck m. 2, Medad Edwards. 

HIS POSTHUMOUS CHILD, BY LOIS BROWN, BORN IN NORTHAMPTON. 

Rebecca, b. April 27, 1758 ; m. John Sanford, 186 



78. John Shattuck, s. of John, (p. 99,) was b. in Shrewsbury, 
Feb. 7, 1722, and settled in that part of Marlborough known as 
" The Farms," now within the limits of Framingham, where he 
d. about Jan., 1785. His will is dated April 1, 1784, and was 
proved May 4, 1785. (Midd. Rec. LXVIL, p. 372.) He was 
warden in Framingham in 1772, a selectman in 1777 and '78, 
and a respected and useful citizen. He was a large proprietor of 
Hubbardston. 

He m. 1, in Marlborough, Nov. 27, 1744, his 3d cousin Abi- 
gail Morse, b. Nov. 11, 1725, dau. of Joseph Morse and Abigail 
Barnes, granddan. of Joseph Morse and Grace Warren, and great- 
granddau. of Joseph Morse and Susanna Shattuck, (p. 66.) 

He m. 2, Mary . She d. June 14, 1822, as. 94.* 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ABIGAIL MORSE, BORN IN FRAMINGHAM. 

1. Joseph, b. March 5, 1745; m. Abigail Fairbanks, 187 

2. Lucy, b. April 12, 1747. 

3. Reuben, b. June 25, 1749. 

4. Thaddeus, b. June 19, 1752; m. Susanna Wait, 188 

5. Susanna, b. May 2, 1755; m. Davis. 

6. John, 1). Aug. 22, 1758. He has been supposed to be the John Shattuck 

described in the United States Invalid Pension Rolls, printed in 1835 — a ser- 
geant in the 4th Reg. of the Infantry, and represented as of Worcester Co. 

7. Anna, b. Oct. 30, 1760; m. Levi Greenwood of Hubbardston. 

8. Chloe, b. Nov. 16, 1764. 



79. Thomas Shattuck, s. of John, (p. 99,) was b. in Marl- 
borough, March 3, 1724, and as early as 1751 settled in Peters- 

* About 3, P. M., Aug. 15, 1787, a tornado passed through the north part of Framingham, and 
" overturned the house occupied by this family, leaving the lower floor. Two childien lying 
upon the bed were found uninjured A Mrs. Saunders, a sister of Mrs. Shattuck, living in the 
house, was carried by the violence of the wind to a considerable distance, and was seriously in- 
jured. Mrs. Shattuck was blown about ten rods. A feather bed was found three miles distant 
from the house, and in it were recovered thirty dollars in specie, which had previously been 
placed there for safe keeping. 7 ' (Parry's History of Framingham, p. G8.) 



EPHRAIM SHATTUCK SILAS SHATTUCK. 135 

ham. then called Nichewang. He often bought and sold real 
estate in that and the neighboring towns. (Worcester Records.) 

He m. Elizabeth Parmenter, dan. -of Joseph Parmenter of 
Framingham, b. May 17, 1722. Both d. in Petersham, dates not 
known. 

HIS CHILDREN, EY ELIZABETH PARMENTER, BORN IN PETERSHAM. 

1. Thomas, b. . One of this name appears often upon the mus- 

ter-rolls of the revolution, and as a sergeant part of the time, represented to 
be from Petersham ; and he is supposed to have been this son. 



2. Ezra, b. Aug. 5, 1751 

3. Abel, b. Aug. 16, 1753 

4. Elizabeth, b. April 10, 1755 

5. Jonathan, b. Oct. 4, 1757 

6. Abel, b. 1759 

7. Lydia, b. May 5, 1760 

8. Sybil, b. April 4, 1762 



m. Rebecca Cunnable, 189 

d. Nov. 30, 1757, a5. 4 y. 3 m. 14 d. 

m. Benjamin Carlton, \qq 

d. of apoplexy, se. 16, as supposed. 

m. 1, M. Marble; 2, L. Oak, .... 191 

m. Lemuel Holton, 192 

d. young. 



80. Ephraim Shattuck, s. of John, (p. 99,) was b. in Marl- 
borough, April 8, 1728 ; first settled in Framingham, but, in 1755, 
removed to Petersham ; and, in 1763, to Templeton, now Phillips- 
ton, (called Gerry until 1812,) where he d. May 5, 1817, se. 89. 
His estate was divided in 1818 between 9 children, names not 
given. (Worcester Records, Vol. XLIX., p. 604.) 

He m. 1, in Marlborough, May 15, 1747, Elizabeth Jackson, 
b. Aug. 21, 1729, dau. of Jonathan Jackson and Martha Frizzel. 
She and her husband covenanted with the church in Framing- 
ham, where her two eldest children were baptized. 

He m. 2, Jan. 15, 1784, widow Hannah Jordan of Barre. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ELIZABETH JACKSON, BORN IN FRAMINGHAM AND PETERSHAM. 

1. Ephraim,bap. July 17, 1748. 

2. Samuel, bap. Jan. 21,1750; m. Sarah Pratt, 193 

3. John, b. ; m. Ruth Phelps, 194 

4. Daniel, b. ; m. Elizabeth Washburn, 195 

5. Abigail, b. 8. Patty, b. 

6. Betsey, b. 9. Lucy, b. June 10, 1764, in Tem. 

7. Polly, b. 10. Sarah, b. May 15, 1766, in Tem. 

81. Silas Shattuck, s. of John, (p. 99,) was b. in Marl- 
borough, Aug. 21, 1738. He was a farmer of Templeton in 
1763; of Petersham in 1767; and removed to Hartland, Vt., 
about 1783, where he d. March 3, 1825, as. 86 y. 6 m. 12 d. 

He m. Sarah Jackson, b. Jan. 5, 1739, sister of his brother 
Ephraim's wife. She d. in Hartland, Sept. 24. 1804, se. 65 y. 
8 m. 19 d. 



136 FIFTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY SARAH JACKSON, BORN IN . 

1. Susan, b. Dec. 16, 1759; m. Henry Chase of Hartford. She d. 1838. He 

d. 1841. Had Patty, Lucy, Sally, Stephen, Asa, Increase. 

2. Ezekiel, b. Mar. 15, 1762; m. Sarah Bullard, 196 

3. Silas, b. Aug. 26, 1766; m. Betsey Ashley, 197 

4. Reuben, b. Mar. 22, 1769; m. 1, Jerusha Sanders. He m. 2, Serepta Rich- 

ardson. He d. 1840, in Hartford, Vt. Had Horace, Rachel, and Betsey. 

5. Ephraim, b. Sept. 28, 1771 ; m. Sophia Ashley, 198 

6. Sarah, b. April 16, 1774 ; m. Daniel Gardner of Hartford. She d. 1842. 

He d. 1848. Had Joel, Enos, Asahel, Susan, Louisa. 

7. John, b. July 13, 1776. He m. and had children ; history not known. 

8. William, b. Oct. 1,1779; m. Eunice Lamphere, 199 



DESCENDANTS OP THE YOUNGER PEPPERELL BRANCHES. 

82. Samuel Shattuck, s. of Samuel, (p. 99, ) was b. Sept. 
25, 1726 — the first white child b. within the limits of Pepperell. 
He was a farmer, and d. of fever, Sept. 16, 1805, se. 78 y. 11 m. 21 d. 

He m. Elizabeth Wesson, who d. of consumption, Nov. 10, 
1806, se. 78. He united with the church in 1756, she, in 1758. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ELIZABETH WESSON, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Samuel, b. Sept. 17, 1757 ; m. Hannah Hartwell, 200 

2. Stephen, b. Feb. 5, 1760 ; m. Lucy Richardson, 201 

3. Anna, b. Mar. 12, 1762 ; m. Thomas Lawrence, 202 

4. Jesse, b. Jan. 9, 1764 ; m. Abigail Boynton, 203 

5. Elizabeth,h. Jan. 7, 1766; m. Nov. 29, 1787, Isaac Woods, Jr., b. May 17, 

1762. She d. March 2, 1837; se. 71 y. 1 m. 25 d., without issue. 



83. Benjamin Shattuck, s. of Samuel, (p. 99,) was b. in Pep- 
perell, Dec. 9, 1728. He was a farmer, and in 1789, removed to 
Brookline, N. H., where he d. Sept. 13, 1813, se. 84 y. 9 m. 4 d. 

He m. 4, Dec. 8, 1763, Abigail Farnsworth, b. Nov. 19, 1735, 
dau. of Matthias F. and Abigail Shed. She d. in Brookline, about 
1767. 

He m. 2, Nov. 15, 1768, Mary Procter, b. in Hollis, dau. of 
Moses Procter. She d. Nov. 4, 1839. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ABIGAIL FARNSWORTH, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. A son, ? b. Jan. 12, 1765 ; d. unnamed, on the day of birth. 

2. A son, y Twins. d. unnamed, Jan. 23, 1765, se. 11 d. 

3. Abigail, b. Dec. 25, 1766 ; m. Ebenezer Emery. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY MARY PROCTER, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

4. Benjamin, b. April 17, 1777 ; m. Sybil Parker, 204 

5. Moses, b. Jan. 10,1779; m. Naomi Weatherbee, 205 

6. Rebecca, b. April 28, 1782 ; m. John Hutchins, 206 

7. Elizabeth, b. April 4, 1785; unmarried. 



ANNA, ELIZABETH AND ISAAC SHATTUCK. 137 

84. Anna Shattuck, dau. of Samuel, (p. 99,) was b. April 13, 
1731, and d. in Groton about 1780. She was a woman of great 
worth and remarkable energy of character, and excelled as a 
mother and manager of her household affairs. As compared with 
her husband she is said to have been the better man of the two. 

She m. Feb. 1, 1753, Simon Blood, b. Aug. 4, 1729, s. of James 
Blood, Jr. and Catherine. They lived near Josiah Clark, as 
marked on Butler's map — the place where her grandfather resided. 

HER CHILDREN, BY SIMON BLOOD, BORN IN GROTON. 

1. Catharine, b. Oct. 27, 1753; m. Nov. 24, 1772, Edmond Blood, b. June 16, 

1751, s. of Benjamin and Eunice Blood. He d. in Ackworth, N. H. 

2. Anna, b. Feb. 25, 1756 ; m. Dec. 15, 1774, Jonathan Sheple,* b. about 1753. 

He first settled in Groton, but removed to Peterborough, thence to Washing- 
ton, N. H., and thence to Jamaica, Vt., where he d. April 21, 1817. She d. 
in Washington, N. H. in 1797. He m. 2, in 1799, Deborah Lawrence, b. 
July 1, 1762, d. Julv 30, 1810. He had 8 children by his 1st and 4 by his 2d 
wife : — 1. Abigail, b. Jan. 15, 1776, m. Daniel Shattuck ; 2. Anna, b. April 22, 
1778, m. Noah Shattuck; 3. Sarah, b. Aug. 16, 1780, d. in Washington in 
1796; 4. Susanna, b. Sept. 8, 1782, m. Seba French of Washington ; 5. Jon- 
athan, b. May 7, 1785, d. in Dexter, Me., March 6, 1854 ; 6. Mary K., b. May 
14, 1787, d. in Groton, May 3, 1836 ; 7. Phebe, b. Dec. 31, 1792, m. Edmond 
Jewett of Pepperell ; 8. Catharine, b. Nov. 30, 1795, m. Daniel Shattuck ; 
9. Benjamin, b. Jan. 15, 1800, d. Oct. 23, 1812; 10. Rebecca, b. Jan. 11, 
1802, m. Benjamin Lawrence ; 11. Sarah, b. Nov. 24, 1804, m. Gardner 
Jameson of Smithfield, R. I. ; 12. Rachel, b. Feb. 6, 1806, m. March 22, 1833, 
Israel Houlten. 

3. Elizabeth, b. July 14, 1762; m. in 1781, Job Shattuck, Jr., . . (Family 174) 

4. Eunice, b. Feb. 25, 1766; m. Sept. 25, 1788, Wm. Shattuck, (Family 177) 



85. Elizabeth Shattuck, dau. of Samuel, (p. 99,) b. Jan. 11, 
1734, m. Nov. 27, 1760, Isaac Baldwin; and had, b. in Pep., — 

1. Jeremiah, b. Sept. 24, 1761. 4. Anna, b. June 15,1768. 

2. Isaac, b. Oct. 12,1763. 5. Daniel,b. Sept. 13, 1771. 

3. Samuel, b. Feb. 12, 1766. 6. Joel, b. Sept. 8, 1773. 



86. Isaac Shattuck, s. of Samuel, (p. 99,) was b. Sept. 1, 
1736. He first settled as a farmer in Pepperell, but removed to 
Brookline, N. H., where he d. Nov. 19, 1807, as. 71 y. 2 m. 18 d. 

* Capt. John Sheple, the ancestor of Jonathan, came to Groton about 1698 ; m. Lydia Lakin, 
dau. of Ensign John Lakin, (p. 95 ;) and d. Sept. 4, 1736. He represented the town in the Gen- 
eral Court six years, between 1716 and 1728, and was a leading man. His s. Jonathan, b. Sept. 
1. 1700, m. Dec. 26, 1728, Lydia Lakin. (probably dau. of Joseph and Abigail Lakin, b. March 
15, 1707,) and d. Nov. 4, 1741. His s. Jonathan, b. Aug. 5, 1729, m. 1, in 1752, Abigail Gragg, 
and had Jonathan, who m. Anna Blood, above mentioned. His mother d. soon after his birth, 
and he was,brought up by his grandmother. The father, in the mean time, m. 2, March 11, 1756, 
Sarah Green, sister of David, (see Butler, p. 270,) and had Sarah and Oliver. 

18 



138 FIFTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

He m. 1, Jan. 15, 1761, wid. Hannah Hall, b. in Pep., March 
30, 1735, dau. of Wm. Spaulding. She d. in Brookline. 

He m. 2, Spaulding, b. in Townsend; d. in Temple, N. H. 

HIS CHILDREN, BAPTIZED AND RECORDED IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Hannah, bap. June 9, 1762 ; m. Eleazer Gilson, 207 

2. Isaac, bap. Oct. 2, 1764; d. Jan. 14, 1775, se. 10 y. 

3. Hepzibah, bap. Mar. 20, 1768 ; d. Sept. 30, 1774, re. 6 y. 

4. Elizabeth, bap. May 27, 1770 ; d. Jan. 23, 1775, re. 5 y. 

5. Anna, bap. April 25, 1773 ; d. Nov. 12, 1774, re. 2 y. 

6. Submit, ; m. Stephen Hall. She d. in New Ipswich, re. 

about 75. He d. in Brookline. 
They had 2 daus. ; one d. in infancy, the other re. 15 y. 



87. Rachel Shattuck, dau. of Samuel, (p. 99,) b. Aug. 21, 
1738, m. Sept. 25, 1765, Sampson Farnsworth, s. of Matthias, 
and b. in Groton. 

1. Samuel, b. Sept. 16, 1767. 2. Philip, b. April 2, 1769. 

88. Philip Shattuck, s. of Samuel, (p. 99,) b. Jan. 18, 1745, 
was a farmer in Pepperell, where he d. July 11, 1806, ee. 61 y. 
5 m. 23 d. ; the church records say, "of mortification of the bow- 
els, occasioned by a fall on the 9th of the same month." He 
left a will, dated 1796, and proved Sept. 22, 1806. (Midd. Rec. 
Vol. CI., p. 44.) 

He m. in Groton, June 9, 1778, Mercy Butterfield, dau. of 
Jonathan Butterfield and Lydia Proctor of Pepperell. She d. Jan. 
27, 1796, se. 41. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY MERCY BUTTERFIELD, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Luther, b. May 28, 1779; m. Dec. 15, 1803, Betsey Badger. He d. in Dun- 

barton, N. H. Had Amelia, who settled in Western New York. 

2. A child, unnamed. ; d. July 11, 1781. 

3. Calvin, b. Mar. 12, 1783 ; m. Phebe Emerson, 208 

4. Anna, b. May 20, 1786; m. Feb. 19, 1815, Wm. Dorrell. 

5. Polly, b. Sept. 5, 1788 ; d. Sept. 7, 1789, se. 1 y. m. 2 d. 

6. Polly, b. Sept. 21, 1790 ; d. Sept. 29, 1806, je. 16 y. m. 8 d. 



89. James Shattuck, s. of James, (p. 100,) b. Sept. 26, 1730, 
was a farmer in Pepperell, where he d. of consumption, Nov. 12, 
1806, as. 76 y. 1 m. 16 d. 

He m. Dec. 9, 1755, Phebe Tucker of Brookline, b. Aug. 25, 
1736, dau. of Josiah and Abigail Tucker of Groton. She d. of 
consumption, July 20, 1813, a?. 76 y. 10 m. 25 d. Both united 
with the church in 1802. 



RUTH, REUBEN, AND JOSEPH SHATTUCK. 139 

HIS CHILDREN, BY PHEBE TUCKER, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Phehe, b. Nov. 8, 1756 ; m. March 10, 1774, Philip Adams of Rockingham, 

Vt. She d. March 11, 1830. ae. 73 y. 4 m. 3 d. 

2. Ruth, b. Aug. 4, 1758 ; d. June 25, 1775, re. 16 y. 10 m. 21 d. 

3. Nathan, b. Oct. 19, 1760 ; m. Hannah Mason, 209 

4. James, b. June 6, 1763 ; m. Sybil Tarbell, 210 

5. Josiah, b. Mar. 26, 1770 ; m. 1, S. Tarbell; 2, A. Tarbell, .... 211 

6. Zimri, b. June 3, 1772 ; d. Dec. 28, 1797, ae. 25 y. 6 m. 25 d. 



90. Ruth Shattuck, dau. of James, (p. 100,) b. Jan. 7, 1733, 
d. in Pepperell, June 6, 1815, se. 82 y. 4 m. 29 d. 

She m. Feb. 21, 1760, Nathaniel Parker, Jr., b. Dec. 2, 1741, 
s. of Nathaniel P., Jr. and Eleanor Walker. He was killed at the 
battle of Bunker Hill. He left a will made just before that event. 

HER CHILDREN, BY NATHANIEL PARKER, JR., BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Sarah, b. July 22, 1761. 4. Nathaniel, b. April 12, 1771. 

2. Ruth, b. Mar. 10, 1764. 5. Thomas, b. March 2, 1774. 

3. Caleb, b. Aug. 20, 1768. 



91. Reuben Shattuck, s. of James, (p. 100,) was b. April 21, 
1741, and d. in Pepperell, Dec. 5, 1826, as. 85 y. 7 m. 14 d. 

He m. Nov. 25, 1773, Lydia Parker, b. Feb. 17, 1742, dau. of 
Edmond Parker of Reading. She d. Aug. 31, 1822, se. 80 y. 
6 m. 14 d. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY LYDIA PARKER, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Reuben,b. Sept. 25, 1775; m. Sarah Parker, 212 

2. Lydia, b. June 11, 1778; m. Willard Shed of Pepperell. 

3. Sally, b. Aug. 18,1783; m. 1, Feb. 11, 1802, Thomas Dorrell ; 2, Daniel 

Shed, brother of Willard. No children. 



92. Joseph Shattuck, s. of James, (p. 100,) b. Oct. 1, 1747, 
was a farmer in Pepperell, where he d. of apoplexy, July 24, 1803, 
se. 55 y. 9 m. 23 d. 

He m. 1. Jan. 16, 1770, Mary Lamson of Townsend. She d. 
April 23, 1781. 

He m. 2, May 9, 1782, Betsey Grimes of Townsend. She d. 
Jan. 29, 1814, ge. 65. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY MARY LAMSON, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Joseph, b. Sept. 21, 1771 ; d. young, of the rickets. 

2. Mary, b. Jan. 2, 1774 ; m. Thomas Wyman of Concord. 

3. Amos, b. June 2, 1776; m. 1, Dec. 2, 1802, Polly Bailey of Lunenburg. 

She d. May 6, 1805. He m. 2, March 17, 1806, Polly Heald. He d. Dec. 
4, 1809, as. 33 y. 6 m. 2 d. 



140 FIFTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

4. Sarah, b. April 27, 1780 ; m. Dec. 23, 1800, Lewis Blood of Groton. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY BETSEY GRIMES, BORN IN GROTON. 

5. Joseph, b. Jan. 22,1783; m. Betsey Pierce, 213 

6. Joel, b. Oct. 22, 1784; m. Olive Hill; d. in Dublin, N. H. No issue. 

7. Betsey, b. Mar. 24, 1787 ; m. Winthrop Shattuck, .... (Family 157) 

8. Asenath, b. May 2, 1790 ; m. Joel Mason ; lives in New Haven. 



93. Moses Shattuck, s. of James, (p. 100,) was b. Jan. 24, 
1752, and d. in Pepperell, July 24, 1830, se. 78 y. 6 m. He 
was a farmer, school teacher, collector, selectman, and held a 
respectable social position in the town. 

He m. in 1778, Abigail Woods, b. Feb. 25, 1756, dau. of Isaac 
W. and Tryphena Parker. She d. Feb. 12, 1840, ae. 84. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ABIGAIL WOODS, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Abigail, b. Sept. 17, 1782; m. Feb. 18, 1805, James Taylor of Groton. 

2. Rebecca, b. Dec. 26, 1783 ; m. Lemuel Lakin, 214 

3. Tryphena, b. March 9, 1785 ; m. Jeremiah Holmes of Woodstock, Ct. 

4. Moses, b. Sept. ]9, 1786; m. in 1814, Ann Butman of Tewksbury; and 
d. without issue, Dec. 5, 1842, se. 56 y. 2 m. 12 d. He was agent for the 
"Locks and Canal Co." "Shattuck Street" in Lowell was named for him. 
His widow m. Quincy Sylvester, and d. suddenly, July 5, 1851. 

5. Sarah, b. Sept. 2, 1788 ; d. Sept. 19, 1820, ee. 32 y. m. 17 d. 

6. Isaac, b. June 4, 1791 ; d. Aug. 18, 1794, as. 3 y. 2 m. 14 d. 

7. Aaron, b. Dec. 13, 1792 ; m. Nancy Shattuck, 215 

8. Amey W., b. July 9, 1794 ; m. Jonathan Butman, 216 

9. Diodama, b. May 18, 1796; m. Caleb Sylvester, 217 

10. MindwellH., b. Feb. 27, 1800 ; m. Jan. 19, 1820, Asa S. Lewis of Groton, b. 
June 25, 1790— his 2d wife. She d. Dec. 31, 1854, se. 54 y. 10 m. 4 d. 

11. Thomas B.,b. Aug. 27, 1802: m. Sarah Folsom. 



94. Nathaniel Shattuck, s. of Jeremiah, (p. 101,) was b. 
Aug. 12, 1724, and d. of the great fever in Pepperell, July 17. 
1757, se. 32 y. 11 m. 5 d. 

He m. 1, Hannah Symonds of Reading. 
He m. 2, April 18, 1757, Ruth Shattuck. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY HANNAH SIMONDS, BOIIN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Hannah, b. Sept. 23, 1747; m. Isaac Boynton, (Family 111) 

2. Nathaniel, b. April 3,1749; m. Catherine Andrews, 218 

3. Elizabeth, b. May 22, 3751 ; m. James Lakin, 219 

95. Jeremiah Shattuck, s. of Jeremiah, (p. 101,) was b. April 
11, 1726, and was a farmer on "Oak Hill" in Pepperell, on the 
place now occupied by Benjamin Williams, where he d. of paral- 
ysis, March 26, 1815, ae. 88 y. 11 m. 15 d. 



JEREMIAH SHATTUCK SARAH SHATTUCK. 



141 



He m. 1, Aug. 10, 1749, his cousin Lydia Lakin, dau. of John 
Lakin and Lydia Parker, and granddau. of Nathaniel and Lydia 
Parker, (p. 100.) She was b. Jan. 8, 1734, and d. Feb. 19, 1767, 
in childbirth, with her 8th child, ae. 33 y. 1 m. 16 d. 

He m. 2, Nov. 25, 1767, his 3d cousin, Kezia Shattuck, b. 
Feb. 4, 1745, dau. of Jonathan, (p. 115.) She survived him, and 
m. 2, in 1821, Moses Blood, who had previously m. Abigail Shat- 
tuck, dau. of James, (p. 100.) She d. suddenly, of apoplexy, Sept. 
8, 1832, ae. 87 y. 7 m. 4 d. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY LYDIA LAKIN, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

m. Joseph Lawrence, 220 

d. Sept. 26, 1771, as. 19 y. 3 m. 6 d. 
killed at the battle of Bunker Hill.* 



1. Lydia, b. Mar. 19, 1750 

2. Phehe, b. June 20, 1752 

3. Jeremiah, b. June 24, 1854 

4. Ebenezer, b. Sept. 8, 1756 

5. Abraham, b. Oct. 12, 1759 

6. Eunice, b. Oct. 28, 1761 

7. Sarah, b. July 18, 1764 

8. A child, b. Feb. 1767 



m. Hannah Tarbell, 



221 



m. Mary Wright, 222 

m. Jonathan Perham, (p. 119.) 

m. Jesse Lovejoy, 223 

d. in infancy, unnamed. 



HIS CHILDREN, BY KEZIAH SHATTUCK, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 



9. Levi, 

10. K'zia, 

11. Moody, 



14. Daniel, 

15. Kezia, 

16. Rhodct, 

17. Leah, 



b. Aug. 8, 1768 
b. Aug. 31, 1770 
b. April 28, 1772 

12. Amaziah, b. May 17, 1774 

13. Jeremiah, b. Aug. 17, 1776 
b. Oct. 26, 1778 
b. Mar. 1,1781 
b. Mar. 17, 1784 
b. June 10, 1786 



m. Sybil Wright, 224 

d. Feb. 7. 1771, a?. 5 m. 7 d. 

m. Eunice Tarbell, 225 

m. Nancy Lovejoy, 226 

m. Abia Welman, 227 

d. Aug. 14, 1800, aa. 21 y. 9 m. 18 d. 

m. Daniel H. Lawrence, 228 

m. Benjamin Williams, . .... 229 

m. James Davis, 230 



96. Sarah Shattuck, dau. of Jeremiah, (p. 101,) was b. Dec. 
8, 1732, and d. in Pepperell, Aug. 3, 1820, " generally thought 
by hydrophobia," aa. 87 y. 7 m. 25 d. 

She m. Aug. 5, 1762, Patrick White. He d. Nov. 24, 1799. 

HER CHILDREN, BY PATRICK WHITE, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Sarah, b. April 28, 1763; m. April 2, 1789, R. W. B. Minchen. 

2. Molly, b. Feb. 28, 1766 ; supposed to have d. young. 

3. Jeremiah, b. July 16, 1768 ; m. Feb. 18, 1800, Nancy Parker. He is inVenice, O. 

4. Betsey, b. Dec. 4, 1770 ; m. Nov. 28, 1799, William Archibald, of Towns- 

end, but afterwards of Lawrenceburg, Indiana. 

* Eight of the Pepperell company were killed at the battle of Bunker Hill .—Joseph Spaulding, 
re. 37; Nathaniel Parker, Jr., (p. 139;) Wm. Warren 7 se.38 ; Ebenezer Laughton, re. 27; Wain- 
wright Fiske, re. 24; Jeremiah Shattuck, 3d, re. 21, (as above;) Ebenezer Pierce, re. 44; and 
Benjamin Woods, re. 20. Eight others were wounded : — Adj. Green ; Wm. Spaulding ; John 
Adams; Abel Parker, (p. 117;) Moses Blood; Simeon Green, (p. 117;) Jonathan Stevens; and 
Thomas Lawrence, (Fam.202.) Few if an} r towns of its size in the Commonwealth contributed 
so many men and so much blood in the war of the Revolution as Pepperell ; and much the largest 
part was taken from the Shattucks and their connections. It was one of the first places where a 
liberty pole was erected. There was not a single tory within its limits, a characteristic of which 
few other towns could boast. 



142 FIFTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

97. David Shattuck, s. of Jeremiah, (p. 101,) b. Feb. 19, 
1735, was a farmer in Pep. He d. Jan. 2, 1820, as. 84 y. 10 m. 13 d. 

He m. 1, May 20, 1756, Sarah Burt. She was b. June 26, 
1731, and d. Dec. 19, 1793, se. 62 y. 5 m. 23 d. ; dan. of John 
Burt and Elizabeth Nutting, who were m. March 9, 1726. Eliza- 
beth Nutting was dau. of James Nutting and Lydia Longley, b. 
1698, (p. 80.) 

He m. 2, Nov. 21, 1804, Lucy Sawtell of Groton. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY SARAH BURT, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Daniel, b. Nov. 15, 1758. 

2. Rhoda, b. July 29, 1760 ; m. 1, Feb. 3, 1780, John Boynton, s. of Abraham 

and Esther ; m. 2, Shebuel Conant. No children. 

3. Sarah, b. Nov. 27, 1762; m. Daniel Butterfield, 231 

4. David, b. Jan. 5, 1765 ; m. Sybil Brown, 232 

5. Oliver, b. July 30, 1768 ; m. Nov. 25, 1790, Nabby Shed. 

6. Junia, b. Aug. 12, 1771 ; m. Mary Getchel, 233 

7. Parker, bap. Sept. 10, 1775. 

98. Solomon Shattuck, s. of Jeremiah, (p. 101,) b. June 9, 
1737, d. in Pepperell, Oct. 31, 1788, se. 51 y. 4 m. 22 d. A farmer. 

He m. April 27, 1763, Hepzibah Perkins. She m. 2, Dec. 29, 
1791, Samuel Kemp of Groton. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY HEPZIBAH PERKINS, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Hepzibah, b. Mar. 20, 1764; d. July 14, 1789, re. 25 y. 3 m. 24 d. 

2. Solomon, b. Mar. 18, 1766; m. Polly Tarbell, 234 

3. Huldah, b. June 20, 1769 ; d. May 20, 1790, re. 20 y. 11 m. 

4. Mary, b. Oct. 12, 1771 ; m. Joseph Eddy. 

99. Nehemiah Shattuck, s. of Jeremiah, (p. 101,) b. Feb. 21, 
1740 ; m. Feb. 9, 1764, Betsey Hosley, b. Nov. 14, 1743, dau. 
of Samuel H. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY BETSEY HOSLEY, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Betsey, b. Mar. 12, 1765 ; m. Josiah Wright, 235 

2. Rebecca, b. Jan. 28, 1769; m. Nov. 17, 1791, James Ball. 

3. Mhemiah,h. July 23, 1772; d. May 11, 1794, re. 21 y. 9 m. 18 d. 

4. Aaron, b. Oct. 30, 1776 ; a cooper, m. in 1812, Nancy Wilson of Ashland, 

then Framingham, where he lived until his death, March 22, 1832, re. 55 y. 
4 m. 22 d. His only surviving son, Aaron, was drowned in Charles River, 
near Brighton, Aug. 14, 1845, re. 24. The mother now living. 

100. Sybil Shattuck, dau. of Jeremiah, (p. 101,) b. in 1743 ; 
m. Aug. 5, 1762, John White, on the same day as his twin- 
brother, above mentioned. He d. in Pepperell, Aug. 21, 1784, 
se. 41 y. 6 m. 



MARTHA, ABEL, JONAS, AND LYDIA SHATTUCK. 143 

HER CHILDREN, BY JOHN WHITE, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. John, b. Aug. 31, 1763 ; m. Dec. 25, 1788, Lydia Farwell of Groton. 

2. Sybil, b. Jan. 24, 1766 ; m. Dec. 6, 1792, Asa Parker of Pepperell. 

3. David, b. Jan. 23, 1769; m. Nov. 12, 1792, Hannah Campbell of Mason. 

4. Nathaniel,*. April 30, 1773; d. May 21, 1773, as. 21 days. 

5. Nathaniel,*. May 25, 1774; m. 1797, Sally Farwell of Chesterfield. 

6. Lois, b. Aug. 9, 1778; m. 1798, John Lawrence of Mason. 

101. Martha Shattuck, dau. of John, (p. 103,) b. June 29, 
1745, m. Dec. 27, 1774, James Blood, Jr., b. Sept. 23, 1742, s. of 
James Blood, Jr. and Mary Gilson, (p. 94,) being his 2d wife. He 
m. 1, Jan. 12, 1769, Elizabeth Jewett. She had, b. in Groton, 

1. Asenath, b. Sept. 30, 1776. 2. Talmai, b. March 7, 1778. 

102. Abel Shattuck, s. of John, (p. 103,) was b. Feb. 15, 
1750, and d. in Brookline, N. H., Dec. 30, 1783, ae. 33 y. 10 m. 
15 d. He m. Hannah Hobart, and had — 

1. Sarah, b. Oct. 1, 1778. 2. Hannah, b, June 2, 1780. 

103. Jonas Shattuck, s. of John, (p. 103,) b. July 23, 1751, 
m. Nov. 26, 1782, Bridget Colburn. He first settled in Hollis, 
but removed to Huntington, Vt. He had — 

1. Betsey, b. Nov. 11, 1783. 2. Jonas. 

104. Lydia Shattuck, dau. of John, (p. 103,) was b. May 9, 
1760, and is now (1853) living with her son Calvin, in Cohocton, 
Steuben Co., N. Y. 

She m. Nov. 26, 1782, Isaac Blood, b. June 2, 1760, s. of Dea. 
David Blood and Abigail Farnsworth. He was a farmer and first 
settled in Pepperell, but removed to Naples, Ontario Co., N. Y., 
and from thence, about 1835, to Cohocton, where he d. July 18, 
1842, as. 82 y. 1 m. 16 d. 

HER CHILDREN, BY ISAAC BLOOD, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Isaac, b. Feb. 13, 1784 ; m. ; d. in Manlius, N. Y. 

2. Asa, b. Nov. 12, 1785; d. Sept. 1, 1849, in Bath, Me.; m. Indiana Farrar, 

dau. of Samuel F., b. Jan. 2, 1793, and had 7 children. 

3. Israel, b. Feb. 26, 1788 ; d. Nov. 19, 1836, in Rushville, re. 48 y. 8 m. 23 d. ; 

m. Phebe Keep, and had 4 children. She m. 2, Calvin Blood, below. 

4. Calvin, b. May 6, 1791 ; a mason and farmer, now postmaster in Cohocton, 

Steuben Co., N. Y. He m. 1, Catherine Wetherbee, of Baldwinsville, N. Y. 
She d. about 1837 ; m. 2, Phebe, widow of his brother Israel. 

5. Lydia, b. Oct. 12, 1793 ; m. William Bassett, and now lives in Italy, Yates 

Co., N. Y. ; has had 4 children. 

6. Frederick, b. April 2, 1796 ; m. Nancy Wade, and had 4 children. She d. and 

he is now living with his 2d wife in Gardner, Me. 

7. Allen, b. Sept. 11, 1800; m. Rosetta Wilcox; d. Oct. 31, 1838, in Bath,N.Y. 



144 FIFTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

105. Asa Shattuck, s. of John, (p. 103,) was b. May 21, 
1762 ; a farmer in Pepperell, d. March 28, 1851, se. 89 y. 

He m. Dec. 25, 1787, Anna Wright, b Dec. 1, 1770, dau. of 
Jonas Wright and Anna Parker, (p. 131.) Living in 1854. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ANNA WRIGHT, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 



1. Asa, b. July 8, 1789 

2. Anna, b. July 19, 1791 

3. diaries, b. Sept. 23, 1796 

4. Roxanna, b. March 3, 1800 

5. Jonas, b. Feb. 19, 1802 

6. Maria, b. June 14, 1803 

7. Alpheus, b. Mar. 10, 1809 



m. Prudence Hardy, 236 

m. Abel Spaulding, 237 

d. unmarried, Feb. 27, 1834, se. 37 y. 5 m. 4 d. 

living unmarried in Pepperell. 

d. March 3, 1802, ae. 12 days. 

d. June 24, 1803, as. 10 days. 

d. unm., Jan. 27, 1847, ro. 37 y. 10 m. 17 d. 



106. Israel Shattuck, s. of John, (p. 103,) b. June 17, 1764 ; 
was a blacksmith in Pep. He d. Dec. 15, 1815, as. 51 y. 5 m. 28 d. 

He m. May 28, 1789, Edith Patch, b. April 2, 1769, dau. of 
Ebenezer Patch and Sarah Wright of Groton. Living in 1854. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY EDITH PATCH, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Israel, b. April 18, 1790 ; m. Eliza Shattuck, 238 

2. Edith, b. Jan. 26, 1792 ; d. Sept. 11, 1818, ae. 26 y. 7 m. 15 d. 

3. Sarah, b. Oct. 21, 1793; d. Dec. 15, 1814, se. 21 y, 1 m. 24 d. 

4. Indiana, b. Nov. 29, 1795; m. May 15, 1832, James Bliss, from England. 
She d. Aug. 10, 1833, ee. 37 y. 8 m. 11 d., leaving one daughter. 

5. John, b. Jan. 29, 1798 ; m. in 1825, Ruth P. Lawrence, dau. of Thomas 
Lawrence. He d. Jan. 31, 1833. She d. March 13, 1830. No children. 

6. Jackson, b. Dec. 6, 1803 ; m. Eliza Burrows, widow, dau. of Isaac Wil- 
liams. He d. Oct. 8, 1840, jb. 36 y. 10 m. 2 d. Had, 1. John ; 2. Cornelius ; 
3. Andrew Jackson. 

7. Rhoda, b. Nov. 3, 1803; m. April 30, 1835, Charles W.Wright. No issue. 

8. Walter, b. Jan. 13, 1805 ; m. Oct. 1, 1829, Ann Corey, and settled in Mil- 
waukee, Wis. A cooper. Has Achsa, b. 1835. 

9. Lucy, b. April 26, 1807 ; m. Oct. 6, 1829, Harmon Cobb, Jr. of Wrentham. 

10. Achsa, b. Feb. 27, 1809; m. Nov. 7, 1832, Timothy Fisher of Medway. 
Had, 1. George, b. Feb. 27, 1844 ; 2. Albert N., b. Nov. 22, 1848. 

11. Catharine,b. Feb. 27, 1811 ; d. Feb. 1, 1830, vs. 18 y. 11 m. 4 d. 



107. Simeon Shattuck, s. of David, (p. 103,) was b. in Pep- 
perell, Sept. 12, 1738, and d. in Fitchburg, April 6, 1832, as. 93 
y. 6 m. 24 d. He was bred a farmer, but in consequence of fract- 
uring his leg, by the falling of a tree, he became lame, and after- 
wards learned the shoemaker's trade, which he followed until the 
year before his death. He first settled in his native town, where 
the births of his six eldest children are recorded. About 1778 he 
went to live with the Shakers under elder Whitaker, at his special 



SIMEON SHATTUCK DOLLY SHATTUCK. 145 

solicitation ; and a short time afterwards his wife joined the same 
association. But not liking their mode of life she soon left them, 
and not long subsequently Mr. Shattuck followed her example. 
About 1780 he bought a tract of 200 acres of wild land in Fitch- 
burg, on the road now leading from thence to Ashby, where his 
grandson Samuel Shattuck lives. He agreed to pay $ 400 for it 
in Continental money, then current, being nearly all he was then 
worth. Before taking his deed the money became depreciated in 
value ; and in consequence, the person from whom he purchased 
unjustly- refused to give him a deed of more than 100 acres, half 
the amount of his purchase. This, combined with the state of 
affairs at that time, (see p. 123,) was the occasion of great embar- 
rassment and trouble. In the beginning of his new settlement 
he struggled with many privations and difficulties ; in the first 
winter, living in a shanty of the most primitive construction, prin- 
cipally upon potatoes and salt. He, however, after awhile suc- 
ceeded in obtaining a comfortable home, and in extending the 
bounds of his possessions. In opinions and habits he sustained a 
character eminently worthy, religious and patriarchal. 

He m. Dec. 31, 1767, Lydia Jewett, b. March 13, 1744, dau. of 
Nehemiah Jewett of Pep. She d. April 9, 1827, se. 83 y. m. 26 d. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY LYDIA JEWETT, BORN IN PEPPERELL AND FITCHBURG. 



1. Simeon, b. Dec. 9, 1769 

2. Obel, b. Nov. 8, 1770 

3. Micah, b. Dec. 3, 1772 

4. Lydia, b. Nov. 13, 1774 

5. Sewall, b. Mar. 25, 1777 

6. Shadrach, b. Aug. 21, 1779 

7. Meshach, b. 1782 

8. Abednego, b. 



m. Lucy Chandler, 239 

m. Mary Farley, 240 

m. Elizabeth Caswell, 241 

m. Moses Jewett, 242 

m. Elizabeth Perham, . 243 

m. Sarah Locke, 244 

m. Rebecca Marshall, 245 

died aged 7 years. * 



108. Dolly Shattuck, dau. of David, (p. 103,) b. Sept. 28. 
1740, d. in Pepperell, March 16, 1805, as. 64 y. 5 m. 18 d. 

She m. Jan. 24, 1758, Josiah Wright, b. July 31, 1737, s. of 
Samuel Wright and Hannah Lawrence. He d. in Pepperell, 
Nov. 4, 1783, ge. 46 y. 3 m. 4 d. 

HER CHILDREN, BY JOSIAH WRIGHT, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Josiah, b. Oct. 4, 1758; m. Dec. 14, 1785, Betsey Shattuck, (Family 235) 

2. Hannah, b. Oct. 29, 1760; m. Caleb Hobart of Pepperell; d. June, 1797. 

3. Silas, b. March 8, 1763 ; m. Sally Castell of Wendell ; d. April 29, 1840. 

4. Dolly, b. June 9, 1765; m. Jonah Williams of Pepperell. 

5. Orpha, b. May 27, 1767; m. Jonas Hodgman of Ashby. 

19 



146 FIFTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

6. Rebecca, b. Aug. 4, 1769; m. Oliver Dresser of Wendell. 

7. Lydia, b. Mar. 15, 1772; m. Abbott Stearns of Billerica. 

8. Pamelia, b. April 19, 1774; m. William Powers. 

9. Washington, b. Feb. 15, 1777; m. Eunice Lawrence; lives in Townsend. 

10. John S., b. July 26, 1779; m. 1, Dec. 27, 1807, Lois Patterson of Edge- 
comb, Me. She d. Nov. 30, 1827. He m. 2, Margaret Pinkham of Booth- 
bay. She d. Feb. 26, 1850. Has had 9 children. He has been a physician 
in Edgecomb, Me., where he now (1853) lives. 

11. Phebe, b. June 10, 1781 ; m. 1, J. Emerson ; 2, C. Shattuck, (Fam.208) 



109. Levi Shattuck, s. of David, (p. 103,) was b. in Pepperell, 
Aug. 17, 1742. He was a carpenter and millwright, and in 1766 
removed to Maine, and worked in Bath, Woolwich, Georgetown, 
and Edgecomb, now Westport, on Squam Island, Lincoln Co. 
He d. in Westport, June 20, 1823, as. 80 y. 10 m. 3 d. In 1784 
he bought the water-power at that place, and in company with 
his brother Jonas, erected the tide grist-mills and saw-mills, since 
known as the " Shattuck Mills." These mills are still owned 
by the family — Levi's part by David and Thomas Shattuck, 
father and son ; and Jonas's part by the brothers Jonas and 
Robbins Heal. An extensive business in the manufacture and 
sale of lumber has been transacted at these mills. 

He m. Jan. 1, 1770, Margaret Robbins, b. in Ipswich, Mass., 
Sept. 2, 1742, dau. of Wm. Robbins, who was b. in Ipswich in 
1707, and d. in 1781 ; and of Sarah Campbell, b. in 1707, and d. 
in 1759, all in the same town. She d. in Westport, Feb. 16, 
1815, as. 52 y. 5 m. 14 d. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY MARGARET ROBBINS, BORN IN WESTPORT. 

1. David, b. Oct. 27, 1774 ; m. Ruth Mahony, 246 

2. Sarah, b. June 5, 1777 ; m. George Reed, 247 

110. Lydia Shattuck, dau. of David, (p. 104.) was b. Aug. 

3. 1748, and d. in Pepperell in 1833, as. 85. 

She m. March 22, 1774, Timothy Hosley, b. Dec. 6, 1749, 
twin s. of Samuel and Elizabeth Hosley. He d. Aug. 12, 1812, 
as. 62 y. 8 m. 6 d. 

HER CHILDREN, BY TIMOTHY HOSLEY, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Polly, )b. Nov. 27, 1774. 4. Hannah, b. May 14, 1780. 

2. Thomas, S Twins. 5. Lydia, b. Jan. 21, 1783. 

3. Timothy, b. May 7, ]777. 

111. Sarah Shattuck, dau. of David, (p. 104,) b. Sept. 22, 
1750, d. in Pepperell, Aug. 18, 1834, bb. 83 y. 10 m. 26 d. 



SARAH, MARY, AND ELIJAH SHATTUCK. 147 

She m. May 14, 1771, Isaac Boynton, b. Aug. 11, 1745, s. of 
Abraham Boynton, and Esther Lakin, (dan. of Josiah L., p. 95.) 
He d. in Pep., March 18, 1786, 93. 40 y. 7 m. 7 d. She was his 
2d wife. He m. 1, June 13, 1769, Hannah Shattuck, b. Sept. 23, 
1747, dau. of Nathaniel, (p. 140.) She d. Oct. 7, 1769, as. 22 y. 
m. 14 d., four days after the birth of her only child. 

HANNAH SHATTUCK'S CHILD, BY ISAAC BOYNTON, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Hannah, b. Oct. 3, 1769 ; m. Reuben Flagg of Hollis. She d. May 2, 1814. 

SARAH SHATTUCK'S CHILDREN, BY ISAAC BOYNTON, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

2. Isaac, b. Aug. 8, 1772; m. Aug. 13, 1801, Sybil Lawrence, b. July 15, 1782, 

dau. of Joseph Lawrence and Lydia Shattuck, (Family 220,) and had, b. in 
Pepperell, 1. Isaac, b. Sept. 11, 1802; 2. Levi, b. June 4, 1804; 3. Eli, b. 
April 21, 1806; 4. Sybil, b. April 8, 1808; 5. John, b. July 4, 1810, (grad- 
uated at Middlebury College in 1835, d. Sept. 18, 1839 ;) 6. Joshua Law- 
rence, b. July 6, 1812 ; 7. Hannah Flagg, b. March 29, 1814 ; 8. Harriet, b. 
Aug. 31, ]816 ; 9. David, b. June 8, 1819 ; 10. Jonathan, b. Aug. 6, 1821, d. 
Oct. 21, 1 830 ; 11. Henry, b. Dec. 2, 1823 ; 12. Royal Bullard, b. Feb. 7, 1826. 

3. Sarah, b. April 23, 1774 ; m. Joseph Flagg, brother of Reuben, in Ohio. 

4. Dolly, b. Oct. 1, 1776 ; m. Sewall Butterfield. She d. in Hollis, Apr. 1847. 

5. David, b. May 20, 1778 ; m. Polly Wheeler of Mason. He d. July, 17, 1815. 

6. Abraham, b. April 20, 1780; m. Mary Adams. He d. April, 1833. 

7. Jonathan, b. March 2, 1782; m. Betsey Lawrence of Middlebury, Vt. 

8. Esther, b. April 10, 1784 ; d. Jan. 20, 1786, Be. 1 y. 4 m. 10 d. 

9. John, b. April 6, 1786; m. Eaton, and lived in Vermont. 



112. Mary Shattuck, dau. of David, (p. 104,) b. April 13, 
1752, d. in Billerica, Dec. 1, 1794, as. 42 y. 7 m. 18 d. 

She m. Dec. 30, 1778, John Parker, Jr., by whom she had 6 
children. He m. 2, Dec. 27, 1795. Susanna Minot of Concord, 
and had, 1. Maria, b. Oct. 10, 1797 ; 2. George, b. March 21, 1805. 
He d. March 14, 1832, as. 76. His 2d wife d. Oct. 15, 1841, as. 76. 

HER CHILDREN, BY JOHN PARKER, JR., BORN IN BILLERICA. 

1. John, b. April 12, 1780; d. Aug. 17, 1792, se. 12 y. 4 m. 5 d. 

2. Mary, ) b. Aug. 26, 1782 ; d. May 15, 1783, a?. 8 m. 19 d. 

3. Anna, S Twins. 

4. Henry, b. Aug. 28, 1784. 

5. David, b. May 16, 1786. 6. Frederick Augustus, b. Dec. 21, 1789. 



113. Elijah Shattuck, s. of David, (p. 104,) b. Oct. 3, 1754, 
was a wheelwright, and d. in Pepperell, Oct. 30, 1841, as. 87 y. 
m. 27 d. 

He m. 1, Olive Reed of Dunstable. She d. Oct. 30, 1826, as. 76. 

He m. 2, Hannah Reed, widow, originally Worcester. She 
d. about 1844. 



148 FIFTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY OLIVE REED, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Elijah, b. Feb. 10, 1776 ; d. of fever, Oct. 2, 1791, re. 15 y. 7 m. 22 d. 

2. Hannah, b. June 9, 1777; d. before 1784. 

3. David, b. May 11, 1779; m. Oct. 20, 1801, Betsey Chapman, ... 248 

4. Jephthah, b. Sept. 19, 1791 ; m. Polly Woods, 249 

5. Polly, b. Jan. 27, 1784 ; m. Feb. 28, 1813, Jonathan Coles of Pepperell. 

6. Bttsey, b. July 19, 1785 ; m. 1, J. Green ; 2, N. Shattuck, . (Family 158) 

7. Rowland, b. March 5, 1788 ; m. Betsey Shattuck, 250 

8. Thirza, b. Feb. 13, 1791 ; d. Dec. 6, 1796, re. 5 y. 9 m. 23 d. 



114. Jonas Shattuck, s. of David, (p. 104,) was b. Dec. 2, 
1756, and d. at Westport, Me., Jan. 27, 1847, £e. 90 y. 1 m. 25 d. 
He was a revolutionary pensioner, and the extraordinary circum- 
stances of his military service are worthy of being stated more in 
detail. In the fall of 1774 he enrolled himself with Abijah Shat- 
tuck, John Shattuck. Oliver Shattuck, David Shattuck, Josiah 
Shattuck, Jeremiah Shattuck, Jr., and others of their connections 
and fellow patriots in Pepperell, in a company of "minute men," 
under Capt. John Nutting, in Col. Prescott's regiment ; and on 
the 19th of April, 1775, marched to Concord, and followed the 
retreating enemy to Cambridge, where they remained during the 
summer, and were in the battle of Bunker Hill, (p. 141.) He 
was a volunteer in Capt. Wm. Goodrich's company, under Gen. 
Arnold, in the expedition which left Cambridge, Sept. 13, 1775, 
and went to Quebec by way of the Kennebec river, and through 
the forests of Maine and Canada, suffering intensely from cold, 
fatigue, and hunger. After the unsuccessful termination of that 
expedition he was one of the retreating party under Lieut. Bixby. 
At Beaufort, Canada, he was discharged, and afterwards returned 
to Pepperell, where he remained a few months. In Dec, 1776, 
he enlisted in Capt. Holden's company under Col. Thatcher, and 
served until he was discharged in Aug., 1777. He then enlisted 
as a corporal in Capt. Jewett's company, Col. Bullard's regiment, 
and was in the attack on Drummond's Island in Lake George on 
the 24th of September. While with a party in a boat he was 
severely wounded in his left leg. Several shot holes were made 
in the boat by the firing of the enemy ; and to prevent it from 
sinking, notwithstanding his wounds, he stripped off his clothes 
with which he made plugs and stopped the leaks, and thus saved 
the lives of the crew. He was taken prisoner and carried to 
the fort. After remaining four days in the open air, suffering 



JONAS, HANNAH, AND JOSEPH SHATTUCK. 149 

intensely, his leg was amputated four inches above his knee. In 
November he was removed to St. Johns, in January, 1778, to 
Montreal, and in May to Quebec, where he remained three weeks 
in the hospital. He was then put on board the old prison ship 
Maria, and carried to Halifax. He remained on board this ship 
and in the garrison at Halifax about eighteen weeks ; and on the 
8th of October, 1778, was, with 700 other prisoners, exchanged 
for British subjects. They were sent to Boston crowded together 
in a small ship, and suffered very severely from filth and disease. 
About one hundred died before their arrival. He entered a hos- 
pital in Boston, where he remained until Jan., 1779, when he 
was able to return to his home in Pepperell. A report had been 
circulated that he was dead ; and the joyful surprise that his 
arrival produced can better be conceived than described. Being 
thus disabled for active labor he learned the shoemaker's trade, 
which he subsequently followed until within six months of his 
death. In 1784 he removed to Squam Island, Me., and, in com- 
pany with his brother Levi, erected the mills already described, 
(p. 146.) He received a pension from government of $60 per 
annum, from 1790 to 1816 ; of $96, from 1816 to 1832 ; and of 
$180, from 1832 to his death. 

He m. in Edgecomb, Me., March 16, 1786, Anna Robbins. b. 
Nov. 14, 1745, in Ipswich, Mass., a sister of his brother Levi's 
wife. She d. in Westport, April 28, 1816, as. 70 y. 5 m. 14 d. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ANNA ROBBINS, BORN IN WESTPORT. 

1. Dolly, b. Feb. 28, 1787. ) ^ ., T , T , m 
o n it a aa iwm > Both m. James Heal, 251 

2. Hannah,b. Sept. 20, 1791. $ 

DESCENDANTS OF THE ANDOVER BRANCHES. 

115. Hannah Shattuck, dan. of Joseph, (p. 105,) b. July 
14, 1729; m. Oct. 18, 1753, Samuel Stevens, Jr. He d. in 
1809. Had— 

1. Hannah, m. Isaac Holt of Andover. 2. Samuel, in. Mary Moore of Andover. 
3. Joshua, m. Polly Chandler. 



116. Joseph Shattuck, s. of Joseph, (p. 105,) b. Nov. 27, 
1731, d. intestate in Andover, April 9, 1778, as. 46 y. 4 m. 12 d. 
He was a farmer upon the paternal homestead. 

He m. April 13, 1756, Anna Johnson, dau. of Cornelius John- 
son of Haverhill — a well-educated woman and an excellent 
mother. All of her large family of children became respectable 
members of society. She d. in Hillsborough, N. H. 



150 



FIFTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 



HIS CHILDREN, BY ANNA JOHNSON, BORN IN ANDOVER. 



1. Anna, b. Oct. 8, 1756 

2. Joseph, b. Nov. 8, 1757 

3. Elizabeth, b. Sept. 2, 1760 

4. Abiel, b. Aug. 8, 1762 

5. Lydia, b. April 27, 1765 

6. William, b. April 26, 1769 

7. Zebediah, b. Feb. 1771 

8. Peter, b. Oct. 18, 1772 

9. Hannah, b. Sept. 8, 1774 

10. Obed, b. July, 1776 

11. Anna, b. Aug. 4, 1778 



d. March 20, 1776, ae. 19 y. 5 m. 12 d. 

m. 1, H. Chandler; 2, P. Abbott, ... 252 

m. Peter Hunt, 253 

m. Phebe Shattuck, 254 

m. Daniel Flint, 255 

m. Abigail Foster, 256 

in. Betsey Martin, 257 

m. Susanna Clark, 258 

m. 1, L. Clark; 2, C. Abbott, .... 259 
m. Mehitable Lovejoy of Pembroke, N. H. 
m. John Tyrrell. 



117. Isaac Shattuck, s. of Joseph, (p. 105,) b. March 24, 
1733, lived a farmer near Frye Village, where he d. April 27, 
1822, ce. 89 y. 1 m. 3 d. 

He m. March 24, 1757, Mary Barnard, b. in Andover in 1740, 
dau. of Nathaniel and Ruth Barnard. She d. June 2, '1804. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY MARY BARNARD, BORN IN ANDOVER. 

1. Isaac, b. Sept. 12, 1759; d. young. 

2. JYathaniel, ) b. Aug. 3, 1760 ; m. Polly Burnes, 260 

3. Mary, S Twins. d. young. 

4. Isaac, b. July 13, 1766 ; m. Rebecca Ingalls, 261 

5. Samuel, b. Mar. 31, 1772 ; m. Lucy Chandler, 262 

6. Mary, b. Feb. 16, 1774; m. Aug. 2, 1796, Enoch Frye, and lived in 

Frye Village. She d. Jan. 30, 1844, se. 69 y. 11 m. 14 d. 



118. Zebediah Shattuck, s. of Joseph, (p. 105,) b. Oct. 26, 
1736, d. in Andover, April, 1826, 83. 89 y. 6 m. He was a sol- 
dier in the French war, and of remarkable muscular strength. 

He m. 1, Aug. 30, 1759, Elizabeth Abbot, b. Nov. 13, 1740, 
dau. of Barachias Abbott of A. She d. Sept. 1779, as. 38 y. 10 m. 

He m. 2, Dec. 25, 1781, Sarah Chandler, dau. of Zebadiah 
Chandler, and widow of Ralph Holbrook. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ELIZABETH ABBOTT, BORN IN ANDOVER. 

1. Elizabeth, b. Nov. 16, 1760; m. Dea. Barachias Holt of Wilton, N. H., and 

had Barachias, Amos, Hannaii, Dolly, Zebediah, and Phebe. 

2. Hannah, b. Nov. 2, 1762; m. James Swan of Bethel, Maine. 

3. Dolly, b. April 14, 1764; m. 1, Joseph Russell of Andover; m. 2, 

Bragg ; m. 3, Benjamin Gage of Bethel, Me. 

4. Phebe, b. Feb. 20, 1766; m. Abiel Shattuck, (Family 254) 

5. Rhoda, b. Sept. 1, 1776; m. Samuel Clark. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY SARAH (CHANDLER) HOLBROOK, BORN IN ANDOVER. 

6. Zebediah, b. ; m. Sarah Durant, 263 

7. Sarah, b. Nov. 3, 1782 ; m. Richard Trow. 



SARAH SHATTUCK SUSANNA SHATTUCK. 151 

119. Sarah Shattuck, dan. of Joseph, ,(p. 105,) b. May 9, 
1739, m. June 6, 1757, John Barnard of Andover, and had — 

1. John, m. Lydia Moore; 2. Sarah, m. Benjamin Stickney; 3. Theodore, m. 
Nancy Mansur ; 4. David, m. Lydia Frye. 

LAST DESCENDANTS OF THE CAMBRIDGE BRANCHES. 

120. Susanna Shattuck, dau. of Josiah, (p. 106,) was b. in 
West Cambridge, Dec. 2, 1756, and d. Sept. 9, 1803, ae. 46 y. 9 
m. 7 d. She was the only surviving child of her mother, and 
sole surviving heir of her father. With her the name of Shattuck 
in the line of her grandfather became extinct. 

She m. at the early age of 13 y. 3 m. 23 d., April 26, 1770, 
Joshua Kendall, b. Sept. 29, 1746. He d. July 25, 1818, ae. 71 
y. 9 m. 26 d., and was interred with his wife in the Waltham 
burying-ground. He inherited the large estate of his father-in- 
law, on which he settled as a farmer and an extensive dairyman. 
For many years he supplied large quantities of milk for the Bos- 
ton market. 

HER CHILDREN, BY JOSHUA KENDALL, BORN IN WEST CAMBRIDGE. 

1. Benjamin Shattuck, b. July 30, 1771 ; m. May, 1811, Hannah Stearns. He d. 

July 12, 1832, re. 60 y. 11 m. 12 d., without issue. 

2. Susanna, b. Nov. 14, 1773 ; m. Thomas Brown. She d. Nov. 5, 1833, re. 59 y. 

11 m. 21 d. Had, 1. Marshall, b. Dec. 18, 1793; 2. Almira, b. Jan. 29, 
1799 ; 3. Adolphus, b. Nov. 29, 1800. The last owns and occupies part of 
the old Shattuck homestead. 

3. Joshua, b. Feb. 4, 1777; d. unmarried, June 5, 1846, re. 69 y. 4 m. 1 d. 

4. Mary, b. Nov. 16, 1779; d. unmarried, Sept. 3, 1849, se. 69 y. 9 m. 17 d. 

5. Lucy, b. June 27, 1782 ; d. June 18, 1801, re. 19 y. 

6. Betsey, b. May 28, 1785 ; and d. at Ludlow, Vt., while on a visit, Sept. 1, 

1854, re. 69 y. 3 m. 3 d. She m. Oct. 3, 1805, Newell Bent, b. in Sudbury, 
Oct. 9, 1778, and d. in Cambridgeport, Feb. 9, 1831, re. 52 y. 4 m. Had, 1. 
Eliza Ann, b. Aug. 7, 1806, d. unm. April 23, 1838 ; 2. Newell, b. March 5, 
1810, m. Mary Trowbridge; 3. Susan Maria, b. March 11, 1814, m. Joseph 
Porter; 4. Mary Kendall, b. Aug. 12, 1822, d. March 25, 1825; 5. Mary 
Lucretia, b. April 19, 1826, m. Henry R. Fuller ; 6. Fanny Loretta, b. March 
22, 1828. 

7. Josiah, b. Jan. 27, 1788 ; m. May 29, 1821, Mary Ann Brown, dau. of Jonas 

Brown of Waltham. He d. April 5, 1845, re. 57 y. 2 m. 8 d. She d. Aug. 
10, 1850, re. 53. Had, 1. Eliza Baldwin, b. March 20, 1823 ; 2. Josiah Shat- 
tuck, b. March 30, 1825, m. Martha Helen Wellington ; 3. Joshua, b. Jan. 4, 
1828, graduated at Harvard College in 1853; 4. Benjamin, b. May 22, 1830, 
m. Sarah Chapin Marston ; 5. Jonas Brown, b. May 7, 1834 ; 6. George, b. 
May §5, 1838. 

8. Hannah, b. May 5, 1790 ; m. March, 1820, Washington Pierce of Waltham. 

No issue. 



152 FIFTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

9. David, b. May 26, 1793; m. Nov. 25, 1819, Lucretia Lawrence, dau. of 
Phineas Lawrence, b. Jan. 18, 1797. Their only children were twins that 
d. in infancy. He d. March 4, 1855. 
10. Charles, b. June 11, 1796; m. May 31, 1825, Julia Smith of Waltham. Had, 
1. Charles Dexter, b. April 30, 1826; 2. David, b. Sept. 7, 1827; 3. Arthur 
Atkins, b. April 13, 1832; 4. Julia Ann, b. Jan. 30, 1834, d. young; 5. 
Julia Ann, b. Nov. 25, 1835 ; 6. Susan Shattack, b. May 14, 1838 ; 7. 
Lucia, b. April 3, 1841. 

DESCENDANTS OF THE DEERF1ELD BRANCHES. 

121. Samuel Shattuck, s. of Samuel, (p. 107,) was b. in 
Deerfield, Sept. 18, 1741, and d. in Portland, Chautauque Co., 
N. Y., Sept. 1, 1827, a3. 85 y. 11 m. 13 d. He was a miller and 
farmer, and first settled in Greenfield in his native county. For 
several years before his death he lived with his children, and 
after 1816 with his son Seth. He was a soldier in the French, 
and in the revolutionary war, and was in the battles at Bunker 
Hill, at Bennington, at Yorktown, and at other places. He was 
a pensioner of the United States government, and is stated in the 
printed list of 1835 to be 95 years old, and of Niagara County. 

He m. Chloe Field, who d. of pleurisy in Greenfield, April 
10, 1781, in her 38th year, about four months after the birth of 
her youngest child. She was a twin daughter of Aaron Field 
of Bernardston, whose father Ebenezer Field was slain Oct. 26, 
1708, " by the enemy a going to Deerfield, near y e Muddy Brook." 
(Gen. Register, Yol. IX., p. 162.) He was the s. of Samuel, and 
grandson of Zachariah Field, one of the first settlers of Hatfield. 
Aaron Field m. in 1742, Eunice Frary, and had one son and 8 
daughters. The eldest, Eunice and Chloe, b. in Deerfield in 
1743, were twins. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY CHLOE FIELD, BORN IN GREENFIELD. 

1. Samuel, b. Aug. 15, 1764; m. Prudence Healey, 264 

2. Chloe, b. Nov. 22, 1766; m. Ephraim Leach, 265 

3. Consider, b. Feb. 7, 1768 ; m. Ann Atherton, 266 

4. Seth, b. Jan. 24, 1770; m. 1, S. Chapin; 2. A. Smith, 267 

5. Lydia, b. Oct. 18, 1771 ; d. Dec. 8, 1772, re. 1 y. 1 m. 20 d. 

6. Lydia, b. Feb. 15, 1773 ; m. Arad Root, 268 

7. Jesse, b. May 16, 1775; d. Aug. 24, 1777, re. 2 y. 3 m. 8 d. 

8. Jesse, b. Sept. 21, 1777; m. Mary E. Sargent, 269 

9. Chester, b. Dec. 17, 1780; m. Miriam Stocker, 270 

122. Maj. William Shattuck, s. of Samuel, (p. 107,) was b. 
in Deerfield, Aug. 31, 1767. He was a blacksmith, and lived 



WILLIAM SHATTUCK JOSEPH SHATTUCK. 153 

successively in Ashfield, Mass., Halifax and Guilford, Vt., Hins- 
dale, N. H., and Dummerston, Vt. From the latter place he 
removed in 1795 to Romulus, Seneca Co.,N. Y. While resident 
in Guilford he was Senior Major of a regiment of Militia, of 
which Timothy Church was Colonel and Henry Edwards, Junior 
Major, raised by the state of New York for the protection of her 
rights in the long contested and exciting controversy with New 
Hampshire in relation to the jurisdiction over the territory now 
comprising Vermont. In the civil war that followed they were 
captured by the "New-States men," under Col. Ethan Allen, 
imprisoned at Bennington, and their property confiscated. In 
March, 17S6, an act was passed by the legislature of New York, 
granting Major Shattuck and others a township of land eight miles 
square on Chenango River, (now Bainbridge, ) as a remuneration for 
their losses and sufferings. Of this grant 3,200 acres were assigned 
to Mr. Shattuck for his portion. (Doc. Hist, of New York, Vol. IV., 
pp. 1014 to 1018.) As early as 1791 or 2, he obtained from the 
government of Canada West a grant of land, but, not complying 
with the settling duties, it became forfeited. About 1809 or 10 
he petitioned for a renewal of the original title, and while his 
petition was pending he made a tour of exploration through Ohio 
and Kentucky, when he wrote to his family the last letter they 
ever received from him. It is said that he returned to Canada to 
ascertain the result of his petition, and that he was there acci- 
dentally thrown from a horse and killed, in 1810. 

He m. in Montague, Lydia Allis. She was b. Dec. 7, 1751. 
and d. in Prattsburg, Steuben Co., N. Y., Sept. 28, 1833, ae. 81 y. 
9 m. 21 d., only child of Eliphalet Allis and Mary Brooks. The 
latter is said to have been the first child born in Greenfield. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY LYDIA ALLIS, BORN IN VARIOUS PLACES. 

1. Eliphalet, b. April 20, 1778 ; m. Jane Wiley, 271 

2. Sophia, b. Nov. 22, 1779 ; m. Otis Doolittle, 272 

3. Phylinda, b. Dec. 7, 1781 ; m. John Stone, 273 

4. Tfllliam, b. Dec. 26, 1784 ; m. A. Bronson, and others, 274 

5. Geo.Clinton,h. Sept. 8, 1786; m. Anne Bronson, 275 

There were 4 other children that d. in infancy or youth, Mary, Phylinda, Sa- 

bra, and a son unnamed, the dates of whose births and deaths have not been 
ascertained. 

123. Joseph Shattuck, s. of Samuel, (p. 107,) was b. in 
Deerfield, Sept. 22, 1749, and first settled in his native town, but 
20 



154 FIFTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

about 1795 removed to Pompey, Onondaga Co., N. Y., near the 
time of its first settlement, and about 1805 to Cohocton, Steuben 
Co., where he d. Dec. 29, 1819, as. 70 y. 3 m. 7 d. He was a 
revolutionary soldier, and is described in the rolls of 1780 as then 
"30 years old, 5 feet 8 inches high, dark complexion." 

He m. Nov. 23, 1775, Chloe Scott, b. Oct. 19, 1755, dau. of 
Stephen Scott of Ashfield, Mass. She d. in Cohocton, March 2, 
1824, 33. 68 y. 4 m. 13 d. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY CHLOE SCOTT, ALL BUT ONE BORN IN DEERFIELD. 

1. Stephen, b. July 14, 1777. He is a farmer and shoemaker in Pompey ; m. in 

1799, Rebecca Pixly, but have had no children. 

2. Zebina, b. Jan. 12, 1780 ; m. Sally Barlow, 276 

3. Joseph, b. April 16, 1782; a gunsmith; m. twice, but had no children. He 

d. in 1841, in Kentucky, as is supposed. 

4. Chester, b. Aug. 17, 1784; m. 1, M. Moore; 2, C. Beach, 277 

5. Eli, b. Mar. 13, 1787; m. Harriet Murray, °78 

6. Ansel, b. Aug. 10, 1789; m. Rachel Bump, 279 

7. Lucius, b. Oct. 15, 1791; m. 1, H. Chamberlin; 2, E. Cornell, ... 280 

8. Alfred, b. Aug. 15, 1794 ; m. Sarah V. Collyer, 281 

9. Truman,b. April 4,1798; m. Huldah Lathrop, 282 



124. Capt. Oliver Shattuck, s. of Samuel, (p. 107,) was b. 
in Deerfield, July 29, 1751, and d. in Hawley, Aug. 27, 1797, 
ae. 46 y. m. 28 d. His will, dated April 10th, was proved Sept. 
12, 1797. He commanded a company from the county of Hamp- 
shire in the revolutionary army, from July to November, 1781. 

He m. Nov. 10, 1772, Lucy Parker, b. Jan. 30, 1751, dau. of 
Nathaniel Parker and Eleanor Walker of Groton. She m. 2, Dec, 
1797, Joseph Longley, and d. in Hawley, May 20, 1834, se. 83 y. 
3 m. 20 d. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY LUCY PARKER, BORN IN HAWLEY. 

1. Lucy, h. Sept. 7, 1773; d. Aug. 28, 1776, re. 2 y. 11 m. 21 d. 

2. Amile, b. Jan. 28, 1775 ; d. Aug. 28, 1776, a?. 1 y. 7 m. 

3. Lucy, b. Sept. 14, 1776; m. Zimri Longley. She d. in Hawley soon 

after the birth of her youngest child. 



in. Phebe Bangs, 283 

d. July 3, 1796, re. 16 y. 6 m. 3 d. 

m. Oliver Patch, 284 

m. Polly Robinson, 285 

m. Dolly Houghton Rice, 286 

m. 1, O.P.Turner; 2, T.Porter, . . . 287 

10. Harriet, $ Twins. m. 1, L. Longley ; 2, A. Ward, . ... 288 

11. Electa, b. July 5, 1788 ; m. John King, 289 

12. Calvin, b. July 30, 1790 ; m. Betsey Sprague, 290 

13. Thera, b. Aug. 1, 1792 ; d. Aug. 17, 1796, re. 4 y. m. 16 d. 



4. Oliver, b. May 11, 1778 

5. Amile, b. Dec. 30, 1779 

6. Polly, b. Sept. 19, 1781 

7. Justus, b. March 1, 1783 

8. Pliny, b. Dec. 8,1784 

9. Henry, } b. May 13, 1786 



WILLIAM SHATTUCK DR. BENJAMIN SHATTUCK. 155 

125. William Shattuck, s. of John, (p. 10S,) was b. in New- 
ton, Dec. 24, 1749, and d. in New York, April 2, 1807, ae. 57 y. 
3 m. 8 d. During the revolution, and a short time before and 
after, he was one of the most distinguished and wealthy merchants 
of Boston. He was a member of the Ancient and Honorable 
Artillery Company in 1787. His place of business was on Long 
Wharf, and his residence in Milk Street, just below the Old South 
Church. Thomas H. Perkins and other eminent merchants served 
their apprenticeship in his counting room. He indorsed the paper 
of several parties who became involved in the disasters of the 
French revolution, by whom he is said to have lost over $100,000, 
and at length failed himself. He was afterwards employed in the 
custom-house. 

He m. Martha Parker, dau. of Peter Parker and Sarah Rug- 
gles Payson, and sister of the late John Parker of Boston, eminent 
for his wealth. She d. March 26, 1807, as. 56. Her children 
were baptized in the Brattle Street Church. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY MARTHA PARKER, BORN IN BOSTON. 

1. Sai'ah, b. ; m. Dec. 11, 1796, Ebenezer Brush of New York. 

He d. there in May, 1814, se. 57. She d. Oct., 1846, at her son's in Illinois. 
She had 10 children: 1. Cornelia ; 2. John, d. at sea; 3. William; 4. Wm. 
Samuel; 5. Henry, d. at Java; 6. Edward; 7. George; 8. Sarah Elizabeth; 
9. Joseph Vinton; 10. Charles Ebenezer. All d. unmarried, except Joseph 
Vinton. He m. Naomi Brush of Huntington, L. I., and settled as a farmer in 
Morristown, Henry County, Illinois, where he now lives. 

2. William, ; d. unm., of the yellow fever, in W. Indies. 

3. Mary Parker, bap. July 11, 1784 ; now living in Roxbury. 

4. John, bap. Jan. 7,1787; d. unmarried. 

5. Benj. Lincoln, bap. Sept. 20, 1789 ; d. unm., of the yellow fever, in N. Orleans. 

6. Peter, bap. Aug. 7, 1791 ; d. young. 

7. Martha Phips, bap. June 11, 1793 ; d. in Hingham, ae. 22. 



DESCENDANTS OF THE LITTLETON BRANCHES. 

126. Doct. Benjamin Shattuck, s. of Stephen, (p. 108,) was 
b. in Littleton, Nov. 11, 1742; and d. of consumption in Tem- 
pleton, Jan. 14, 1794, se. 51 y. 2 m. 3 d. He was fitted for College 
by Jeremiah D. Rogers, son of the clergyman of Littleton, and 
graduated at H. C. in 1765. He studied medicine with Dr. Oliver 
Prescott of Groton, and settled in Templeton at the special invi- 
tation of the people of that town, where he continued in extensive 
practice about twenty-five years ; and became one of the most 
eminent of his profession. His industry and frugality secured a 
comfortable provision for his family. 



156 FIFTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

" His death," says Thatcher's American Medical Biography, 
(Vol. II., p. 79,) "was deeply lamented by the whole community 
to which he was known ; but this loss was more poignantly felt 
by his townsmen, the people of Templeton. He had settled 
with them by invitation, had lived in their affection and confi- 
dence for nearly a quarter of a century, and had identified himself 
with their joys and sorrows. At his funeral all classes crowded 
around his bier to pay the last sad and mournful tribute of respect 
to their physician and friend. The pious pastor of the flock 
poured out his heart in an honest eulogy in commemoration of 
his virtues, and spake of the 'sense, skill, and philanthropy' of 
their departed physician and friend. This was said in the pres- 
ence of those who knew the deceased, and knew too that the 
words flowed in truth and sincerity : such praises from the mouth 
of discriminating affection, have a lasting unction in them, and are 
sweet in the remembrance of ages, when the cold stone and the 
proud entablature are defaced or forgotten." 

He ra. April 12, 1772, Lucy Barron, b. in Chelmsford, Dec. 
19, 1.753, dau. of Jonathan Barron and Rachel Howard, and a 
descendant of Ellis Barron of Watertown, (p. 76.) She survived 
her husband, and m. 2, July 7. 1796, Rev. Asaph Rice of West- 
minster, who d. March 22, 1816, se. 83. She d. in Templeton, 
April 5, 1821, aa. 67 y. 3 m. 16 d. She united with the church 
in Peppereli in 1772, and in 1778 was dismissed to that in Tem- 
pleton, — one of the most noble women of the day, "an honor to 
her husband and a blessing to her children." # 

HIS CHILDREN, BY LUCY BARRON, BORN IN TEMPLETON. 

1. Lucy Barron, b. April 10, 1774; m. Josiah Howe, 291 

2. Benjamin, b. May 12, 1777; graduated at Harvard College in 1797; ap- 

pointed, June 30, 1799, midshipman in the United States navy ; resigned, 

* Moses Barron, s. of Ellis, b. March 6, 1643, m. Mary Lamed, and had Moses, b. Oct. 28, 

1669, settled in Chelmsford, and had by Mary , Jonathan, b. June 28, 1698 ; who m. Rebecca 

Prescott, and had, 1 . Jonathan, b. Nov. 12, 1726, m. Oct. 19, 1749, Rachel Howard ; 2. Lucy ; 3. 
William, father of Wm. Amherst j Oliver ; and Thomas, Harvard College, 1787, 1788, and 1796. 
Jonathan Barron, the husband of Rachel Howard, was a brave provincial officer, who was killed 
at Lake George, Sept. 8, 1755, in the memorable battle known as " Johnson's Fight." He had 
Jonathan ; " Lucia" (so it appears on the records) or Lucy, m. Dr. Shattuck ; and Benjamin. The 
widow m. 2, Capt. Edmond Bancroft of Peppereli, by whom she had eight more children. 
Rachel Howard was the dau. of Benjamin and Mary, granddau. of Nathaniel and Sarah, both of 
Chelmsford, and great-granddau. of Nathaniel Howard of Dorchester, freeman in 1641, and 
member of the Artillery Company in 1643. Rebecca Prescott was descended from distin- 
guished and noble families. Her great-grandfather was Capt. John Prescott of Lancaster, an- 
cestor of the Prescott families. Her mother was a daughter of Hon. Peter Bulkely, and grand- 
dau. of Rev. Peter Bulkely, whose ancestors are traced through many noble families to Robert 
Bulkely, Esq., an English baron in 1216, in the reign of King John. (See Shattuck's History of 
Concord, pp. 157, 241, 242, 381.) 



ELIZABETH, HANNAH, AND TIMOTHY SHATTUCK. 157 

April 20, 1801 ; and was subsequently a ship-master in the merchant service. 
He d. unmarried, at Little Rock, Arkansas, Jan., 1831, se. 54. 

3. Jonathan, b. Mar. 11, 1779; m. Betsey Richardson, 292 

4. Rebecca, b. May 4, 1781 ; d. Aug. 28, 1795, se. 14 y. 3 m. 24 d. 

5. George Cheyne, b. July 17, 1783; m. Eleanor C. Davis, 293 

6. Elizabeth, % b. May 21, 1786; d. Aug. 1, 1795, a-. 9 y. 2 m. 10 d. 

7. JVancy, b. Nov. 30, 1788; d. April 15, 1790, ee. 1 y. 4 m. 15 d. 

127. Elizabeth Shattuck, dau. of Stephen, (p. 108,) m. in 
Littleton, Sept. 6, 1772, Nathan Kinsman, then a resident of Con- 
cord, N. H. In 1782 they removed to Landaff, N. H., where they 
both died. Had — 

1. Stephen b. ; now lives in Clifton, Canada West. 

2. *Yathan,h. Nov., 1777; graduated at Dartmouth College, 1799, and settled 

as a lawyer in Portland, Me., where he d. Feb. 28, 1829, se. 51. He m. 
Eliza DafForne, who d. June 28, 1841, se. 58. They had, 1. John, b. Oct. 
13, 1805, graduated at Dartmouth College, 1825, and d. at Belfast, May 27, 
1850, se. 44. He was a lawyer and U. S. marshal under Harrison's administra- 
tion ; 2. Elizabeth, b. Jan. 28, 1807, d. June 8, 1831, ae. 23; 3. Martha, b. 
May 14, 1809, d. June 28, 1841, the same day as the mother, ae. 32 y. 

3. Peter, b. ; settled on his father's place in Landaff. 

4. Martha, b. ; m. Nathan Robbins. 5. Timothy; m. . 

128. Hannah Shattuck, dan. of Stephen, (p. 108,) b. in Lit- 
tleton in 1747, d. in Whitefield, N. H., March, 1823, se. 76 y. 
m. 17 d. Her death was sudden. Peeling faint while sitting at 
her breakfast, she went to her bed and d. almost instantly, with- 
out a struggle. She was a woman of remarkable mental and 
moral characteristics. Though a step-mother, her husband's chil- 
dren regarded her with all the affection of kindred blood ; and 
the excellence of her example and her religious teachings are now 
remembered with gratitude. 

She m. in 1793, Solomon Cook, being his 2d wife. She had 
no children. He d. Dec. 23, 1735, ae. 86. By his 1st marriage 
he had — 1. Britton, who d. in Canada; 2. Ruth, who m. Ephraim 
Stocker, and lived at or near Ogdensburg, N. Y. ; 3. Solomon, 
who m. Sally Hosmer, and d. March 23, 1839, se. 55, father to 
Rev. Solomon Cook of North Andover, who d. in 1850, and of 
Rev. Edward Cook, lately of Boston, and now President of the 
Lawrence University, Appleton, Wis. 



129. Timothy Shattuck, s. of Stephen, (p. 108,) b. May 21, 
1749, first settled as a farmer in Littleton, but in 1798 removed 



158 FIFTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

to Landaff, then Lincoln, Grafton Co.,N. H., where he d. of con- 
sumption, Dec. 6, 1822. as. 73 y. 6 m. 15 d. He was a strong, 
athletic man, 6 ft. 2 in. in height, and weighed more than 200 lbs. 
He m. March 28, 1777, Elizabeth Fletcher, dau. of Timothy 
Fletcher of Acton. She d. in Landaff of consumption, Feb. 18, 
1823, se. 65. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ELIZABETH FLETCHER, BORN IN LITTLETON. 

1. Elizabeth, b. Aug. 28, 1777; m. Silas Hooker, 294 

2. Timothy, b. April 29, 1779; m. Betsey Fletcher, 295 

3. Rebecca, b. Mar. 30, 1781 ; m. Abraham Whitcomb, ...... 296 

4. Stephen, b. April 7, 1783; m. Joanna Judd, 297 

5. Hannah, b. May 4, 1785 ; m. Thaddeus Grimes, 298 

0. Martha, b. Feb. 19, 1788; m. Simon Blanchard, 299 

7. Mary, b. May 3, 1790 ; unmarried, now in Landaff. 

8. Lucy, b. June 29, 1793; m. Josiah Emerson of East Landaff. She d. Dec. 

21, 1819, m. 26 y. 5 m. 22 d. Had Mary, m. Amos Noyes. 

9. Benjamin, b. Feb. 25, 1797; m. Mirah Bond, . . . 300 

130. Edmond Shattuck, Esq , s. of Dr. Benjamin, (p. 110,) was 
b. in Littleton, July 20, 1744, and in 1773 or 4, settled in Groton, 
then Cockermouth, N. H., as a shoemaker and farmer, where he 
d. of consumption, Jan. 12, 1816, ag. 71 y. 5 m. 22 d. He was 
much employed in public business, was a selectman, town clerk, 
post-master, representative in the legislature, justice of the peace, 
and the leading man in the public affairs of the town. 

He m. 1, in Pepperell, June 7, 1770, Abigail Chamberlain, b. 
in Groton, Mass., Sept. 8, 1748, dau. of John Chamberlain, Jr. 
and Rachel Lawrence, and granddau. of John C, (p. 93.) She 
d. in Groton, N. H., March 17, 1796, se. 47 y. 6 m. 9 d. 

He m. 2, Feb. 26, 1801, Hannah Powers of Pepperell. She 
d. about 1838. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ABIGAIL CHAMBERLAIN, BORN IN PEPPERELL AND GROTON. 

1. Rachel, b. March 9, 1771; m. Samuel Hazleton, 301 

2. Edmond, b. Oct. 1, 1772; m. Sarah Milliken, 302 

3. Benjamin, b. June 30, 1770 ; m. Mary Stone, 303 

4. John, b. April 12, 1778. His history is imperfectly known. 

5. Mary, b. April 14, 1780 ; d. unm., Sept. 19, 1812, *e. 32 y. 5 m. 5 d. 

6. Lydia, b. May 7, 1782 ; m. Zachariah B. Hall. She d. in Groton, Oct. 
19, 1809. 

7. Elizabeth, b. Jan. 1, 178G; d. unm., in Essex, Vt., April, 1834, a?. 38 y. 

8. Abigail, b. April 17, 1788; m. Samuel Keeler, 304 

9. Arthur, b. May 31, 1790; d. unm., Sept. 12, 1812, gd. 22 y. 3 m. 12 d. 

10. Moses, b. Mar. 30, 1794; m. in 181G, Sarah George of Hebron. He d. Jan. 
24, 1818. Had Mandana, b. June, 1817, who m. and lives in Nashua, N. H. 



JONATHAN SHATTUCK SOMERS SHATTUCK. 159 

131. Jonathan Shattuck, s. of Dr. Benjamin, (p. 110,) b. in 
Littleton, Aug. 9, 1746, resided awhile in his minority with his 
uncle, (probably Ebenezer, p. 90,) in Oxford, and in 1776 bought 
of John Earle a farm in that town. In 1781 he removed to Ches- 
terfield, N. H., and in 1787 to Townshend, Vt, where he d. April, 
1821, a3. 74 y. 4 m. 

He m. Sept. 15, 1767, Huldah Curtis, b. in Dudley, Mass., in 
1748. After her husband's death she removed to Bakersfield, Yt., 
where she d. Nov. 1, 1821, as. 73. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY HULDAH CURTIS, BORN IN . 

1. Jonathan, b. Sept. 20, 1768 ; m. Mehitable Fairbanks, 305 

2. Huldah, b. Mar. 24, 1770 ; m. Harmon Davis, a blacksmith of Townshend, 

Vt. She d. Oct. 1805. He is also dead. 

3. Arethusa, b. Aug. 15, 1772; m. James Saunders of Chesterfield, N. H. 

4. Elizabeth, b. April 6, 1774 ; m. Amos Coburn, a farmer of Champion, N. Y. 

She d. July, 185 J. He is also dead. 

5. Moses, b. Nov. 20, 1776 ; m. Hannah Brigham, 306 

6. Phebe, b. June 27, 1778 ; m. Winslow Wheelock. He was a farmer, and 

settled in Leroy, N. Y. Both dead. 

7. Josiah, b. Oct. 20, 1781 ; m. Susan B. Boutwell, 307 

8. John, b. Sept. 11, 1786. Lived in Brandon, N. Y. 

9. Benjamin, b. Mar. 20, 1789 ; m. Lydia Jackman, 308 

10. Hepzibah, b. May 16, 1793; m. 1, Ezekiel Cady, a chairmaker of Wilming- 
ton, Vt, where he d. She m. 2, John Smith, a farmer of the same place. 
She d. Aug., 1850. 

132. Somers Shattuck, s. of Dr. Benjamin, (p. 110,) b. July 
6, 1749, settled as a shoemaker in Portland, Me., where he d. 
Aug. 11, 1818, ae. 69 y. 1 m. 5 d. He was steward of the priva- 
teer sloop Retrieve in the revolution, and was taken prisoner by 
the enemy's ship Milford. He was exchanged, and afterwards 
served as a sergeant in the campaigns of 1779 and 1781. 

He m. in 1773, Esther Rogers, b. Feb. 22, 1756, and d. Nov. 
26, 1837, se. 81 y. 9 m. 4 d. ; only child of Gershom Rogers and 
Esther Mountfort, dau. of Edmond Mountfort, who went from 
Boston to Portland, and m. Mary, dau. of Maj. Samuel Moody, a 
man of note in his day. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ESTHER ROGERS, BORN IN PORTLAND. 

1. Moses, b. July 25, 1775; d. in 1800, unmarried. 

2. Dorcas, b. Oct. 13, 1777 ; m. March, 1801, Samuel Berry. 

3. Sally, b. July 20, 1780; m. April, 1802, Gideon Hobby. 

4. Anna, b. Jan. 7, 1783; unmarried, in Portland. 

5. Elizabeth, b. Mar. 23, 1786; d. Dec, 1786, jb. 9 m. 



160 FIFTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

6. Samuel, b. Mar. 20, 1788 ; d. unra., Aug., 1820, Be. 32 y. 5 m. 

7. Mary, b. April 4, 1792; m. Nov., 1825, James Mountfort. 

8. Elizabeth, b. Dec. 25, 1795 ; unmarried, in Portland. 



133. Timothy Shattuck, s. of Timothy, (p. 110,) was b. in 
Middleton, Ct., April 9, 1750. He first settled in North Haven, 
then a part of New Haven, and several of his transactions in real 
estate are entered upon its records between 1770 and 1782. About 
the latter date he removed to Durham and lived first in the south 
part of the town, and subsequently in its centre, where he carried 
on an extensive business as a cooper, principally for the New 
Haven market, by which he accumulated a handsome property. 
He had large business transactions with a Mr. Spelman, a mer- 
chant of his neighborhood, who failed, and involved Mr. Shat- 
tuck to the amount of his entire property ; and he was obliged 
to fail himself. He afterwards, about 1795, removed to Catskill, 
N. Y., where he died previous to 1807; the precise date is un- 
known to us. 

He m. about 1770, Deborah Barnes of North Haven. After 
the death of her husband, she returned to New Haven and lived 
with her children, where she died. She was interred in the 
cemetery of that city. A monument erected to her memory bears 
the inscription — ''Deborah, widow of Timothy Shattuck. Died 
Dec. 9, 1831, aged 83 years. She possessed a meek and quiet 
spirit, which in the sight of God is of great price." Her father, 
Capt. Joshua Barnes, d. in North Haven, Jan. 7, 1790, ae. 69, said 
to have been a descendant of Thomas Barnes, one of the earliest 

settlers of Hartford. Her mother Deborah d. Dec. 20, 

1782, K. 57. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY DEBORAH BARNES, BORN IN NORTH HAVEN AND DURHAM. 

1. Polly, b. ; m. Elkanah Perceval, and lived in Durham, Greene 

Co., N. Y. ; d. about 1851, without issue. Gertrude, an adopted dau., m. in 
Durham. 

2. Jared, b. April 27, 1773 ; m. a dau. of Governor Vincent, .... 309 

3. Lois, b. ; m. Timothy Perceval, a brother of Elkanah. 

They removed to Ohio. 

4. Roxanna, b. March 1, 1778; m. Jesse Grant, 310 

5. Sally, b. ; m. Dr. Porter of Saugerties, Ulster Co., N. Y. 

6. Lucinda, b. ; m. Wm. Den' on of Newfield, Tompkins, Co., 

N. Y. She d. Dec. 31, 1853. 

7. Harriet, b. May 19, 1791 ; m. Johann Frederick Uhlhorn, 311 

8. Anna, b. ; d. unm., in New Haven, July 20, 1840, so. 45. 



WILLIAM, JOHN, AND PETER SHATTUCK. 161 

134. William Shattuck, s. of William, (p. Ill,) b. in Little- 
ton about 1755, removed with his father in 1769, to New Ipswich, 
and is said to have kept the first public school in that town. He 
commanded a company in the army of the revolution, and was 
killed with 20 of his men, near Ticonderoga, in 1777. 

He m. Mary Dustin, b. about 1754, a descendant, and proba- 
bly a great-granddau. of Hannah Dustin, whose capture by the 
Indians in Haverhill, March 15, 1697, and whose remarkable 
escape from her captors by killing and scalping them, entitle her 
to be considered one of the greatest heroines of any age. (See 
Myrick's Hist. Haverhill, pp. 86, 100.) She m. 2, April 9, 1779, 
Simeon Hildreth of New Ipswich, and they removed to Brad- 
ford, N. H., and subsequently to Meriden, N. H., where she d. 
Aug. 6, 1832, a3. 78. Mr. Hildreth d. Sept. 28, 1843, as. 85, 
without issue. He was in the battle of Bunker Hill. An anec- 
dote relating to his conduct on that occasion is told of him to 
the following effect : " See," says he to his fellow-companion in 
arms, " how I do it ;" and drawing a ball from his pouch, and 
first wetting it in his mouth, let it fall into the muzzle of his gun j 
and taking a deliberate aim at a particular person in the enemy's 
ranks, he sent it through his heart. "There," said he, "this is 
the sixteenth that I have fixed in like manner!" 

William, his only son, b. in New Ipswich, Jan. 5, 1774, m. Jane Stevens, . 312 



135. John Shattuck, s. of William, (p. Ill,) was b. about 
1757. His history and that of his family we have been unable 
to obtain. It is said he removed first to Peterborough, N. H., 
thence to Bakersfield, Yt., and subsequently to Ohio or some other 
western state. 

He m. in New Ipswich, Dec. 9, 1779, Polly Parley of Hollis, 
who d. at the birth of her ninth child. His children — 
1. John, m. Polly Barnes, settled in Bakersfield, Vt., where he had the small pox, 

and d. without issue ; 2. Nancy, m. Singless of Peterborough ; 3. Susanna ; 

4. William; 5. Jonathan, m. his cousin Sally Shattuck, dau. of Benjamin; 

G. Brown ; 7. Polly ; 8. Sally ; 9. Betsey. 

136. Peter Shattuck, s. of William, (p. Ill,) was b. in 
Littleton in 1762, and first settled as a farmer and carpenter in 
New Ipswich, near his father's, on the estate recently owned by 
J. Tenney. In 1800 he removed to Bethlehem, N. H., where he d, 

21 



162 FIFTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

July 18, 1824, as. 62. He was a prominent and useful man in 
that town. 

He m. 1, Lydia Henney, dau. of Jonathan Henney. About 
1784 she joined the Shakers at Lebanon, taking her three chil- 
dren with her, not on account of any trouble between her and 
her husband — for they lived happily together — but because she 
considered it her duty. She however d. soon after, and the 
children returned to their father. 

He m. 2, Hannah Hildreth of New Ipswich, probably a dau. 
of Stephen H. She d. Sept. 25, 1792. 

He m. 3, Feb. 16, 1795, Rebecca Breed, dau. of John Breed. 
She d. in Bethlehem, April, 1837. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY LYDIA HENNEY, BORN IN NEW IPSWICH. 

1. Peter, b. July 15, 1778 ; in. Ruxbey Whiting, 313 

2. Lydia, b. April 14, 1781 ; m. Samuel Jackman, 314 

3. Ruth, b. April 10, 1783; m. Moses Howe, 315 

HIS CHILDREN, BY HANNAH HILDRETH, BORN IN NEW IPSWICH. 

4. Abigail, b. June 9,178-; m. Samuel P. Sweet, 316 

5. Stephen, b. Aug. 27, 1788; m. Rachel Nurse, 317 

6. Simeon, b. 1791 ; d. in New Ipswich, 11 months old. 

137. Sherman Shattuck, s. of William, (p lll,)b. in Little- 
ton, March 26, 1768, first settled in New Ipswich. From thence 
he removed in 1792 to Hancock, about 1794 to Bradford, in 1802 
to JafFrey, and in 1806 to Bethlehem, N. H. He d. in White- 
field, Nov. 5, 1837, ae. 69 y. 7 m. 9 d. He was a carpenter, shoe- 
maker, and farmer ; and few persons possessed more energy of 
character, or could perform a greater amount of labor. 

He m. in Peterborough, Feb., 1789, Hannah Putnam, b. in 
Sutton, Mass., Jan. 20, 1770, dau. of Elisha Putnam and Lucy 
Chamberlain. She d. in Bethlehem, Oct. 11, 1835, se. 65 y. 8 
m. 21 d. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY HANNAH PUTNAM, BORN IN VARIOUS PLACES. 

1. Vashli, b. Dec. 4, 1789; m. John Nurse, a farmer. She is dead. 

2. Richard P.,b. Feb. 15, 1791 ; m. Abigail Farnsworth, 318 

3. Ezra, b. Dec. 27, 1793; m. Jan. 5, 1820, Polly Whitcomb of Guilford. 

He d. in Bethlehem, July 23, 1829. Had Lydia, who m. Ezekiel Gilbert. 

4. Charlotte, b. Dec. 29, 1795 ; m. Alpheus Sawyer, 319 

5. Oliver P., b. Feb. 17, 1797 ; m. Charlotte Whittey 320 

6. Sherman, b. April 25,1799; d. in Bethlehem, Nov.27, 1819, se.20y. 7m. 6 d. 

7. Hannah, b. Feb. 15, 1801 ; m. Feb. 15, 1820, Wm. Eaton. She d. Feb., 

1851, in N. Y, state. Had Wm., Sherman, Edward, Andrew, and Hannah. 

8. William, b. Sept. 21, 1803; m. Rebecca Page, 321 

9. Elisha, b. Dec . 17, 1805 ; m. Emily Sawyer. He is a millwright in N. Y. 



BENJAMIN, RANDALL, AND WILLIAM SHATTUCK. 163 

10. lrena, ) b. May 11, 1808; d. on the day of birth. 

11. Catama, S Twins. d. on the day of birth. 

12. Mary, b. April 20, 1810; m. Feb. 18, 1828, Arnasa Briggs. She d. in 

Boscawen. He is in East Stoughton, Mass. 

138. Benjamin Shattuck, s. of William, (p. Ill,) b. in New 
Ipswich about 1771, and first settled in Bradford, but subsequent- 
ly removed to Bethlehem, and afterwards to Ohio, but to what 
place is unknown. 

He m. Sally Acres of Bradford, and had 3 children, Polly 
and Samuel, who settled in Ohio ; and Sally, who m. her cousin 
Jonathan, (p. 161.) 

DESCENDANTS OF THE CONNECTICUT BRANCHES. 

139. Randall Shattuck, s. of Robert, (p. 114.) was b. in 
Chatham, Middlesex Co., Ct, June 11, 1748, and was a miller 
and cooper. He first settled in his native town, but in 1795 
removed to Middletown, in 1797 to Winchester, and in 1800 to 
Torrington, all in the same State. He d. of consumption in the 
latter place, in the fall of 1804, as. 56. 

He m. Comfort Tyler, who d. in Smithville, N. Y., about 1834. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY COMFORT TYLER, BORN IN CHATHAM. 

i. Lydia, b. Sept. 23, 1770 ; m. Nathan Rose, 322 

2. Hannah, b. Mar. 31, 1772; m. Ozias Spencer, (Family 146) 

3. Randall, b. May 4, 1774 ; m. Sally Scoville, 323 

4. Mary, b. Oct. 30, 1775 ; in. Uriah Gates, 324 

5. Thankful, b. Oct. 14, 1777 ; m. Edward Root, 325 

6. Amasa, b. Mar. 22, 1779 ; m. Joanna Smith, 326 

7. Ruhamah, b. Sept. 23, 1781 ; m. Orange Mott, 327 

8. Asa, b. April 29, 1784 ; m. Clarissa Loomis, 328 

9. David, b. March 8, 1786 ; m. Esther Bailey, 329 



140. William Shattuck, s. of Robert, (p. 114,) b. Aug. 13, 
1750, was a farmer first in Chatham, and afterwards in Torring- 
ton, where he d. Feb. 7, 1840, se. 89 y. 5 m. 23 d. He was an 
officer in the continental army, and a revolutionary pensioner. 

He m. March 22, 1780, Hannah Spencer. She was b. Nov. 5, 
1758, and d. in Torrington, May 22, 1831, se. 72 y. 6 m. 17 d. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY HANNAH SPENCER, BORN IN CHATHAM. 

1. Sally, b. July 13, 1782; m. Warren Foote, 330 

2. Spencer, b. June 1,1784; m. Sally Barton, 331 

3. Ansell, b. June 19, 1786; m. L. Burns, and others, 332 

4. Hannah, b. ; unmarried, in Erie. 

5. Annis, b. Jan. 28, 1793 ; m. William Arbuckle, 333 

6. Chav.ncey, b. Aug. 16, 1795 ; m. Sarah M. Rowley, 334 



164 FIFTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

141. Thomas Shattuck, s. of Robert, (p. 114,) was b. July 1, 
1752. He was by trade a mason, and first settled in New Canaan, 
Ct., but removed in 1790 to Catskill, in 1796 to Charlotte, Dela- 
ware Co., in 1807 to Smithville, Chenango Co., and in 1830 to 
Greene, same Co., where he d. May 23, 1835, se. 82 y. 10 m. 
22 d. He was interred at Smithville. He was a revolutionary 
soldier. 

He m. 1, Olive Phelps, dan. of David Phelps, of Concord, N. H. 
She d. at Smithville, July 23, 1819. Four of their children m. 
four of the children of Jonathan Phelps, (no known relative of 
David Phelps,) producing double cousins all round. 

He m. 2, Ruth Strickland, widow of Abner Wells, now living. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY OLIVE PHELPS, BORN IN NEW CANAAN AND CATSKILL. 

1. David P., b. Jan. 25, 1786 ; m. Asenath Phelps, 335 

2. Olive, b. May 5, 1787; m. Rodney Phelps, 336 

3. Clarissa, b. Aug. 31, 1790; m. N. Beckwith Phelps, 337 

4. Calvin, b. Feb. 5, 1793; m. Anna Brooks, 338 

5. Lyman, b. Sept. 12, 1795 ; m. Julia Ann Phelps, 339 

HIS CHILD, BY RUTH WELLS, BORN IN SMITHVILLE, IN HIS SEVENTIETH YEAR. 

6. Mary C, b. Jan. 19, 1822 ; m. Henry Hoyt, 340 



142. Robert Shattuck, s. of Robert, (p. 114,)b. Oct. 1, 1756, 
was a farmer and blacksmith, and first settled in Colchester, West 
Chester Parish, New London Co., Ct., but in 1802 removed to 
Hamilton, Madison Co., N. Y., where he d. March 8, 1813. se. 56 
y. 5 m. 7 d. He was a sergeant with Samuel Shattuck, (p. 152,) 
in the Revolutionary Army. 

He m. in 1781, Anna Loomis, b. Sept. 12, 1764, dau. of Caleb 
and Anna Loomis. She m. 2, Adriel Sabins. and d. in Hamilton, 
May 12, 1832, se. 67 y. 8 m. Grave-stones are erected to their 
memory in Hamilton. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ANNA LOOMIS, BORN TN COLCHESTER AND HAMILTON. 



1. Caleb, b. May 24, 1782 

2. Erastus, b. Jan. 9, 1785 

3. Alfred, b. April U, 1787 

4. Alfred, b. July 11, 1789 

5. Nancy, b. July 25, 1791 

6. Esther, b. Dec. 25, 1793 

7. Robert, b. May 29, 1796 

8. Mary, b. April 3, 1799 

9. Loomis, b. Jan. 6, 1803 
10. Lorenzo,b. June 14, 1805 



m. Rhoda Fuller, 341 

m. Zoda Scoville, 342 

d. April 9, 1789, se. 1 y. 11 m. 28 d. 

m. Olive Orton, 343 

m. Roswell Porter, 344 

m. Erastus Rowley, 345 

m. Lois Bean, 346 

m. Allan Colson, 347 

m. Lydia Brown, 348 

m. Hannah Streeter, 349 



DAVID SHATTUCK PATIENCE SHATTUCK. 165 

143. David Shattuck,s. of Robert, (p. 114,) b. Sept. 12,1758, 
was a farmer and blacksmith in West Chester Parish, Colchester, 
Ct., where he d. Jan. 23, 1840, ae. 81 y. 4 m. 11 d. He served 
in the Continental Army ; was present at the disbanding of the 
army when Washington took his farewell ; and was a pensioner 
on the United States government. 

He m. Nov. 1789, Dorothy Alcott, b. Jan. 12, 1767, dau. of 
Thomas and Mary Alcott of East Haddam. She d. in Colchester, 
April 26, 1838, ae. 71 y. 3 m. 14 d. Her father d. Sept. 9, 1807, 
in his 83d year ; and his mother, Feb. 8, 1786, in her 53d year, 
and they have grave-stones erected to their memory in Moodus, Ct. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY DOROTHY ALCOTT, BORN IN COLCHESTER. 

1. Josiah, b. Feb. 7, 1791 ; m. Parthenia Wells, 350 

2. Gilbert, b. Feb. 1, 1793 ; m. Hannah L. Post, 351 

3. Memos, b. Mar. 10, 1795; m. , 352 

4. Giles, b. Jan. 24, 1798 ; m. Nancy Eggleston, 353 

5. David O., b. Mar. 21, 1800; m. Elizabeth A. Sanders, 354 

6. Dorothy, b. May 7, 1804; m. David Foote, 355 

144. Patience Shattuck, dau. of Robert, (p. 114,) was b. 
July 19, 1761, and d. in Concord, Lake Co., Ohio, July 24, 1832, 
ae. 69 y. m. 5 d. 

She m. Lemuel Mitchel, a cooper, who removed in 1804 from 
Colchester to Hamilton, N. Y., (where his dwelling-house with 
its contents was destroyed by fire;) and in 1820 to Chardon, 
Geauga Co., Ohio. He d. in Clandon, same Co., July 5, 1821, 
ae. 57. His father, Zephaniah Mitchel, d. in Colchester, ae. 103, 
and his mother ae. 100 years. 

HER CHILDREN, BY LEMUEL MITCHEL, BORN IN COLCHESTER. 

1. Harriet, b. Aug. 25, 1795; m. in 1817, Julius Bixby of Hamilton, a farmer, 

settled in Concord, Lake Co., Ohio. Had, 1. Sarah, b. June 8, 1820; 2. 
Emily, b. June 22, 1822'; 3. Dewit, b. Sept. 4, 1824; 4. Lydia, b. May 6, 
1833, d. in Chardon, July 24, 1843. The mother d. in Chardon, April 28, 
1853, a3. 57 y. 8 m. 3 d. 

2. George, b. May 19, 1797 ; m. Jan. 24, 1822, Almira Winchel of Concord. 

He has been a farmer and mechanic. He has also been a justice of the 
peace, and a local preacher of the Methodist church, and in 1853 was or- 
dained a deacon. Now lives in Eagleville. Has had, 1. Elizabeth, b. June 
8, 1823; 2. Patience, b. Oct. 24, 1824; 3. Huldah, b. May 31, 1826; 4. 
Harriet Jenette, b. March 16, 1829 ; 5. Daphne, b. March 2, 1832. 

3. William, b. July, 1799; d. unmarried, in Concord, Sept., 1833. 

4. Lyman, b. Dec, 1801 ; m. Sept., 1826, Polly Winchel, sister of his brother's 

wife. He is a farmer and carpenter in Concord. Has Maria W., b. Feb. 
28, 1833. 



166 FIFTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

145. Moses Shattuck, s. of Robert, (p. 114,) b. Dec. 29, 1763, 
was a cabinet maker, and first settled in Connecticut, but removed 
in 1810, to Jefferson, Schoharie Co., N. Y. ; in 1811, to Davenport. 
Delaware Co. ; in 1816, to Worcester, Otsego Co. ; in 1820, to 
Summit, Schoharie Co. ; and in 1822, again to Worcester, where 
he d. of consumption, Aug. 20, 1840, se. 77 y. While in Con- 
necticut he fell from a building, fractured his skull, and received 
other injuries, which disabled him for life. His left leg was a 
little shorter than his right, and the fingers of his left hand were 
so drawn together that he could not take hold of his tools until 
they were opened by the other hand. He however obtained a 
good living by his trade. 

It is said he m. 1, Grangier, of Suffleld, Hartford Co., Ct., 

where he had Sally, Emily and Henry, but we have been unable 
to obtain their history. 

He m. 2, in Jefferson, in 1810, Betsey, widow of George Conk, 
and dau. of John Vaughan and Priscilla Robins of New Jersey. 
She d. of consumption in Summit, Nov. 11, 1851. Had — 

1. A daughter, b. 1812; d. unnamed, in infancy. 

2. Amander, b Sept. 18, 1815 ; m. Almira Killnor, 356 

3. Elmy, b. Oct. 19, 1828; umn. in Summit, in 1853. 

4. A son, b. July, 1820; d. unnamed, 3 weeks old. 



146. Hannah Shattuck, dau. of Randall, (p. 163, )b. in Chat- 
ham, March 31, 1772, d. in Colebrook, Ct., Oct. 16, 1800, as. 28 
y. 6 m. 16 d. She m. Sept. 29, 1799, Ozias Spencer, b. Oct. 1, 
1769, and had — 

1. Hiram, b. June 12, 1800; m. Jan. 26, 1834, Mary Hill, b. Feb. 15, 1807, lives 

in Colebrook, and has, 1. Amos, b. June 29, 1835; 2. Harriet, b. Nov. 28, 
1838; 3. Mary L., b. April 25, 1841. 
Polly Shattuck, dau. of Robert, and aunt to the above Han- 
nah Shattuck, b. Nov. 17, 1766, (p. 114,) m. Oct. 5, 1801, the 
above Ozias Spencer for his 2d wife. They are both now (1853) 
living in Colebrook. 

POLLY SHATTUCK'S CHILDREN, BY OZIAS SPENCER, BORN IN COLEBROOK. 

2. Hannah, b. March 21, 1804, m. Jan. 9, 1821, Jacob B. Cobb, b. Aug. 2, 1799. 

Has, 1. Mary, b. Oct. 17, 1822, m. Feb. 15, 1842, Gillet A. Webster. She <1. 
April 21, 1853; 2. Hiram, b. March 5, 1824, m. Oct. 28, 1845, Harriet 
Hawley; 3. Charlotte, b. June 4, 1826, m. Sept. 21, 1850, Timothy Phelps; 

4. M. Huntington, b. April 20, 1828, m. March 6, 1849, Amanda Bartlett ; 

5. Cornelia Ann, b. Aug. 21, 1830, d. Sept. 16, 1838; 6. Arthur H., b. Sept. 
19, 1835, d. July 25, 1842 ; 7. Adaline C, b. March 8, 1837, d. April 6, 1841 ; 



JONATHAN SHATTUCK ANNIS SHATTUCK. 167 

8. Edward A., b. Jan. 25, 1840, d. March 6, 1841 ; 9. Jane M., b. April 15, 
1841 ; 10. Abrada V., b. Nov. 7, 1842. 

3. Alvira, b. Oct. 8, 1805. 

4. Bartlettejn. April 16, 1808; m. Susan H. Deland of Sandisfield. 

5. Robed, b. Sept. 7, 1810; in. Sept., 1838, Charlotte Chapin, b. 1813; live in 

Penn Yan, N. Y. Have, 1. Ransom B., b. July, 1839 ; 2. Victoria, b. 1844. 



vi. Sidjj (Alteration anb Cjjilfant. 

DESCENDANTS OF THE ELDER PEPPEBELL BRANCHES. 

147. Jonathan Shattuck, s. of Jonathan, (p. 115,) was b. in 
Pepperell, March 16, 1747, and settled on his father's estate on 
Windfall Plain. He d. at the residence of his son Thomas C. 
Shattuck, March 18, 1835, se. 88. He was a millwright, and 
erected the mill on Sucker Brook, where his son Jonathan now 
resides. He is said to have been employed in building more than 
fifty mills in different parts of the country. Rev. Mr. Bullard 
used to say that he acquired more property by his own personal 
labor than any man he knew in Pepperell. 

He m. 1, in 1769, Abia Chamberlain, dau. of Thomas Cham- 
berlain of Chelmsford, and sister of Azubah, (p. 118.) She was b. 
April 22, 1740, and d. March 13, 1817, se. 76 y. 10 m. 21 d. 

He m. 2, Oct. 9, 1817, Elizabeth Parker, widow of Lemuel 
Parker, and dau. of Mr. Nichols of Billerica. She d. Jan. 31, 
1835, se. 93. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ABIA CHAMBERLAlxX, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Abijah, b. Jan. 16, 1770 ; m. Nancy Sanderson, 357 

2. Jonathan, b. Nov. 9, 1771 ; m. Elizabeth Giles, 358 

3. Sally, b. June 5, 1773 ; m. John Kemp, 359 

4. Vryling, b. Sept. 29, 1774 ; m. Lucinda Parker, 360 

5. Polly, ) b. Aug. 14, 1776; d. June 18, 1785, ae. 8 y. 10 m. 4 d. 

6. Lucinda, S Twins. d. Sept. 27, 1779, se. 3 y. 1 m. 13 d. 

7. Thomas C.,b. Oct. 23, 1779 ; m. Lucy Blood, 361 



148. Annis Shattuck, dau. of Jonathan, (p. 115,) was b. in 
Pep., Oct. 2, 1749, and d. there, Dec. 13, 1831, ae. 82 y. 2 m. 11 d. 

She m. Oct. 11, 1775, Jonas Fitch, s. of Zachariah Fitch. 
He was a farmer in Pepperell. On the 11th June, 1808, he fell 



168 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

into a brook in Groton, and was found dead, probably stunned 
and drowned. He was buried in Pepperell. 

HER CHILDREN, BY JONAS FITCH, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Annis, b. July 14, 1776; m. Feb. 15, 1814, Simeon Nutting. She d. in Pep- 

perell, Jan. 25, 1824, re. 46 y. 6 m. 11 d. 

2. Milk, b. July 9, 1779 ; m. Oct. 17, 1793, Thomas Blood. She d. in Pepperell, 

June 4, 1823, re. 43 y. 10 m. 25 d. 

3. Jonas, b. March 23, 1783 ; m. Oct. 29, 1809, Thirza Jewett, b. March 3, 1780, 

dau. of Nehemiah Jewett and Sarah Shattuck, (p. 104.) They lived in Pep- 
perell, where she d. April 25, 1852, re. 72. Had, 1. Jonas, b. March 21, 
1811, now of Boston; 2. Sarah, b. Sept. 22, 1812; 3. Calvin, b. Dec. 29, 
1814 ; 4. Luther, b. Oct. 28, 181 6, d. ; 5. Luther, b. April 24, 1820 ; 6. Lucy, 
b. July 22, 1822. 

4. Polly, b. Sept. 22, 1785; m. Thomas Blood, the widower of her sister Mille. 

5. Calvin, b. July 9, 1790; d. Feb. 13, 1815, re. 24 y. 7 m. 4 d. 



149. Eleazer Shattuck, s. of Jonathan, (p. 115,) was b. in 
Pepperell, Oct. 26, 1751, and settled as a farmer, carpenter, and 
millwright in Ashby, where he d. Aug. 19, 1844, ae. 92 y. 9 m. 23 d. 

He m. in 1776, Mary Blood, b. March 10, 1753, dau. of Dea. 
David Blood and Abigail Parnsworth of Pepperell. She d. Feb. 
11, 1825, ae. 71 y. 11 m. 1 d. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY MARY BLOOD, BORN IN ASHBY. 

1. Joshua, b. Feb. 26, 1777 ; m. Nov. 21, 1801, his cousin Kezia Blood, dau. 

of Joshua B., b. March 12, 1775; lives in Ashby; no issue. 

2. Nathan B., b. April 27, 1781 ; m. 1, A. Wilkins ; 2, E. Smith, .... 362 

3. Lydia, b. Nov. 9, 1782 ; m. Amos Lawrence, 363 

4. Joel, b. Aug. 21, 1784 ; m. Betsey Jewett, 364 

5. JYabby, b. Feb. 22, 1786; m. Jonathan Blood, 365 

6. Mary, b. Dec. 14, 1787 ; unmarried, in Ashby. 

7. Ruth, b. Feb. 6, 1790; m. April 14, 1844, Isaac Damon of Ashby. He 

was b. March 29, 1786, and d. April 21, 1847. No issue. 

8. David, b. May 11, 1794 ; m. Hepzibah Shattuck, 366 

150. Alice Shattuck, dau. of Jonathan, (p. 115,) was b. May 
8, 1754, and d. in Pepperell, May 8, 1840, ae. 86. 

She m. 1, Nov. 30, 1773, Abel Wright, s. of Benj. W. of Hollis. 
She m. 2, Moses Blood, having been his 3d wife. 

HER CHILDREN, BY ABEL WRIGHT, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Abel, b. Feb. 12, 1774 ; d. Feb. 14, 1776, se. 2 y. m. 2 d. 

2. Abel, b. Nov. 2, 1776 ; d. April 16, 1779, ee. 2 y. 5 m. 14 d. 

3. Kezia, b. Mar. 29, 1779 ; d. Nov. 27, 1796, se. 17 y. 7 m. 28 d. 

4. Joseph, ) b. Feb. 12, 1782 ; resided in Yates County, N. Y. 

5. Mary, > Twins. m. Mosely. 

6. Joel, b. Jan. 23, 1784 ; m. Hannah Brown of Pepperell. 



EBENEZER SHATTUCK ELIZABETH SHATTUCK. 169 

7. Lucinda, b. May 9, 1786 ; m. William Eaton of Boston. 

8. Susanna, b. Aug. 4, 1789 ; m. Jacob Lawrence of Pepperell. 

9. Betsey, b. Feb. 26, 1792; m. Ralph Wright of Pepperell. 

10. Abel, b. Nov. 6, 1795; m. Towne. 

11. Calvin, b. Aug. 15, 1798. 12. Benjamin, b. Sept. 21, 1800. 

151. Ebenezer. Shattuck, s. of Jonathan, (p. 115,) was b. in 
Pepperell, Dec. 25, 1760, and first settled as a farmer in his na- 
tive town, but, in 1788, removed to Mason, N. H. ; and, in 1816, 
to Jerusalem, Yates Co., N. Y., where he d. July 30, 1840, ee. 
79 y. 7 m. 5 d. 

He m. Dec. 29, 1784, Lucy Woods, b. March 22, 1766, dau. of 
Aaron and Rebecca Woods of Pepperell. She d. in Jerusalem, 
May 27, 1844, ae. 78 y. 2 m. 5 d. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY LUCY WOODS, BORN IN PEPPERELL AND MASON. 

1. Ebenezer, b. Oct. 15, 1785; m. Cynthia Sweetland, 367 

2. Sewall, b. June 1,1787; m. Rebecca Uptagrew, 368 

3. Lucy, b. Dec. 4. 1789 ; m. Joseph Baker, 369 

4. Mahala, b. Jan. 29, 1792 ; m. Nathan Baker, 370 

5. Hepzibah, b. Feb. 27, 1794 ; m. 1, D. Shattuck ; 2, T. Tenney, (Farn. 366) 

6. Aaron W., ? b. Mar. 26, 1799 ; m. Lydia Cole, 371 

7. Geo. Wheeler, $ Twins. m. Rachel Davis, 372 

8. Rebecca, b. May 31, 1802; m. . She d. at Porto Rico, West 

Indies, May 11, 1851, ae. 49, leaving a child in New York. 

9. Clarissa, b. May 16, 1804 ; m. Joseph Fitch, 373 

152. Elizabeth Shattuck, dau. of John, (p. 117,) was b. in 
Pepperell, June 11, 1751, and d. in New Ipswich, N. H., April 9. 
1844, ee. 92 y. 9 m. 28 d. 

She m. Feb. 28, 1776, Simeon Blanchard, b. in Groton, June 
11, 1747, and d. in New Ipswich, June 29, 1822, as. 75. He was 
a farmer in the southwesterly part of that town ; his sons are 
farmers ; and his daughters have m. farmers. 

HER CHILDREN, BY SIMEON BLANCHARD, BORN IN NEW IPSWICH. 

1. Simeon, b. Nov. 25, 1776 ; m. Submit Winship, settled in Roxbury, N. H., and 

has had 7 children — Hosea, Charles G., Nancy, Susan, Sarah, Amos M., and 
Joseph. 

2. Betsey, b. Nov. 25, 1778 ; m. Simeon Wright, settled in Bradford, Vt., and has 

had 5 children — Winchester, Diodama, Wells, Wealthy, and Betsey. The 
mother d. June 21, ]843, se. 64 y. 6 m. 26 d. 

3. Levi, b. Dec. 17, 1780 ; m. Hannah Nichols, and is now living in New Ipswich. 

He has had 11 children — Betsey, Marinda, Elvira, Gilman, Hannah, L. Mon- 
roe, Clarissa, Julian, Horace, Charles, and Sophronia. 

4. Louisa, b. Jan. 3, 1783 ; m. Josiah Wright, settled in Bradford, Vt., and has 

had 6 children — Hale, Lydia, Asenath, Dexter, Nancy, and Electa. The 
mother is not living. 
22 



170 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

5. Sarah, b. July 24, 1785 ; unmarried, in New Ipswich. 

6. William, b. May 3, 1788 ; m. Susan Farnsworth, settled on the paternal home- 

stead in New Ipswich, and has had 11 children — Louisa, Susan, Harriet, 
William H., Eben H., Mary Ann, Andrew, Asenath, Henry, George H., and 
Lurena. All married. 

7. James, b. April 29, 1790; m. June, 1822, Lydia Brown; resides in Peter- 

borough, N. H., and has had 7 children — Nancy, Jason, Joseph, Maria, Eliz- 
beth, Myron, and Caroline. 

8. Charlotte, b. Aug. 16, 1792; m. David Whitney, settled in Ashby, Mass., and 

has had 6 children — James N., Lucius M., George S., Mary C, Harriet M., 
and Charles E. 



153. Olive Shattuck, dau. of John, (p. 117,) was b. in 
Pepperell, Jan. 27, 1753, and d. in Nashua, N. H., April 20, 1837, 
ae. 84 y. 2 m. 23 d. She united with the church in Pep. in 1784. 

She m. 1, Dec. 14, 1784, Capt. James Bennett, b. in Groton, 
Dec. 5, 1736, s. of Moses Bennett and Anna Blanchard, who were 
m. Aug. 11, 1719. He was nearly 18 years older than his 2d 
wife, and had had by his first wife — 1. Betsey, b. April 5, 1766 ; 
2. Hannah ; 3. Asa ; 4. Mille ; 5. Sewall ; 6. Q,uincy ; and 7. 
Amos, b. Sept. 10, 1778. He settled in the northwest corner of 
Ashby, near Wautatic Mountain, adjoining the bounds of Ash- 
burnham and New Ipswich. He d. of consumption, April 9, 
1808, ae. 71 y. 4 m. 4 d. In 1775 he was stationed at Lechmere 
Point, (East Cambridge,) and was in the battle of Bunker Hill; 
and commanded a company engaged in other battles of the 
revolution. 

She m. 2, Jan. 25, 1816, Nehemiah Hardy of Hollis. He d. 
in Nashua, N. H., Feb. 4, 1837, a3. 86. 

HER CHILDREN, BY JAMES BENNETT, BORN IN ASHBT. 

1. Eliab, b. Jan. 13, 1789 ; d. in Pepperell of a fever, May 4, 1815, on the day 

appointed for his marriage, ae. 26 y. 3 m. 21 d. 

2. James Harvey, b. Nov. 22, 1791. He has been a merchant in Boston, but 

dwells in Lexington. He m. Winifred Knowles, b. in Truro, Mass., June 
21, 1800; and have had, 1. James Knowles, b. July 30, 1821, m. Martha 
Stimpson of Boston ; 2. Mary Winifred, b. April 22, 1823, m. Peter Mclntire ; 
3. Charles Hawes, b. March 23, 1836. 

3. Sarah, b. Aug. 7, 1795 ; m. in Boston in 1816, William Wright, b. in Pep- 

perell, April 6, 1788, s. of David Wright and Polly Lowell, (p. 131.) He 
has been a merchant and a dealer in real estate in Boston. They have had, 
1. Sarah; 2. William Augustus, m. in Salem in 1850, Frances Sophia, dau. 
of Benjamin Huntington; 3. Caroline Elizabeth; 4. Charles Lowell ; 5. Ada- 
line Fanny; 6. Henry Clarence. The eldest b. in Hollis, the others in 
Boston. 



SARAH SHATTUCK JOHN SHATTUCK. 171 

154. Sarah Shattuck, dau. of John, (p. 117.) was b. in Pep- 
perell, Feb. 23, 1755, and d. in Townsend, July 8, 1785, ae. 30 y. 
4 m. 15 d. Her death was supposed to have been occasioned 
by an imprudent administration of an emetic by her physician. 

She m. Oct. 18, 1781, Ebenezer Ball, a farmer of Townsend, 
b. Sept. 2, 1756, and d. Dec. 5, 1837, se. 81 y. 3 m. 3 d. He m. 2, 
June, 1786, Hannah Smith, who d. April 7, 1787. He m. 3, Oct. 
10, 1787, Phebe Watson, b. Dec. 19, 1767, d. Nov. 2, 1848, 33. 81. 
Sarah, her only child, b. Nov. 20, 1782, m. I)ea. Samuel Walker of Townsend, 

by whom she had several children — 1. John, b. May 13, 1814 ; 2. Levi, b. Feb. 

5, 1816; 3. Sarah Shattuck, b. Dec. 18, 1818; 4. Nathan, b. Feb. 19, 1822, 

and perhaps others. 

155. John Shattuck, s. of John, (p. 117,) was born in Pep- 
perell, July 7, 1757, and d. in New Ipswich, N. H., Saturday, April 
26, 1816, ee. 58 y. 9 m. 19 d. He was a farmer and shoemaker, 
and first settled in 1783, in the northwesterly part of Ashby, near 
his two elder sisters. He brought a portion of the farm, since 
known as the Bedlow farm, under cultivation, and erected on it a 
dwelling-house and other buildings. This dwelling-house was 
burned in 1807. Suffering inconvenience from its remoteness 
from public worship and other town privileges, he sold this 
estate in 1794, and bought another southerly of the present meet- 
ing-house in New Ipswich, N. H., now partly occupied by Mr. 
Willard. This farm was enlarged by subsequent purchases, ad- 
ditional buildings were erected, and other improvements were 
made ; but though it contained some good land, and yielded a com- 
fortable subsistence to its owner, yet it was generally rocky and 
unproductive, and gave a comparatively poor return for the labor 
expended. The same amount of toil and good management 
would have produced on some farms a considerable fortune. He 
and his wife united with Rev. Mr. Farrar's church in New Ips- 
wich in 1786, and he bore the character of an intelligent, indus- 
trious, honest, upright, Christian man, eminently a peacemaker 
in his family and among his neighbors. He was often known to 
perform the usual day's work on his farm, and in the evening to 
enter his shop, and earn enough before retiring to rest to pay his 
hired man the next day ; and to repeat this labor day after day. 
He was often solicited to take public office in the town, but uni- 
formly declined. Private life was more congenial to his unob- 
trusive, amiable, and excellent temperament. 



172 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

He m. 1, Dec. 11, 1783, Betsey Miles, b. in Concord, Mass., 
Dec. 4, 1758, dau. of Abel Miles and Elizabeth Adams, then of 
New Ipswich. She d. of consumption, Jan. 3, 1798, ae. 39 y. m. 
29 d. She was a woman who possessed uncommon intelligence 
and piety, and excelled as a housekeeper and a mother. Her an- 
cestors were among the first settlers and leading men of Concord. 

He m. 2, Nov. 14, 1799, Sarah Potter of Rindge. She sur- 
vived him, and m. 2, James Saunderson of New Ipswich, who d. 
two years after marriage. She d. in N. I., Feb. 11, 1851, 33. 91 y. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY BETSEY MILES, BORN IN ASHBY AND NEW IPSWICH. 

1. John, b. July 10, 1785 ; m. Hepzibah J. Prescott, 374 

2. Abel, b. June 14, 1788; m. Mary Bedlow, 375 

3. Daniel, b. July 10, 1790; m. Sarah Edwards, 376 

4. Betsjf, b. April 6, 1792 ; d. of cons., Aug. 26, 1822, se. 30 y. 4 m. 20 d., unm. 

5. Lemuel, b. Oct. 15, 1793; m. Clarissa Baxter, 377 

6. Rebecca, b. July 18, 1796 ; d. of consumption, May 4, 1817, se. 20 y. 9 m. 16 d. 

156. Sybil Shattuck, dau. of John, (p. 117,) was b. in Pep., 
Sept. 23, 1759, and d. of typhus fever, Sept. 21, 1820, se. 61. 

She m. in 1783, Nathaniel Sartell, b. Oct. 27, 1760, s. of 

Nathaniel S. and Catherine , and grand nephew of Josiah 

S., the donor of the Groton Ministerial Fund, (see Family 174.) 
He m. 2, July 15, 1821, Hannah Green, widow of Abel Green. 
He d. Sept. 1, 1847, se. 86 y. 10 m. 4 d. 

Nathaniel, their only child, b. Aug. 12, 1784, settled as a wheelwright in the busi- 
ness, and on the place of his father, on Sucker Brook, northerly of Windfall 
Plain. He m. in 1810, Sybil Shattuck, b. April 16, 1792, dau. of Levi, 
(Family 224,) by whom he has had 16 children — 1. Nathaniel Prentice, b. 
April 2, 1811 ; 2. James Quincy, b. Nov. 14, 1812; 3. Lucy B., b. March 8, 
1814; 4. William, b. May 25, 1815; 5. John, b. Sept. 17, 1816, d. Dec. 12, 
1817; 6. Sybil, b. May 23, 1819; 7. John, b. Sept. 22, 1820; 8. Mary Jane, 
b. May 25, 1822 ; 9. Henry, b. Oct. 8, 1823 ; 10. Joseph B., b. Jan. 15, 1826 ; 
11. Benjamin F., b. April 6, 1827; 12. Elizabeth, b. Jan. 1, lb29; 13. Levi, 
b. Feb. 25, 1831, d. May 14, 1833; 14. Charles Babbidge, b. March 9, 1832; 
15. Levi, b. March 9, 1834 ; 16. Hannah, b. . 

157. Emerson Shattuck, s. of John, (p. 117,) b. Oct. 12, 
1761, was a farmer in Pepperell. and d. of consumption, on the 
anniversary of his birth, Oct. 12, 1817, ae. 56. 

He m. Susanna Shattuck, b. April 7, 1768, dau. of Zaccheus, 
(p. 118.) She d. in Townsend, Nov. 12, 1846, ae. 78 y. 7 m. 5 d. 

THEIR CHILDREN, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Henry, b. March 9, 1789. He was executor to Emerson Shattuck's will, and 
settled upon his place; m. March 9, 1815, Azubah Bowers, who after his 



NATHANIEL SHATTUCK EUNICE SHATTUCK. 173 

death m. Eliphalet Bailey. Henry Davenport Shattuck, their only child, 
resides on the homestead. 

2. Winthrop, b. Aug. 15, 1793 ; m. Betsey Shattuck, (see Family 92, p. 140 ;) 

he had John, Olive, Hannah, Mary Jane, and Fanny. 

3. Sophronia,b. May 26, 1795; m. Marshall Atherton. 

4. Sabra, b. May 12, 1797; m. Bolter Colson. 

5. Emerson, b. July 2, 1800 ; m. Justinia Woods. 



158. Nathaniel Shattuck, s. of John, (p. 117,) b. Jan. 5, 
1764, first settled upon the paternal homestead, but removed and 
afterwards lived in other places in Pepperell. He d. there June 
14, 1847, SB. 83 y. 5 m. 9 d. 

He m. March 22, 1786, Hannah Ball, b. Oct. 20, 1762, dau. of 
Ebenezer Ball of Townsend. She d. June 5, 1833, se. 70 y. 
7 m. 15 d. Both were members of the church. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY HANNAH BALL, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Hannah, b. Oct. 29, 1788; d. unm., of the dropsy, April 30, 1811, se. 22 y. 

6 m. 1 d. During the last four years of her life she was " tapped" many 
times ; and between 600 and 700 pounds of water was taken from her side. 

2. Betsey, b. Aug. 12, 1790 ; m. Rowland Shattuck, .... (Family 250) 

3. Nathaniel, b. Oct. 5, 1792 ; m. Betsey Green, 378 

4. Gardner, b. March 5, 1795 ; m. Silence Warren, 379 

5. Rebecca, b. May 11, 1797; m. Lemuel Hall, 380 

6. Olive, b. July 8, 1799; m. May 28, 1818, Bryant Lawrence, b. April 

22, 1795. He d. April 18, 1822, se. 27. She d. Feb. 3, 1849, se. 49 y. 6 m. 
25 d. . They had Bryant, b. Feb. 19, 1822, d. June 5, 1822, se. 3 m. 16 d. 

7. Abel, b. July 24, 1802; m. Deverd Verder, 381 

8- Maiy, b. Aug. 23, 1804 ; unm., in Pepperell. In youth one of her hands 

and arms was accidentally caught in her father's cider mill, and so badly 
injured that amputation above the elbow became necessary. 



159. Eunice Shattuck, dau. of John, (p. 118,) b. July 23, 
1767, d. of apoplexy in Pep., Nov. 4, 1829, a3. 62 y. 3 m. 11 d. 

She m. Dec. 26, 1791, Nehemiah Jewett, Esq., b. Sept. 1, 
1762, s. of Nehemiah Jewett and Sarah Green. (Family 46.) He 
lived on his farm in the northwesterly part of Pepperell, near the 
bounds of Brookline, where he d. of a fever, April 11, 1820, as. 
57 y. 7 m. 10 d. He was much employed in public business ; 
was many years one of the selectmen ; town clerk eleven years, 
1806 to 1816; representative in the legislature seven years, 1811 
to 1819, excepting 1817 and 1818; and for a long period a jus- 
tice of the peace. He d. in office, laden with honor, and his 
death was considered a great public loss. 



174 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

HER CHILDREN, BY NEHEMIAH JEWETT, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Cynthia, b. Aug. 31, 1795; d. unm., April 12, 1820, ce. 25 y. 7 m. 12 d. 

2. Andrew, b. Oct. 10, 1797 ; d. in the U. S. service at Buffalo, Dec. 25, 1814. 

3. Mary, b. July 17, 1799 ; m. Alpheus Nutting. 

4. Lucretia, b. Nov. 13, 1802; m. Edmond Lawrence. 

5. Benjamin F.,b. April 16, 1805; m. Martha Warner of Townsend, b. 1808. 

He d. Sept. 7, 1738 ; having had, 1. Andrew F., b. March 7, 1830 ; 2. Adelia, 
b. Sept. 21, 1832; 3. Marietta, b. April 11, 1836. 



160. Dr. Caleb Shattuck, s. of John, (p. 118,) was b. in 
Pepperell, April 26, 1770, and graduated at Dartmouth College in 
1794. He studied medicine, and settled in his profession in 
Paxton, Worcester Co., but d. in Lebanon, N. Y., while on a visit 
to that place, Oct. 24, 1811, ae. 41 y. 5 m. 28 d. 

He m. Martha Kelley of Rutland. She d. in Gardner, June, 
1824. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY MARTHA KELLEY, BORN IN PAXTON. 

1. Martha Caldwell, b. March 28, 1801 ; m. March 28, 1820, Geo. Fay of Oak- 

ham, and had, 1. Martha, b. April 5, 1821, d. July 22, 1841; 2. George, b. 
June 16, 1825; 3. Charles, b. June 16, 1830, d. Jan. 13, 1832; 4. Lyman, b. 
Jan. 11, 1835. 

2. Harriet Jennison, b. March 8, 1803; m. 1, Dr. Seth Field of West Brookfield. 

She m. 2, Lyman Johnson of Sturbridge. No issue. 

3. Calistia Shaw, b. May 15, 1805 ; d. 3 months old. 

4. Hannah Caldwell, b. Sept. 26, 1806; m. Otis Stone of Oakham, and has had, 

1. Martha, b. April 5, 1821, d. July 22, 1841, bb. 20 y. 3 m. 17 d. ; 2. George, 
b. June 16, 1825; 3. Charles, b. June 16, 1830, d. Jan. 13, 1832; 4. Lyman, 
b. Jan. 11, 1835. 

5. Richard Kelley, b. Nov. 15, 1809; m. Gleason. 



161. Noah Shattuck, s. of Zaccheus, (p. 118,) was b. in 
Pepperell, Feb. 21, 1766, and settled in Townsend, where he d. 
Aug. 19, 1801, as. 35 y. 5 m. 28 d. 

He m. Nov. 7, 1793, Sarah Spaulding, and had — 

1. JYoah, b. Aug. 22, 1794; d. Dec. 15, 1797, se. 3 y. 3 m. 23 d. 

2. Sarah, b. Oct. 6, 1795; m. Jeremiah L. Perham, (p. 119,) . . . . 382 

3. Lovell, b. July 1, 1797 ; d. Sept. 2, 1801, se. 4 y. 2 m. 1 d. 

4. Morrell, b. June 19, 1799; d. Sept. 9, 1801, ae. 2 y. 2 m. 20 d. 

5. Noah, ) b. Feb. 1, 1801. 

6. Jhuhah, S Twins. 

DESCENDANTS OF THE HOLLIS BRANCHES. 

162. William Shattuck, s. of William, (p. 120,) was b. in 
Hollis, Feb. 26, 1741 ; first settled in his native town, but re- 
moved to Deny, N. H., about 1783, and is said to have d. soon after. 



NATHANIEL SHATTUCK ZACHARIAH SHATTUCK. 175 

He m. Dec. 2, 1761, Zilpha Turner. She d. in Deny, se. 
80. Had— 

1. Lurana, b. ; m. Dec. 28, 1783, David Saunderson. She d. in 

Rindge, N. H., leaving 1 child — Peter. 

2. Rebecca, b. ; m. Dec. 24, 1789, Michael Carter of Dunstable. 

3. Priscilla, (afterwards altered to Polly,) m. Josiah Spaulding, a wealthy citizen 

of Nashua. She d. leaving 3 children, who settled in Zanesville, Ohio. He 
m. a second wife. 

4. Sally, b. ; d. unmarried. 

5. William, b. ; m. Hannah Hardy of Danville, Vt. ; d. in Canada. 

6. Lemuel, b. Feb. 13, 1773 ; m. Rachel Fish, 383 

7. Daniel, b. ; d. unmarried, in Dunstable, July 15, 1799. 



163. Nathaniel Shattuck, s. of William, (p. 120,) b. in 
Hollis in 1746, was a farmer and wheelwright ; removed to 
Groton, where he d. of the typhus fever, April 5, 1813, se. 67. 

He m. Eunice Hazen, b. April 30, 1754, dan. of Benjamin 
Hazen and Betty Nutting. She m. 2, Jan. 19, 1815, Thomas 
Bennett. She d. in Groton, July 9, 1844, se. 90 y. 2 m. 9 d. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY EUNICE HAZEN, BORN IN GROTON. 

1. Jeremiah, b. Aug. 23, 1775 ; m. Abigail Stearns, 384 

2. John, b. Mar. 22, 1778 ; m. Mary Bennett, 385 

3. Eunice, b. ; m. Oct. 12, 1800, Jonathan Jones. She d. in 

Charlestown. Had 2 children, who d. in infancy. 

4. Sally, b. Jan. 22, 1789 ; m. Nov. 12, 1805, Levi Parker of Dunstable. He 

d. in Pepperell ; left 4 children — 1. Levi ; 2. Sarah ; 3. Jonas ; 4. Jonah. 

5. Betsey, b. Nov. 11, 1791 ; m. Sept. 26, 1808, Joel B. Patten. He d. at sea, 

April 12, 1832. Had, 1. Elizabeth; 2. Ann Maria; 3. Harriet; 4. Joel. 
Elizabeth m. Joseph Lawrence of Pepperell. The others d. young. 

6. William, b. Nov. 12, 1796 ; m. Eunice Hazen, 386 



164. Zachariah Shattuck, s. of Zachariah, (p. 120,) was b. 
in Hollis, Dec. 7, 1747, and d. June 7, 1819, ae. 71 y. 6 m. 

He m. Nov. 28, 1771, Elizabeth Farley, b. in Billerica, Aug. 
25, 1755, dau. of Caleb Farley. She d. in Hollis, of consump- 
tion, March 22, 1838, as. 82 y. 6 m. 27 d. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ELIZABETH FARLEY, BORN IN HOLLIS. 

1. Elizabeth, b. 1772; m. 1, Nov. 21, 1793, James Ball, who d. in 

Concord, N. H., leaving one son. She m. 2, Conant of Milford. She 

m. 3, John May of Concord, Vt. 

2. Sarah, b. May 4, 1774 ; in. Aaron Hardy, 387 

3. Mary, b. March 9,1776; m. Oct. 10, 1804, Abijah Gould. She d. in 

Hollis, May, 1806, se. 34 y. 6 m., having had one child. 

4. Isaac, b. April 9, 1778 ; m. Hannah Moore, 388 

5. Zachariah, b. July 23, 1781 ; m. in 1810, Mary Killam. He d. without issue, 



176 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

Nov. 25, 1815, ae. 34 y. 4 m. 3 d. She m. 2, Sept. 30, 1816, Jeremiah Ames, 
a carpenter of Salem. No children. 

6. Abel, b. Sept. 21, 1782; m. Alice Little, 389 

7. Joseph, b. Jan. 20, 1785 ; unm., in Hollis, with his brother. 

8. Amos, b. Jan. 11, 1793 ; m. Margaret Ball, 390 



165. Elizabeth Shattuck, dau. of Zachariah, (p. 120,) was 
b. in Hollis, and d. in Deering, N. H., Aug. 1, 1809, in her 60th 
year. 

She m. Dec. 17, 1772. Timothy Wyman, b. in Woburn, Mass., 
about 1748, s. of Timothy Wyman and Sarah Locke. He first 
settled in Hollis, but about 1777 or 8 removed to Deering, and 
lived about one and a quarter mile from Hillsborough Bridge, 
where he d. Oct. 31, 1830, as. 82 years. He was a farmer in 
comfortable circumstances, and brought up a large family of chil- 
dren respectably. 

HER CHILDREN, BY TIMOTHY WYMAN, BORN IN HOLLIS AND DEERING. 

1. Timothy, b. Nov. 25, 1773. He wrought on his father's farm during his mi- 

nority, and afterwards turned his attention to study, and was employed first 
as a school teacher, and subsequently as a clerk in a store. In 18Q2 he set- 
tled at Hillsborough Bridge as an innkeeper, merchant, and manufacturer, 
and succeeded in accumulating a considerable estate. He was a justice of 
the peace, and by his great energy, firmness, and decision of character, be- 
came very popular as a magistrate. His decisions were always sustained 
when carried to a higher court. A correspondent states, that during the 
whole course of his large business, " though beginning upon borrowed capital, 
he never gave a mortgage, or was a bondsman, never was bound for any one, 
was never sued, and always met his payments when due." He d. March 31, 
1850, ae. 76 y. 4 m. 6 d. He m. Dec. 28, 1813, Abigail Dow, b. in Hollis, 
April 22, 1797, dau. of Stephen Dow. She d. Oct. 31, 1832, ae. 35 y. 6 m. 9 d. 
They had, 1. Lot, b. Dec. 13, 1816, d. Feb. 14, 1833, ae. 16 y. 2 m. 1 d. ; 2. 
Stephen Dow, b. July 31, 1821 ; now living upon the paternal homestead. 

2. Nathan, b. May 28, 1775. He was a farmer in Vermont, first in Windham, 

and afterwards in Westminster and Jamaica. He d. at the last place, about 

1853-4. He m. 1, Stuart of Amherst, by whom he had Nathan 

and Betsey. He m„ 2, , by whom he had Timothy, Matilda, Dan- 
iel, Lydia, Fanny, Mary, and Abigail. He m. 3, Patty Howard of Jamaica, 
Vt, by whom he had 1 child, that d. young. 

3. Elizabeth, b. March 13, 1777; m. about 1814, Jesse Emery, a farmer, first in 

Deering, and afterwards of Henniker, N. H. He d. in 1838. She d. Jan. 
30, 1850, ae. 72 y. 10 m. 7 d., without issue. 

4. Ebenezer, b. May 23, 1780; settled as a farmer near his father's, and has ac- 

quired a large property. He m. 1, in 1818, Mehitable Clement. She d. Dec. 
22, 1818. He m. 2, Sept. 17, 1820, Betsey Stanley of Hopkinton, b. Jan. 19, 
1796. They have had, 1. Elizabeth S., b. Oct. 2, 1821, d. Jan. 29, 1854; 
2. Mehitable C, b. Nov. 8, 1822; 3. John S., b. Dec. 3, 1823, d. March 8, 



ELIZABETH SHATTUCK MARY SHATTUCK. 177 

1844; 4. Charles, b. March 5, 1825; 5. Daniel, b. May 23, 182G, d. March 
22. 1828; 6. Abigail Dow, b. Aug. 12, 1827; 7. Daniel, b. Sept. 10, 1829; 
8. Sybil, b. Nov. 16, 1830, d. Sept. 2, 1852; 9. Cynthia, b. May 17, 1832; 
10. Almira, b. Oct. 19, 1833, d. Oct. 29, 1846; 11. Almena, b. Sept. 19, 1836; 
12. Moses, b. Nov. 12, 1837; 13. An infant, b. April 15, 1840, d. same day. 

5. Sybil, b. Aug. 6, 1782 ; m. in March, 1809, Jonathan Sargent, Jr. of Hills- 

borough. She d. Avithout issue, Aug. 13, 1827, as. 45 y. m. 7 d. 

6. Reuben, b. Feb. 27, 1784. He first settled as a farmer in Hillsborough, but in 

1811 removed to Bradford, and in 1827 to Concord, N. H., where he is now 
a butcher. He m. Feb. 27, 1809, Rhoda Hartwell, b. Sept. 24, 1790, in 
Hillsborough; and have had, 1. Reuben G., b. May 1, 1810; 2. William H., 
b. Jan. 5, 1812, d. Oct. 5, 1813 ; 3. William H., b. March 26, 1815; 4. Jesse 
Emery, b. Jan. 9, 1818; 5. Lorenzo, b. Nov. 13, 1824, d. Nov. 15, 1829; 6. 
Lafayette, b. Nov. 8, 1826 ; 7. Joseph J., b. July 9, 1829 ; 8. Rhoda Jane, b. 
April 8, 1832. 

7. Mel, b. Feb. 7, 1786 ; d. in Deering, about 1795. 

8. Sally, b. June 19, 1789; m. April 10, 1810, Josiah Kilborn, b. Oct. 2, 1783, a 

farmer of Hillsborough, where he d. They had, 1. Frederick D., b. April 
21, 1811; 2. Daniel, b. Sept. 3, 1813, d. April 3, 1817; 3. Stephen W., b. 
July 27, 1816; 4. Laphalia, b. April 3, 1819, d. April 15, 1819; 5. Cyrus, b. 
April 7, 1822, d. April 17, 1822 ; 6. Paige, b. July 27, 1824, d. Oct. 30, 1829 ; 
7. Edward, b. June 8, 1826; 8. Sybil, b. Aug. 22, 1827. 

9. Polly, (twin with last;) m. Dec. 8, 1808, Isaac Merrill, b. June 11, 1784. 

They resided in Hillsborough and Hopkinton, N. H. She d. in Hopkinton, 
May 31, 1843. She had, 1. Clarinda, b. Feb. 17, 1810; 2. Elizabeth Adaline 
and Mary Caroline, twins, b. about 1812, d. young; 4. Isaac D., b. Oct. 1, 
1814; 5. Milton W., b. July 15, 1816; 6. James M., b. Aug. 8, 1818, d. in 
New York city, Oct. 11, 1848; 7. Elizabeth, b. Jan. 9, 1821, d. young; 8. 
Emily, b. Feb. 12, 1824; 9. Annette, b. June 28, 1831. The father subse- 
quently m. a 2d and 3d wife. 

10. Hannah, b. Nov. 24, 1791 ; m. Nov. 28, 1813, John Smith, b. Nov. 23, 1787. 
They have lived in various places, and have had, 1. An infant, d. unnamed ; 
2. Sybil S., b. Oct. 3, 1816; 3. Elizabeth, b. Sept. 7, 1820; 4. Simeon F., b. 
July 3, 1824; 5. Lucretia Ann, b. Feb. 10, 1829, d. April, 1851 ; 6. Hannah 

5. and Lydia M., twins, b. July 14, 1843. 

11. Daniel, b. March 24, 1794. He is a farmer, drover, and butcher, in Hills- 
borough; m. Dec. 21, 1830, Louisa Moore, b. in Hollis, June 28, 1806, and 
has had, 1. Squiers Clement, b. Nov. 15, 1831 ; 2. Louisa Maria, b. Oct. 26, 
1833, d. Feb. 10, 1849; 3. Ann Sophia, b. Jan. 11, 1836; 4. Laura Fidelia, 
b. Aug. 25, 1837; 5. Andrew Jackson, b. July 14, 1839, d. Aug. 12, 1839; 

6. Martin Van Buren, twin with last ; 7. Loella Matilda, b. Oct. 26, 1842. 



166. Mary Shattuck, dau. of Zachariah, (p. 120,) was b. in 
Hollis in 1753, where she d. May, 1816, as. 63 years. 

She m. Jan. 28, 1779, Stephen Farley, b. Jan. 30, 1753, s. of 
Benjamin Farley of Hollis. A farmer. He d. Jan. 13, 1837 ; 
33. 84. 

23 



178 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

HER CHILDREN, BY STEPHEN FARLEY, BORN IN HOLLIS. 

1. Stephen, b. Nov. 12, 1779. He grad. at Dartmouth College in 1804, and was 

settled as minister in Claremont, N. H. He d. in Amesbury, Mass., Sept. 6, 
1851, se. 71 y. 9 m. 24 d. He m. Lucy Saunders of Kennebunk, Me., and 
had 10 children, of whom are, Massalon, (H. C, 1831,) and Caleb Ellis, (D. C, 
1843,) now attorney at law in Texas; and Harriet, editor of the "Lowell 
Offering." 

2. Mary,b. Aug. 11, 1781 ; m. Asahel FoAvler of Groton, N. H., and have Ste- 

phen, Jesse, Page, Ruth, and Elizabeth. 

3. Isaac, b. Aug. 21, 1783; m. Dec. 15, 1808, Charlotte Woods, and is a deacon 

in the church in Hollis. Has had 10 children. 

4. Joanna, £ b. Sept. 15, 1785; d. in 1787, se. 2 years. 

5. Elizabeth, S Twins. m. Samuel Chaffin of Hollis. 

6. Hannah, b. 1787; m. Solomon Hobart of Groton, N. H. 

7. Christopher, b. Oct. 19, 1789; m. Constantina Cummings. He was a deacon 

in the church in Brookline, N. H. ; d. without issue. 

8. Joanna, b. Aug. 10, 1791 ; d. unmarried, March, 1829, se. 37. 



167. Abigail Shattuck, dau. of Zachariah, (p. 120,) was b. 
in Hollis, June 10, 1755 ; and d. March 11, 1851, ae. 95 y. 9 m. 1 d. 

She m. Jan. 28, 1779, Nathan Colburn, s. of Robert Col burn 
of Hollis. He resided there as a farmer and land surveyor, and 
d. Feb. 17, 1831. 

HER CHILDREN, BY NATHAN COLBURN, BORN IN HOLLIS. 

1. Abigail, b. Nov. 1, 1782; m. Jan. 12, 1804, Daniel Merrill of Hollis. He is a 

farmer in Hillsborough, N. H., where she d. Oct. 20, 1844, having had — 
Daniel, Elizabeth, Leonard, Erastus, Alvah, Catharine, Abigail, Luke, and 
William. 

2. Nathan, b. March 31, 1785; is a farmer in Hollis; m. Jan. 14, 1808, Lydia 

Jewett, and had — Nathan E., Lydia C, Moses, Lucinda, James A., Rachel, 
and Enoch J. 

3. Rachel, b. Aug. 11, 1787; d. unm., Sept. 22, 1814, se. 27 y. 1 m. 11 d. 

4. Elizabeth, b. Nov. 19, 1792; m. Nov., 1816, J. T. Wright, Esq., a farmer of 

Hollis. She d. Feb. 25, 1819, se. 26 y. 3 m. 6 d. Had Elizabeth. 

5. Nathaniel W., b. July 17, 1794 ; is a farmer in Brookline ; m. Oct. 12, 1818, 

Asenath Malendy, and has — Lott, Asenath J., Irving, Newton W., Mary A., 
Lydia M., Adelaide, and Emeretta. 

6. Daniel, b. Oct. 8, 1796; is a cooper in Hollis; m. March 14, 1822, Sarah 

Farley, and have — Lorinda, Luke, Franklin P., and D. Webster. 



168. Samuel Shattuck. s. of Zachariah, (p. 120,) resided 
some time in Hollis, but removed, in 1803, to Orange, N. H., 
where he died. 

He m. May 5, 1791, Louis Wheat, and had, b. in Hollis — 

1. Samuel, b. Mar. 25, 1792. 4. Calvin, b. Jan. 25, 1799. 

2. Louis, b. Oct. 20, 1793. 5. William, b. Feb. 2, 1802. 
8. Nathaniel, b. Jan. 17, 1795. 



SYBIL, HANNAH, AND ABEL SHATTUCK. 179 

169. Sybil Shattuck, dau. of Zachariah, (p. 120,) was b. in 
Hollis, March, 1760, and d. there, Nov., 1835, as. 75 y. 8 m. 

She m. Aug., 1780, Phineas Hardy, b. in Bradford, Mass., in 
1752, s. of Phineas H. He d. in Hollis, May, 1835, as. 83. 

HER CHILDREN, BY PHINEAS HARDY, BORN IN HOLLIS. 

1. Isaac, b. Nov. 23, 1782. He was killed, in 1813, in the battle on Lake Erie, 

under command of Commodore Perry. 

2. JYoah, b. March 23, 1784; m. Nov. 20, 1820, Elizabeth Farly of Hollis. He 

was a physician in Hollis, where he d. Dec. 25, 1850, se. 66 y. 9 m. 2 d. 

3. Sybil, b. Aug. 5, 1787; d. unm, Sept. 27, 1851, se. 64 y. 1 m. 22 d. 

4. Hannah, b. Sept. 29, 1790 ; d. June 24, 1821, se. 30 y. 8 m. 25 d. 

5. James, b. Sept. 5, 1792; m. April 10, 1818, Mary Smith. He d. March 2, 

1844, ©. 51 y. 5 m. 27 d. 

6. Submit, b. May 13, 1795; m. May 24, 1823, Moses Woods. 

7. Lewis, b. May 18, 1798;' m. May 5, 1820, Roxanna Dunklee. He was a 

farmer in Hollis, and d. July 16, 1829, ee. 31 y. 1 m. 28 d. 

8. Gilman, b. Oct. 15, 1802. 

9. Elizabeth,^. April 13, 1804; m. Nov. 15, 1839, Abiel Steele of Amherst. 



170. Hannah Shattuck, dau. of Zachariah, (p. 120.) She 
d. in Hollis of consumption, Sept. 14, 1791. 

She m. Jan. 15, 1784, Jacob Moore. He m. 2, Sarah Cum- 
mings of Dunstable. He d. in Hollis, Feb., 1828. 

HER CHILDREN, BY JACOB MOORE, BORN IN HOLLIS. 

1. Jacob, b. ; m. Sarah Cummings ; d. in New York, Sept. 7, 1828, 

and had, 1. Sarah C, d. July, 1826; 2. Antoinette B. 

2. Abel, b. ; went to sea. 

3. Hannah, b. Oct. 21, 1788; m. Tsaac Shattuck, (Family 388) 

4. Nathan, b. ; d. Jan., 1791. 



171. Abel Shattuck, s. of Zachariah, (p. 120,) removed to 
Nashua in 1801, and d. there Sept. 20, 1852, aged over 80. 
He m. April 16, 1795, Sally Blood, dau. of Daniel Blood. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY SALLY BLOOD, BORN IN HOLLIS AND NASHUA. 

1. Sarah, b. April 2, 1796 ; m. 1, Feb. 9, 1819, Ebenezer Gilson. He d. leav- 

ing Ebenezer D. She m. 2, Ezra Holt of Hollis. 

2. Abel, b. May 22, 1798. 

3. Hannah, b. April 1, 1800; m. 1, John P. Coffin ; 2, Thomas Burton. 

4. Mighill, b. April 28, 1802; m. April 12, 1825, Dorcas D. Blanchard, and have 

had, 1. Mighill Putnam, b. Jan. 11, 1828 ; 2. Henry Joseph, b. Oct. 17, 1830, 
m. in Lowell, Jan. 5, 1854, Jane D. Gale; 3. Charles Pratt, b. June 4, 1833 
4. Martha Ann, b. Aug. 11, 1835 ; 5. John Noyes Little, b. Dec. 31, 1837 
6. Sarah Maria, b. March 18, 1841 ; 7. Elizabeth Pierce Hunt, b. Oct. 18, 1843 
8. Dorcas Adelaide, b. June 18, 1848. 

5. Daniel, b. April 14, 1804 ; m. Jan. 19, 1832, Mary Ann Southwick. 



180 SJXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

6. Eliza, b. Jan. 14, 1806 ; m. Daniel A. Whittemore of Derry. 

7. Martha, b. Feb. 28, 1809; d. Nov. 13, 1830, unm., jb. 21 y. 8 m. 15 d. 

8. Caroline, b. ; m. 

9. Jonas P., b. Jan. 31, 1811 ; d. Feb. 14, 1836, unm., jb. 25 y. m. 14 d. 



172. Nathan Shattuck, s. of Zachariah, (p. 120,) resided as 
a farmer awhile in Hollis, but removed to Dorchester, N. H., 
where he now resides. 

He m. Susanna Woods. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY SUSANNA WHEAT, BORN IN HOLLIS. 

1. Nathan Gardner, b. Nov. 30, 1804. 6. Emily, b. Jan. 26, 1813. 

2. Roxanna, b. May 12, 1806. 7. William,b. June 27, 1816. 

3. Nathan Gardner, b. Feb. 26, 1808. 8. John, b. Sept. 24, 1818. 

4. Almira, b. Dec. 26, 1809. 9. Daniel, b. June 3,1823. 

5. Solomon, b. Feb. 7, 1811. 



173. Daniel Shattuck, s. of Zachariah, (p. 120.) He re- 
moved from Hollis about 1800 to Deering, afterwards to Canan- 
daigua, where his first wife died, and it is said he m. his 2d wife, 
and became wealthy, but his history has not been ascertained. 

He m. Jan. 8, 1793, Betsey Corey of Chelmsford, and had — 

1. Daniel, b. April 2, 1795 ; ) b> in Rom 

2. Calvin, b. Dec. 24, 1796; S 



DESCENDANTS OF THE GROTON BRANCHES. 

174. Job Shattuck, s. of Job, (p. 131,) was b. in Groton, Dec. 
10, 1758, and d. upon the old homestead, May 4, 1827, ae. 68 y. 
4 m. 24 d., by a "decay of nature," brought on by excessive 
labor, and over-exertion of body and mind to accumulate prop- 
erty. When he entered the Continental Army in 1780, (p. 122,) 
he was described as " 21 years old, 5 feet 8 inches high, and dark 
complexion." About 1790 he came into possession of a large 
part of the real estate of his father, on condition that he should 
support his parents during life, and pay a specific sum in money 
to each of his brothers and sisters. These conditions were subse- 
quently altered, and in 1791 he received a full title to a portion 
of the estate, and instead of the bond he relinquished the farm 
known as the "William Green Place," since owned by his brother 
Noah. On the 2d March, 1812, he bought of the town of Groton 
the estate bequeathed by Josiah Sartell, Esq.,* for "the support 
of the Gospel Minister," on condition that he should maintain the 

• * See Butler's History of Groton, pp. 203, 298 j and « The Prentice Family," pp. 245—248. 



JOB SHATTUCK. 181 

poor of the town for five years, the whole expense of which was 
estimated at $4,000 or $ 800 per annum. This contract was ex- 
ecuted between April '13, 1812, and 1817, and proved to be a 
good one for Mr. Shattuck. This estate was the subject of a 
long controversy, first between the inhabitants of the town, and 
subsequently in the Supreme Court. The heirs of Col. Sartell 
brought an action of ejectment against Samson Shattuck, to 
whom the estate was conveyed by his father in 182.1. The case 
was assumed by the town, and finally resulted in its favor; and 
it was the occasion of settling important legal questions having a 
general bearing upon parochial affairs. (See Pickering's Reports, 
Vol. X., p. 306.) By his sagacity, energy, untiring industry, and 
perseverance, Mr. Shattuck added farm after farm to his posses- 
sions, until he became the largest owner of real estate, and paid 
the highest tax, of any person in Groton. His lands consisted of 
more than 1200 acres, bordering on Nashua River, and extending 
easterly between three and four miles to Baddacook Pond. He 
was able to give a good farm to each of his nine surviving chil- 
dren at their marriage. The old homestead was settled upon 
Warren and Merrick, which, after the death of their father, was 
divided. Warren took the central portion, and Merrick the out- 
lands, which were divided into lots and sold in 1829. The old 
place, after being owned by the name more than 125 years, thus 
passed from the family. Mr. Shattuck, towards the close of his 
life, regretted most deeply, that, instead of larboring so earnestly 
to lay up wealth for his children, he had not educated them more 
thoroughly, and taught them how to earn and take care of prop- 
erty themselves ; and thus impress upon them a character for 
self-reliance, which would be more likely to secure success in 
life. "A family properly educated is a family provided for." 

He m. in 1781, Elizabeth Blood, b. July 14, 1762, dau. of 
Simon Blood, (p. 137.) She d. April 26, 1840, ae. 77 y. 9 m. 12 d. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ELIZABETH BLOOD, BORN IN GROTON. 

1. Job, b. Jan. 22, 1782; m. Polly P. Sawtell, 391 

2. Anna, b. Mar. 31, 1784; m. James Bennett, s. of Tho. 

3. Samson, b. Nov. 17,1787; m. Joanna Sawtell, . 392 

4. Sarah, b. May 8, 1790 ; m. March 20, 1808, Nathaniel Lawrence of Gro. 

5. George, b. April 1, 1792; d. Sept. 12, 1796, se. 4 y. 5 m. 11 d. 

6. Luther, b. Feb. 1, 1794; m. Polly P. Sawtell, (Family 391) 

7. George, b. April 11, 1796; d. Aug. 22, 1797, ©. 1 y. 4 m. 11 d. 

8. Rachel, b. Aug. 28, 1799; m. James McLean, 393 



182 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

9. Eliza, b. Dec. 11, 1801 ; m. March 26, 1821, Isaac Woods. 

10. Warren, b. Feb. 10, 1803 ; m. Olive Procter, 394 

11. Merrick, b. June 17,1805; m. 1, Oct. 16, 1828, Almira Shattuck, dau. of 

John, (Family 385;) and 2, Parker. He removed to, and d. in Pep. 



175. Sarah Shattuck, dau. of Job, (p. 131,) was b. in Groton, 
Dec. 27, 1760, arid d. in Winslow, Kennebec Co., Me., Sept. 20, 
1849, se. 88 y. 8 m. 23 d. She was an energetic woman, and 
remarkable for her beauty. 

She m. in Boston, March 28, 1781, Benjamin Simpson. In 
1789 he settled as a farmer in Winslow, where he d. Sept., 1839, 
as. 94 years. He took an Englishman prisoner on the 19th April, 
1775; and was in the battle of Bunker Hill. Weighed 180 lbs. 

HER CHILDREN, BY BENJAMIN SIMPSON, BORN IN , AND WINSLOW. 

1. Roxanna, b. ; m. 1, John Witherell of Norridegwock, Me. He 

d. leaving-, Harriet, John, and Nancy. She m. 2, Joseph Foss of Clinton, 
Me., by whom she had, Orin, Rosilla, Joel, Joseph Bunker, Harriet, Liberty, 
and Tufton. 

2. Daniel, b. Sept. 29, 1790. He resides in Boston ; has been a grocer, livery- 

stable keeper, and dealer in real estate. He m. Sept. 29, 1816, Harriet 
Simpson, dau. of Benj. Simpson, and has had, 1. Harriet A., b. July 4, 1817, 
m. Jeremiah Royce of Vermont; 2. Sarah A., b. Jan. 15, 1821, m. Samuel 
A. Way ; 3. Daniel A., b. March 8, 1823, d. Sept. 29, 1830 ; 4. Caroline 
M., b. Feb. 21, 1825, m. Albert Cutting; 5. Delia A., b. Nov. 8, 1827, m. 
James Shelden ; 6. William H., b. Dec. 4, 1829 ; 7. Daniel A., b. March 14, 
1831, d. Sept. 23, 1836; 8. Andrew J., b. July 20, 1834. 

3. Tufton, b. May 20, 1793; m. 1, Susan Reynolds, dau. of Thomas R. of 

Winslow, and had, 1. Augusta Octavia, b. Dec. 31, 1817; 2. Paulina 
Bailey, b. Feb. 13, 1820; 3. Ripley Tufton, b. Nov. 17, 1821; 4. Leonard 
Wilson, b. Nov. 16, 1823; 5. Lucius Allen, b. July 30, 1825; 6. Eugene 
Appleton, b. Sept. 29, 1828; 7. Susan Matilda, b. Oct. 8, 1830; 8. Anna 
Tappan, b. July 17, 1832; 9. Frances Olena, b. July 2, 1834; 10. Ellen 
Arabella, b. July 12, 1836; 11. Sarah Arabina, b. July 27, 1839. The 
mother d., and he m. 2, Harriet N. Getchel of Winslow, and had Mary 
Elizabeth, b. June 4, 1845. 

4. Ezekiel, b. in Groton in 1795; m. Roxanna Simpson, dau. of Benjamin S. 

They reside in Winslow, and have had, 1. Laforest, b. Sept. 12, 1825; 2. 
Sarah Amanda, b. Nov. 14, 1826; 3. Emeline Phebe, b. Sept. 4, 1828; 4. 
Albert Allen, b. Nov. 2, 1832; 5. William Wallace, b. Feb. 29, 1836; 6. 
Daniel Worcester, b. April 11, 1838; 7. Delina Arabina, b. Dec. 25, 1841. 

5. Sarah, b. June 9, 1798 ; m. Simon Shattuck, (Family 396) 

6. Harriet, b. May 10, 180 J ; m. in Boston, May 10, 1821, Noah Chase, b. Nov. 

14, 1797, s. of Job Chase of Middleborough, Mass. He d. in Boston, Sept. 
3, 1849, se. 51 y. 9 m. 19 d. Had, 1. Charles, d. in infancy; 2. Harriet, m. 
Francis Ross ; 3. Francis, d. young ; 4. Almeda ; 5. Charles. 

7. Sophronia, b. Sept. 4, 1803; m. Nov., 1825, Jonathan Stanley, b. in 1800. He 

is a bootmaker in Boston, and has had 5 children. 



EZEKIEL, WILLIAM, AND RACHEL SHATTUCK. 183 

176. Ezekiel Shattuck, s. of Job, (p. 131,) was b. in Groton, 
April 12, 1763, and d. in Boston of the typhus fever, after a short 
illness, April 1, 1813, se. 49 y. 11m. 19 d., while on a visit to that city. 

He m. Sept. 25, 1788, Prudence Blood, b. Oct. 30. 1770, dan. 
of Levi Blood, and granddau. of James Blood. She d. Sept. 2, 
1819, a3. 48 y. 10 m. 2 d. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY PRUDENCE BLOOD, BORN IN GROTON. 

1. Prudence, b. May 8, 1789; d. Sept. 7, 1802, se. 13 y. 3 m. 29 d. 

2. Amelia, b. Sept. 6, 1791 ; m. April 9, 1818, Stephen tLheple of Groton. 

They removed to Shirley, and are both dead. Left children. 

3. Sarah, b. Sept. 29, 1794 ; m. 1, Samuel Bennett ; 2, Merriam. 

4. Ezekiel, b. June 3, 1796 ; d. unmarried. 

5. Rufus, b. June 16, 1798; m. in Boston, May 10, 1834, Elizabeth Martin, a 

native of Nova Scotia. He was a grocer in Boston, but d. of consumption in 
Groton, without issue. 

6. Haniet, b. May 2, 1800; m. April 2, 1828, her cousin William S. Ben- 

nett, (Family 181) 

177. William Shattuck, s. of Job, (p. 131,) was b. in Groton, 
March 8, 1765, and d. Oct. 9, 1806, 33. 41 y. 7 m. 1 d. His death 
was caused by a white swelling on his knee, which confined 
him at home a long period. He and his wife were admitted to 
the church on the 15th of July, 1806, at a special meeting held 
at his house for that purpose ; and all his children were then bap- 
tized. He was universally beloved for the many excellent traits 
of character which he possessed. 

He m. Eunice Blood, b. Feb. 25, 1766, dau. of Simon Blood, 
(p. 137.) She d. in Groton, Feb. 10, 1807, se. 40 y. 11 m. 15 d. 

HIS CHILDREN, BT EUNICE BLOOD, BORN IN GROTON. 

1. William, b. Dec. 12, 1789 ; m. Sarah Parker, 395 

2. Alexander,h. 1791 ; d. Aug. 14, 1793, se. 2 years. 

3. Simon, b. Feb. 25, 1793 ; m. Sarah Simpson, 396 

4. Margaret, b. Sept. 9, 1795; m. George Brigham, 397 

5. Alexander, b. Sept. 9, 1797 ; m. Flora Andrews, 398 

6. Sarah, b. Aug. 6, 1799; d. Nov. 7, 1806, re. 7 y. 3 m. I d. 

7. Anna, b. Oct. 3, 1802 ; m. Stephen Bates. She d. in Dunstable, Nov. 

10, 1823, se. 21 y. 1 m. 7 d., and was interred in Groton. A grave-stone is 
erected to her memory. Had one child, Emily. 

8. Mary, b. Aug. 27, 1804; m. Dec. 16, 1830, Sumner Boynton. No issue. 

178. Rachel Shattuck, dau. of Job, (p. 131,) b. July 12, 
1767, d. in Dunstable, on her birth day, July 12, 1816, as. 49. 

She m. March 27, 1789, Oliver Hartwell, b. in Groton, Sept. 
7, 1761; a farmer. He first settled in Groton, but removed to 
Stetson, Penobscot Co., Me., where he still (1854) lives. His 



184 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

father Oliver Hartwell, s. of Ebenezer H., was b. in Groton, April 
22, 1739, and d. in New York ; and his mother, Rnth Farns- 
worth, afterwards married, removed to Canada, and d. over 100 
years of age. 

1. Sarah, b. Nov. 8, 1791 ; m. June 6, 1809, David Lakin, b. in Groton, Jan. 2, 

1785. They are now farmers in Stetson. Have had, 1. Elizabeth, b. Aug. 
26, 1810; 2. Sarah, b. July 7, 1812; 3. John, b. Aug. 12, 1814; 4, George 
Washington, b. Oct. 22, 1824. 

2. Rachel, b. Feb. 28, 1793 ; m. in 1812, Jonathan Lawrence, b. in Groton, Sept. 

11, 1788 ; a farmer. He d. in Groton, Sept. 26, 1842, se. 54 y. m. 15 d. 
Had, 1. Eliza; 2. Jonathan; 3. Ephraim ; 4. Jonathan, (these 4 children d. 
in infancy;) 5. Ephraim, b. May 31, 1821, d. Oct., 1847; 6. John H., b. 
April 13, 1824 ; 7. Walter S., b. Dec. 27, 1825; 8. Sarah, b. Aug. 26, 1827, 
d. in infancy ; 9. Mahala R., b. Jan. 6, 1831 ; 10. Mary E., b. April 11, 1833, 
d. young. 

3. Asahel ; 4. JYancy ; 5. Margaret. These d. in infancy. 

6. Clarissa, b. June 2, 1800; m. Aug. 3, 1827, Samuel Williams, b. in Groton, 

Nov. 3, 1794 ; a farmer in Groton. Have had, 1. Samuel P., b. Feb. 5, 1828 ; 
2. Jacob L., b. Oct. 24, 1829 ; 3. Mary S., b. April 17, 1832 ; 4. Clarissa H., 
b. Oct. 29, 1834; 5. Charles H., b. Sept. 23, 1836, d. Oct. 17, 1836; 6. 
Sarah E., b. Nov. 1, 1837, d. Nov. 3, 1837 ; 7. Charles H., b. Dec. 12, 1839 ; 
8. Asa, b. Feb. 21, 1842, d. April 4, 1842; 9. Sarah A., b. May 20, 1843; 
10. Ellen M., b. Oct. 29, 1844 ; 11. Herbert M., b. April 5, 1850. 

7. Oliver, b. Nov. 22, 1802; m. Louisa Bennett of New Boston, N. H., where 

he d. March 7, 1833. Had Jacob, Ira, James D., and Belinda. 

8. Margaret, b. March 9, 1805; m. May 4, 1834, Rufus Williams, b. in Groton, 

Sept. 6, 1808. Had, 1. Sarah M., b. Aug. 8, 1834, d. April 14, 1852; 
2. George H., b. May 4, 1836 ; 3. Marcilena P. P., b. July 4, 1839 ; 4. 
Adelaide L., b. Dec. 16, 1841; 5. Frances A., b. Aug. 28, 1843; 6. 
Asa, b. Aug. 28, 1845 ; 7. Josiah S., b. Aug. 13, 1848. 

9. Elizabeth, b. Jan. 15, 1807 ; m. Robert Straw of Nashua, N. H. She d. in 

Groton, Feb. 11, 1850, ae. 47. Had Elizabeth, b. in 1829, d. 1847. 
10. Ruth Farnsworth, b. ; d. young. 



179. Capt. Daniel Shattuck, s. of Job, (p. 131,) was b. Feb. 
11, 1770, and d. in Groton of consumption, April 8, 1831. ge. 61 
y. 1 m. 27 d. He was a farmer. He also kept a tavern, exten- 
sively frequented by travellers, then situated on the site now oc- 
cupied by the Baptist meeting-house. In these different occupa- 
tions he acquired a considerable estate. He had 17 children, 
whose history exhibits some remarkable features in the produc- 
tion and loss of life. Three of them only, and 8 grandchildren, 
were living January, 1855; four had m., one of whom d. with- 
out issue ; another had 7 children, 3 of whom had d. ; another d. 
leaving 3 children; the only living one married has one child. 



DANIEL SHATTUCK NOAH SHATTUCK. 185 

He m. 1, March 28, 1799, Abigail Sheple, b. Jan. 15, 1776, 
dau. of Jonathan Sheple, (p. 137.) She d. April 8, 1814, as. 38 
y. 2 m. 23 d. 

He m. 2, July 7, 1815, Catharine Sheple, b. Nov. 30, 1795, 
sister to his 1st wife. She d. May 30, 1825, ae. 29 y. 6 m. 

He m. 3, April 30, 1826, Hannah White, b. April 23, 1789, 
widow of Joel White, and dau. of Josiah Davis of Townsend. 
She afterwards m. John Fitch, who d. July 7, 1854. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ABIGAIL SHEPLE, BORN IN GROTON. 

1. Rosilla,b. Nov. 10, 1799; m. James M. Colb urn, 399 

2. Daniel, b. Feb. 10, 1802; m. May 10, 1827, Maria Richardson. He d. July 

28, 1850, a-. 48 y. 5 m. 18 d. She d. July 20, 1850. No issue. He com- 
manded a military company ; represented the town in the legislature in 1839 ; 
and left a handsome estate, which was divided among his brothers and sisters. 

3. Charles B., b. June 28, 1804 ; d. unmarried, at Mr. Colburn's. 

4. James, b. Aug. 30, 1806; d. at sea, unmarried. 

5. Francis, b. Nov. 30, 1808 ; resides in Groton, unmarried. 
0. Otis, b. Nov. 28, 1810 ; do. do. 

7. Abigail, b. Sept. 9, 1812 ; d. Oct. 8, 1818, se. 6 y. m. 29 d. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY CATHARINE SHEPLE, BORN IN GROTON. 

8. Cortlandt Wilkins, b. Sept. 23, 1816; graduated at Dartmouth College in 

1840 ; and at the Andover Theological Seminary in 1846. He was invited 
to settle over a religious society in Charlestown, but his health failing, he 
journeyed south for its recovery. He returned, however, unimproved, and d. 
of consumption, Oct. 13, 1847, se. 31 y. m. 20 d. He was to have been 
ordained, and married to a lady of Charlestown, in the month of his death. 
He was a man of great promise, and his death was most deeply lamented. 

9. Jerome Marshall, b. Sept. 12, 1817 ; d. in Groton, Aug. 12, 1845, 89. 28. 

10. Abby Rosalinda, b. March 7, 1820 ; m. Nov., 1838, Albert Spaulter. She d. in 

Groton, Dec. 4, 1854, leaving 3 children, now with their father in Brattle- 
borough, Vt. 1. Henry Albert Clarence ; 2. Catharine Elizabeth ; 3. Abby 
Maria. 

11. Alvin French; 12. Catharine; 13. Catharine. These d. in infancy. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY HANNAH WHITE, BORN IN GROTON. 

14. Sarah Elizabeth, b. Nov. 16, 1826; d. Sept. 9, 1827, 33. 9 m. 23 d. 

15. Hannah Maria, b. Feb. 29. 1828; m. Jan. 1, 1849, John S. P. Wheeler, a 

civil engineer of Salem. Have Lizzie Lincoln, b. March 2, 1851. 

16. Bigelow, > b. Dec. 23, 1829; d. Jan. 20, 1830, as. 27 d. 

17. Bancroft, S Twins. d. Jan. 28, 1830, 33. 1 m. 5 d. 



180. Noah Shattuck, Esq., s. of Job, (p. 131,) was b. in 
Groton, Aug. 30, 1772, and is now (1855) living. He command- 
ed a company stationed at Fort Warren, from Sept. 19th to Nov. 
30, 1814. He was one of the selectmen, assessors, and overseers 
of the poor in Groton, from 1817 until he declined a reelection 
24 



186 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

in 1824; was town clerk from 1819 to 1822; representative in 
the legislature in 1824; justice of the peace and of the quorum, 
and otherwise useful in public affairs. He has been much em- 
ployed as administrator of estates, and as a guardian of children. 
He and his sons are extensive farmers in Groton. 

He m. Nov. 25. 1798, Anna Sheple, b. in Groton. April 22, 
1778, dau. of Jonathan Sheple and Anna Blood, (p. 137.) 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ANNA SHEPLE, BORN IN GROTON. 



1. JYoah, b. Sept. 14, 1799 

2. Walter, b. Aug. 9, 1801 

3. Anna, b. Dec. 23, 1803 

4. Andrew, b. Dec. 28, 1805 

5. Susanna, b. May 3, 1807 

6. George, b. May 1, 1809 

7. Caroline, b. Oct. 14, 1811 

8. William, b. June 5, 1816 

9. JYorman, b. Sept. 6, 1818 



m. Prudence Wright, 400 

m. Roxanna Fletcher, 401 

d. Sept. 19, 1813, as. 9 y. 8 m. 26 d. 

m. Cynthia Stone, 402 

m. Richard Williams, 403 

m. Louisa Capell, 404 

m. John H. Hartwell, 405 

m. Lucy Burgess, 406 

m. Mary A. Brown, 407 



181. Margaret Shatttjck, dau. of Job, (p. 131,) b. March 13, 

1774, d. in Amherst, N. H., Nov. 29, 1852, as. 78 y. 8 m. 16 d. 
She m. May 11, 1800, Jonathan Bennett, Esq., b. Nov. 28, 

1775, s. of James B. He d. in Amherst, Feb. 20, 1829, ae. 53 y. 
2 m. 22 d. 



HER CHILDREN, BY JONATHAN BENNETT, BORN IN . 

1. Sarah, b. Oct. 13, 1800 ; m. in 1826, Doct. Hezekiah Eldridge. She d. April 

6, 1846, as. 45 y. 5 m. 23 d. Had, 1. Lucius Owen, b. April, 1827 ; 2. Eras- 
mus Darwin, b. Dec. 1829; 3. Frederick Augustus, b. Nov., 1836. 

2. Jonathan, b. Sept. 1, 1802; m. Dec, 1831, Mary Taylor. Had John Owen, 

b. Nov., 1838. 

3. Wm. Shattuck, b. Sept. 28, 1804 ; m. in Boston, April 2, 1828, his cousin Har- 

riet Shattuck, (p. 183.) She d. in Dunstable, Feb., 1847. Had, 1. Harriet 
Josephine, b. March, 1829 ; 2. Rufus Shattuck, b. Feb., 1831, d. Aug., 1832 ; 
3. William, b. Jan., 1834; 4. George, b. Nov., 1837. 

4. Margaret, b. Sept. 2, 1806; m. Nov., 1825, Jefferson Taylor. Children, 1. 

Margaret Shattuck, b. Jan. 26, 1827, m. Nov. 5, 1851, Nathan Russ ; 2. Han- 
nah Augusta, b. Jan. 9, 1828, m. May 1, 1851, Ezra T. Blodget; 3. Sarah 
Ann Eldridge, b. Jan. 3, 1831, d. March 4, 1831 ; 4. Sarah Ann Eldridge, b. 
Feb. 20, 1832 ; 5. Lucinda Maria, b. Aug. 30, 1833 ; 6. Mary Frances, b. 
March 16, 1837; 7. Joseph Jefferson, b. Nov. 6, 1838, d. Oct. 1, 1839; 8. 
Louisa Jane, b. May 10, 1840; 9. Annie Elizabeth, b. May 23, 1851. 

5. Louisa, b. July 13, 1808; m. June, 1830, Joel Fletcher Osgood, and has, 1. 

Ann Maria, b. Feb., 1831, d. July, 1832; 2. Louisa Jane, b. June, 1832, m. 
Nov. 1, 1851, James Prince; 3. George Wilder, b. Dec, 1836; 4. Joel 
Fletcher, b. Dec, 1845. 



ANNA SHATTUCK CYRUS SHATTUCK. 187 

6. James, b. Sept. 2, 1811 ; m. May, 1834, Rebecca Swallow. Have, Rebecca 

E., b. Feb., 1835. 

7. Wilder, b. April 17, 1813; m. Nov., 1840, Mary Ann Davis. Have, 1. Mary 

Louisa, b. Aug., 1843, d. May, 1847; 2. Frank Wilder, b. Dec, 1846, d. 
Aug., 1848 ; 3. Caroline Delia, b. Dec, 1848 ; 4. and 5. Wilder C. and Mary 
Jane, twins, b. Aug., 1851. 

8. Alden Bradford, b. April 18, 1816; m. Nov., 1836, Elizabeth Stebbins. Have, 

1. Emily Elizabeth, b. Aug., 1837; 2. Margaret Adalaide, b. March, 1843; 
3. Sarah Louisa, b. Aug., 1844 ; 4. Isabel Bradford, b. Oct., 1845. 



182. Anna Shattuck, (or Nancy,) dan. of Job, (p. 131,) b. 
Feb. 6, 1779, d. in Brookline, N. H., Feb. 7, 1843, ge. 64. 

She m. Nov. 25, 1798, Thomas Bennett, s. of Stephen, and a 
nephew of Jonathan above mentioned. He settled, and now lives 
in Brookline, N. H. Has been a representative in the legislature, 
justice of the peace, deacon in the church, and was otherwise use- 
ful. He m. 2, July 16, 1844, Betsey Drake. 

HER CHILDREN, BY THOMAS BENNETT, BORN IN BROOKLINE. 

1. Jlsher, b. April 2, 1799; in. in 1828, Sally Hall. 

2. Nancy, b. June 22, 1801. 

3. Almira, b. Jan. 11, 1804; m. in 1828, Leonard French. 

4. Philiahasse, b. Aug. 16, 1806; m. April 12, 1832, John Burge. 

5. Beri, b. Sept. 19, 1808; m. June 12, 1828, Margaret Russell. 

6. Thirza, b. Jan. 14, 1811 ; m. June 23, 1835, Calvin R. Shed. 

7. Thomas, b. Jan. 9, 1814 ; d. Aug. 10, 1818, m. 4 y. 7 m. 1 d. 

8. Rodolphus D.,b. Feb. 3, 1817; m. May 14, 1840, Mary Woodward. 

9. Rosilla, b. Feb. 10, 1819; m. March 8, 1838, Adolphus Malendy. 

10. Mary C, b. Oct. 27, 1820; m. April 6, 1843, Jeremiah Baldwin. She 
d. Jan. 19, 1847, ». 26 y. 2 m. 22 d. 



DESCENDANTS OF THE HINSDALE BRANCHES. 

183. Capt. Cyrus Shattuck, s. of Daniel, (p. 133,) was b. in 
Amherst, Sept. 30, 1754. He was a farmer in Hinsdale, and lived 
upon the old homestead, where he d. Sept. 6, 1825, se. 70 y. 11 
m. 6 d. 

He m. Dec. 27, 1781, Tirza Evans. She d. Sept. 18, 1823, as. 71. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY TIRZA EVANS, BORN IN HINSDALE. 

1. Charlotte, b. Oct. 2, 1783 ; m. Nehemiah Church, 408 

2. Alvin, b. Nov. 3, 1785; m. April, 1809, Huldah Ide, b. Oct. 1, 1787. He 

is a carpenter in Hinsdale, and a deacon in the church. Have no children. 

3. Tcrza, b. June 17, 1788 ; d. July 6, 1801, ae. 13 y. m. 19 d. 

4. Sally, b. Nov. 10, 1790; m. Daniel Fisher. They live in Java, Wyoming 

Co., N. Y. Had one s. d. young, and a dau. m. 

5. Cyrus, b. Dec. 6, 1793 ; m. Catharine Perkins, 409 



188 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

184. Makepeace Shattuck, s. of Daniel, (p. 133,) b. Aug. 6, 
1756, d. in Hinsdale, in 1815, ae. 59. He was a revolutionary 
pensioner. 

He m. in 1776, Lydia Grandy of Hinsdale. She d. in 1815. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY LYDIA GRANDY, BORN IN HINSDALE. 

1. Phena, b. Sept. 7, J 777 ; m. Walter Stearns, 410 

2. Abigail, b. Feb. 1779 ; resides in Henderson, N. Y., unm. 

3. Daniel, b. July 27, 1780 ; unm. Lived in Utica, N. Y. 

4. James, b. April 16, 1782; m. and lived in Castleton, Vt. 

5. Rhoda, b. ; d. young-. 

6. Clarissa, b. Nov. 3, 1786 ; m. Joseph Fish. She d. about 1842. She had 

4 daughters, all of whom are married. 

7. Alpheus, b. April 11, 1790; m. Clarinda Elmore, 411 

8. Lorin, b. Aug. 31, 1792; m. . 9. Elijah, b. ; m. . 

10. Child, unnamed, d. in infancy. 

185. Gideon Shattuck, s. of Daniel, (p. 133,) b. Aug. 27, 1761. 
He settled as a farmer in Hinsdale, but in 1795 removed to Ticon- 
deroga, Essex Co., N. Y., near Lake George, where he d. Aug. 6, 
1838, a3. 77. 

He m. Sept. 29, 1785, his 2d cousin, Experience Ingram, bap. 
Nov. 1, 1761, dau. of Philip Ingram of Amherst, Mass., and a 
brother of Reuben, (p. 133.) She d. in Ticonderoga, Sept. 12, 
1837, ae. 76, a member of the Methodist church. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY EXPERIENCE INGRAM, BORN IN HINSDALE AND TICONDEROGA. 



1. Chester, b. Jan. 17, 1787 

2. Mindwell,h. 

3. Stephen, b. May 23, 1792 

4. Austin, b. Sept. 25, 1793 

5. George, b. Nov. 13, 1795 

6. Arad, b. Mar. 22, 1798 

7. Samuel, b. March3, 1800 



m. Laura Hendrick, 412 

d. about 4 years old. 

m. Abigail Newton, 413 

m., and lives in Hague, Warren Co., N. Y. 

m. Electa Beldin, 414 

m. Hester Brill, 415 

m. Polly Ward, 416 



8. A girl, and 9, a boy, d. in infancy, unnamed. 



186. Rebecca Shattuck, dau. of Gideon, (p. 134,) b. April 
27, 1758, d. in Northampton, June 5, 1834, ae. 76 y. 1 m. 8 d. 

She m. Nov. 28, 1792, John Sanford, a native of Saybrook, 
Ct, then of Norwich, Mass. In 1800 he removed to East Hamp- 
ton, and in 1805 to Northampton, where he d. April 12, 1830, ae. 

76. They had— 

1. Asenath, b. Oct. 20, 1794 ; m. Jan. 3, 1821, Wm. C. Prentice, a native of Bos- 

ton, then of Northampton. Had 6 children. 

2. Gideon Shattuck, b. Oct. 19, 1796 ; m. Adaline Robbins; lived many years in 

Hartford, but is now in New York. No children. 

3. Rebecca, b. Nov., 1799; d. Sept., 1803. 



JOSEPH, THADDEUS, AND EZRA SHATTUCK. 189 

DESCENDANTS OF THE MARLBOROUGH BRANCHES. 

187. Joseph Shattuck, s. of John, (p. 134.) was b. in Marl- 
borough, March 5, 1745. In 1769 he bought lands of his father 
in Hubbardston, and first settled in that town. In 1799, he and 
his son Joseph, being then described as residents of Greenfield, 
Alleghany Co., Pa., sell their lands in Hubbardston. We have 
been unable to obtain their subsequent history in Pennsylvania. 

He m. in Marlborough, May 25, 1770, Abigail Fairbanks, 
and had — 
1. Joseph, b. May 5. 1773. 2. Abraham, b. Sept. 15, 1775. 



188. Thaddeus Shattuck, s. of John, (p. 134,) was b. June 
19, 1752. He was a cooper and farmer in Lancaster in 1779, 
and subsequently in Sterling and West Boylston. He d. in the 
latter place, Nov. 11, 1819, as. 67 y. 4 m. 22 d. 

He m. Susanna Wait. She d. in W. Boylston, Nov. 3, 1831. 
Had— 

1. John, b. ; d. about 1820, ae. 46, without issue. 

2. Walter, b. ; in. Betsey Morse, 417 



189. Ezra Shattuck, s. of Thomas, (p. 135,) was b. in Peters- 
ham, Aug. 5, 1751, and settled as a miller and farmer in Leyden, 
Franklin Co., where he d. Aug. 8. 1816, as. 65 years. He built 
the mills in that town known as the " Shattuck Mills." 

He m. Jan. 22, 1778, Rebecca Connable, dan. of Samuel 
Connable and Mary English, said to have been natives of Boston. 
She d. March, 1816, ae. 61 y. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY REBECCA CONNABLE, BORN IN AND LEYDEN. 

1. Electa, b. Dec. 2, 1778 ; m. July 4, 1814, Charles Packer. He d. in Ley- 
den, Sept. 30, 1835. Had, 1. Charles, b. July 28, 1817, d. Sept. 3, 1819; 
2. Rebecca Zuriah, b. Oct. 28, 1820. 

2. Asaph, b. Dec. 6, 1780 ; m. Mary Dorrell, 418 

3. Rufus, b. June 20, 1782; m. Anna Dorrell, 419 

4. Lydia, b. Sept 5, 1783 ; m. Joseph Crandell ; d. in Vt., leaving children. 

5. Ezra, b. May 16, 1785 ; m. Sybil Connable, 420 

6. Luther, b. April 18, 1787 ; m. Margery Wilbur, .421 

7. Calvin, b. April 30, 1789 ; m., and settled in Galway, Saratoga Co., N. Y. 

8. Abel, b. June 11, 1793; m. 1, A. D. Frizzell ; 2, S. Hastings, . . 422 

9. Thomas, b. Jan. 8,1796; m. Feb. 8, 1821, Cynthia Wilbur of Leyden. 

In 1822 he settled in Diana, Lewis Co., N. Y., where he d. in 1829, m. 33, 
without issue. She d. there, June 17, 1851, se. 59. 
10. James, b. Jan. 5, 1799 ; m. Rachel Frizzell, 423 



190 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

190. Elizabeth Shattuck, dau. of Thomas, (p. 135,) b. in 
Petersham, April 10, 1755, and d. in Coleraine, June 15, 1836, 
as. 81 y. 2 m. 5 d. 

She m. in 1774, Benjamin Carlton, b. in Bradford, Mass., 
Dec. 27, 1745, s. of Benjamin Carlton and Elizabeth Bancroft. 
He settled in Coleraine in 1775, where he d. Jan. 30, 1828, as. 
82 y. 1 m. 3 d. 

HER CHILDREN, BY BENJAMIN CARLTON, BORN IN COLERAINE. 

1. Betsey, b. June 17, 1775; d. May 6, 1778, m. 2 y. 10 m. 19 d. 

2. Phebe, b. Sept. 18, 1776; d. April 29, 1778, 53. 1 y. 7 m. 11 d. 

3. Elizabeth, b. Aug. 9, 1778; m. in 1795, Henry Sweet, who d. at his residence 

in Shelburne, Aug. 14, 1826, se. 58. They had, 1. Joel, b. July 8, 1797, d. 
Sept. 20, 1779 ; 2. Pamelia, b. Oct. 19, 1799, d. Sept. 25, 1803 ; 3. Melinda, 
b. July 12, 1801, d. Sept. 10, 1803; 4. Sally, b. April 12, 1803; 5, Anna, b. 
March 1, 1805; 6. Eliza, b. Jan. 24, 1807; 7. Ebenezer, b. Feb. 12, 1809; 
8. Henry, b. July 12, 1811, d. Aug. 28, 1829; 9. Melinda, b. Jun30, 1813; 
]0. Lucinda, b. Dec. 20, 1816; 11. Joel, b. June 27, 1820. 

4. Rodolphus, b. Jan. 28, 1780 ; m. about 1804, Anna Parmelee of Somerset,Vt. ; 

first settled in Dover, Vt., but removed to Winchester, N. H. Have several 
children. 

5. Joseph, b. June 26, 1782; m. about 1811, Dolly Parmelee of Somerset, Vt. 

He d. at his residence in Sullivan, Ashland Co., Ohio, Sept. 27, 1844, 
a?. 62 y. 3 m. 1 d. 

6. Benjamin, July 15, 1784 ; m. Hannah Wilson of Coleraine. He was a physi- 

cian, and settled in Pompey, Onondaga Co., N. Y., where he d. June 14, 
1840, a?. 55 y. 10 m. 29 d. No issue. 

7. Lydia, b. Feb. 24, 1787 ; d. of consumption, Oct. 3, 1833, aa. 46 y. 7 m. 9 d. 

8. Reuben, b. Jan. 22, 1789 ; d. unm., Aug. 1, 1837, 33. 48 y. 6 m. 9 d. 

9. Persis, b. Feb. 22, 1791. 

10. Sybil, b. Sept. 11, 1793. 11. Lucinda, b. June 9, 1798. 



191. Abel Shattuck, s. of Thomas, (p. 135,) was b. in Pe- 
tersham in 1759. He first settled in his native town, but after 
the death of his first wife, went to New Lebanon, Columbia Co., 
N. Y., and united with the Shakers, with whom he lived ten 
years ; and during this time he learned the clothier's trade. He 
afterwards left that association, and followed the same occupation 
in Coleraine, where he d. of consumption, July 1, 1816, a). 57. 
He was much employed in the public business of the town. 

He m. 1, in Petersham, in 1780, Mary Marble of that town. 
She d. about a year after marriage. Had one son. 

He m. 2, in 1793, Lydia Oak, dau. of Sylvester and Abigail 
Oak, natives of Holden, but then residents of Coleraine. She d. in 
Coleraine, Feb. 25, 1852, as. 78. 



ABEL, LYDIA, AND SAMUEL BHATTUCK. 191 

1. Luke, only child by 1st wife, m. in Coleraine, and settled in Hartland, Vt., and 

had several children. History unknown. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY LYDIA OAK, BORN IN COLERAINE. 

2. Mary, b. April 18, 1794 ; m. Ira Donelson, 424 

3. Jethro, b. June 14, 1795; settled in Durhamsville, Oneida Co., N. Y. 

4. Almira, b. Nov. 25, 1790; m. Sept. 27, 1821, John Lyman Clark, a wealthy 

farmer of Coleraine. Have had, 1. Lewis, b. June 4, 1823 ; 2. Mary, b. May 
3, 1825, m. Sept. 5, 1844, Jonathan M. Taylor; 3. John L. b. May 4, 1840. 

5. Abel, b. Oct. 26, 1798; m. Nancy Miller, 425 

6. Park, b. Oct. 4, 1800 ; d. June 19, 1825, ee. 24 y. 8 m. 15 d. 

7. Lydia, b. Oct. 1, 1802 ; m. Jan. 23, 1825, Benjamin Babcock, b. Feb. 7, 

1788. He was a farmer in Leyden until 1833, when he removed to Coleraine 
and took care of Mrs. Shattuck; where he d. Dec. 6, 1839, 33. 51 y. ID m. 
Had Adelaide, b. March 21, 1840, d. Feb. 25, 1842, ee. 1 y. 11 m. 4 d. 

8. Ai, b. May 8, 1804 ; m. Betsey Sixberry, 426 

9. Milo, b. March 9, 1806; m. 1, P. Barrett; 2, C. E. Parsons, . . 427 

10. Asenath, b. Feb. 21, 1808. She d. in Washington, Vt., June 25, 1826, se. 

28 y. 4 m. 4 d. ; m. Dec. 16, 1827, Ledyard Haley, now of Huevelton, St. 
Lawrence Co., N. Y. Had, 1. Edward, b. Nov. 18, 1831; 2. William, b. 
1 Aug. 25, 1835. 

11. Silas, b. Oct. 2, 1809 ; d. June 17, 1828, se. 18 y. 8 m. 15 d. 

12. Truman, ? b. June 18, 1811; m. Amanda Coolidge, 428 

13. Truly, S Twins. m. David Bishop, 429 

14. Ezra, b. Oct. 2, 1813; was killed at his residence in Readsborough, 

Vt., in a planing mill, Oct. 24, 1854, 83. 41 y. m. 22 d. He m. Irene 
Holbrook, and had, 1. Susan, b. April, 1840 ; 2. Milo Putnam, b. June, 1848. 

15. Sylvia, b. Sept. 2, 1815 ; m. George W. Miller, 430 

192. Lydia Shattuck, dau. of Thomas, (p. 135,) was b. May 
5, 1760, and d. in Vermont, the date and place unknown to us. 
She had 15 children by 3 husbands. She m. 1, in 1776. Lemuel 
Holton of Northfield. He d. in 1786, having had 5 children. 
Luther Holton, her son, lived in Northfield. Two of the de- 
scendants are shoe dealers in Boston. She m. 2, Smith, by 

whom she had several children. She m. 3, Pelatiah Philips, 
by whom she had 1 son and 1 daughter. 

193. Samuel Shattuck, s. of Ephraim, (p. 135,) was b. in 
Framingham, Jan., 1750. He first settled in Conway, but re- 
moved to Chesterfield, where he d. in 1834, ae. 84. 

He m. Sarah Pratt, who d. in 1818. They had — 

1. Samuel, b. 1775; d. in Conway, Aug. 11, 1777, ae. 2 y. 

2. Betsey, b. 1778 ; d. of scarlet fever, Feb. 13, 1795, se. 16 y. 

3. Cynthia,b. 1782; d. of ditto, Feb. 20, 1795, se. 12 y. 

4. Samuel, b. 1784. He is a millwright in Mount Clemens, Macomb 

Co., Mich. Has 2 sons, Dexter and Dwight. 

5. Joel, b. Aug. 20, 1786 ; m. Sally Pomeroy, 431 



192 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

194. John Shattuck, s. of Ephraim, (p. 135,) was b. in 
Framingham, and d. about 1821, in Phelps, Ontario Co., N. Y. 

He m. 1, June 29, 1775, Ruth Phelps of Phillipston, b. about 
1758. She d. of consumption in Conway, April 26, 1788, as. 30. 
He m. about 1788, a 2d wife, but her name is unknown to us. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY RUTH PHELPS, BORN IN . 

1. David, b. April 22, 1776; m. Martha Smith, 432 

2. Dorothy, b. Oct. 19, 1779; m. William C. Smith, a brother of Martha. She 

d. leaving a large family ; 2 of whom are in Boston. 

3. Ephraim, b. Oct. 11, 1782; m. Sarah Hill, 433 

4. Jonathan, b. July 34, 1785. He was killed by a saw-log rolling over him, 

April, 1809,33.24. 

5. A child, b. Mar. 11, 1788 ; d. March 14, 1788, se. 3 days, unnamed. 

6. Daniel, b. Jan. 23, 1792, by 2d wife ; lives in Mount Clemens, Mich. 
7 and 8, two Children, d. unnamed — one, June 12, 1789, one, Feb. 26, 1794. 



195. Daniel Shattuck, s. of Ephraim, (p. 135,) was b. in 
Phillipston. He was a millwright, and lived successively in 
Conway, Hadley, Chesterfield, Norwich, Chenango Co., N. Y., 
Phelps, Ontario Co., Butternuts, and other places. He went to 
Canada West to build a set of mills, where he d. of cholera, the 
date and place unknown to us. His books and papers were 
burned in his son's house. 

He m. in Phillipston, about 1777, Elizabeth Washburn. 

1. Reuben, b. Nov. 22, 1778; m. in 1800, Bethanah Joslyn. No issue. 

2. Rufus, b. ; a millwright ; d. in Canada Avar in 1838 ; have 2 

children, carpenters, in Alleghany Co., N. Y. 

3. Olive, b. ; m. Hatfield Cooper of Humphrey, Cattaraugus 

Co., N. Y. 

4. Lydia, b. ; m. 1, Samuel Cooper, who d. at sea; she m. 2, 

David Wheeler. She d. in 1848. 

5. Lucy, b. ; m. George Loy of Maryland. 

196. Ezekiel Shattuck, s. of Silas, (p. 136,) b. March 15, 
1762; settled in Barre, Mass., where he d. Aug. 4, 1825, as. 63 
y. 4 m. 19 d. He entered the Revolutionary Army in 1778, and 
served until peace. 

He m. Sarah Bulllard, who d. in Barre, June 23, 1846, as. 82. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY SARAH BULLARD, BORN IN BARRE. 

1. Sally,h. Nov. 29, 1784; m. Oct. 3, 1805, Capt. Noah Rice, who settled in 
Union, Me., and had— 1. Noah Shattuck, b. April 3, 1813, m. Sept. 3, 1838, 
Augusta Diana Bachelor, b. June 29, 1820, and has Caroline Louisa, b. 
Aug. 2, 1840, and Henry Clay, b. Nov. 22, 1843 ; 2. Mary Harding, b. July 
19, 1815, m. in 1840, George Washington Morse, b. Aug. 24, 1813, and has 
Edward, Leslie, Orville, and Sarah. 



SILAS SHATTUCK EPHRAIM SHATTUCK. 193 

2. Mary, b. March 4, 1787; m. March, 1807, Abijah Harding, Jr. She d. July 

17, 1813. Had Lorenza, Leander, and Abijah S. 

3. Asa, b. March 26, 1789; m. Oct. 31, 1810, Abigail Conant; settled in Barre, 

and had — 1. Sarah, b. June 1, 1812, m. April 11, 1833, Edson D.Cheney; 
2. Abigail, b. Jan. 18, 1814, d. March 11, 1816, se. 2 y. 1 m. 23 d. ; 3. Lucy, 
b. March 1, 1816, m. April 5, 1836, Lewis Allen; 4. George, b. April 11, 
1813; 5. Mary, b. March 19, 1820, m. June 24, 1841, James Hays, d. May 
11, 1851; 6. Eliza, b. May 10, 1823; 7. Dolly, b. Nov. 4, 1825, d. Jan. 24, 
1848, a3. 22 y. 2 m. 20 d.; 8. Henry J., b. Nov. 26, 1827; 9. N. Lazelle, b. 
Aug. 8, 1832. 

197. Silas Shattuck, s. of Silas, (p. 136,) was b. Aug. 26, 
1766, settled in Hartland, Vt., as a farmer, where he d. Feb. 11, 
1849, se. 82 y. 5 m. 15 d. 

He m. in 1792, Betsey Ashley. She d. May 10, 1854. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY BETSEY ASHLEY, BORN IN HARTLAND. 

1. Fanny, b. April 23, 1797 ; d. Aug. 11, 1848, se. 51 y. 3 m. 18 d. She m. Jan. 

1, 1821, Aaron Crandall, b. Jan. 3, 1795, s. of Adam Crandall. He d. Feb. 
11, 1849, se. 54 y. 1 m. 8 d. They had— 1. Aaron, b. Sept. 21, 1822, m. May 
22, 1849, Lurin Rogers, b. March 15, 1828; 2. Jane, b. Jan. 6, lb26, m. Sept. 
19, 1851, Lorenzo Rogers, b. Nov. 2, 1823, brother of Lurin, and children of 
William Rogers. 

2. Betsey, b. March 12, 1801 ; m. in 1818, Joshua Rogers, s. of Oliver Rogers. 

They had — 1. Malinda ; 2. Lewis; 3. Lewis; 4. Almira; 5. Pamelia ; 6» 
William ; 7. Amanda ; 8. Rhoda. 

3. Mary, b. Sept. 30, 1805 ; m. in 1824, George Burrill, and had, 1. George 

2. Albert. 

4. James, b. March 3, 1807; m. Aug. 25, 1829, Caroline Chase, b. July 11, 1811, 

dau. of Asa Chase. They had — 1. Laura; 2. Henry; 3. Jennette ; 4. Ca- 
neill; 5. George; 6. Jane; 7. Martha; 8. Nancy; 9. Thomas; 10. Asa. 

5. Matilda, b. July 10, 1809. 

6. Foster, b. March 15, 1812; m. in 1840, Lovisa West, dau. of Ezekiel West. 

They had — 1. Emily; 2. Owen; 3. Fanny; 4. Sophronia. 

7. Oliver, b. Oct. 23, 1813. 



198. Ephraim Shattuck, s. of Silas, (p. 136,) b. Sept. 28, 
1771, settled as a farmer in Hartford, Vt., where he d. May 2, 
1847, se. 75 y. 7 m. 4 d. 

He m. April 15, 1797, Sophia Ashley, b. in 1777, dau. of 
Lemuel Ashley. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY SOPHIA ASHLEY, BORN IN HARTFORD. 

1. Charles, b. Dec. 17, 1797; m. Lucy Wright; both d. in Hartford. 

2. Paschal, b. Nov. 23, 1799 ; m. Nov. 15, 1821, Betsey Lamphere, b. 1796, dau. 

of Thompson Lamphere. They had — 1. George; 2. Lorenzo; 3. Sarah; 4. 
Joseph; 5. Albert; 6. Nancy; 7. Lorenzo; 8. Harriet; 9. Charles; 10. Na- 
than, all b. in Hartford. 
25 



194 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

3. Harriet, b. May 8, 1801 ; m. April 15, 1818, Harvy Lamphere, b. April 20, 

1794, s. of Thompson Lamphere. They had — 1. Paschal ; 2. Norman ; 3. 
Alford ; 4. Lidorna ; 5. Edward. 

4. Sophia, b. Feb. 5, 1803; m. Dec. 2, 1824, Thompson Lamphere, b. Feb. 21, 

1801, s. of Thompson Lamphere. They had — 1. Sophia, b. Aug. 6, 1825; 
2. Jane, b. Dec. 9, 1826; 3. Amanda, b. July 2, 1828 ; 4. Lucia, b. June 16, 
1831; 5. Charles, b. April 15, 1835; 6. Roxanna, b. Aug. 10, 1839; 7. 
James, b. Nov. 26, 1844. 

5. JVahum, b. May 6, 1806. 

6. Patty, b. May 29, 1810 ; m. Daniel Town, and had, b. in Hartford — 1. Charles ; 

2. George ; 3. Jane ; 4. Andrew ; 5. Alba. 

7. Lucia, b. Sept. 10, 1812; m. William Durfee, and had, b. in Hartford — 1. Wil- 

liam ; 2. Delphine ; 3. Henry ; 4. Ormil ; 5. Edward. 



199. William Shattuck, s. of Silas, (p. 136,) b. Oct. 1, 1779, 
was a farmer in Hartland, Vt., where he d. March 10, 1847, 33. 
67 y. 5 m. 9 d. 

He m. Sept. 18, 1802, Eunice Lamphere. b. March 20, 1784, 
dau. of John Lamphere. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY EUNICE LAMPHERE, BORN IN HARTLAND. 

1. John, b. Dec. 12, 1803, a farmer in Hartland; m. April 17, 1824, Relief 

Rogers, b. May 28, 1800, dau. of Eliphalet R., and has — 1. Eliphalet, b. July 
4, 1825, m. June 5, 1849, Eliza Lamphere, b. Feb. 28, 1831, dau. of Reuben 
Lamphere ; 2. Sarah Ellen, b. July 10, 1832. 

2. Mary, b. May 17, 1805 ; m. Nov. 5, 1827. Phineas Hubbard, and had— 1. Jane, 

b. Sept. 15, 1828; 2. Albert, b. Oct. 6, 1829; 3. Allen, b. May 10, 1831; 4. 
George, b. Dec. 21, 1834 ; 5. Kate, b. Nov. 5, 1841. 

3. Eliza, b. March 18, 1807 ; d. Jan., 1835, se. 27 y. 10 m. 

4. Hannah, b. April 7, 1809; m. Jan. 27, 1832, William H. Gray. She d. Jan. 

29, 1835. 

5. Eunice, b. April 19, 1811 ; m. April 10, 1835, James Pratt. She d. May 22, 

1845. 

6. Ann, b. May 28, 1813; m. Jan. 1, 1838, Frederick Freeman, and had — I.Cal- 

vin, b. May 18, 1839 ; 2. Mary, b. May 5, 1840 ; 3. Delia, b. Aug. 5, 1849. 

7. Matilda, b. May 26, 1815; m. Jan. 1, 1842, George Lawton. He d. in 1848. 

Had—1. Hannah, b. July 29, 1843; 2. Eliza, b. Nov. 30, 1845. 

8. Eveline, b. Aug. 13, 1817. 

9. William, b. Aug. 21, 1820; m. Jan. 2, 1842, Almira Gilbert, and have — 1. 

George, b. Nov. 22, 1843 ; 2. Laura, b. May 10, 1845. 



DESCENDANTS OF THE YOUNGER PEl»PEItEL.Ii BRANCHES. 

200. Samuel Shattuck, s. of Samuel, (p. 136,) was b. in 
Pepperell, Sept. 17, 1757, first settled as a farmer in his native 
town; but, in 1805, removed to Springfield, Windsor Co., Vt., 
where he d. in 1835, se. 78. 



SAMUEL, STEPHEN, AND ANNA SHATTUCK. 195 

He m. Dec. 14, 1781, Hannah Hartwell, dai*. of Samuel H. 
She d. March, 1850, ae. 99 y. 5 m. 21 d. They both united with 
the church in Pepperell in 1782 j and, in 1806, removed their 
relation to that of Springfield. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY HANNAH HARTWELL, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Samuel, b. Sept. 17, 1781 ; m. , 434 

2. Daniel, b. July 18, 1783; m. Louisa D. Organ, 435 

3. Wesson, b. Oct. 25, 1785 ; m. Betsey Mathers of Springfield. He settled 

in Essex, Essex Co., N. Y., and d. leaving children. 

A. Hartwell, b. Feb. 19, 1788; m. Mercy Safford, 436 

5. Hannah, b. July 29, 1790; d. Aug. 22, 1790, ae. 23 days. 

6. Clementina, b. Sept. 4, 1791 ; m. David Merrick, 437 

7. Roxanna, b. April 3,1796; m. Samuel Litchfield, 438 



201. Stephen Shattuck, s. of Samuel, (p. 136,) was b. Feb. 
5, 1760, but in 1798 removed from Pepperell, where he first set- 
tled, to Francistown, N. H., where he d. June 5, 1833, ae. 73 y. 
4 m. He served three years in the Continental Army, and was 
a pensioner on the United States government. 

He m. April 26, 1781, Lucy Richardson. She d. June 12, 
1834, ae. 72. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY LUCY RICHARDSON, BORN IN PEPPERELL AND FRANCISTOWN. 

1. Lucy, b. Aug. 20, 1782 ; m. May, 1821, Samuel M. Smith of Francistown. 

His 2d wife. He d. in Lowell, Sept. 15, 1843. No issue. 

2. Stephen, b. Aug. 10, 1785; m. 1, H. Carter; 2, D. Longley, .... 439 

3. A child, b. ; d. unnamed, a few days old. 

4. Jesse, b. Nov. 14, 1788 ; m. Harriet Williams, 440 

5. Betsey, b. Oct. 8, 1790 ; m. William R. Lord, 441 

6. Anna, b. ; d. 1794, eb. 2 years. 

7. Polly, b. Mar. 14, 1794; m. Abner Savage, 442 

8. Edmond, b. Sept. 5, 1797 ; m. Susan Lord, 443 

9. Martha, b. Aug. 13, 1799 ; m. Sept. 13, 1835, John Stanley. He d. in 

Francistown, April 10, 1845, se. 41. Had, 1. Olive E., b. Aug. 15, 1836; 
2. Lucy M., b. June 26, 1840. 

10. Wffiard, b, June 20, 1801 ; m. Elizabeth Fuller, 444 

11. Fanny, b. July 16, 1806; m. June 15, 1830, Mark Dean, b. March 28, 

1805, and have — 1. Lucretia F., b. May 5, 1831 ; 2. Martha, b. Aug. 15, 
1833; 3. Sarah E., b. Jan. 13, 1836; 4. Newell D., b. Dec. 28, 1838; 5. 
Charles, b. June 26, 1842, d. Sept. 16, 1847, se. 5 y. 2 m. 20 d. 



202. Anna Shattuck, dau. of Samuel, (p. 136,) was b. March 
12, 1762, and d. in Pepperell, Jan. 2, 1846, se. 83 y. 9 m. 20 d. 

She m. Aug. 10, 1779, Thomas Lawrence, b. in Pepperell, 
Dec. 25, 1757, s. of Thomas L. and Mary Houghton. He d. 



196 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

July 27, 1822, se. 04 y. 7 m. 2 d. He was wounded in the battle 
of Bunker Hill, and was afterwards a major in the militia. 

HER CHILDREN, BY THOMAS LAWRENCE, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Anna, b. Jan. 23, 1781 ; d. May 5, 1788, se. 7 y. 3 m. 12 d. 

2. Thomas, b. Dec. 30, 1782 ; m. Rebecca Dorrell. Had 2 sons. 

3. Edmond, b. June 27, 1785 ; m. Lydia Green. 

4. Betsey, b. April 7, 1788 ; d. Feb. 8, 1792, a3. 3 y. 10 m. 1 d. 

5. John, b. Dec. 12, 1791 ; m. in 1818, Sally Ames of Pepperell. 

6. Mary, b. March6, 1794; m. Life Parker, and has 5 children. 

7. Anna, b. June 13, 1796. 

8. Charles, b. Feb. 7, 1799. 

9. Luther, b. Nov, 7, 1801 ; m. Thirza Spaulding. Has 7 children. 
10. Royal, b. Mar. 18, 1804 ; m. Almira Norcross. Has 6 children. 

203. Jesse Shattuck, s. of Samuel, (p. 136,) b. Jan. 9, 1764, 
was a farmer on the old homestead, where he d. Jan. 24, 1846, 
ad. 82 y. m. 15 d. 

He m. Feb. 27, 1798, Abigail Boynton, b. Oct. 3, 1771, dau. of 
Abijah and Sarah B. She d. Feb. 11, 1851, se. 79 y. 4 m. 8 d. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ABIGAIL BOYNTON, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Eliza, b. Nov. 25, 1798 ; m. April 23, 1826, Jonathan Carlton of Canaan, N. H. 

She d. March 26, 1852, as. 53 y. 4 m. 1 d. Had 6 children. 

2. Abel B., b. Sept. 8, 1800 ; m. Aug. 17, 1834, Charlotte Merritt, b. Aug., 1798, 

dau. of Jacob Merritt of Kennebunkport. He kept a boarding-house in 
Boston, where he d. May 30, 1855, a?. 54 y. 8 m. 22 d., on the day this sheet 
went to the press. Had, 1. Sarah Frances, b. May 24, 1836, d. Feb. 10, 
1843, a?. 6 y. 8 m. 16 d. ; 2. Charlotte, b. Sept. 26, 1837. 

3. Jesse, b. July 24, 1802; m. Sept. 6*, 1832, Hannah Child, b. Jan. 5, 1806, dau. 

of Amos Child. He is a farmer in Pepperell, upon the old homestead, where 
the first white child was born, (p. 99.) Has had, 1. Sarah Frances, b. July 
28, 1833, d. Aug. 11, 1833, se. 13 d.; 2. Joseph Lyman, b. July 26, 1834 ; 
3. Charles Boynton, b. April 8, 1839. 

4. Abigail, b. July 21, 1804. 

5. Sarah, b. March 6, 1807; m. 1, in Boston, June 6, 1844, Melzar Comey. He 

d. in Savannah, leaving 1 child. She m. 2, Oct. 2, 1851, Phineas Welch. 

6. Ln/dia, b. Oct. 6, 1809. 

7. Thirza, b. Oct. 28, 1812 ; m. Sept. 11, 1841, Joseph McCullom of Ogdensburg. 

His name was altered by act of the legislature to Joseph Chandler. She d. in 
Boston, June 22, 1848, se. 35 y. 7 m. 24 d. Had, 1. William Baker; 2. Geo. 
Henry ; 3. Joseph M. 

204. Benjamin Shattuck, Esq., s. of Benjamin, (p. 136,) was 
b. in Pepperell, April 17, 1777, and d. in Brookline, N. H., May 
28, 1851, 8D. 74 y. 1 m. 11 d. He was a farmer, a leading pub- 
lic man, and an ardent politician of the democratic party. He 
held every town office of note ; collected the U. S. tax in 1812, 
'13 and '14 ; was a justice of the peace, and a deputy sheriff. 



MOSES SHATTUCK REBECCA SHATTUCK. 197 

He m. May 13, 1800, Sybil Parker, b. in Groton, July 20, 
1772, dan. of Eleazer Parker and Lydia Lawrence. She d. in 
Brookline, Dec, 1827, ae. 55 y. 5 m. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY SYBIL PARKER, BORN IN BROOKLINE. 

1. Luther, b. July 4, 1802; m. Mary Louisa Holt, 445 

2. Alpheus, b. Oct. 15, 1803; m.Clarinda Wallace, 446 

3. Benjamin, b. ; d. April 26, 1807. 

205. Moses Shattuck, s. of Benjamin, (p. 136,) b. Jan. 10, 
1779, settled as a farmer in Brookline, and is now living. 

He m. Sept. 10, 1802, Naomi Weatherbee, b. in Concord, 
Mass., Sept. 26, 1778, dan. of Timothy W. and Lydia Parker. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY NAOMI WEATHERBEE, BORN IN BROOKLINE. 

1. Roxanna, b. June 6, 1803; m. Dec. 28, 1845, Joseph F. Jefts, a farmer of 

Brookline. She d. Sept. 15, 1851, ae. 48 y. 3 m. 9 d. Had Asa, b. Aug. 6, 
1847. 

2. Asia, b. Sept. 28, 1804 ; m. Jane Wallace, 447 

3. Africa, b. April 30, 1807. 

4. Europe, b. Jan. 1, 1809; m. Olive Holmes. He d. in Sutton, N.H., Dec. 

11, 1839, se. 30 y. 11 m. 10 d. Had Moses and Martin. 

5. America,* b. Sept. 8, 1810 ; m. a Spanish Lady of Porto Rico ; and d. at 

Staten Island, on his return to the United States, June, 1844, ae. 33 y. 9 m. 

6. Mary, b. June 23, 1812; m. Rufus Senter, s. of Isaac S. and Abigail 

Stearns. Has Africa, Moses, Harrison, Deborah, and Eliza. 



206. Rebecca Shattuck, dau. of Benjamin, (p. 136,) b. April 
28, 1782, d. in Brookline, Nov. 23, 1817, as. 35 y. 6 m. 25 d. 

She m. in 1812, John Hutchins, s. of Nathaniel H. and Mary 
Hurd of Pep. He d. in Brookline. Dec. 24, 1846, ae. 59. Had— 

1. Mary, b. Dec. 18, 1813; m. May 1, 1839, Ira Proctor. 

2. Rebecca,b. Dec. 30, 1815; m. May 1, 1839, Asa Sever. 

* The names given to these children, geographically speaking, are rather comprehensive. 
The parents certainly could not be accused of being partial or " sectional" in their feelings, for 
they took in the whole world. But the taste of persons in regard to names differs ; and in look- 
ing over this volume a great diversity will be perceived. In some families a plain outspoken 
taste appears, and in others a more fanciful one. Some would not have selected Shadrach, 
Meshach, and Abednego ; others would object to Sobieskie ; and others to Serepta Sijneda. 
Singularity of taste, however, is not peculiar to our family. We once had under our instruction 
in Detroit a family whose sons were named One Stickney, Two Stickney, Three Stickney ; and 
whose daughters were named First Stickney, Second Stickney, and so on. How far on, either 
in the cardinal or ordinal enumeration, the parents finally arrived we have never learned. The 
three elder children of a family nearer home were named Joseph, And, and Another ; and it has 
been supposed, that, should they have had any more, they might have named them Also, More- 
over, Nevertheless, and Notwithstanding. Another family actually named their child Finis, sup- 
posing it was their last, but they happened afterwards to have a daughter and two sons, whom 
they called Addenda, Appendix, and Supplement. Another parent set out to perpetuate the names 
of the twelve patriarchs, but the mother wept because she had not the wherewithal to bear the 
last two names. The familiar example of Mr. New, who named his first child Something, and 
his second Nothing, stated a fact which might have been true at the birth of each, but not after- 
wards. Mr. Chase of Boston named his child Wild Goose, but whether its pursuits finally re- 
sulted as the name imports, we are uninformed. These eccentric and amusing illustrations 
might be greatly extended, but these specimens will suffice our present purpose, and show that 
singularity of taste in this matter is not confined to our family. 



198 



SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 



207. Hannah Shattuck, dau. of Isaac, (p. 138,) b. in Pep- 
perell in 1762, d. in Brookline, May 15, 1834, se. 72. 

She m. Eleazer Gilson, s. of Eleazer and Mary Gilson of Pep- 
perell ; was a farmer in Brookline, where he d. Dec. 21, 1851, ae. 
95 y. 9 m. He was a selectman several years, a deacon in the 
church, and otherwise respected and useful. Had — 

m. 1, Mary Center; 2, Abigail Center. 

m. Eliza Cunningham. 

m. Prescott Wright. 

m. Lydia Barrett. 

m. Robert Sever. 

m. May 9, 1813, Rebecca Wright. 

m. Janette Orr; d. Feb. 11, 1845. 

m. 1, L.Floyd; 2, L.Newell;d.Dec.23, 1845. 

m. Nancy Tuttle; d. 1831. 

m. John Hemphill. 

m. Thomas Averill. 



1. Eleazer, b. Oct. 1, 1780 

2. Isaac Shattuck, b. Aug. 30, 1782 



3. Hannah, 

4. Ephraim, 

5. Hepzibah, 

6. Samuel, 

7. John, 

8. William, 

9. Lemuel, 

10. Mary, 

11. Betsey, 



b. Dec. 14, 1784 
b. Jan. 16, 1787 
b. Nov. 19, 1789 
b. April 6, 1792 
b. June 9, 1794 
b. May 28, 1796 
b. Oct. 10, 1798 
b. Dec. 14, 1800 
b. Oct. 15, 1802 



208. Calvin Shattuck, s. of Philip, (p. 138,) b. in Pepperell, 
March 12, 1783, now resides, a cooper, in his native town. 

He m. March 24, 1811, Phebe, widow of Joseph Emerson, and 
dau. of Josiah Wright, (p. 146,) b. June 10, 1781. Mr. Emerson 
was s. of Joseph and Abigail E., b. June 15, 1765 ; m. Aug. 24, 
1800 ; and d. May 11, 1809. She had by Mr. E.— 1. Mary Jones, 
b. May 7, 1801, m. Daniel B. Wheeler of Troy, N. Y. ; 2. And, 
b. Feb. 3, 1803 ; 3. Joseph Sewall, b. April 26, 1805, m. Julia 
Emerson of Rockport — he d. May 29, 1849 ; 4. Abigail Hays, b. 
May 6, 1808, m. Harvy Copeland of Francistown. 

HER CHILDREN, BY CALVIN SHATTUCK, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Luther, b. June 12, 1812; resides in New York. He m. 1, Fanny Vanvalian 

of New York. She d. in Boston, Nov. 15, 1842, ae. 30. By her he had Calvin, 
b. May 13, 1835, Luther, Randall, and Frances. He m. 2, Harriet Boynton, 
dau. of Isaac of Pepperell, and had, 1. Harriet Cornelia; 2. Fanny Cornelia. 

2. Samuel Pepperell, b. June 25, 1813 ; m. May 9, 1844, Mary Lucinda Shattuck, 

b. Dec. 7, 1821, dau. of Vryling S., (Family 360,) and have Mary Lucinda 
Parker, b. Jan. 7, 1849. He is a carpenter; was a colonel in the militia; 
and a deputy sheriff under Governor Boutwell's administration. 

3. Calvin, b. April 10, 1814 ; d. June 15, 1814, ae. 2 m. 5 d. 

4. Phebe Ann, b. Aug. 25, 1816; m. Nov., 1838, Carmi E. King, a merchant of 

Boston. She d. Sept. 3, 1847, re. 31 y. m. 8 d. Had, 1. William E., b. 
March 17, 1840, d. March 24, 1840; 2. Isabella D., b. July 19, 1841 ; 3. 
Charles E., b. July 14, 1847, d. Dec. 26, 1849. He m. 3, Margaret F. Rogers 
of Milton. 

5. William Spaulding, b. Oct. 8, 1821. 

6. Harriet JVason, b. Dec. 20, 1823. 



NATHAN, JAMES, JOSIAH, AND REUBEN SHATTUCK. 199 

209. Nathan Shattuck, s. of James, (p. 139,) b. Oct. 19, 
1760, was a farmer in Pepperell. He was drowned in Heald's 
Pond, June 28, 1808, ae. 47 y. 8 m. 9 d. 

He m. Hannah Mason. She m. 2, John Green of Groton. 
Had— 

1. Nathan, b. July 22, 1794 ; d. suddenly, June 23, 1808, ae. 13 y. 11 m. 1 d. 

2. Ithamar, b. Nov. 2,1795; m. Dec. 19, 1816, Rebecca Kemp. Had, 1. G. 

Danforth, b. Aug. 17, 1817, d. Nov. 15, 1820; 2. Charles, b. Dec. 17, 1819, 
d. Dec. 4, 1820. 

3. Hannah, b. Feb. 7, 1798 ; m. 1, March 20, 1821, Jacob Gragg ; 2. John Holt. 

4. Eli, b. Mar. 11,1800; d. unmarried. 

210. James Shattuck, s. of James, (p. 139,) b. June 6, 1763, 
first settled in Pep., but removed to South Solon, Me., where he d. 

He m. 1, Sept. 8, 1784, Sybil Tarbell, b. April 4, 1763, dau. 
of David T. and Bathsheba Woods. She d. in Pepperell, June 
27, 1804, a3. 41. 

He m. 2, Dec. 1, 1804, Amy Tarbell, sister of his first wife. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY SYBIL TARBELL, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. James, b. Feb. 26, 1785; m. July 6, 1809, Mary Lakin, and had, b. in Pep- 

perell, 1. Catharine, b. Dec. 14, 1809; 2. Emily, b. Jan. 1812; 3. James 
Lawrence, b. May 27, 1814, d. Dec. 20, 1814 ; 4. James Lawrence, b. April 
14, 1819. Milo Shattuck, a trader in Groton, is supposed to be of this family. 

2. Sybil, b. March 19, 1788; m. July 2, 1809, Z. W. S. Gleason. 

3. Milk, b. Sept. 15, 1791. 4. Wm. B., b. ; d. Jan. 15, 1807. 

211. Josiah Shattuck, s. of James, (p. 139,) b. March 26, 
1770, was a mason in Pepperell, where he d. Dec. 1, 1833, as. 63 
y. 8 m. 5 d. The fingers of one of his hands, when a child, 
were accidentally cut off by his brother. 

He m. Nov. 24, 1794, Nancy Tarbell, b. Sept. 9, 1773, sister 
of his brother's wives. She d. April 29, 1836, ae. 62 y. 7 m. 20 d. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY NANCY TARBELL, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Nancy, b. Oct. 6, 1 795 ; m. Aaron Shattuck, .... (Family 215) 

2. Luke, b. Sept. 24, 1797; d. Oct. 18, 1800, sb. 3 y. m. 24 d. 

3. PhebeM., b. Feb. 10,1800; m. 1817, Luther Tarbell, and had, 1. Harriet 

Elizabeth ; 2. Henry Josiah ; 3. Catharine ; 4. Ann Catharine. 

4. Mary Bird, b. Feb. 3, 1803; m. Nov. 25, 1821, Asa B. Coolidge of Leomin- 

ster ; live in Townsend, and have, 1. Sarah Jane ; 2. Martha Ann ; 3. William 
Henry ; 4. Mary Frances ; 5. Charles Carroll. 

212. Reuben Shattuck, s. of Reuben, (p. 139,) b. Sept. 25, 
1775, is a farmer, now living upon the paternal residence. 

He m. July 21, 1799, Sarah Parker, dau. of Eleazer Parker 
of Groton. 



200 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

1. Henni, b. Sept. 14, 1799; m. April 2, 1826, Sybil Lawrence. He d. in Pep- 

perell, March, 1832. Had Berrj. F., and Sarah Elizabeth. 

2. Reuben, b. Jan. 27, 1801 ; d. Sept. 26, 1807, jb. 6 y. 8 m. 

3. Charles,b. May 17, 1803; m. Sarah Taggart of Hookset, N. H. Lives in 

Michigan, and has a large family. 

4. Sarah, b. Oct. 5, 1805; m. Oct. 1, 1845, Edward Gray, an apothecary at East 

Cambridge, where they now reside. 

5. Sirene, b. Sept. 2, 1807; m. John Whitney of Bolton, and d. March 16, 1838, 

leaving one child. 

6. Rvfus, b. June 25, 1811. He was an apothecary in East Cambridge, and Post 

Master during Polk's administration; m. May 27, 1838, Harriet Barron of 
CharlestoAvn. Had, 1. Mary, b. April 22, 1840; 2. Maria Josephine, b. June 
8, 1841 ; 3. Marcellus C, b. Jan. 5, 1843; 4. Harriet, b. March 1, 1848. 



213. Joseph Shattuck, s. of Joseph, (p. 140,) b. Jan. 22, 1783, 
was a farmer upon his father's place. He was killed, Oct. 27, 1817, 
by a wagon running over him, se. 34 y. 9 m. 5 d. 

He m. March 7, 1805, Betsey Pierce, b. April 30, 1784, dau. 
of Solomon P. and Eunice Parrar of Townsend. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY BETSEY PIERCE, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Joel, b. March 25, 1806; m. Oct. 14, 1831, Nancy Kemp, b. Aug. 8, 1810, 

dau. of Moses K. and Nancy Blood. Have had — 1. Joseph Franklin, b. Jan. 
28, 1832; 2. Nancy Elizabeth, b. Jan. 17, 1836; 3. William Henry, b. May 
24, 1840 ; 4. Sumner G., b. May 13, 1847 ; 5. Sarah Lucretia, b. July 19, 1849. 

2. Betsey, b. July 20, 1808; m. Nov., 1834, John Everbeck, a painter of Boston. 

Have had— 1. George S., b. April 3, 1835; 2. John W., b. Oct. 6, 1836, d. 
Oct. 2, 1837; 3. Catharine E., b. Nov. 19, 1838, d. June 4, J841 ; 4. Helen 
M., b. Jan. 26, 1841; 5. John H., b. Feb. 15, 1843; 6. Elizabeth B., b. 
Aug. 24, 1845, d. Feb. 3, 1849; 7. Gorham H., b. June 4, 1849. 

3. George, b. Aug. 18, 1810 ; m. Nov. 29, 1840, Isabella King, b. in Salem, 

June 10, 1817. Have had— 1. George Doane, b. Jan. 3, 1842; 2. Joseph 
Warren, b. June 29, 1843. He is a fish dealer in Quincy Market, Boston. 

4. Lucretia, b. Jan. 20, 1814 ; m. Jan. 29, 1829, Lot Gorham. No issue. 

5. Charles Pierce, b. May 19, 1817; m. March 25, 1841, Frances Ann Butler, 

dau. of Capt. Francis C. Butler of Boston. Have, 1. Frances Butler, b. Dec. 
11, 1842; 2. Charles Henry, b. Feb. 28, 1847. He is a fish dealer in 
Boylston Market, Boston. 



214. Rebecca Shattuck, dau. of Moses, (p. 140,) b. Dec. 26, 
1783, m. in Boston, March 17, 1802, Lemuel Lakin, b. Oct. 9, 
1773, s. of Isaac and Mary Lakin, (p. 95.) He d. July 17, 1843, 
Ee. 69 y. 9 m. 8 d. 

HER CHILDREN, BY LEMUEL LAKIN, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Lemuel, b. 1804 ; m. Betsey Lawrence, and lives in Groton. 

2. Naomi, b. Oct. 4, 180G; m. Nowell G. Ponet of Nashua. 

S.Eliza, b. Sept. 10, 1807; m. J. Minot Colburn, (Family 399) 



AARON, AMEY, DIODAMA, AND NATHANIEL SHATTUCK. 201 

4. Isaac, b. June 5, 1809; m. Elizabeth Runlet; lives in Bedford, N. H. 

5. Luther, b. Sept. 11, 1811; m. Martha Lund. 

6. Henri), b. April 8, 1813; resides, unmarried, in Lowell. 

7. Martha, b. Aug. 8, 1816; m. John Gammel of West Cambridge. 

8. Milicent A. D., b. Aug. 26, 1820 ; m. Thomas Hadley of East Lexington. 
9 and 10, two children, d. in infancy. 



215. Aaron Shattuck, s. of Moses, (p. 140,) b. Dec. 13, 1792, 
m. Nov. 6, 1814, Nancy Shattuck, b. Oct. 6, 1795, (p. 199.) He 
is a mason in Pepperell. 

1. JVancy Augusta, b. Jan. 31, 1815; m. June 26, 1832, James B. Lovejoy, and 

have had, 1. John Wilder, b. Oct. 8, 1843, d. Dec. 25, 1847; 2. James Fran- 
cis, b. Dec. 22, 1835 ; 3. Harriet Melissa, b. Feb., 1837 ; 4. Josiah ; 5. Daniel 
Merrill, b. July 9, 1845. 

2. Josiah, b. March 13, 1822; m. Oct. 20, 1846, Catharine L. Tarbell. He keeps 

a hotel in Brookline, N. H. Have, 1. Samuel Stearns, b. Sept. 19, 1847 ; 

2. Mary Catharine, b. Feb. 21, 1849. 

3. Charles Mchols, b. Oct. 17, 1825. 

4. Mai-y Miranda, b. Nov. 8, 1827; m. Sept. 27, 1848, James S. Walton. 

5. Clara Ann, b. Oct. 19, 1833; in. July 28, 1852, John W. Loring of 

Newark, N. J. 

216. Amey Willard Shattuck, dau. of Moses, (p. 140,) b. 
July 9, 1794, m. March 2, 1818, Jno.Butman of Tewksbury. Had — 
1. Louisa W., b. Sept. 9, 1819; 2. Joseph, b. Feb. 28, 1822, d. March 9, 1822; 

3. Jonathan W., b. Jan. 31, 1823; 4. Joseph C, b. Jan. 15, 1825; 5. Edson, 
b. Nov. 27, 1826, d. Aug. 25, 1830; 6. Henry B., b. Feb. 1, 1829; 7. Har- 
riet L., b. Jan. 7, 1834, d. May 7, 1835; 8. Albert, b. Dec. 25, 1835; 9. 
Eliza Ann, b. June 29, 1837, d. May 6, 1846. 

217. Diodama Shattuck, dau. of Moses, (p. 140,) b. May 18, 
1796, m. Sept. 5, 1815, Caleb Sylvester of Townsend. Have — 

1. Minerva, b. June 28, 1816. 6. Adelia, b. Aug. 25, 1826. 

2. Diana, b. March 5, 1818. 7. Edward, ^b Sept. 25, 1834. 

3. Caleb, b. Jan. 17, 1819. 8. Edwin, I Twins. 

4. Abigail, b. March 4, 1821. 9. Gilbert G., b. Feb. 17, 1837 . 

5. Julia, b. July 13, 1823; d. Sept. 10, 1841. d. Oct. 17, 1837! 

218. Nathaniel Shattuck, s. of Jeremiah, (p. 140,) was b. 
in Pepperell, April 3, 1749, and d. at the place of his residence in 
Temple, N. H., Jan. 30, 1828, ae. 78 y. 9 m. 27 d. He was a 
farmer. He was one of fifty-three men, who, on the 7th of Sep- 
tember, 1773, fell at the raising of the old meeting-house in 
Wilton, N. H. Three were killed instantly, two more died 
soon after, others were crippled for life, and most of them were 
more or less injured. Mr. Shattuck received a wound in his 

26 



202 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

head, and had three of his ribs broken. Rev. Mr. Peabody, in 
his Centennial Address, delivered in that town, says — " Among 
other things, which might in part account for the accident was, 
the town voted to provide one barrel of West India rum, five bar- 
rels of New England rum, one barrel of brown sugar, half a box 
of good lemons, and two loaves of loaf sugar, for framing and 
raising the meeting-house" ! Temperance does not seem to have 
been considered then, as it is now, and should always be, one of 
the necessities for the preservation of life, and for success in life. 
It is not strange that intemperance should prevail when it was 
thus sanctioned by public and private example ; nor that disaster 
should happen, and thousands of lives should be sacrificed or 
ruined thereby. 

He m. in 1773, Catharine Andrews, b. in Ipswich, Mass., Feb. 
16, 1753, dau. of Jeremiah Andrews, then a resident of Concord, 
Mass. She d. in Temple, Nov. 19, 1845, as. 92 y. 9 m. 3 d. 
At her decease she had 208 descendants — 13 children, 78 grand- 
children, 115 great-grandchildren, and 2 of the fifth generation, 
of whom 150 were then living — 7 children, 51 grandchildren, 90 
great-grandchildren, and 2 of the fifth generation. The aggre- 
gate ages of the 58 children and grandchildren was 2026 years, 
or about 35 each. She could say, " Arise, daughter, and go to 
thy daughter, for thy daughter's daughter hath a daughter." 

HIS CHILDREN, BY CATHARINE ANDREWS, BORN IN TEMPLE. 



1. Nathaniel,*. Feb. 27, 1774 

2. Oliver, b. July 22, 177G 

3. Parker, b. July 10, 1777 

4. Hannah, b. Mar. 30, 1779 

5. Catharine, b. Mar. 11, 1781 



6. 


Polly, 


b. Mar. 13, 1783 


7. 


Oliver, 


b. Feb. 10, 1785 


a 


Polly, 


b. Jan. 1,1787 


9. 


Dolly, 


b. Sept. 1, 1788 


10. 


Sally, 


b. July 12, 1790 


11. 


Milly, 


b. Aug. 24, 1792 


12. 


Ralph, 


b. July 7, 1794 


13. 


Ralph, 


b. April 17, 1798 



m. Mary Wallace, 448 

d. Aug. 17, 1777, ae. 1 y. m. 25 d. 

m. Sally Spofford, 449 

m. Nathan Richardson, 450 

m. George Kimball, 451 

d. Aug. 6, 1785, ae. 2 y. 4 m. 23 d. 

m. Sally Start, 452 

m. Aaron K. Putnam, 453 

m. Josiah Wheeler, 454 

m. Joseph Putnam, 455 

m. John Bales, 456 

d. Nov. 29, 1795, as. 1 y. 4 m. 22 d. 
d. Dec. 6, 1798, as. 7 m. 19 d. 



219. Elizabeth Shattuck, dau. of Nathaniel, (p. 140,) b. 
May 22, 1751, d. in Pepperell, March 24, 1826, a?. 74 y. 10 m. 2 d. 

She m. Nov. 5, 1772, James Lakin, b. June 2, 1749, s. of Rob- 
ertson and Hannah Lakin. He was a farmer, and d. in Pepperell, 
June 10, 1821, oe. 72 years. 



LYDIA SHATTUCK EBENEZER LAKIN SHATTUCK. 203 

HER CHILDREN, BY JAMES LAKIN, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Nathaniel, b. July 31, 1774. 5. Betsey, b. Aug. 25, 1782. 

Q.James, b. July 24, 1776. G.Rhoda, b. Jan. 21, 1784. 

3. Hannah, b. Oct. 19, 1778 ; 7. Sybil, b. May 31, 1787. 

d. Sept. 26, 1779, se. 11 m. 7 d. 8. Catharine, b. Feb. 14, 1789. 

4. Hannah, b. July 22, 1780. 

220. Lydia Shattuck, dan. of Jeremiah, (p. 141,) b. March 
19, 1750, d. in Pepperell, Feb. 6, 1834, a?. 83 y. 10 m. 17 d. 

She m. April 9, 1791, Joseph Lawrence, b. April 6, 1749, s. of 
Joseph and Elizabeth, and grandson of Nathaniel Lawrence, (p. 71. ) 
He was a farmer and d. in Pep., Jan. 5, 1829, se. 79 y. 8 m. 29 d. 

HER CHILDREN, BY JOSEPH LAWRENCE, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 



1. Joseph, b. Feb. 15, 1773 

2. Lydia, b. March 9, 1775 

3. Phebe, b. Mar. 15, 1777 

4. Eunice, b. July 16, 1780 

5. Sybil, b. July 15, 1782 

6. Abraham, b. April 19, 1784 

7. Abijah, b. Feb. 25, 1786 

8. Levi, b. April 25, 1788 

9. Joshua, b. Feb. 3, 1790 
10. Bryant, b. April 22, 1795 



m. Lucy Farwell of Mason ; lives in Pepperell. 

m. Ezra Blood of Townsend. 

m. April 18, 1796, John Perham, (p. 119.) 

m. Washington Wright, (p. 146.) 

m. Isaac Baynton, (p. 147.) 

d. July 14, 1806, s. 22 y. 2 m. 25 d. 

d. Feb. 27, 1808, aB. 22 y. m. 2 d. 

d. April 11, 1816, aB. 27 y. 11 m. 16 d. 

d. March, 1812, se. 22 y. 1 m. ; all of consumption. 

m. May 28, 1818, Olive Shattuck, (p. 173.) 



221. Ebenezer Lakin Shattuck, s. of Jeremiah, (p. 141,) was 
b. in Pepperell, Sept. 8, 1756. He was a farmer in his native 
town, where he d. March 2, 1823, ee. 66 y. 5 m. 24 d. A Revo- 
lutionary Pensioner. 

He m. Dec. 11, 1781, Hannah Tarbell, b. Feb. 5, 1761, dau. of 
David and Bathsheba T. She d. April 19, 1833, se. 72 y. 2 m. 14 d. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY HANNAH TARBELL, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Oliver, b. June 7, ] 782; m. Hannah Tarbell, 457 

2. Hannah, b. Feb. 29, 1784; d. March 4, 1823, a?. 39 y. m. 4 d.; unm. 

3. Ebenezer, b. Aug. 15, 1785 ; m. Achsah F. Sherwin, 458 

4. Mai-y, b. May 31, 1788; m. Zebadiah W. T. Gleason, a shoemaker of 

Concord, N. H. 

5. Phebe, b. Feb. 18, 1790; in. April 20, 1845, Levi Houghton of Lunenburg. 

No issue. She was his 3d wife. He was b. in Worcester, March 8, 1774, 
s. of Levi H. and Amey Richardson. 

6. Henry, b. March 7, 1792 ; m. Mary Snow. He was a cooper, and d. in 

Augusta, Me., Sept., 1836, sb. 44 y. 6 m. Had, 1. James Henry; 2. Susan 
Louisa ; 3. George Snow. 

7. Elijah, b. Aug. 26, 1794 ; m. Ellen E. Farrar, 459 

8. Jeremiah,b. Jan. 2, 1797; d. at Burlington, Vt., Nov. 25, 1822, jb. 25 y. 10 

m. 23 d., unmarried. He was a physician. 

9. Lydia, b. March 8, 1800 ; m. in 1827, Henry Lawrence. 

10. Louisa, b. Oct. 31, 1803; m. Feb. 26, 1829, William F. Chaffin of Harvard. 



204 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

He was a cooper; removed to Oxford, Me., where he d. April, 1838. She 
d. May 20, 1851, se. 47 y. 6 m. 20 d. Had, 1. Mary Louisa, b. March 9, 
1834; 2. William Ladd, b. Aug. 10, 1837. 
11. Lucy Caroline, b. May 24, 1807 ; m. James H. Dimond. She d. in Pepperell, 
Sept. 29, 1829, se. 22 y. 4 m. 5 d. No issue. 

222. Abraham Shattuck, s. of Jeremiah, (p. 141,) was b. in 
Pepperell, Oct. 12, 1759, and d. in Washington, N. H., in 1841, 
se. 82. He was in the service in the Revolutionary War, and 
received a pension from the United States government. He was 
a farmer and first settled in Pepperell, but in 1797 removed, and 
resided ten years in Wilton, N. H., ten in Temple, and a less 
time each in Nelson, Dublin, and Washington. 

He m. 1, Dec. 2, 1790, Mary Wright, b. Feb. 9, 1766, twin 
dau. of Benjamin Wright. She d. Jan. 31, 1800, 83. 34 y. 

He m. 2, Gray of Andover. 

He m. 3, in 1823, Widow Craton of Mason, originally Jefts. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY MARY WRIGHT, BORN IN PEPPERELL AND WILTON. 

1. Abraham, b. Oct. 29, 1791 ; m. 1, S. Kendall; 2, J. H. French, ... 460 

2. Ashur, b. Aug. 9, 1793 ; m. Rachel Shattuck, 461 

3. Abner, b. Jan. 18, 1796 ; m. Lydia Batchelder, 462 

4. Ammi, b. Dec. 3, 1797; m. Phebe Hutchinson, 463 

5. Mary, b. Jan. 20, 1800 ; m. Charles Barrett. 

223. Sarah Shattuck, dan. of Jeremiah, (p. 141,) b. July 18, 
1764, m. Sept. 21, 1794, Jesse Lovejoy, b. July 9, 1767, s. of 
Nathan and Apphia L. They had 9 children, but we have not 
learned their history. 

224. Levi Shattuck, s. of Jeremiah, (p. 141,) b. Aug. 8, 1768, 
settled in Pepperell as a shoemaker. 

He m. March 9, 1791, Sybil Wright, dau. of Benjamin W. 
She m. 2, Feb. 4, 1801, Nathan Blood. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY SYBIL WRIGHT, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Sybil, b. April 16, 1792 ; m. Nathaniel Sartell, (Family 156) 

2. Rachel, b. Jan. 14, 1794; m. Ashur Shattuck, (Family 461) 

225. Moody Shattuck, s. of Jeremiah, (p. 141,) was b. in 
Pepperell, April 28, 1772. He was a farmer, and resided in 
Athens, Windham Co., Vt., from 1796 to 1804, and then removed 
to Belvidere, Lamoille Co., where he d. April 7, 1851, se. 78 y. 
11 m. 9d. 

He m. in 1795, Eunice Tarbell, b. June 6, 1767, dau. of Da- 
vid and Bathsheba Tarbell. She d. in Belvidere, April 16, 1850, 



AMAZIAH SHATTUCK. 205 

ae. 82 y. 10 m. 10 d. They had 7 children, all of whom married 
and had families, but their history we have been unable to obtain. 
Their names were — 

1. Moody; 2. Eunice; 3. Baihsheba, d. May 22, 1842; 4. Kezia ; 5. Daniel T. ; 
6. Jere; 7. Randall, b. April 4, 1811. 



226. Amaziah Shattuck, s. of Jeremiah, (p. 141,) was b. in 
Pepperell, May 17, 1774, and first settled as a mason in his native 
town, but in 1814 removed to Milford, N. H., where he d. Jan. 
15, 1833, a3. 58 y. 7 m. 28 d. 

He m. in 1799, Nancy Lovejoy, b. in Pepperell, March 4, 1781. 
She d. in Milford, Dec. 25, 1821, ae. 40 y. 9 m. 21 d. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY NANCY LOVEJOY, BORN IN PEPPERELL AND MILFORD. 

1. Amaziah, b. Oct. 17, 1799; settled in 1819 in Oriskany, Oneida Co., N. Y. ; 

m. there, Almira, dau. of Eli Root, and had, 1. Almira; 2. Eli; 3. William. 

2. Nancy, b. June 23, 1801 ; m. April 1, 1827, Samuel D. Knowlton, a saddle 

and harness maker in Milford. They have had — 1. Caroline S., b. Oct. 2, 
1827, m. June 23, 1852, John Bass of Quincy, Mass.; 2. Nancy J., b. 
Sept. 7, 1829, m. Aug. 20, 1851, E. P. Brewer of Worcester; 3. William 
M., b. June 4, 1832; 4. Harriet A., b. Oct. 23, 1838 ; 5. Mark D., b. Oct. 
5, 1840; 6. George P., b. Aug. 11, 1844. 

3. Catharine, b. Dec. 11, 1802; m. May 18, 1823, Jesse Phelps of Lancaster. 

Removed to Lowell in 1826, and he represented that city in the Legislature, 
in 1833, '39, '41, and '45. He d. there Sept. 29, 1847, and was buried with 
Masonic honors. Eliza C, their only child, b. Feb. 14, 1826, m. Jan. 10, 
1850, Col. David Davis of Concord, N. H. 

4. Daniel, b. Nov. 15, 1803; settled in Windham, Vt. 

5. Sophia, b. Sept. 12, 1805; m. 1, in Waltham, Feb. 12, 1825, Thomas 

Jefferson Wheeler, b. in Westminster, Sept. 15, 1801. He d. in Lowell, 
Oct. 15, 1835, ae. 34 y. 1 m. Had Eliza A., b. Sept. 19, 1827, m. Aug. 2, 
1848, Isaac N. Mack; 2. Lorenzo, b. May 20, 1829, m. Dec. 9, 1852, Mar- 
tha Labbateras. She m. 2, Dec. 24, 1842, Oliver Barrett, b. in Ashby, 
Jan. 31, 1790. They live in Shirley Village. 

6. Mary A., b. July 24, 1807; m. Nov. 15, 1824, James Cailef. They have— 

1. Mary J., b. June 15, 1831 ; 2. Kate, b. March 19, 1833 ; 3. George W., 
b. Feb. 22, 1836; 4. Eliza A., b. June 20, 1838; 5. Helen M., b. Oct. 9, 
1839; 6. Albert, b. Jan. 31, 1844; 7. Isabella, b. March 7, 1847. 

7. Kezia, b. Jan. 1, 1809; m. July 6, 1837, William Reed of Lowell. Have one 

child— William II., b. June 17, 1838. 

8. Jane, b. Feb. 25, 1811; m. April 28, 1831, Thomas Moore, b. March 29, 

1808 ; reside in Chelmsford. No children. 

9. Amelia, b. Oct. 18, 1813 ; m. May 24, 1832, William Studley, b. July 14, 

1803. They have— 1. George, b. Sept. 18, 1833; 2. Warren, b. Nov. 30, 
1835 ; 3. Henry, b. Nov. 9, 1838 ; 4. Thomas, b. Jan. 9, 1844 ; 5. Charles, 
b. Sept. 7, 1845; 7. Willard, b. Feb. 17, 1848. 
10. Angeline, b. Oct. 20, 1814 ; d. March 5, 1815, ze. 4 m. 15 d. 



206 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

11. William, b. Mar. 26, 1816; d. Nov. 26, 1819, se. 3 y. 8 m. 

12. Angeline, b. Dec. 22, 1817; m. July 27, 1835, William Upham, b. in Putney, 

Vt., Jan. 11, 1810. Have— 1. Mary Jane, b. Dec. 28, 1838; 2. James, b. 
Oct. 26, 1841 ; 3. Angeline, b. Dec. 16, 1844 ; 4. Harriet A.,b. Aug. 24, 1851. 

13. Alvira, b. Jan. 23, 1820; m. in Nashua in 1842, William W. Bean, b. Feb. 

19, 1815 ; and have— 1. William H., b. May 27, 1843 ; 2. Frank O., b. July 
3, 1849; 3. Fred. E., b. Dec. 19, 1850; 4. Charles S., b. Feb. 14, 1852; 5. 
Alvira A., b. March 16, 1853. 

227. Jeremiah Shattuck, s. of Jeremiah, (p. 141,) was b. in 
Pepperell, Aug. 17, 1776, and first settled in Charlestown, but 
removed first to Athens, and afterwards to Belvidere, Lamoille 
Co., Vt., where he d. Nov., 1836, as. 60. 

He m. in Charlestown, May 19, 1799, Abia Wellman, b. in 
Lynnfield, May 8, 1775, dau. of Thomas Wellman. She d. in 
Belvidere, May 4, 1855, se. 80 y. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ABIA WELLMAN, BORN IN CHARLESTOWN AND . 

1. Kezia, b. June 12, 1801 ; d. Feb. 17, 1803, se. 1 y. 8 m. 5 d. 

2. Hannah, b. Jan. 20, 1803; m. Randall Coone of Waterville, Vt., d. in 1834. 

3. Daniel, b. Jan. 31, 1805; m. Anna Carpenter, b. Sept. 17, 1804. lie is a 

farmer in Belvidere. Children— 1. Anna, b. Aug. 18, 1828, d. Jan. 27, 1829; 
2. Emily, b. Sept. 28, 1829; 3. Daniel, b. Jan. 14, 1831, d. Nov. 14, 1832; 
4. Sybil, b. May 4, 1833; 5. Calvin, b. Oct. 26, 1834 ; 6. Sabrina, b. Aug. 1, 
1837; 7. Luther, b. March 18, 1839. 

4. Jeremiah, b. Oct. 15, 1806 ; m. Sarah Call, b. Aug. 24, 1817. He is a farmer 

in Belvidere, and has— 1. Henry P., b. Sept. 23, 1837 ; 2. Maria, b. Aug. 27, 
1839; 3. Darwin, b. Nov. 25, 1S41 ; 4. Julius, b. Nov. 3, 1847; 5. Cornelia 
Ann, b. Sept. 27, 1850. 

5. Roxanna, b. Nov. 4, 1808 ; m. . She d. in 1835, without issue. 

6. Martha, b. ; m. Aaron Tillison of Brooklyn, Ohio. 

7. Levi, b. ; m. Lydia Brown. Farmer in Belvidere. 

8. Thomas, b. 1813 ; m. Mary Cheney, b. Nov. 30, 1813. He is a farmer 

in Belvidere. Have had— 1. Thomas A., b. Nov. 24, 1840; 2. Mary A., b. 
Jan. 22, 1843; 3. Hannah Frances, b. Nov. 14, 1845. 

9. Andrew B.J. G., b. May 23, 1815; m. in Boston, April 27, 1837, Frances 

Coates, b. in England, only child of Benjamin P. Coates. He is a pile-driver, 
living at South Boston. Have, 1. Andrew, b. Sept. 26, 1838 ; 2. Thomas, b. 
Sept. 17, 1840; 3. William, b. April 20, 1842; 4. James, b. Dec. 24, 1843, 
d. Aug. 16, 1844; 5. Mary Frances, b. May 28, 1845. 

10. Norman Fiske, b. ; living in Belvidere, unm. 

228. Kezia Shattuck, dan. of Jeremiah, (p. 141,) was b. in 
Pepperell, March 21, 1781, and d. there, Oct. 4, 1822, the day 
after the birth of her 10th child, as. 41 y. 6 m. 13 d. 

She m. May 27, 1801, Daniel H. Lawrence, b. in Pepperell, 
Sept. 7, 1780, s. of Thomas L. He was a blacksmith in the 



KEZIA, RHODA, AND LEAH SHATTUCK. 



207 



centre of the town. He m. 2, Sally Ames, by whom he had 
Elijah A., b. Jan. 5, 1825. He d. Jan., 1852, ae. 71 y. 

HER CHILDREN, BY DANIEL IT. LAWRENCE, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Kezia Shattuck, b. Jan. 29, 1802 



2. Mehitabk Hall, b. Feb. 19, 1804 

d. Sept. 3, 1839. 

3. Daniel Eri, b. Jan. 23, 1806 

4. Henry Lewis, b. Nov. 8, 1808 

5. Edward Manley, b. Dec. 12, 1810 

6. Lorindia, b. Jan. 15, 1813 

7. Jeremiah Thomas, b. April 7, 1815 

8. William, b. Oct. 13, 1817 

9. John Walton, b. July 16, 1820 
10. Leah Fancell, b. Oct. 3, 1822 



m. Moses Gill of Groton. 

m. Samuel Newell of Pepperell. 



She 



m. Rachel G. Chapman of Pepperell. 
m. Martha Leighton of Westford. 
m. Annis Frost of Dublin, N. H. 
m. James L. Bridges of Wilton, N. H. 
m. Martha Crage of New Ipswich, 
d. Dec. 19, 1837, unmarried, 
m. Sarah Nutting of New Ipswich, 
m. James Davis of Mason, N. H. 



229. Rhoda Shattuck, dau. of Jeremiah, (p. 141,) b. March 
17, 1784, m. Nov. 4, 1800, Benjamin Williams, b. May 14, 1778, 
s. of Benjamin W. and Prudence Hardy, and grandson of Isaac 
Williams and Lydia Shattuck, (p. 94.) They have been farmers, 
and are now living upon the homestead of her father on " Oak 
Hill," in Pepperell. 

HER CHILDREN, BY BENJAMIN WILLIAMS, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Rhoda, b. May 18, 1801 ; m. Wm. Fuller. She d. in Boston, March 

3, 1846. 

2. Benjamin, b. June 5, 1803 ; d. in New Ipswich, Jan. 16, 1822, a?. 18 y. 

7 m. 11 d. 

m. Ashur Blood of Pepperell. 

m. David R. Shattuck, . . (Family 248) 

m. Daniel Jewett. 

m. Rebecca Shattuck, . . (Family 250) 

m. 1, Mary E. Sheple ; 2. Hannah Wheeler. 

m. June, 1838, Jacob Miller. 

m. Dec. 31, 1845, Frederick Williams. 

in. Caroline White. 



3. Lucretia B., b. June 20, 1805 

4. Eliza, b. Oct. 11, 1808 



5. Amelia, 

6. John, 

7. Charles, 

8. Caroline, 

9. Martha B., 



b. April 25, 1810 
b. May 16, 1815 
b. Nov. 24, 1818 
b. Jan. 24, 1821 
b. June 23, 1823 



10. Benjamin A., b. Oct. 5, 1826 

11. Luther T., b. April 9, 1828. 



230. Leah Shattuck, dau. of Jeremiah, (p. 141,) was b. in 
Pepperell, June 10, 1786, and d. suddenly of apoplexy in West 
Townsend, Aug. 5, 1852, 9e. 66 y. 1 m. 25 d. 

She m. Dec. 5, 1803, James Davis, b. July 3, 1780, s. of Elea- 
zer and Martha Davis. He d. in West Townsend, the place of 
his residence, of apoplexy, Aug. 21, 1851, se. 71 y. 1 m. 18 d. 

HER CHILDREN, BY JAMES DAVIS, BORN IN WEST TOWNSEND. 

1. Leah, b. Feb. 24, 1804 ; d. Oct. 24, 1805, re. 1 y. 8 m. 

2. Leah, b. March 7, 1806; m. Dec. 31, 1828, Capt. Ebenezer Rawson of West 

Townsend. He d. May 8, 1854. 



208 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

3. Kezia, b. Mar. 15, 1808; m. Dec. 27, 1828, Seth Stevens. She d. Nov. 

2, 183G, ae. 28 y. 7 m. 17 d. 

4. James, b. April 18, 1810 ; d. Aug. 26, 1814, 83. 4 y. 4 m. 8 d. 

5. JMartoa, b. Feb. 22, 1812: d. Sept. 4, 1813, re. 1 y. 6 m. 12 d. 

6. 5roo/», b. Mar. 17, 1814; d. Nov. 10, 1819, a?. 5 y. 7 m. 23 d. 

7. Franklin, b. Oct. 22, 1816; in. June 21, 182C, Caroline Coburn. 

8. JaneM., b. April 22, 1819; m. March 27, 1839, Reuben Bacon, Jr., of 

Bedford. 

9. William, b. Aug. 9, 1821. 

10. Martha A., b. Jan. 29, 1826 ; m. Nov. 29, 1843, Ezekiel Coburn of Townsend. 



231. Sarah Shattuck, dau. of David, (p. 142,) was b. Nov. 
27. 1762, and d. in Pepperell, Jan. 12, 1849, ae. 86 y. 1 m. 15 d. 

She m. Nov. 26, 1789, Daniel Butterfield, s. of Jonathan B. 
He was a farmer, and d. in Pepperell, April 24, 1822, ae. 62. 

HER CHILDREN, BY DANIEL BUTTERFIELD, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Sally, b. March 17, 1792 ; m. Thomas S. Tuttle, b. Feb. 22, 1796, s. of William 

Tuttle of Littleton, (p. 109,) where they lived, and had William G., George 
W., and Mary G. 

2. Lydia, b. Nov. 21, 1793 ; d. in New Ipswich, unmarried. 

3. David, b. Nov. 25, 1795; m. 1, Feb., 1819, Catharine H. Williams, and had 

Henry D. ; Lucy C. P., m. Simon Stevens Shattuck, (Family 250 ;) Mary 
C. H.; Dolly A. F.; Charles F. He m. 2, April 18, 1844, Eliza Shattuck, 
widow of Israel, (Family 238,) and dau. of David, (Family 248,) and had 
Elijah Albert, b. May 24, 1846. 

4. Rhoda, b. June 18, 1798 ; m. Nathan Powers of New Ipswich, and had John 

A., Lydia Ann, Charles, and Albert. 

5. Daniel, b. Oct. 31, 1800 ; m. Sept. 23, 1827, Sarah H. Hurlburt of Berlin, Ct., b. 

April 25, 1803. They live in Pepperell, and have had — 1. Sarah E., b. Jan. 
15, 1829, d. Nov. 6, 1833 ; 2. James E., b. Feb. 23, 1833. 

6. Betsey, b. Aug. 8, 1806; m. Nov. 26, 1826, William Hassall, and have had 

William E., James L., Mary J., and George A. 

7. Joseph, (a twin with the last,) m. Mary P. White. He d. in the autumn of 1844. 

Had Henry, d. in 1844, Joseph, and George. 



232. David Shattuck, s. of David, (p. 142,) was b. in Pep- 
perell, Jan. 5, 1765. He was a mason and farmer in Pepperell, 
and in Temple and Mason, N. H. He d. in New Ipswich, March 
22. 1826, 33. 61 y. 2 m. 17 d. 

He m. Dec. 25, 1786, Sybil Brown of Mason, both being then 
residents of Groton, where they were married. She d. in Lowell, 
May 13, 1846, 03. 77. Her father David Brown d. in Mason, 

Dec. 9, 1821, oe. 83, and her mother Lydia , d. in Mason, 

May 5, 1823, se. 77. 



DAVID, JUNIA, AND SOLOMON SHATTUCK. 209 

HIS CHILDREN, BY SYBIL BROWN, BORN IN VARIOUS PLACES. 

1. Charles, b. 1788; d. in Woburn, Nov. 8, 1810, Be. 22, unmarried. 

2. Jane, b. 1789 ; d. in N. Ipswich, Feb. 22, 1820, 83. 31 y., unm. 

3. Francis, b. Jan. 9, 1794 ; m. Mary Heald, 464 

4. Shebuel, b. June 12, 1797; m. Elizabeth Knowlton, 465 

5. Daniel, b. June 15, 1801 ; m. 1, L. E. Woodbury; 2. White, . . 466 

6. Martha, b. Aug. 13, 1804; m. in 1822, Luke Lane of Bedford. He d. Feb., 

1849. She kept a boarding-house in Lowell, nearly 20 years, but now 
resides with her sons Dudley and George in Springfield. 

7. Bi-ooks, b. Dec. 5, 1805 ; m. S. Searls, and others, 467 

8. Charles F.,h. Aug. 21, 1810; m. Sarah H. Burnham, 468 



233. Junia Shattuck, s. of David, (p. 142,) was b. in Pep- 
perell, Aug. 12, 1771, where he d. Oct. 27, 1841, as. 70 y. 2 m. 
15 d. He was a shoemaker, and for thirty or more years the 
undertaker or sexton of the town. 

He m. Sept. 21, 1794, Mary Getchel, dau. of Jeremiah Get- 
chel, (a shipmaster of Marblehead, but a resident of Pepperell, 
after his retirement from business,) and Eunice Diamond. She 
d. in West Roxbury, Nov. 8, 1853, se. 80. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY MARY GETCHEL, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Mary Harris, b. March 9, 1795; m. Sept. 17, 1835, Richard Lethbridge, s. of 

Richard Lethbridge and Mary Holbrook. He was a butcher in West Rox- 
bury, where he d. Sept. 7, 1847, se. 57. Had, 1. Catharine A., b. Dec. 15, 
1836; 2. Eliza Smith, b. June 13, 1839. 

2. Eliza Brown, b. April 17, 1800 ; m. April 6, 1830, Samuel Smith, s. of Samuel 

S. of Deerfield. Lives in West Roxbury. No issue. 

3. Jeremiah Getchel, b. Jan. 14, 1802. He is a painter in Pepperell, and succeeds 

his father as undertaker ; m. Dec. 27, 182C, Nancy C. Parker, b. Nov. 30, 
1806, dau. of Thomas Parker. Have had — 1. Edwin Jeremiah, b. Dec. 27, 
1827; 2. Eliza Ann, b. Dec. 12, 1829; 3. James Thomas, b. Dec. 19, 1832, 
m. Feb., 1852, Caroline Travers of Natick ; 4. Charles Henry, b. Aug. 3, 1835 ; 
5. Sarah Maria, b. Aug. 23, 1837 ; 6. Lizzie Helen, b. Aug. 12, 1844. 

4. Deborah G., b. Dec. 4, 1803; m. in 1829, Thomas Alker. He keeps a hotel 

at Svvamscot, and has Eliza and Alicia. 

5. William Burt, b. Dec. 24, 1805 ; d. June 4, 1806, Ee.'5 m. 10 d. 

6. Sarah Burt, b. June 7, 1806 ; m. John Mozart of Northampton. 

7. William Burt, b. May 29, 1808 ; d. Sept. 13, 1830, Ee. 22 y. 3 m. 14 d., unm. 

8. Christopher Prentiss, b. April 24, 1810 ; m. May, 1835, Mary White, dau. of 

James White of Roxbury. He d. there, Sept. 16, 1853, se. 43 y. 4 m. 22 d. 
Had Emily and Ward Boylston. 

9. Charles Bullard, b. Feb. 2, 1815 ; m. April 23, 1846, Lucy Cohan of Swamscot. 

He d. in Lynn, Oct. 12, 1846, a3. 31 y. 8 m. 10 d. No children. 



234. Solomon Shattuck, s. of Solomon, (p. 142,) was b. in 
Pepperell, March 18, 1766 ; first settled as a farmer in his native 
27 



210 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

town, but in 1802 removed to Windsor, Vt., where he d. July 1, 
1836, se. 70 y. 3 m. 13 d. 

He m. Dec. 31, 1789, Mary Tarbell, b. Feb. 1777, dau. of 
Edmond and Mary Tarbell. She d. at the residence of her son 
in Burlington, Vt., Oct. 2, 1854, ae. 77 y. 8 m. We have ob- 
tained less satisfactory information about this family than we 
desired. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY MARY TARBELL, BORN IN PEPPERELL AND WINDSOR. 

1. Solomon, b. Nov. 6, 1790; ra. 1, H. Folger, 469 

2. Sewall, b. Nov. 23, 1791. 

3. Huldah, b. Nov. 3, 1793 ; d. Jan. 7, 1795, re. 1 y. 2 m. 4 d. 

4. Oliver T., b. Jan. 7, 1795 ; m. Susan Barrett, 470 

5. Mary, b. Aug. 4,1797; d. in Pepperell. 

6. Mel Lewis, b. Jan. 4, 1799. 

7. Edmond, b. 1800 ; m. 1, L. Procter ; 2, L. H. Hall, ... 471 

8. Ira, b. Mar. 16, 1804 ; m. Lucinda Cotterell, 472 

9. Minerva, b. 

10. Lucy, b. ; m. Samuel Stone, 473 

11. Albert, b. Nov. 6, 1810; m. Hannah Hutchinson, 474 

12. Sylvtsler, b. ; d. in Windsor. 

13. Henry S., b. May 15, 1814; m. Nancy A. Simpson, 475 

235. Betsey Shattuck, dau. of Nehemiah, (p. 142,) b. March 
12, 1765, m. June 28, 1785, Josiah Wright, s. of Josiah Wright 
and Dolly Shattuck, (p. 145.) He d. in Montpelier, Yt., Dec. 
23, 1834, as. 76 y. 2 m. 19 d. Had, b. in Pepperell— 

1. Prescott, b. April 11, 1786. 5. Rebecca, b. Jan. 12, 1793. 

2. Betsey, )b. July 25,1788. 6. JYehemiah, b. Feb. 7,1796. 

3. Josiah, $ Twins. 7. Mien, b. March 8, 1798. 

4. Sally, b. Jan. 25, 1791. 8. Dolly V., b. Mar. 28, 1800. 



236. Asa Shattuck, s. of Asa, (p. 144,) was b. in Pepperell, 
July 8, 1789. He went west as a teacher, but is now a mason 
and master builder in Aurora, Dearborn Co., Indiana. 

He m. 1, Oct. 2, 1818, Prudence Harding, dau. of David H. 
and Abigail Umberfield of Pennsylvania. She d. June 25, 1833. 

He m. 2, May 11, 1838, Catharine Abdeen. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY PRUDENCE HARDING, BORN IN . 

1. diaries Perry, b. July 5, 1819; d. July 26, 1843, re. 24 y. m. 21 d., unm. 

He was a pilot between Cincinnati and New Orleans. 

2. John Sobieskie, b. Sept. 2, 1821 ; m. July 8, 1847, Sarah Ann Hill of New 

York, b. April 2, 1845. He is a mason in Aurora, la. Have had, 1. Charles 
Llelwin, b. June 25, 1849, d. July 13, 1849; 2. John Sobieskie, b. Oct. 12, 
1850, d. Oct. 14, 1850. 



ANNA, ISRAEL, AND SIMEON SHATTUCK. 211 

3. Betsey Jinn, b. June 23, 1824 ; d. Sept. 6, 1841, se. 17 y. 2 m. 13 d. 

4. Aurilla Jane, b. Nov, 29, 1826 ; m. Sept. 4, 1845, James Henry Mitchel. 

5. Pamelia Ann, b. May 5, 1829 ; m. July 8, 1847, George Shackley. 

6. Emily Mebina, b. Aug. 7, 1831 ; m. Jan. 31, 1849, John L. Conway. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY CATHARINE ABDEEN, BORN IN AURORA. 

7. Mary Prudence, b. June, 1839 ; d. Sept. 25, 1840, se. 1 y. 3 m. 

8. Mehitable Augusta, b. Jan. 1, 1842. 10. Alice Cordelia, b. Sept. 10, 1848. 

9. Roxanna, b. Sept. 12, 1844. 11. Harriet Stedman, b. Dec. 20, 1852. 



237. Anna Shattuck, dau. of Asa, (p. 144,) b. July 19, 1791, 
m. Feb. 19, 1815, Abel Spaulding, s. of Abel S. and Lucy 
Wetherbee. 

1. Elizabeth Ann, b. Feb. 9, 1816 ; m. Justus Peabody of Milford, N. H. 

2. Josephine Augusta, b. Feb. 10,1818; m.EzraFarnsworth. Shed. June 15, 1844. 
Z.Alfred, b. Dec. 9,1819. 4. William, b. Dec. 10, 1821. 

5. Edward, b. Sept. 3, 1824; m. May 15, 1850, Olive C. Atherton of 

Mansfield. 

6. John, b. March 2, 1827 ; m. Sept. 25, 1851, Maria J. Smith. 

7. Alonzo, b. April 5, 1830. 

8. Erastus, b. Aug. 14, 1832. 9. Andrew, b. May 21, 1834. 



238. Israel Shattuck, s. of Israel, (p. 144,) b. April 18, 1790, 
d. in Pepperell, July 28, 1843, ae. 43 y. 3 m. 10 d. A cooper. 

He m. March 1, 1818, Eliza Shattuck, b. May 7, 1802, dau. 
of David Shattuck, (Family 248.) She m. 2, April 18, 1844, 
David Butterfield, (Family 231.) 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ELIZA SHATTUCK, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Edith Patch, b. July 4, 1818 ; d. March 14, 1832, a>. 13 y. 8 m. 10 d. 

2. Edmond Augustus, b. Oct. 12, 1821. 

3. Elizabeth, b. Oct. 26, 1826; m. June, 1847, Charles H. Winn. 



239. Simeon Shattuck, s. of Simeon, (p. 145,) was b. in Pep- 
perell, Dec. 3, 1769, and removed from Fitchburg to Wheelock, 
Caledonia Co., Vt., where he settled as a farmer, and where he 
d. May 20, 1826, se. 56 y. 5 m. 11 d. 

Hem. Feb. 29, 1799, Lucy Chandler, b. May 13, 1775, dau. 
of David Chandler of Hanover, N. H. She m. 2, Aug. 30, 1832, 
Elijah Dana. She d. Dec. 5, 1834, Ee. 59 y. 6 m. 22 d. 

SIMEON SHATTUCK's CHILDREN, BY LUCY CHANDLER, BORN IN WHEELOCK. 

1. Simeon C, b. Dec. 7, 1800. A farmer of Wheelock, where he d. Feb. 1, 1845, 

se. 44 y. 1 m. 24 d. He m. Sept. 18, 1832, Nancy Willard, dau. of Elijah 
Willard of Wheelock, and had— 1. Elijah W., b. Sept. 12, 1833; 2. Lucy 
A., b. May 29, 1835 ; 3. Nancy F., b. Jan. 24, 1838, d. Nov. 30, 1839, 83. 1 
y. 10 m. 7 d. ; 4. Simeon F., twin with the last ; 5. Mary, b. Aug. 5, 1841. 

2. David, b. Nov. 15, 1802; a farmer in Wheelock; unmarried. 



212 SJXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

3. Sally, b. Nov. 7, 1804; m. July 4, 1826, Daniel B. Batchelder. She d. in 

Wheelock, Dec. 31, 1843, ae. 39 y. 1 m. 24 d., leaving 8 children. 

4. Samuel, b. Feb. 7, 1807; m. July 12, 1840, Jane Lockey of Danville. He is 

a farmer. Has, 1. Leonard W., b. Aug. 22, 1841 ; 2. Cynthea J., b. July 3, 
1846; 3. Austin, b. Jan. 31, 1851, d. Feb. 23, 1852, ae. 1 y. m. 23 d. 

5. Rebecca, b. Nov. 19, 1809 ; d. Feb. 14, 1835, a?. 25 y. 2 m. 25 d. 

6. Lucy C.,b. Sept. 15, 1812 ; m. March 13, 1832, Samuel B. Randall. No issue. 

7. Betsey, b. Feb. 11, 1814; m. June 15, 1837, Elijah Willard, Jr., a farmer 

of Wheelock. 



240. Obil Shattuck, s. of Simeon, (p. 145,) was b. in Pep- 
perell, Nov. 8, 1770, and in 1793, before his marriage, he removed 
from Fitchburg to Wheelock, Vt., and was among the first set- 
tlers of that town. He suffered the many privations and hard- 
ships incident to the new settlement. In 1808, while cutting 
trees, one which he tried to dislodge fell upon and fractured his 
leg. He was alone, so far from home that his voice could not be 
heard ; and nearly perished before he was discovered by his 
neighbors. The injuries he received confined him to his house 
nearly a year ; and he was lame ever afterwards. He d. Dec. 
27. 1828, ae. 53 y. 1 m. 19 d. Thirteen years before, he was 
thrown from his wagon, and the wheel passed over his head pro- 
ducing an injury from which he never recovered. " He was a 
man," says a correspondent, "that was much beloved by all. 
He never had an enemy. His house was always open to all 
who needed a shelter." 

He m. March 26, 1794, Mary Farley, b. March 13, 1777, dau. 
of Samuel Farley, then of Danville, Vt., but formerly of Camp- 
ton, N. H. Mr. Farley m. in 1770, Polly Morrill of Plymouth, 
N. H., and in 1809 removed to New York, where he d. at the 
advanced age of 95 y. Mrs. S. is now (1853) living in Wheelock. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY MARY FARLEY, BORN IN WHEELOCK. 

1. Lydia, b. Nov. 17, 1795; m. Jonathan Noyes, 476 

2. Mary, b. Nov. 2, 1796; m. Harvey Kelsey, 477 

3. Daniel, b. Sept. 25, 1797; d. July 25, 1804, re. 6 y. 10 m. 

4. Thirza, b. Nov. 14, 1798 ; m. 1, J. Harran ; 2, J. Johnson, . . . 478 

5. Frederick, b. Aug. 2, 1800 ; d. May 25, 1812, re. 11 y. 9 m. 23 d. 

6. Samuel F., b. Oct. 18, 1801. He is a farmer upon the old homestead ; m. 

Oct., 1825, Abigail B. Means of Danville, and have had— 1. Obil, b. 1826, d. 
1827 ; 2. Warren, b. Jan., 1828 ; 3. Obil, b. Dec, 1830 ; 4. George, b. 1834 ; 
5. Abby, b. 1836, d. 1838 , 6. Samuel, b. 1840 ; 7. Abby A., b. May 8, 1847. 

7. Obil, Twin with Samuel ; m. Direxa Eastman, 479 

8. Fabius, b. Aug. 1, 1803 ; m. 1, H. Smith ; 2, M. L. Farns worth, . 480 

9. Anson, b. Feb. 11, 1805; m. 1, M. Heath; 2, Lucy Pierce, ... 481 



MICAH SHATTUCK LYDIA SHATTUCK. 213 

10. Sally, b. Feb. 22, 1807; m. March 9, 1834, Moses K. Hill of Danville ; 

and had— 1. Ellen M. L., b. May 12, 1837; 2. Algernon S., b. Oct. 19, 
1839; 3. Ebenezer A., b. March 7, 1843, d. Sept. 25, 1848, as. 5 y. 6 m. 18 
d. ; 4. Orimal F., b. March 1, 1846 ; 5. Ida Eliza K., b. Oct. 30, 1849. 

11. Ann, b. June 11, 1808 ; d. July 24, 1833, ae. 25 y. 1 m. 13 d. ; unm. 

12. Shadrach, b. April 4, 1810 ; m. Calinda M. Crandall, 482 

13. Millins, b. Aug. 24, 1812 ; d. March 3, 1844, as. 31 y. 6 m. 9 d. ; unm. 

14. Emily, b. Oct. 11, 1814; m. in 1834, Daniel Hart of Wheelock. She 

d. April 15, 1836, se. 21 y. 6 m. 4 d. ; leaving 1 child. 

15. Eliza Ann, b. Dec. 31, 1816; m. Feb. 18, 1835, Hugh Kelsey, b. in Dan- 

ville, March 20, 1813. They reside in Lowell, Mass. Have no children. 
We are indebted to her for the account of her father's family and de- 
scendants. 



241. Micah Shatttjck, s. of Simeon, (p. 145,) was b. in Pep- 
perell, Dec. 3, 1772, and settled upon the old paternal farm in 
Fitchburg, where he d. May 13, 1852; se. 79 y. 5 m. 10 d. 

He m. Dec., 1801, Elizabeth Caswell, b. Sept. 26, 1778, 
dau. of Samuel C. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ELIZABETH CASWELL, BORN IN FITCHBURG. 

1. Simeon, b. Feb. 22, 1803; in. April 6, 1829, Emeline Curtis, b. Jan. 7, 1809, 

dau. of Moses Curtis. Live in Fitchburg. No children. 

2. Samuel, b. April 21, 1804 ; m. April 6, 1828, Martha Wood, b. Aug. 10, 1808, 

dau. of John Wood; settled as a farmer upon the paternal homestead; and 
have had, 1. Eliza P., b. Dec. 3, 1829; 2. Levi L., b. Aug. 10, 1831 ; 3. War- 
ren W., b. July 13, 1833 ; 4. Sarah J., b. Jan. 3, 1836 ; 5. Charles W., b. May 
23, 1838; 6. Harrison H., b. Oct. 7, 1841. 

3. Micah, b. Aug. 23, 1805; m. Nov., 1839, Harriet Lawrence, dau. of Silas 

L. ; and have had, 1. George F., b. Dec. 1840 ; 2. Harriet A., b. Jan., 1843. 

4. Eliza, b. April 12, 1807 ; d. Aug. 6, 1825, se. 18 y. 3 m. 24 d. 

5. Sarah, b. Jan. 1, 1809 ; d. Aug. 13, 1825, jb. 16 y. 7 m. 12 d. 

6. Lydia, b July 8, 1811 ; d. Jan. 13, 1812, se. 6 m. 5 d. 

7. Levi, b. Dec. 17, 1813; d. Oct. 12, 1820, 33. 6 y. 9 m. 25 d. 

8. Obil, b. Jan. 7, 1815; m. Nov., 1839, Maria Conant, dau. of Simeon Co- 

nant of Acton. He d. of cholera in Louisville, Ky., July 5, 1849, se. 34 y. 5 
m. 28 d. She d. in Acton, June 15, 1852, 8e. 34. Had Orrimal, Minerva, 
and Corinna. 

9. Sewall, b. Sept. 13, 1820; m. March 27, 1847, Mary Jane Searle, dau. of A. 

Searle of Fitchburg. He is a merchant tailor in Lowell. 



242. Lydia Shattuck, dau. of Simeon, (p. 145,) b. in Pep- 
perell, Nov. 13, 1774, d. in Littleton, Nov. 10, 1846, se. 72. 

She m. May, 1801, Moses Jewett, s. of Ezra and Lucy J. He 
settled as a farmer, first in Fitchburg, in 1800 removed to JarTrey, 
N. H., and in 1815 to Littleton, Mass. He d. in Natick, Sept. 8, 
1840, se. 64, and was interred in Littleton. 



214 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

HER CHILDREN, BY MOSES JEWETT, BORrf IN FITCHBURG AND JAFFREY. 

1. Lucy, b. Mar. 25, 1802; m. Dec. 3, 1835, Geo. W. Ramsdell of Litt. 

2. Stillman, b. Dec. 6, 1803; m. April 29, 1834, Sarah Maria Wright. 

3. Shadrach S., b. July 11, 1805; d. in Leominster, aged 2£ years. 

4. Lydia, b. May 20, 1807 ; m. Thomas Richardson. She d. 1831. 

5. Sarah L., b. May 10, 1809; m. William Bowen, Jr. of Wayland. 

6. Rebecca M., b. Feb. 1, 1811 ; d. in Jaffrey, July following. 

7. Shadrach S, b. Oct. 6, 1812 ; m. July, 1842, Harriet N. Parkhurst. 

8. Henry P., b. Feb. 14, 1815; m. Jan. 27, 1839, Mary Damon. 

243. Sewall Shattuck, s. of Simeon, (p. 145,) was b. in 
Pepperell, March 25, 1777. He was a farmer and sawmiller, and 
first settled in Wheelock, Vt., but removed after a few years to 
the neighboring town of Danville, where he resided until 1817, 
when he removed to Genesee Co., N. Y., and has since lived in 
various places, and has experienced an eventful life. He d. at 
his son's residence in Illinois, in 1853, ee. 76. 

He m. in Pepperell, Jan. 18, 1799, Elizabeth Perham, b. Oct. 
23, 1774, (see p. 119.) She d. in Mina, Chautauque Co., N. Y., 
April 24, 1851, se. 76 y. 6 m. 1 d. Most of her family were mem- 
bers of the Christian Church. In a letter to his relative in Fitch- 
burg, dated in 1851, he says, "My 8 children have had 57 chil- 
dren, and buried 5. I have had 11 great-grandchildren." 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ELIZABETH PERHAM, BORN IN WHEELOCK AND DANVILLE. 

1. Sewall, b. Feb. 6, 1800 ; m. Sept. 21, 1826, Almira Ellithorp. He settled, in 

1839, in Blackberry, Kane Co., 111. Has 5 sons, 2 daus., and 2 grandchildren. 

2. David T., b. May 28, 1801 ; d. Dec. 13, 1820, fe. 19 y. 6 m. 17 d. 

3. Betsey, b. April 14, 1803; m. Sept. 21, 1826, Jonas Johnson, a millwright 

of Monroe, Ashtabula Co., Ohio. He is now dead. 

4. Lovina, b. June 15, 1805 ; m. in Erie, Pa., July 18, 1823, Lyman Brown. They 

reside in Ashtabula Co., Ohio ; and have had 12 children, and 12 grand- 
children. 

5. Eunice, b. June 11, 1807; m. Feb. 23, 1826, Ebenezer Eaton. They live in 

Greenfield, Erie Co., Pa., and have 11 children and 2 grandchildren. 

6. Cyrena, b. March 23, 1809; m. in Erie, Pa., Sept. 26, 1833, John Nichols, a 

blacksmith in Greenfield, Erie Co., Pa. Have had 3 children. 

7. Submit, b. Feb. 26, 1811 ; m. June 7, 1829, James Ottawa, a native of England. 

They live at North East, Erie Co., Pa., and have had 11 children and 2 
grandchildren. 

8. Harriet, b. Jan. 27, 1813; m. Nov. 14, 1841, Asher Thompson. They reside 

in Mina, Chautauque Co., N. Y. Have had 8 children. ' 

9. Frederick Simeon, b. April 25, 1815; m. Dec. 12, 1841, Nancy Mason. In 

1852 he removed to Blackberry, 111. Have 3 daughters. 

244. Shadrach Shattuck, s. of Simeon, (p. 145,) was b. in 
Pepperell, Aug. 21, 1779. He was a brickmaker, and about 1800 



SHADRACH SHATTUCK MESHACH SHATTUCK. 215 

settled in Charlestown, Mass. He was thrown from his carriage 
on Charlestown bridge and instantly killed, June 5, 1823, as. 43 
y. 9 m. 14 d. 

He m. in Charlestown, June 24, 1801, Sarah Locke, b. Dec. 
25, 1777, dau. of Josiah Locke and Elizabeth Richardson. She 
m. 2, in 1827, Silas Stickney, a school teacher, formerly of Bev- 
erly. He d. in Charlestown, Oct. 14, 1847. She still resides in 
that city.* 

HIS CHILDREN, BY SARAH LOCKE, BORN IN CHARLESTOWN. 

1. Betsey, b. Nov. 9, 1802; d. Sept. 19, 1803, Be. 10 m. 10 d. 

2. Varnum P., b. Oct. 22, 1804; m. Cherry A. Locke, 483 

3. Eliza, b. Mar. 30, 1806 ; m. Charles T. Scott, 484 

4. Warren S., b. Mar. 25, 1808 ; m. Eliza Ann Joy, 485 

5. Artemas L., b. Mar. 31, 1810; m. Catharine Hickey, 486 

6. Sarah, b. Dec. 3, 1812; m. June 22, 1842, Walter Ward Wheelock, 

b. Feb. 14, 1813. He resides in Brooklyn, and is a merchant in New York. 
No children. 

7. Mary, b. Sept. 1, 1814; m. Nov. 6, 1834, Thomas Crosier, b. April 23, 1811. 

He is a pianoforte maker in Charlestown. Has, 1. Caroline Shattuck, b. 
April 15, 1835; 2. Thomas, b. Aug. 8, 1837. 

8. Caroline, b. July 31, 1816 ; m. Oct. 8, 1846, Earle Wyman, his 2d wife. He 

is a carpenter of Charlestown. By him she has had, 1. Walter Wheelock, 
b. Nov. 14, 1847; 2. Eveline Frost, b. May 16, 1851. 

9. Josiah L., b. Sept. 9, 1848 ; m. Dec. 26, 1841, Elizabeth T. Stickney of Dux- 

bury, and has, 1. Mary Elizabeth, b. Aug. 16, 1844 ; 2. Lelia Augusta, b. 
Oct. 10, 1851. 

10. Shadrach, b. Nov. 26, 1823 ; d. March 11, 1852, at Reading's Bar, California. 

245. Meshach Shattuck, s. of Simeon, (p. 145,) was b. in 
Fitchburg in 1782, and was drowned near Charlestown bridge, 
Dec. 17, 1811, se. 29. The body was found and interred, April 
12, 1812. He was a partner in the firm of Barrett & Shattuck, 
who established and owned the silk dye-house in Maiden, which 
after his death was known as the Barrett Dye-House. His place 
of business was at the corner of Union and Hanover streets, in 
Boston. He was chosen a member of the Ancient and Honora- 
ble Artillery Company in 1809. 

He m. in 1804, Rebecca Marshall, b. in 1785, dau. of Joseph 
Marshall and Rebecca Harmon of Dorchester. She m. 2, July 23, 
1819, George Bacon, a merchant of Bradford, where she d. Jan. 

11, 1840, as. 55. He d. Sept. 25, 1851. 

* In Locke's valuable " Book of the Lockes," may be found an account of the ancestors and 
descendants of Sarah (Locke) Shattuck, and Cherry A. Locke. 



216 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY REBECCA MARSHALL, BORN IN BOSTON. 

1. Louisa, b. April 12, 1805; m. 1, Wm. H. Balch; 2, A. Parker, . 487 

2. Charles, b. Feb. 20, 1807 ; d. in Boston, May 24, 1829, m. 22 y. 3 m. 4 d. 

3. Augustus P., b. Jan. 1809; d. Oct., 1813, in his 5th year. 

4. Rebecca Ann, b. Mar. 10, 1811 ; m. Joseph E. Fisk of Salem, .... 488 



246. David Shattuck, s. of Levi, (p. 146, ) was b. in George- 
town, Me., Oct. 27, 1774, and succeeded his father as one of the 
owners and managers of the " Shattuck Mills" in Westport, where 
he now (1855) resides, enjoying a vigorous old age. 

He m. Aug. 28, 1796, Ruth Mahony, b. in Edgecomb, Feb. 
14, 1775, dau. of James and Abigail Mahony, a farmer of George- 
town. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY RUTH MAHONY, BORN IN WESTPORT. 

1. Levi, b. Jan. 11, 1798. He is a ship-builder; first settled in Westport, but 

in 1832 removed to Wiscasset, where he now resides. He m. Dec. 3, 1827, 
Hannah B. Cushman, b. March 24, 1805, dau. of Kenelm Cushman of 
Wiscasset, and a descendant of the May Flower Pilgrims of Plymouth. 
Their children have been— 1. Levi P., b. March 13, 1829; 2. Martha H., b. 
March 16, 1831 ; 3. Emeline G., b. June 22, 1833 ; 4. Sarah C, b. Nov. 5, 
1834; 5. Abby P., b. Jan. 12, 1837; 6. Lucy M., b. July 16, 1840, d. Aug. 
13, 1840, 83. 27 d. ; 7. John P., b. Dec. 21, 1841, d. Feb. 2, 1845, se. 3 y. 1 
m. 11 d.; 8. Sidney B., b. May 15, 1844; 9. Mary A., b. April 16, 1846; 
10. John, b. 16, 1847. 

2. Jonas, b. June 17, 1799 ; d. July 17, 1814, a?. 15 y. 1 m. 

3. Abigail, b. Feb. 14, 1801 ; m. Aug. 27, 1818, John Thomas. They live in 

Westport, and have had— 1. Harriet N., b. June 20, 1820, m. Nov. 14, 1844, 
John Heal, and have Margaret T., Harriet P., and Ruth H. ; 2. Ruth S., b. 
Nov. 14, 1822, m. Sept. 6, 1840, Stephen Hodgdon, and have Emeline and 
Gardner; 3. James, b. Aug. 9, 1828; 4. Elijah S., b. March 29, 1832; 5. 
Sarah A., b. June 25, 1834 ; 6. John F., b. Nov. 28, 1836. On the 16th of 
August, 1850, Elijah and John, two of the above children, were caught in 
a heavy thunder shower, about three miles from home, between Westport 
and Bath ; and while taking shelter under a tree, were struck by lightning, 
and instantly killed. Their father was with them and received some 
injury, but soon recovered. 

4. Margaret, b. Dec. 17, 1802 ; m. Dec. 23, 1827, John Brooks. They live in 

Westport, and have had— 1. Susan A., b. Aug. 21, 1829; 2. Elijah T., b. 
March 7, 1838; 3. Margaret Ann, b. Sept. 23, 1840; 4. Phebe Augusta, b. 
April 29, 1846. 

5. Ruth, b. June 11, 1804 ; d. Feb. 9, 1807, a3. 2 y. 7 m. 28 d. 

6. David, b. Feb. 9, 1806. Pie is a ship carpenter in New Castle, Me. ; m. 

April 30, 1835, Mercy Greenleaf, b. Dec. 22, 1811, dau. of Westbrook 
Greenleaf, and has had— 1. Wilmot G., b. April 24, 1836; 2. Ruth Ellen, 
b. Sept. 8, 1837; 3. David A., b. Sept. 24, 1842; 4. Charles K, b. Feb. 28, 
1845; 5. Mary Z., b. Aug. 20, 1846. 



DAVID, SARAH, AND DAVID SHATTUCK. 217 



7. Phebe, b. Sept. 6, 1807 ; m. Oct. 7, 1832, James Prebble, a ship and house 

joiner in New Castle. Have had— 1. David S., b. Nov. 12, 1833 ; 2. Sarah 
T., b. May 25, 1837; 3. James M., b. July 31, 1839, d. March 21, 1841, 
as. 1 y. 7 m. 21 d. 

8. Sarah, b. March 7, 1809; m. May 1, 1838, Dennis Mahony. No issue. 

9. Elijah, b. June 17, 1811 ; d. Jan. 1, 1832, a>. 20 y. G m. 14 d. 

10. TJiomas, b. May 18, 1813. He is a carpenter, and one of the owners of the 
Shattuck Mills; m. March 7, 1839, Jerusha Knight, and has had — 1. Ruth, 
b. Oct. 14, 1839; 2. Betsey K., b. July 17, 1841 ; 3. Sarah B., b. March 7, 
1843; 4. Henry R., b. July 9, 1846; 5. David, b. May 14, 1848; 6. James 
P., b. April 6, 1851, d. March 12, 1854, sb. 2 y. 11 m. 6 d. ; 7. Ella, b. 
Sept. 9, 1854. 



247. Sarah Shattuck, dau. of Levi, (p. 146,) was b. in 
Georgetown, Me., June 5, 1777, and d. at her residence in Wool- 
wich, Me., Jan. 23, 1808, as. 30 y. 7 m. 18 d. 

She m. in Edgecomb in 1794, George Reed, a farmer in 
Woolwich, where he d. Nov. 6, 1836, as. 66 y. 

HER CHILDREN, BY GEORGE REED, EORN IN WOOLWICH. 

1. Margaret, b. April 2, 1795; m. July 28, 1822, Charles Brooks, a house join- 

er. He d. July 28, 1851. Had, 1. George W., b. May 18, 1824 ; 2. 
Sarah S., b. March 11, 1827, m. Dec. 20, 1846, Jefferson Bailey ; 3. Rachel, 
b. July 10, 1832, m. Dec. 28, 1854, Jackson Greenleaf ; 4. Charles, b. Nov. 
24, 1833. 

2. Polly, b. Oct. 10, 1796 ; m. Thomas Blair. 

3. Lydia, b. May 23, 1798 ; m. Stephen Wyman, removed to Wisconsin. 

4. Rufus W., b. Nov. 7, 1799 ; m. Bithrum, and removed from Bradford 

to Ohio. 

5. Robert, b. Nov. 3, 1801 ; m. Mary H. McClintock. He is a farmer in Perkins, 

Me. Have, 1. Franklin F., b. Feb. 19, 1835; 2. Zorady T., b. Dec. 27, 1836; 
3. Roscoe McC, b. Nov. 7, 1846. 

6. Levi, b. Oct. 27, 1803 ; m. Dec. 2, 1830, Abigail C. Perry. He is a ship- 

builder in Boothbay, Me. Have had— 1. John P., b. Dec. 10, 1832; 2. 
George, b. July 26, 1834; 3. Sarah Jane, b. May 29, 1836; 4. Margaret 
P., b. Aug. 19, 1838; 5. Levi S., b. Aug. 17, 1841; 6. Mary A., b. Sept. 
11, 1847. 

7. Susan, b. Aug. 2, 1805. She d. in Bradford, Penobscot Co., Me., Feb. 7, 

1834, se. 28 y. 6 m. 5 d. ; m. Thompson Trott, a millwright, who removed 
from Woolwich to Bradford, and had William J., Theodore, and Levi. 



248. David Shattuck, s. of Elijah, (p. 148,) was b. in Pep- 
perell, May 11, 1779, and is now a cooper in his native town. 
He m. Oct. 20, 1801, Betsey Chapman, b. April 8, 1778. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY BETSEY CHAPMAN, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Eliza, b. May 7, 1802; m. 1, 1. Shattuck; 2. D. Butterfield, (Fam. 238, 231) 

2. Thirza, b. Feb. 13, 1804 ; m. 1, C. P. Shattuck ; 2, C. Hutchinson, (Fam. 358) 

28 



218 



SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 



3. Dolly Varnum, b. Sept. 24, 180G; m. April 15, 1827, Joseph Hovey, a farmer 

in Pepperell, upon the homestead of her grandfather, and has had — 1. Betsey 
Caroline, b. Feb. 3, 1828, m. Henry C. Winn; 2. Joseph Augustus, b. Oct. 
11, 1830; 3. Thirza Ann, b. April 15, 1832; 4. Henry Varnum, b. Nov. 
20, 1836. 

4. David Ransom, b. Sept. 23, 1808. He is a farmer in the East Village of Pep- 

perell, where Nehemiah Hobart (p. 104) lived, and where public worship was 
first held before the erection of a meeting-house. He m. Nov. 29, 1832, 
Eliza Williams, b. Oct. 11, 1806, (p. 207,) and has had— 1. David Brainard, 
b. Nov. 6, 1833 ; 2. Benjamin Franklin, b. Jan. 20, 1835 ; 3. Isabella Eldridge, 
b. April 8, 1837 ; 4. Eliza Adelaide, b. Nov. 9, 1839 ; 5. Samuel Tyler, b. 
Sept. 16, 1841 ; 6. Mary Ellen, b. Sept. 12, 1843 ; 7. Freeman Lewis, b. Aug. 
7, 1846; 8. Harriet Estella, b. Dec. 4, 1849. 

5. Almira, b. Nov. 20, 1813; m. June 4, 1832, John D. Fiske of Wilton, N. H., 

and reside in Pepperell. Have had — 1. Almira Elizabeth, b. Nov. 20, 1833; 
2. John Cornelius, b. June 4, 1840; 3. Timothy Abbot, b. July 14, 1842; 
4. Henrietta Achsah, b. March 14, 1844 ; 5. Sarah Antoinette, b. March 25, 
1846 ; 6. Abby Ann, b. Oct. 29, 1848 ; 7. Harriet Farrar, b. Dec. 29, 1851. 

6. Elijah Davis, b. Feb. 29, 1816; d. Jan. 1, 1819, se. 2 y. 10 m. 2 d. 

7. Timothy Reed, b. April 19, 1820 ; m. Dec. 18, 1845, Mary E. Kendall of Dun- 

stable, b. June 28, 1824; and has— 1. Timothy Nelson, b. Oct. 28, 1846; 
2. David Herbert, b. Oct. 20, 1849; 3. Alden Kendall, b. Feb. 6, 1851; 
4. George Henry, b. Feb. 12, 1853. 



249. Jephthah Shattuck, s. of Elijah, (p. 148,) was b. in 
Pepperell, Sept. 19, 1791, and is a cooper in his native town. 
He m. March 10, 1803, Polly Woods, b. April 18, 1783. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY POLLY WOODS, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 



1. George U. $., b. May 18, 1803 

2. Almira R., b. Oct. 28, 1804 

3. E. Cummings, b. Feb. 10, 1806 

4. Harriet P., b. March 6, 1808 



5. Mary E., 

6. Sybil B., 

7. Lydia W., 

8. Winslow A., 

9. Olive, 

10. James W., 

11. Nancy H., 

12. John H. G., 



b. Jan. 25, 1810 
b. July 2, 1812 
b. Feb. 6, 1814 
b. Jan. 15, 1816 
b. April 9, 1817 
b. Feb. 28, 1819 
b. Nov. 26, 1820 
b. May 26, 1822. 



resides, unmarried, in Pepperell. 

d. Oct. 13, 1805, a3. 11 m. 15 d. 

m. Abigail Bowers. No issue. 

d. July 4, 1832, m. 24 y. 3 m. 28 d., unm. 

m. Stephen Altin. 

m. June 23, 1833, Jabez D. Lamson. 

m. Ambrose Packard. 

m., and resides in Nashua. 

m. James Carlton. 

m. Almira Woods. 

d. Jan. 30, 1843, se. 22 y. 2 m. 4 d. 

d. Aug. 23, 1825, a. 7 m. 23 d. 



13. Catharine W., b. Dec. 31, 1824 

14. Caroline L., b. Sept. 27, 1826 ; m. Jacob Cleaveland, a Norwegian. 



250. Rowland Shattuck, s. of Elijah, (p. 148,) was b. in 
Pepperell, March 5, 1788. In 1822 he removed from Pepperell 
to Greenbush, N. Y., and from thence to Wampsville Village, in 



ROWLAND, DOLLY, AND HANNAH SHATTUCK. 219 

Lenox, Madison Co., N. Y., where he d. March 11, 1842, se. 54 
y. m. 6 d. 

He m. 1, Nov. 17, 1808, Betsey Shattuck, b. Aug. 12, 1790, 
dau. of Nathaniel, (p. 173.) She d. in Greenbush, N. Y., Aug. 

9. 1823, twenty-two days after the birth of her second pair of 
twins, 83. 33 y. 

He m. 2, Eveline Qjtackenbush of New York. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY BETSEY SHATTUCK, BORN IN PEPPERELL AND GREENBUSH. 

1. Mindwell, b. Feb. 27, 1809 ; m. Nov. 29, 1827, Nathan Blood, 2d, s. of Nathan 

B. and Sybil, widow of Levi Shattuck, (p. 204,) and had, 1. Edward Augus- 
tus, b. June 10, 1828; 2. Rebecca Adaline, b. Oct. 3, 1832; 3. Nathan 
Evander, b. Sept. 4, 1839; 4. Ann Maria, b. Oct. 8, 1841. 

2. Hannah, b. March 7, 1811; m. Dec. 1, 1832, Edward F. Blood, b. Feb. 24, 

1810, s. of Nathan B. ; and have had, 1. Hannah Melissa, b. Oct. 11, 1836; 
2. Lavina Justine, b. Sept. 17, 1842; 3. Edward Alonzo, b. Feb. 14, 1846. 

3. Simon Stevens, b. Jan. 27, 1813; m. 1, Lucy C. P. Butterfield, dau. of 

David B., (p. 208.) She d. . He m. 2, Betsey W., widow of Wil- 
liam R. Greene of Brcokline, N. H. ; and has had, 1. Simon Angelo, b. Jan. 
6, 1846; 2. Harlan Page, b. July 29, 1848. 

4. Betsey, b. March 24, 1815; m. Walter Warren of Townsend, and have had, 

1. Charles Richard Fairfield, b. April 1, 1840; 2. Melora Hannah Eliza, 
b. Feb. 25, 1842. 

5. Rebecca, b. Jan. 13, 1817; m. Sept. 4, 1838, John Williams. No issue. 

6. Jonas, ? b. Nov. 21, 1820 ; m. May 1, 1845, Mary Jane Chapman of Pep. 

7. Ann, ) Twins. m. Oct. 4, 1843, Daniel Blood, Jr. 

8. Caroline, ) b. July 28, 1823 ; d. Aug. 17, 1823, se. 19 d., at Greenbush. 

9. Adaline, S Twins. d. Aug. 10, 1823, se. 12 d., at Greenbush. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY EVELINE QUACKENBUSH, BORN IN . 

10. Nancy, b.Feb. 20, 1831. 

11. Charles Elijah,b. Oct. 12, 1832. 12. Mary E Wimple, b. March 14, 1837. 

251. Dolly and Hannah Shattuck, daus. of Jonas, (p. 149,) 
were b. in Edgecomb, now Westport, Me., and both m. James 
Heal, b. in Edgecomb, Dec. 17, 1781, s. of David Heal, of 
French descent, and Sarah Edes of Boston, of English descent. 
He m. 1, April 28, 1808, Hannah Shattuck, b. Sept. 20, 1791. 
She d. March 19, 1812, se. 20 y. 5 m. 29 d. He m. 2, May 3, 
1818, Dolly Shattuck, b. Feb. 28, 1787. She d. on her birth- 
day, Feb. 28, 1849, 8e. 62. They were members of the Meth- 
odist Church. 

HrS CHILDREN, BY HANNAH SHATTUCK, BORN IN WESTPORT. 

1. William Rollins, b. Aug. 26, 1809 ; d. May 8, 1826, se. 16 y. 8 m. 12 d. 

2. Jonas Shattuck, b. Jan. 22, 1812; m. June 10, 1838, Ruth Ann Jewett, dau. 

of James and Phebe Jewett of Westport ; and have, 1. Mary Shattuck Parker, 
b. June 18, 1839 ; 2. Martha Hannah, b. Oct. 25, 1840; 3. James Robbins, 



220 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

b. Dec. 27, 1842; 4. Jonas Shattuck, b. May 30, 1848 ; 5. Ruhamah, b. May 
16, 1849. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY DOLLY SHATTUCK, BORN IN WESTPORT. 

3. Robbins, b. June 28, 1818 ; unm. One of the owners of the Shat- 

tuck Mills. 

4. Hannah Shattuck,b. March 9, 1821 ; d. Aug. 10, 1821, as. 5 m. 1 d. 

5. James, b. Oct. 11, 1822; d. in 1838, as. 16 years. 

6. Levi Shattuck, b. Feb. 13, 1825. Postmaster in Westport. 

7. Hanna Anna, b. May 6, 1827; m. Feb. 1, 1852, James L. Tarbox. 

8. William, b. May 22, 1829. 



DESCENDANTS OF THE ANDOVESl BRANCHES. 

252. Joseph Shattuck, s. of Joseph, (p. 150,) was b. in 
Andover, Nov. 8, 1757, upon the old homestead, where his father 
and grandfather had lived, situated upon the line of the Lowell 
and Lawrence Railroad, near the Merrimac River, forty or fifty 
rods east of the road leading from the meeting-house in West 
Andover to the North District. Soon after his father's death this 
house was torn down, and he settled near the place now occupied 
by his son Joseph, about two miles from the old site, where he lived 
as a farmer, together with his second wife, more than fifty-seven 
years, and where he d. July 8, 1847, ae. 89 y. 8 m. He was a 
revolutionary pensioner, having served as a soldier and sergeant, 
and fought in the battles at Bennington, Saratoga, Monmouth, 
and other places. He was a highly respectable and worthy man, 
and a member of the church. 

He m. 1, June 1, 1784, Hannah Chandler, b t in 1765, dan. of 
Joshua and Hannah Chandler. She d. Aug. 13, 1785, as. 20 y.. 
without issue. Her monument is the only one in the South 
Burying-ground that bears the name of ^Shattuck. 

He m. 2, March 30, 1790, Phebe Abbott, b. in Andover, Feb. 
26, 1766, dau. of Capt. Jonathan Abbott and Mary Chandler. She 
d. in Andover, Dec. 20, 1848, 83. 82 y. 9 m. 24 d. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY PHEBE ABBOTT, BORN IN ANDOVER. 

1. Hannah C, b. Aug. 5, 1791 ; d. unm., Oct. 26, 1847, ce. 56 y. 2 m. 21 d. 

2. Joseph, b. Oct. 18, 1793 ; m. Hannah Bailey, 489 

3. Nathan, b. March 4, 1797 ; m. Mary F. Abbott, 490 

4. Phebe A., b. Feb. 21, 1807; m. Feb. 4, 1836, William Merrill, a farmer of 

Andover, and have had Phebe Augusta, George W., Hannah, and Charles H. 

253. Elizabeth Shattuck, dau. of Joseph, (p. 150,) was b. 
Sept. 2, 1760, and d. in Andover, Nov. 12, 1837, as. 77 y. 2 m. 
10 d. 



\ 



ABIEL, LYDIA, AND WILLIAM SHATTUCK. 221 

She m. Sept. 27, 17S0, Paul Hunt, b. in Tewksbury, July 
20, 1753, and d. in Andover, Nov. 28, 1831, ae. 78 y. 4 m. 8 d. 
He was a farmer, and had — 
1. Elizabeth, d. April 22, 1782; 2. Paul, d. Oct. 15, 1826; 3. John; 4. Elizabeth. 



254. Abiel Shattuck, s. of Joseph, (p. 150,) was b. in An- 
dover, Aug. 8, 1762, and settled as a farmer in Hillsborough, 
N. H., where he lived thirty-six years. He subsequently removed 
to Plainfleld, Yt., where he d. April 29, 1834, se. 71 y. 8 m. 21 d. 

He m. July 25, 1786, his cousin Phebe Shattuck, dan. of 
Zebediah Shattuck, b. Feb. 20, 1766. (Family 118.) She is 
now living in Plainfleld. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY PHEBE SHATTUCK, BORN IN HILLSBOROUGH. 

1. Phebe, b. Nov. 26, 1787; m. John B. Upton, 491 

2. Rhoda, b. Nov. 2, 1788 ; d. unm., June 6, 1845, se. 56 y. 7 m. 4 d. 

3. John, b. Feb. 25, 1792. He was a shoemaker in Antrim ; but in 1816 re- 

moved to Charlestown, N. H. ; m. Hannah Holt, dau. of Barachias Holt. 
She d. Oct. 22, 1817, having had, 1. Horace H., b. June 22, 1815 ; 2. Hannah 
H., b. July 12, 1817. 

4. Abiel, b. June 10, 1795 ; m. Susanna B. King, 492 

5. Asenath, b. June 14, 1797; d. unm., Aug. 23, 1843, se. 46 y. 2 m. 9 d. 

6. Herman, b. Nov. 22, 1799 ; m. in 1827, Mary Mann. He was a shoemaker in 

Plainfleld, Vt., where he d. Aug. 5, 1836, se. 36 y. 8 m. 13 d. Had, 1. Mary 
C, b. Feb. 16, 1829; 2. Semantha, b. Feb. 20, 1830, d. March 2, 1849, 
se. 19 y. m. 12 d. 

7. Elizabeth A., b. Sept. 14, 1802 ; d. in Plainfleld, Vt., Dec. 2, 1842, se. 40 y. 2 m. 

18 d. She m. in 1826, Abram Mann a farmer of Plainfleld, b. Oct. 6, 1802 ; 
and had, 1. Caroline E., b. March 4, 1827; 2. Phebe Jane, b. Oct. 23, 1836 ; 
3. Leander A., b. Oct. 27, 1839; 4. John C, b. Dec. 12, 1841. 

8. Julia Ann, b. Feb. 12, 1806; m. May 15, 1836, Stephen Everett, Jr., b. May 

23, 1804. He d. Aug. 29, 1840, se. 36 y. 3 m. 6 d. He was a portrait 
painter in Boston and Vermont. Left one child, Julia Ann Ophelia, b. 
March 1, 1837. 

9. James Madison, b. Feb. 28, 1810, a farmer in Plainfleld. 



255. Lydia Shattuck, dan. of Joseph, (p. 150,) was b. in 
Andover, April 27, 1765, and lived in Hillsborough. 

She m. Jan. 28, 1795, Daniel Flint, a farmer, who d. in 
Hillsborough, June 10, 1853. Had — 
1. Lydia; 2. Daniel; 3. Amos; 4. Luther. 

256. William Shattuck, s. of Joseph, (p. 150,) was b. in 
Andover, April 26, 1769, and settled as a farmer and shoemaker 
in Otisfield, Cumberland Co., Me., where he was accidentally killed 



222 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

by the falling of a tree, Aug. 31, 1806, se. 37 y. 4 m. 5 d. He 
was a prominent man in the town, and highly respected. 

He m. in 1791, Abigail Foster, b. Jan. 14, 1771, dau. of 
Gideon Foster of Andover. She d. in Andover, Dec. 30, 1846, 
se. 75 y. 11 m. 16 d. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ABIGAIL FOSTER, BORN IN OTISFIELD. 

1. William,}). April 25, 1792; m. Elizabeth Hill, 493 

2. Abigail, b. Mar. 22, 1794 ; m. April 30, 1815, Isaac Lovejoy, a shoemaker in 

Nashua, N. H. Had Augustus, Nancy, Elizabeth, and Warren. 

3. Tamasine, b. Jan. 21, 1796, and d. in Andover, April 4, 1831, se. 35 y. 2 m. 

13 d. She m. Feb. 22, 1816, John Gleason, of Andover, a mason by trade ; 
and had, 1. Wyman, m. Eliza Manning ; 2. William ; 3. Lucy ; 4. John ; 
5. George ; 6. Eliza Jane. 

4. Sarah, b. July 18, 1798. Resides in Boston. 

5. Anna, b. Sept. 6, 1800 ; m. Amos Wardwell, who d. in Illinois, having had 

Abby Ann and Ann Maria, both of whom are dead. 

6. Elizabeth, b. Aug. 22, 1802. Resides in Andover. 

7. Joseph, b. Sept. 4, 1804. In 1823 he went to Charleston, S. C, where he 

m. Elizabeth Flowers; and where he d. May, 1831, leaving 2 daughters. 

8. Mary, )b. Dec. 11, 1806. Resides in Andover. 

9. Pamelia, S Twins. d. unm., April 28, 1836, se. 29 y. 4 m. 17 d. 

257. Zebediah Shattuck, s. of Joseph, (p. 150,) was b. in 
Andover, Feb., 1771, and settled as a farmer in Hillsborough, 
N. H., where he d. May 2, 1821, se. 50 years. 

He m. Elizabeth Martin, dau. of Joseph M. of Andover. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ELIZABETH MARTIN, BORN IN HILLSBOROUGH. 

1. Zebediah, b. June 7, 1792 

2. Elizabeth, b. Jan. 19, 1795 

3. Joseph, b. April 5, 1797 

4. Myra, b. April 23, 1800 

5. Gilman, b. Dec. 2, 1802 

6. Myra, b. May 3, 1806 

7. Tamasine,b. Nov. 17, 1808 

8. Phebe, b. May 7, 1811 



m.l, M.Taylor; 2, V.Parker; 3, R. Taylor, 494 
m. in 1847, Joseph Bryant of Barstow. 

m. Elizabeth K. West, 495 

d. July 14, 1803, a?. 3 y. 2 m. 21 d. 
m. 1, M. J. Conant; 2, Emeline B. Dutton, 496 
d. July 11, 1820, a3. 14 y. 2 m. 8 d. 
d, unm., May 20, 1836, se. 27 y. 6 m. 3 d. 
m. Feb. 23, 1829, Hiram Taylor of Washington, 
N. H. Had, 1. Moses D., b. June 25, 1830 ; 2. Elizabeth S., b. Oct. 27, 1837. 

258. Peter Shattuck, s. of Joseph, (p. 150,) was b. in An- 
dover, Oct. 18, 1772 ; and settled as a farmer near the West 
Parish meeting-house in that town, where he now (1855) resides. 

He m. May 5, 1795, Susanna Clark, b. Nov. 8, 1775, dau. of 
Samuel and Sarah Clark of Andover. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY SUSANNA CLARK, BORN IN ANDOVER. 

1. Peter, b. June 27, 1797; d. in Andover, May 2, 1831, a?. 33 y. 10 m. 5 d. 
He m. Lucy Moore, and had, 1. George Edward, b. June 28, 1819, m. Mary 
Mason; 2. Benjamin, b. Aug. 26, 1820; 3. Alfred, b. July 13, 1822, m. 



HANNAH, NATHANIEL, AND ISAAC SHATTUCK. 223 



Sarah Kingsley ; 4. John, b. Aug. 25, 1826, m. Elizabeth Chandler; 5. 
William, m. Mary Billings. 

2. George, b. June 18, 1801 ; d. June 17, 1815, re. 14 years. 

3. Leonard, ? b. Nov. 1, 1803 ; m. Harriet Clark ; had Harriet B., and Susan J. 

4. Susanna, 3 Twins. m. George Bradley. Had William Osgood. 

5. Harriet, b. Dec. 10, 1805; m. William Bradley. 

6. Franklin, b. May 21, 1808; m. Rebecca Couch, and had Elizabeth, Susan- 

na Melissa, Merit, and Charles. 

7. William, b. Aug. 19, 1810 ; m. Olive Clark ; had Elizabeth. 

8. Thomas, b. Feb. 17, 1812; m. Salomi Bailey, and had Mary Elizabeth, George 

Thomas, John, Salomi Jane, Augusta, Sarah, Harriet Lois, and Peter Lewis. 

9. Charles, b. May 21, 1815; m. June 18, 1840, Rosetta Hopkins, and had, 1. 

Frances Rosetta, b. March 30, 1841 ; 2. Charles William, b. May 24, 1843. 



259. Hannah Shattuck, dau. of Joseph, (p. 150,) was b. in 
Andover, Sept. 8, 1774, where she d. Sept. 24, 1828, se. 54 y. 
m. 16 d. 

She m. 1, Lemuel Clark. He d. , leaving children. 

She m. 2, Caleb Abbott, who d. in Andover, April 12, 1837. 
Her children, Thomas Jefferson, William, Joseph, and Lewis. 

260. Nathaniel Shattuck, s. of Isaac, (p. 150,) was b. in 
Andover, Aug. 3, 1760, where he d. July 15, 1835, as. 74 y. 
11m. 12 d. 

He m. Nov. 28, 1782, Polly Barnes of Dracut, and had — 
1. JYathaniel ; 2. Simeon. 

261. Isaac Shattuck, s. of Isaac, (p. 150,) was b. in Andover, 
July 13, 1766, where he d. June 10, 1835, as. 68 y. 10 m. 27 d. 

He m. Jan. 17, 1785, Rebecca Ingalls, b. June 16, 1766. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY REBECCA INGALLS, BORN IN ANDOVER. 

1. Hannah, b. Sept. 26, 1785; m. Charles Newell; d. April, 1845. 

2. Isaac, b. Nov. 14, 1787; m. 1, Fanny Fry; 2, Betsey Jeffts. No children. 

3. Henry, b. Feb. 7, 1790 ; m. Sophia Rogers. He d. in Andover, May, 1829. 

She d. Sept. 17, 1841. Had, 1. Henry, b. Nov. 10, 1819, m. Lilitia J. Ban- 
field; 2. Varnum; 3. Nathan, m. Elizabeth McGee; 4. Edwin, b. Oct. 1, 
1816, m. Sept. 5, 1846, Eliza Jane Reed ; 5. Sophia, d. unm., July, 1846. 

4. Jacob, b. Aug. 10, 1793; d. unm., Feb. 1, 1847, a?. 54 y. 5 m. 21 d. 

5. JYathaniel, b. Dec. 7, 1797 ; m. Caroline Rogers, and had, 1. Mary, b. March 

19, 1824, m. William Durant — she d. 1843, no issue ; 2. Nathaniel, b. Dec. 
15, 1826; 3. Rebecca, m. Willard Robbins ; 4. Martha Ann, b. March 8, 
1831, m. John Frye ; 5. Charles. 

6. Rebecca, b. June 18, 1795 ; m. Oct. 4, 1832, Nehemiah Abbott, and had — 1. 

Almond P. ; 2. Rebecca J. ; 3. Olive T. ; 4. Mary. 

7. Aaron, b. June 29, 1800. Now living, unmarried. 

8. Phineas, b. Aug. 4, 1802 ; m. 1, E. Hill ; 2, R. Chandler. 

9. .Simeon, b. Nov. 22, 1807; m. 1, A. Hill; 2, Eliza Hill, -497 



224 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

262. Samuel Shattuck, s. of Isaac, (p. 150,) was b. in An- 
dover, where he d. Dec. 27, 1832, ae. 60 y. 7 m. 27 d. 
He m. Feb. 18, 1793, Lucy Chandler. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY LUCY CHANDLER, BORN IN ANDOVER. 

1. A child, b. March 9, 1796; d. unnamed. 

2. Samuel, b. Feb. 25, 1797 ; m. Hannah Mansur, 498 

3. Ezra, b. Mar. 26, 1799 ; m. Rebecca Sylvester. Had Rebecca, b. Oct. 29, 

1820. 

4. Lucy, b. May 24, 1801 ; m. Peter Stevens. Had Peter, Lucy, and John. 

5. Ruth P.,b. Dec. 22, 1803 ; m. David Jones, and had Willard, Abiel, Caroline, 

Elizabeth, and Lucinda. 

6. Nathaniel B., b. Jan. 5, 1809. 

7. John Kneeland, b. ; m. Martha Gray, and had — 1. Martha, b. Oct. 22, 

1837 ; 2. John Kneeland, b. Nov. 22, 1839. 

8. James Madison, b. Feb. 1, 1815. 



263. Zebediah Shattuck, s. of Zebediah, (p. 150,) was b. in 
Andover, and d. in that town, Oct. 25, 1829. 

He m. Nov. 27, 1806, Sarah Durant, b. Sept. 23, 1783, dau. 
of Amos and Sarah Durant. She lives with Mr. Clark in Roxbury. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY SARAH DURANT, BORN IN ANDOVER. 

1. Sophronia, b. Dec. 27, 1808 ; m. Feb. 12, 1834, William Clark, s. of Daniel 

and Susanna Clark. He is a provision dealer in Bowdoin street, Boston. 
Resides on the Highlands in Roxbury. Children — 1. William Henry, b. 
Aug. 5, 1835; 2. Ellen Matilda, b. July 20, 1837; 3. Georgiana Miller, b. 
Dec. 14, 1840; 4. Amanda Frances, b. Nov. 14, 1846. 

2. Abiel, b. July 30, 1811 ; m. in 1834, Sarah Wiley. He lived in North Ando- 

ver, where he d. Aug. 9, 1848, se. 37. She d. Aug., 1845. Children— 1. 
James Henry, b. 1836 ; 2. Sarah, b. 1838 ; 3. George, b. 1843. 

3. Zebediah, b. June 16, 1816; unm. in 

4. Sarah Ballard, b. July 13, 1821 ; m. Feb. 10, 1846, Charles O. Gould of 

Hollis, N. H., s. of Ambrose and Susan Gould. Had Sarah, b. Sept. 14, 1848, 
d. Feb. 14, 1851. 



DESCENDANTS OF THE DEEKFIEED BRANCHES. 

264. Samuel Shattuck, s. of Samuel, (p. 152,) was b. in 
Greenfield, Aug. 15, 1764. He was a farmer, and first settled in 
Shelden, Franklin Co., Vt., but removed in 1809 to Stukely, 
Canada East, and in 1846 to Tittabawasse, Saginaw Co., Mich., 
where he d. Aug. 9, 1847, se. 73. 

He m. Feb. 18, 1795, Prudence Healey, b. in Guilford, 
Vt., April 15, 1775, dau, of Ithamar Healey, b. in England, d. 
in Guilford, and Mary Thrasher. They belonged to the Meth- 
odist Church. 



CIILOE SHATTUCK CONSIDER SHATTUCK. 225 

HIS CHILDREN, BY PRUDENCE HEALEY, BORN IN SHELDON AND STUKELEY. 

1. Samuel, b. Aug. 26, 1796 ; d. Feb. 20, 1807, <e. 10 y. 5 m. 23 d., in Frank- 

lin, Vt. 

2. Sophronia, b. Nov. 22, 1798; m. John C. Tibbets, 499 

3. itoccina JE.,b. Dec. 17, 1801; m.Lott Parker, 500 

4. Calista, b. June 15, 1805; m. Isaac Lawrence, 501 

5. Adaline, b. Jan. 10,1807; m. Arza Tibbits of Durham, and resides in 

Broome, C. E. 

G. Chester, b. Feb. 22, 1810; m. Alma Guy, 502 

7. Samuel, b. Sept. 27, 1814 ; m. Catharine Beach, 503 

265. Chloe Shattuck, dau. of Samuel, (p. 152,) was b. in 
Greenfield, Nov. 22, 1766, and d. in Enosburg, Franklin Co., 
Vt., Jan. 22, 1845, ae. 78 y. 2 m. 

She m. Nov. 17, 1785, Ephraim Leach, b. in Westmoreland, 
Mass., Dec., 1761. He was a clothier, and removed to Enos- 
burg about 1800, where he d. Feb. 28, 1840, ae. 78 y. 2 m. 

HER CHILDREN, BY EPHRAIM LEACH, BORN IN AND ENOSBURG. 

1. Tertius, b. Nov. 21, 1787; m. Jan. 1, 1811, Sophia Hanley of Sheldon. He 

is a farmer in Enosburg, and has, 1. Tertius Hanley; 2. Sophia Eliza; 

3. Lorin Atwood ; 4. Henry Waterhouse. 

2. Clarissa, b. April 2, 1789; m. Feb. 28, 1812, Christopher Tracy of Sheldon. 

He was a farmer in Morristown, St. Lawrence Co., N. Y., where she d. 
April 18, 1837, ae. 48. Had, 1. Nobles Everett; 2. Ira Otis; 3. Lucinda ; 

4. Luthera; 6. Julia; 7. Emily; 8. Lois Williams. 

3. Otis, b. June 25, 1790; d. unm., in Enosburg, Nov. 29, 1837, se. 47 y. 5 

m. 4 d. 

4. Rodolphus, b. Aug. 13, 1793. He is a clothier in Enosburg, unmarried., 

5. Ephraim, b. Oct. 24, 1795 ; m. Dec, 1829, Sarah Smith. He was a car- 

penter; d. in Enosburg, Dec. 13, 1844, se. 49 y. 1 m. 19 d. ; had, 1. Sarah 
Elizabeth; 2. Ephraim Smith; 3. Jay Smith; 4. Harriet Emons. 

6. Chloe Fields b. June 25, 1798. She is a milliner, unm., in Enosburg. 

7. Sidney Albro, b. Jan. 22, 1801; m. Dec, 182G, Lucenia Perky Whitcomb. 

He d. Aug. 19, 1849. Had, 1. Hiram Whitcomb; 2. Mary Whitcomb; 
3. Ami Barbour. 

8. Amanda Amarance, b. June 5, 1804; a milliner, unm., in Enosburg. 

9. Eraslus Field, b. Feb. 2, 1807. He was a merchant in Williston ; d. Aug. 

30, 1828, ae. 21 y. 6 m. 28 d., unmarried. 
10. Lorin Cushman, b. July 7, 1809; m. Jan. 5, 1841, Martha Smith Dow. He 
is a farmer in Enosburg ; has, 1. Isabella Chloe ; 2. Martha Jane. 

266. Consider Shattuck, (or Sidney as sometimes written,) 
s. of Samuel, (p. 152,) was b. in Greenfield, Feb. 7, 1768, re- 
moved in 1794 to Sheldon, Franklin Co,,. Vt., where he d. Aug. 
15, 1803, ae. 35 y. 6 m. 8 d. 

He m. in Greenfield, Jan. 1, 1794, Ann Atherton, b. May 4, 
1771, dau. of Oliver Atherton. She m. for her 2d husband, 
29 



226 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

Elisha Goodsell, by whom she had 6 children, all living except- 
ing the youngest. The oldest, E. B. Goodsell, resides in Frank- 
lin, Mo., the others in Sheldon. The mother is with the 
youngest son, John Goodsell, on the old farm where she orig- 
inally settled with her first husband. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ANN ATHERTON, BORN IN SHELDON. 

1. Alva, b. 1794; was a farmer in Sheldon, where he d. April 6, 1836, 

ee. 42. He m. Pamelia Butler, and had one child who, with the mother, is 
living in North Troy, Vt. 

2. Zama Severance, b. Oct. 14, 1797; m. Dec. 25, 1821, Samuel B. Hurlburt, an 

extensive farmer in Sheldon. Have had, 1. Mary Ann Jane, b. Feb. 16, 
1823, m. J. H. Stufflebean, a merchant in Sheldon — have one child ; 2. Ada- 
line, b. Nov. 25, 1825; 3. Clarence Lorane, b. Dec. 4, 1832; 4. Jackson 
Monroe, b. May 16, 1841. 

3. Richard A., h. March 19, 1802; m. Mary Smith, 504 



267. Seth Shattuck, s. of Samuel, (p. 152,) was b. in 
Greenfield, Mass., Jan. 24, 1770. He was a farmer, and first set- 
tled in Sheldon, Franklin Co., Vt., but in 1816 removed to near 
Toronto, Canada West, and in 1823 to Portland, Chautauque Co., 
N. Y., where he d. July 15, 1828, as. 58 y. 5 m. 21 d. 

He m. 1, Sylvia Chapin, who d. Sept., 1804, in childbirth 
with her 5th child. 

He m. 2, in 1805, Anna Smith, dau. of William Smith of 
Fairfield, Franklin Co., Yt. She d. in Portland, Aug. 23, 1828, 
8B. 60. By her he had 3 children : 2 children, one by each wife, 
d. in infancy. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY SYLVIA CHAPIN, BORN IN SHELDON. 

1. Angelina, b. ; m. Lewis Gilbert of Fairfield. They had, 1. Cath- 

arine ; 2. Seth ; 3. John. 

2. Sylvia, b. ; m. Thomas Robinett, a farmer of Toronto, Canada 

West. Had, 1. Angelina; 2. Josiah. 

3. Phylinda, b. Oct. 7, 1802, and d. in Toronto, July 1, 1837, se. 34 y. 8 m. 24 d. 

She m. June 14, 1820, Joseph Horning of Toronto, and had, 1. Erastus, b. 
May 25, 1822; 2. William, b. Aug. 7, 1824; 3. Mary, b. March 29, 1827, d. 
March 3, 1848 ; 4. Catharine, b. Dec. 7, 1829 ; 5. Lucy Ann, b. Jan. 7, 1834, 
d. March 10, 1834 ; G. Phylinda, b. May 21, 1839, d. July 25, 1837. 

4. Lorin, b. Sept. 1, 1804; is a farmer in Portland, Chautauque Co., N. Y. ; m. 

March 27, 1830, Sarah Jackson, and has, 1. Helen S., b. Sept. 30, 1832; 2. 
Corydon, b. Dec. 7, 1834, d. Aug. 2, 1843, se. 8 y. 7 m. 25 d. ; 3. Frances, b. 
April 1, 1844; 4. Mary, b. June 17, 1849; 5. Emma, b. Sept. 30, 1851. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ANNA SMITH, BORN IN . 

5. Isaac, b. July 8, 1806; is a farmer in Portland. He m. 1, Harriet Crosby, b. 

Feb. 2, 1807, dau. of Luther Crosby. She was accidentally thrown from a 



LYDIA, JESSE, AND CHESTER SHATTUCK. 227 

carriage and killed, April 23, 1843, ae. 36 y. 2 m. 21 d. He m. 2, Dec. 3, 

1843, Sarah Kayes, b. in Odletown, Canada East, June 27, 1819. Had by 
1st wife, Caroline E., b. Dec. 15, 1833; and by 2d wife, William, b. Dec. 7, 

1844, d. Oct. 7, 1845; William, b. June 11, 1847 ; Gertrude, b. July 15, 1852. 
6. Lucy, b. ; m. Lorin P . Carley, a farmer of Erie, Pa., and has 

Lucy Ann, Seth, Isaac, Calestine, and Oscar. 



26S. Lydia Shattuck, dau. of Samuel, (p. 152,) b. in Green- 
field, Feb. 15, 1773, m. Aug. 5, 1802, Arad Root, b. in Monta- 
gue, Mass., Sept. 10, 1767, s. of Elisha Root and Lucy Matoon. 
He settled in 1800 in Williston, Chittenden Co., Vt., where they 
both now (1853) live in the house first occupied. 

HER CHILDREN, BY ARAD ROOT, BORN IN WILLISTON. 

1. Lucy, b. May 12, 1804 ; d. Dec. 22, 1828, se. 24 y. 7 m. 10 d. 

2. Zimri,b. May 19, 1806; m. Jan. 29, 1834, Amelia Atwater of Williston, b. 

Aug. 6, 1815. They have had, 1. Henry, b. Feb. 24, 1835, d. Jan. 8, 1840 ; 
2. Lucy M., b. Nov. 24, 1836 ; 3. Jane E., b. Aug. 31, 1841 ; 4. Henry A., b. 
Nov. 27, 1845; 5. Charles F., b. May 1, 1848. 

3. Lucinda, b. Aug. 15, 1808; d. Oct. 12, 1829, ee. 21 y. 1 m. 27 d. 

4. Elisha, b. May 19, 1811 ; d. xWay 21, 1842, 83. 31 y. m. 2 d. He was a 

physician in South Hero, Vt. ; m. Susan B. Adams, and had one child. 

5. Henry, b. March 14, 1816, d. Sept. 27, 1816, a3. 6 m. 13 d. 



269. Jesse Shattuck, s. of Samuel, (p. 152,) was b. in 
Greenfield, Sept. 21, 1777. At the age of 14 he was apprenticed 
to a clothier in Winchester, N. H., and, after he was free, resided 
in Pittsford, and Castleton, Vt., and in St. Armand, Canada East. 
In 1835 he removed to Monroe, Ashtabula Co., Ohio, and in 1844 
to Aurora, Kane Co., 111., where he now resides. 

He m. in Durham, Canada East, Mary E. Sargent, b. in 
Dummerston, Windham Co., Vt., Sept. 23, 1784, dau. of Col. Wil- 
liam Sargent, latterly of St. Armand, and Rachel Todd, a native 
of Yorkshire, England. Their eldest child was b. in Pittsford, 
the two next in Castleton, and the two youngest in St. Armand. 

1. Chloe, b. June 2, 1806 ; m. T. F. Mason, of Comstock's Landing, N. Y. 

2. Maria, b. Nov. 8, 1808 ; m. W. R. Champney of Brighton, Mass. 

3. George A., b. Jan. 10, 1811 ; merchant in Aurora. Unmarried. 

4. William, b. May 17, 1817 ; d. Nov. 19, 1836, m. 19 y. 6 m. 2 d. 

5. Rachel, b. Aug. 30, 1820 ; m. S. H. Baldwin of Aurora, la. 

270. Chester Shattuck, s. of Samuel, (p. 152,) was b. in 
Greenfield, Dec. 17, 1780. His mother d. when he was about 
four months old, and he was adopted by Ezekiel Bascom of 
Greenfield, by whom he was brought up. The name originally 



228 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

selected for him by his parents was Robert, and by this name his 
birth is entered upon the town records of Greenfield. His adopt- 
ed parents altered it to Chester. Mr. Bascom m. a sister of the 
wife of Gideon Shattuck, (p. 134,) and was the maternal grand- 
father of Hon. Samuel Wells of Northampton. Chester Shattuck, 
before he was 21 years old, enlisted into the army, and was a 
sergeant in a company under Gen. Anthony Wayne, in his expe- 
dition on the Miami River in 1794, and returned home in 1797. 
He remained about a year, and then enlisted as an officer into the 
" Oxford Army," so called. He was afterwards a proprietor of a 
line of stages that ran between Portsmouth, N. H. and Boston. 
He d. in Portsmouth, July 26, 1823, as. 42 y. 7 m. 9 d. He was 
a generous, amiable, and popular man. 

He m. Dec. 20, 1804, Miriam Walton Stocker of Portsmouth, 
b. July 11, 1785, dau. of Capt. William Stocker and Abigail 
Randall, and a descendant of Sir William Pepperell and the 
Sheafes of Portsmouth. Her father commanded a vessel of war 
in the Revolution. He was the s. of Ebenezer Stocker, and prob- 
ably a descendant of Ebenezer Stocker who d. in Lynn, Nov. 2, 
1704. She d. in Charlestown, June 17, 1855, se. 69 y. 11 m. 6 d. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY MIRIAM STOCKER, BORN IN PORTSMOUTH. 

1. Wm. Chester, b. Nov. 4, 1805 ; d. March 1, 1827, se. 21 y. 3 m. 27 d. 

2. Harriet M, b. Dec. 25, 1807; m. Charles B. Goodrich, 505 

3. Marion, b. May 15, 1810. Resides in Charlestown. 

4. Benjamin F., b. Jan. 3,1814; m. Anna B. Doane, 506 

271. Dr. Eliphalet Shattuck, s. of William, (p. 153,) was 
b. in Ashfield, Mass., April 20, 1778. He first settled in Ovid, 
Seneca Co., N. Y., where his five elder children were born. 
From thence he removed about 1808 to Benton, Ontario, now 
Yates Co., N. Y., where his other children were born. He after- 
wards removed to Prairie Creek, near Terre Haute, Vigo Co., la., 
where he d. April 23, 1840, ae. 62 y. m. 3 d. He was a self- 
educated man and a successful physician. 

He m. in Romulus, N. Y., Jan. 18, 1798, Jane Wiley, b. March 

1, 1781, only child of James Wiley. She d. in Prairie Creek, May 

2, 1840, nine days after her husband, ae. 59 y. 2 m. 1 d. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY JANE WILEY, BORN IN OVID AND BENTON, N. Y. 

1. Jane, b. Nov. 12, 1798; m. April 16, 1815, Foster. Shed. Jan. 7, 1848. 

2. Lydia, b. Feb. 13, 1801 ; m. Keene. She d. Aug. 4, 1839. 

3. James W., b. May 19, 1803. 



SOPHIA SHATTUCK. 229 

4 Polly, b. Mar. 25, 1805 ; m. Lewis Packard. She d. Nov. 30, 1842. 

5. William T. J., b. Mar. 27, 1807; m. Nov. 11, 1830, . 

6. Amanda, b. Sept. 29, 1810; m. Dec. 5, 1830, Paddock. 

7. Benjamin R, b. June 4, 1813. 9. Sophia, b. Nov. 10, 1818 ; 

8. Phylinda, b. April 2, 1817. m. William Morgan. 

272. Sophia Shattuck, dan. of William, (p. 153,) was b. in 
Halifax, Vt., Nov. 22, 1779. and is still living in Hinsdale, N. H. 

She m. May 19, 1793, at the early age of 13 y. 5 m. 27 d., 
Qtis Doolittle, b. in Hinsdale, Sept. 20, 1770. He is an ex- 
tensive and well-to-do farmer in his native town ; a son of Oliver 
Doolittle, who m. his cousin Sybil Field, and had 12 children: 
a grandson of Lucius Doolittle, who m. Sarah Smith and had 11 
child. ; and a gr. -grands, of Rev. Benjamin Doolittle, (p. 97,) the 
first minister of Hinsdale, who m. Lydia Todd, (who lived to be 
101 years old,) and had 10 children. He was the son of John, 
and grandson of Abraham Doolittle, one of the first settlers of 
New Haven. This family have been exceedingly prolific, and 
their descendants unusually numerous. Mrs. Sophia Doolittle 
had 18 children, the oldest born when the mother was 14 y. 9 
m. old ; 2 were still-born ; the other 16 are given below. She 
had 2 grandchildren before the birth of her youngest child. 

1. Frederick, b. Aug. 22, 1794 ; m. June, 1819, Mary Ann Collins of Penn Yan 

Village, Milo, Yates Co., N. Y., and have had— 1. John, b. Oct. 17, 1820 ; 2. 
Cyrenius, b. March 2, 1822 ; 3. Sybil, b. April 23, 1823 ; 4. Charlotte, b. Dec. 
12, 1826; 5. Mary A., b. May 7, 1828; 6. Frederick, b. July 10, 1829; 7. 
Caroline, b. Feb. 2, 1831, d. Aug. 11, 1847; 8. Oliver, b. March 28, 1832, 
d. Aug. 5, 1835; 9. George, b. July 20, 1833; 10. Everil, b. Sept. 21, 1835; 
11. Edward, b. June 13, 1837, d. March 2, 1841 ; 12. Almon, b. April 21, 
1839; 13. Sarah, b. Aug. 19, 1842; 14. Julia, b. Sept. 7, 1844. 

2. Olis, b. Oct. 22, 1795; d. Aug. 11, 1816, se. 20 y. 9 m. 19 d. 

3. IVi(liam,b. July 19, 1797; m. June, 1819, Hannah Waggoner of Penn Yan, 

N. Y., and have had— 1. Alfred, b. Sept., 1820, d. Aug., 1827 ; 2. Albert, b. 
Oct., 1822 ; 3. Henry, b. March, 1826; 4. Oscar, b. May, 1828; 5. Alphonso, 
b. June, 1830; 6. Emeline, b. Dec, 1832. William, the father, d. Nov., 
1834. Hannah, the mother, d. March, 1853. 

4. Lydia, b. March 4, 1799; m. March, 1822, her cousin Tyler C. Stone, b. in 

Romulus, May 1, 1799, s. of John Stone and Phylinda Shattuck. (See 
next family.) 

5. Sybil, b. May 18, 1801, and d. Aug., 1839. She m. Dec, 1829, John Barrett 

of Hinsdale, and have had — 1. Sylvanus, b. Nov., 1830 ; 2. John A., b. June, 
1833; 3. William C, b. July, 1837. 

6. Oliver, b. March 1, 1803, and d. July, 1845. He m. Oct., 1827, Martha C. 

Wright of Vernon, Vt, and have had— 1. Martha C, b. Nov., 1830; 2. 
Mariett, b. Feb., 1832. 



230 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

7. Hiram, b. Feb. 2, 1805; m. Oct., 1825, Cynthia Perry of Northfield, Mass., 

and have had— 1. Joseph, b. July, 1827; 2. Sophia S., b. March 23, 1829; 

3. George, b. Aug. 23, 1831; 4. William, b. April 19, 1834; 5. Alvin, b. 
April 8, 1836; 6. Dwight, b. June 23, 1839; 7. Edward, b. July 7, 1842; 
8. Charles M., b. Oct. 16, 1845; 9. Ithael W., b. Sept. 4, 1848. 

8. Clinton, b. Aug. 8, 1806; d. Oct. 4, 1830, re. 24 y. 1 m. 26 d. 

9. Eliphalet, b. Aug. 21, 1808 ; m. May, 1830, Phebe E. Bolton of Winchester, 

N. H., and have had— 1. Eliza A., b. Aug. 14, 1831 ; 2. Fanny S., b. July 

4. 1835; 3. Alonzo E., b. July 11, 1840; 4. Albert N., b. Feb. 8, 1844; 5. 
Olive C, b. April 21, 1846; 6. Warren G., b. July 31, 1848 ; 7. Ellen M., 
b. Sept. 18, 1851. 

10. Seth, b. Feb. 22, 1810; m. 1, in 1832, Minerva Morse of Winchester, and 

have had— 1. Seth H., b. May 3, 1833; 2. Mary M., b. Sept. 27, 1839. 
His wife Minerva d. July, 1843. He m. 2, Sept. 24, 1844, Z ub ah A. 
Whitaker of Northfield. 3. Zubah S., b. Dec. 7, 1845; 4. Silas W., b. 
Jan. 29, 1850. 

11. Franklin, b. Jan. 4, 1812; m. Feb. 24, 1831, Elizabeth Howard of Winches- 

ter, and have had — 1. Franklin, b. May 15, 1835, d. Dec, 1835 ; 2. Lydia, 
b. Sept. 14, 1836, d. Jan., 1837; 3. Franklin V., b. April 1, 1838; 4. Lydia 
E., b. Nov. 20, 1841 ; 5. Byrona S., b. May 7, 1849. 

12. Sylvanus, b. June 16, 1813; d. Aug. 9, 1814, re. 1 y. 1 m. 23 d. 

13. Jackson, b. Feb. 17, 1815; m. Jan. 14, 1836, Jane Howard of Winchester, 

and have had— 1. Phylinda J., b. Oct. 2, 1836 ; 2. Andrew J., b. Dec. 22, 
1838; 3. Rodney D., b. Nov. 11, 1842; 4. Alfred A., b. June 8, 1846; 

5. Ernest E., b. Aug. 23, 1849. 

14. Phylinda, b. Dec. 15, 1816 ; as yet unmarried, in Hinsdale. 

15. Sophia, b. July 15, 1818 ; m. May 27, 1838, Sariel Howard of Winchester, 

and have had— 1. Lydia S., b. June 22, 1839, d. May, 1841 ; 2 Byron S., b. 
Aug. 23, 1847; 3. Otis D., b. April 14, 1850; 4. Edgar E., b. March 29, 
1852. 

16. Otis, b. April 11, 1821; m. Oct. 14, 1844, Rophelia G. Howard of Win- 

chester, and have Tmogine, b. Feb. 14, 1850. 



273. Phylinda Shattuck, dau. of William, (p. 153,) b. Dec. 
7, 1781, d. at Romulus, Seneca Co., N. Y., April 26, 1843, 88. 61 
y. 4 m. 19 d. 

She m. July 4, 1798, John Stone, who was b. in New Milford, 
Ct., Aug. 25, 1776, and d. at Romulus, Dec. 27, 1838, se. 62 y. 
4 m. 2 d. He was the son of Reuben Stone, b. 1749, and 
Deborah Comstock. b. 1745, (dau. of John Comstock and Deborah 
Welch.) They removed from New Milford to Madrid, St. Law- 
rence Co., N. Y. Reuben Stone was a son of Benajah Stone of 
Branford or Guilford, Ct., who m. Mary Chittenden, a dau. of 
Joseph and Mehitable Chittenden. John Stone emigrated from 
Connecticut in 1797, in company with some of the followers of 



PHYLINDA SHATTUCK. 231 

Jemima Wilkinson, (though he was not a believer in their faith,) 
and took up his residence in a place called Bayleytown, a part 
of Romulus, where he followed the business of boot and shoe 
making until his marriage the next year. He then removed to 
West Cayuga, (now Bridgeport,) Seneca Co., purchased half an 
acre of land, and pursued the business of a tanner until March, 1801. 
The- location proved unhealthy. After suffering much sickness, 
principally from fever and ague, for about two years, he returned 
to Romulus, and settled on a farm, where he spent the remainder 
of his life, and where he was buried in his own family bury- 
ing-ground. On his tomb-stone is the following inscription : — 
"John Stone, died December 27, 1838, aged 62 years 4 months 
and 2 days. — In 1797 he emigrated from Connecticut, removed 
the forest and cultivated his mother earth, surrounding the place 
of his repose for thirty-seven years, comfortably supporting and 
leaving a competence for a numerous family. His regard for 
truth and devotedness to fixed principles based on reason, his 
worth and many virtues, are held in strong remembrance by his 
surviving friends." They had 13 children. 

1. Tyler Comstock, b. May 1, 1799; m. March, 1822, Lydia Doolittle, (see p. 

229.) They reside at South Dansville, Steuben Co., N. Y. Have one dau., 
Mary E., b. 1824, who m. Sept., 1845, Solon Ingals. 

2. Sophia Shattuck, b. Aug. 24, 1801; m. Aug. 13, 1818, John Daniel Coe, b. 

June 12, 1790, at Hampstead, Orange Co., N. Y., (now Ramapo, Rockland 
Co.,) s. of John D. Coe and his cousin Sarah Coe, and a descendant from 
Robert Coe of Suffolk, England. He resides at Romulus, and has had 8 
children— 1. Phylinda Sophia, b. May 15, 1819; 2. Sarah Minerva, b. 
Oct. 6, 1820, m. Feb. 14, 1843, Henry Wicker; 3. Adaline Lucinda, b. 
March 2, 1824; 4. John D. Clement, b. Feb. 22, 1826, m. Sept. 18, 1850, 
Catharine Van Duyn; 5. Amanda Keturah, b. Sept. 11, 1828, m. Dec. 15, 
1852, Aaron Van Natta Brokaw; 6. Schuyler Post, b. Oct. 2, 1832; 7. A 
son b. and d. Sept., 1837 ; 8. Elmer Stone, b. July 2, 1839, d. Aug. 4, 1841. 

3. Ithiel Vernon, b. Feb. 20, 1803; ra. Aug. 21, 1831, Sarah Gurnee, b. March 

8, 1803, dau. of Halsted Gurnee and Hannah Coe of Rockland Co., N. Y. 
He resides at Cuba, Alleghany Co., N. Y., and have had 4 children — 1. 
Ella, b. Aug. 6, 1832 ; 2. Cornelia, b. March 23, 1834 ; 3. Ray, b. Oct. 17, 
1836; 4. Ida, b. July 18, 1840. 

4. A son, unnamed, b. May 29, 1805 ; d. June 9, lb05, a?. 10 d. 

5. Charles Vinson, b. July 7, 1806, and d. at Wheeler, Steuben Co., N. Y., 

March 10, 1841, ee. 34 y. 8 m. 3 d. He m. 1, Feb. 20, 1825, Nancy 
Wickoff, b. Oct. 4, 1808, dau. of Joseph Wickoff and Keziah Fore. She d. 
April 7, 1834, re. 25 y. 6 ra. 3 d. He m. 2, June 17, 1837, Helen Wheeler, b. 
June 17, 1814, dau. of Seth Wheeler and Mary Stone of Wheeler, Steuben 



232 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

Co. She d. April 20, 1840, Be. 25 y. 10 m. 3 d. Mr. Stone had 3 children 
by his 1st, and 2 by his 2d wife— 1. Cyrus Sutton, b. Nov. 21, 1829, d. April 
4, 1834; 2. Edward, b. March 4, 1831, d. April 3, 1834; 3. Nancy, b. Aug. 
3, 1833, m. Feb. 24, 1853, Giles Alderman of Penn Yan, Yates Co. ; 4. 
Helen Wheeler, b. Aug. 17, 1838, d. June 12, 1841; 5. John Charles, b. 
Feb. 29, 1840. His family resided at Wheeler, but were interred with their 
relatives in Romulus. 

6. William Pitt, b. May 24, 1809; d. at Albany, N. Y., March 11, 1842, 83. 32 

y. 9 m. 17 d., and was interred in the family ground in Romulus. He 
resided principally in Ithaca, and was engaged in making and vending 
maps, atlases, &c. At the time of his death he was endeavoring to procure 
the passage of an act to furnish each school district with a state and county 
map. He m. Jan. 31, 1830, Sally Ann Kidder, b. July 2, 1811, dau. of James 
Kidder and Jeanette McCall of Ovid. She d. Nov. 18, 1842, se. 31 y. 4 m. 
16 d. Had 5 children— 1. Frederick Dumont, b. Nov. 24, 1831 ; 2. John 
James, b. Feb. 13, 1834, d. Nov. 10, 1834 ; 3. Ann Olivia, b. Feb. 13, 1836, 
d. July 17, 1836; 4. Sarah Elizabeth, b. March 24, 1838, d. March 28, 
1839; 5. Helen Mary, b. March 21, 1841. 

7. Guy, b. June 11, 1810, and now resides at Cuba, Alleghany Co. He in. Dec. 

27, 1837, Ann Dimon, dau. of Jonathan Dimon and Ann Jennings of Lodi, 
Seneca Co. She d. Nov. 17, 1841, se. 23 y. 8 m. 13 d. One child, Celestia, 
b. Jan., 1840. 

8. Minerva Tamazon, b. Oct. 9, 1813; m. Oct. 17, 1838, Henry McQuigg. Re- 

side in Cass Co., Mich. Have 3 children, Mary, Edgar, and Minerva. 

9. Laura Lucinda, b. Jan. 16, 1816; m. Nov. 16, 1848, Coe Swarthout, b. in 

Romulus, Dec. 20, 1817, son of James Swarthout and Nancy Hunt. They 
live in Romulus, upon the old homestead of her father, John Stone. 

10. Mary Louisa, b. April 17, 1818; m. Oct. 11, 1837, David W. Kinne, b. 

March 24, 1814, s. of Elijah Kinne and Hetty Weisner of Romulus. They 
reside at Romulus, and have 7 children — 1. Minerva, b. July 5, 1838; 2. 
Emi, b. Sept. 23, 1840; 3. Sarah, b. Sept. 16, 1844; 4. Ada, b. March 26, 
1846; 5. Lucy, b. April 28, 1848; 6. Smith, b. July 28, 1850; 7. Walter, 
b. June 28, 1852. 

11. John Reuben, b. June 9, 1820 ; reside at Fayette, Seneca Co. ; m. March 7, 

1849, Emily Caroline Johnson, b. Aug. 23, 1828, dau. of Joseph Johnson 
and Clarissa Hogarth of Romulus. Children — 1. Carlton Baldwin, b. Dec. 
14, 1849; 2. Warren Homer, b. Sept. 21, 1851 ; 3. Eva, b. March 9, 1853, 
d. May 9, 1853. 

12. Phylinda Deborah, b. Sept. 21, 1822; m. July 4, 1842, Cornelius Bodine, b. 

Dec. 30, 1820, s. of Gilbert Bodine and Harriet Swarthout, from Pennsyl- 
vania. He resides in Ovid, Seneca Co. Children — 1. Helen, d. ae. 1 m. ; 

2. Ada, b. March 13, 1844; 3. Guy, b. May 20, 1846; 4. Francis, b. March 

3, 1850. 

13. Warren Montgomery, b. Oct. 4, 1825, resides at Ovid, Seneca Co. 

274. William Shattuck, Esq., s. of William, (p. 153,) was 
b. in Guilford, Vt., Dec. 26, 1784. At the age of 9 years he 
emigrated with his father to Seneca Co., N. Y., then a new 



WILLIAM SHATTUCK GEORGE CLINTON SHATTUCK. 233 

country, and after improving the means of education then at 
command, he studied law and was admitted to the bar. He en- 
gaged in the profession three years In Romulus, and nine years 
in Penn Yan, Yates Co., N. Y. He was appointed master in 
chancery, captain of an artillery company, and had a colonel's 
commission offered him, which he refused. In 1821 he relin- 
quished the profession of law and united with the Friends' So- 
ciety. In 1824 he removed to Steuben Co. ; in 1831 to Warren, 
Pa. ; and in 1842 to Randolph, Cattaraugus Co., where he now 
resides. After the division of the Friends' Society he refused to 
enter his name upon either side. In 1843 he wrote and pub- 
lished a small volume, entitled " Antidote for Infidelity, Supersti- 
tion, Sectarian Bigotry, Violence and Oppression." 

He m. 1, in 1810, Aurilia Bronson, eldest dau. of Thomas 
Bronson of Steuben Co., N. Y. She d. in 1814. 

He m. 2, in 1815, Mary Hart. She d. of consumption in 1822. 

He m. 3, in 1823, Maria Hart, dau. of Armstrong Hart, then 
one of the judges of Franklin Co., Missouri. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY AURILIA BRONSON, BORN IN ROMULUS. 

1. Sabra, b. Nov. 28, 1811 ; m. in 1827, James H. De Golier, who d. in 1837. 

She d. April 7, 1849, se. 37 y. 4 m. 9 d. They left a son Alfred and a dau. 
Aurilia. 

2. Alfred, b. July 3, 1813; d. April 17, 1815, fe. 1 y. 9 m. 14 d. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY MARY HART, BORN IN ROMULUS. 

3. Emma, b. Oct. 6, 1816; d. Oct. 16, 1818, se. 2 y. m. 10 d. 

4. Aurilia,b. Aug.2, 1818; m. in 1833, John Israel, and has three daughters, 

Jane, Maria, and Isabel. 

5. Mary E., b. April 28, 1821 ; m. in 1839, Addison Crowley of Randolph, and 

d. in 1842, leaving Ella and Melvin. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY MARIA HART,, BORN IN . 

6. Sophia, b. Nov. 19, 1823; m. Sept. 10, 185], James Ray of Warren, Pa. 

7. John, b. Dec. 16, 1825; drowned in Alleghany River in 1845. 

8. Susan, b. Jan. 15, 1828. 

9. Lydia E., b. Feb. 7,1830; m. June 17, 1852, Archibald McKollor of 

Elliotville. 

10. AnnM., b. April 21, 1832. 13. Emma, b. Feb. 26, 1842. 

11. Ellen, b. Sept. 9, 1834. 14. Clarey, b. Dec. 15, 1846. 

12. Phylinda, b. Aug. 28, 1836. 15. William, b. July 5,1850. 



275. George Clinton Shattuck, s. of William, (p. 153,) was 

b. near Brattleborough, Vt., Sept. 8, 1786. His name was given 

to him by his father from his regard to George Clinton, Governor 

of New York, for whom he had performed important military ser- 

30 



234 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

vice, on whose account he had suffered, and by whom he had 
been rewarded, (p. 153.) He has been a pioneer settler of the 
West ; and in advance of canals, steamboats and railroad cars. 
In 1817 he left Romulus, N. Y., and settled near Fort Harrison, 
Vigo Co., Indiana. In 1827 he removed to Galena, 111., and 
assisted in raising the first framed house in that town, before it 
had been visited by a steamboat. He was among the first who 
visited Dubuque, Iowa ; became a miner in 1827 ; and subse- 
quently made and lost large sums of money. In 1849 he ex- 
plored some of the eastern counties of Iowa; and finally settled 
in Wawkon village, in Makee township, the county seat of 
Allamakee Co., where he now resides. He was engaged in the 
public defence in the Winnebago Indian war of 1827, and in the 
Black Hawk war of 1832. 

He m. in 1810, Anne Bronson, sister of the first wife of his 
brother William ; and they have had the following children : — 

1. Sophia, b. March 7, 1811 ; m. in 1828, David Seely. 

2. Araminla, b. Jan. 1, 1813; m. in 1830, Ralph Carver. 

3. Phylinda, b. Nov. 16, 1814. 

4. Aurilia, b. April 18, 1816; m. in 1834, George C. Willard. 

5. Clarissa, b. July 10, 1817; m. in 1843, Milton M. Johnson. 
<3. Nelson, b. Nov. 6, 1821 ; m. Sept., 1853, Philena Reed. 

7. Caroline, b. Feb. 4, 1824 ; m. in 1845, Robert Stevenson; d. July 6, 1852. 

8. Monroe, b. March 1, 1826; in Santa Cruz, California, unmarried. 

9. Scott, b. Nov. 20, 1828; m. Nov. 13, 1853, Elizabeth Inman. 

10. Pitt, b. Oct. 7, 1830. 

11. Imogene, b. Feb. 7, 1832; m. Dec, 1852, Benjamin Pitcher. 

12. Minerva, b. Dec. 3, 1834. 



276. Zebina Shattuck, s. of Joseph, (p. 154,) was b. in 
Deerfield, Mass., Jan. 12, 1780; and in 1808 settled as a farmer 
in Cohocton, Steuben Co., N. Y., where he d. of consumption, 
April 25, 1832, ae. 52 y. 3 m. 13 d. 

He m. July 3, 1801, Sarah Barlow, dau. of Samuel B. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY SARAH BARLOW, BORN IN POMPEY AND COHOCTON. 

1. Silas, b. Nov. 10, 1803; m. 1, Oct. 15, 1832, Betsey Smith. She d. Nov. 2, 

1833. He m. 2, May 3, 1835, Mary Smith, sister of Betsey. 

2. Thankful L.,h. Jan. 19, 1806; m. Aug. 16, 1824, Geo. H. Snider of Cohocton. 

3. Stephen L., b. Feb. 4, 1808; m. Dec. 7, 1831, Sarah Ann Higby of Pompey. 

4. Zimri L., b. July 8, 1810 ; m. Oct. 9, 1836, Catharine Snyder of Cohocton. 

She d. in Jackson, Mich., in 1848. 

5. Mtlinda L. b. Nov. 13, 1813 ; m. Jan. 15, 1838, Elmar W. Chaffe of Plymouth, 

Wayne Co., Mich. He d. in Plymouth of consumption, Jan. 4, 1853 ; had, 1. 



CHESTER SHATTUCK ELI SHATTUCK. 235 

Mary Elizabeth, b. Aug. 18, 1840, d. Sept. 23, 1840 ; 2. Albert Wellington, 
b. Aug. 10, ]841 ; 3. Theodore Newbury, b. Oct. 15, 1844, d. Dec. 7, 1844 ; 
4. Theodore Wellington, b. March 24, 1846 ; 5. Alfred Williams, b. June 
16, 1848; 6. Elmore Wadsworth, b. April 18, 1851. 

277. Chester Shattuck, s. of Joseph, (p. 154,) was b. in 
Deerfield, Aug. 17, 1784, and removed with his father about 
1795 to Pompey, Onondaga Co., N. Y., and resided as a farmer 
on Pompey Hill until his death, Dec. 5, 1849, se. 65 y. 3 m. 18 d. 

He m. 1, Feb. 19, 1808, Melinda More. She d. Oct. 9, 1810, 
ten days after the birth of her daughter Melinda, who was b. 
Sept. 29th, and d. Oct. 20, 1810, as. 21 days. 

He m. 2, March 4, 1812, Caroline Beach, b. in Simsbury, Ct., 
Oct. 9, 1789, dau. of James Beach and Sarah Moses. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY CAROLINE BEACH, BORN IN POMPEY. 

1. Melinda More, b. Feb. 1, 1813; d. Dec. 17, 1836, se. 23 y. 10 m. 16 d. 

2. Seraph Seyneda, b. Jan. 1, 1815 ; d. Nov. 12, 1840, ». 25 y. 10 m. 11 d. 

3. Sarepta Serada, b. March 1, 1817. 

4. AlvahAvaih, b. June 19, 1819; m. Dec. 10, 1844, Helen Geraldine Jen- 

nings of Pompey. He is a carpenter in Pompey. Has Charles Leonidas, 
b. Jan. 29, 1846. 

5. Phebe Amarilla, b. Sept. 27, 1821 ; m. Oct. 29, 1849, Henry George Porter 

of La Fayette, now a farmer in Pompey. Has, 1. Frederick D., b. Oct. 
15, 1850; 2. Julia Adel, b. Aug. 3, 1852. 

6. Chester Philetus, b. Dec. 10, 1824 ; m. Dec. 8, 1847, Cordelia Hataling of 

La Fayette. Is a farmer, settled in Williamsville, Elk Co., Pa. Has, 1. 
Frances Ophelia, b. June 6, 1849; 2. Harriet Eliza, b. July 15, 1851. 

7. Caroline Salumith, b. Feb. 8, 1827; m. Sept. 18, 1854, John T. Elliott, a 

teacher in Grand Rapids, Kent Co., Michigan. 

8. Thisby Aihalia, b. Aug. 10, 1829. 

9. Lucina Rebecca, b. May 28, 1832 ; d. Aug. 17, 1852, se. 20 y. 2 m. 19 d. 
10. Cornelia Elizabeth, b. Oct. 6, 1835. 

278. Eli Shattuck, s. of Joseph, (p. 154,) was b. in Deer- 
field, Mass., March 13, 1787. He removed with his father to 
Pompey, N. Y., and resided after his marriage in West Bloom- 
field, Ontario Co., N. Y., following his occupation of a cooper 
until 1835, when he removed to Michigan ; and in 1838 settled 
on a farm in Vernon, Shiawassee Co., four miles north of Byron, 
where he d. Aug. 1. 1853, of inflammation of the lungs, after an 
illness of eight days, bd. 66 y. 4 m. 18 d. He was a volunteer in 
the army in the last war with Great Britain, and was in the bat- 
tle at Black Rock. When Buffalo was burned he was taken 
prisoner, and remained six weeks in Canada, until he was ex- 



236 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

changed for a British subject. He was a worthy man. A cor- 
respondent remarks — " He did honor to his country and to his 
name, and especially to the cause that lay nearest his heart — 
Christianity." 

He m. Sept. 11, 1810, Harriet Murray, b. in Florida, Mont- 
gomery Co., N. Y., July 15, 1784, dan. of Reuben Murray and 
Sarah Knickerbocker, the widow of David Griffin. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY HARRIET MURRAY, BORN IN WEST BLOOMFIELD. 

1. Elias D. W., b. June 9, 1811 ; d. April 3, 1813, se. 1 y. 9 m. 24 d. 

2. Maria, b. Aug. 2, 1812; m. Aug. 20, 1832, Marvin Wilcox of East 

Bloomfield, a farmer, now in Byron, Michigan ; have Mary Elizabeth, b. 
April 30, 1848. 

3. Ann Jennette, b. Nov. 13, 1814; m. Geo. N. Van Volkenburgh of Leb- 

anon, N. Y. 

4. Marcus Joseph, b. May 20, 1818; d. Sept. 25, 1838, as. 20 y. 4 m. 5 d. 

5. Caroline R, b. Mar. 28, 1820 ; d. Dec. 30, 1834, je. 14 y. 9 in. 2 d. 

6. Sarah, b. Aug. 20, 1823 ; d. Sept. 27, 1826, ae. 3 y. 1 m. 7 d. 

7. Elizabeth Ann, b. April 25, 1825 ; d. Jan. 27, 1839, ae. 13 y. 9 m. 2 d. 

8. Sarah A., b. May 31,1828. 



279. Ansel Shattuck, s. of Joseph, (p. 154,) was b. in Deer- 
field, Aug. 10, 1789, and settled in Pompey, Onondaga Co., N. Y., 
where he d. Feb. 8, 1849, as. 59 y. 5 m. 28 d. He was a well- 
to-do farmer, and a contractor for public works. 

He m. Jan. 25, 1809, Rachel Bump of Pompey. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY RACHEL BUMP, BORN IN POMPEY. 

1. Henry, b. Sept. 13, 1811. Resides at Syracuse, and has been constable, dep- 

uty sheriff, colonel in the militia, and otherwise employed in public business. 
He m. 1, Oct. 10, 1831, Mehitable Knapp of Pompey. She d. Jan. 15, 1840. 
He m. 2, Feb. 5, 1842, Sarah Park of La Fayette. Has had, 1. Mary Ann, 
b. Sept. 25, 1832; 2. Cornelia, b. June 10, 1835; 3. Alice, b. June 11, 1843; 
4. Frank, b. Jan. 2, 1851. 

2. Electa, b. Nov. 11, 1812; m. Nov. 25, 1832, Josiah Russell, a millwright of 

Pittsburg, Indiana. Has had, 1. Mary Ann, b. Oct. 25, 1833; 2. Virgil, b. 
Sept. 5, 1845. 

3. Almira, b. Sept. 30, 1815; m. Nov. 20, 1834, Dotus Russell. He is a farmer 

in Otisco, Ionia Co., Mich., and has Henry Ansell, b. Nov. 4, 1845. 

4. Loron, b. Aug. 25, 1817; m. Nov. 1 1, 1842, Lydia Ann Wright. He lives in 

Jamesville, Onondaga Co.; is a farmer and constable. Have had, 1. George 
W., b. Oct. 2, 1843, d. Oct. 18, 1844; 2. Evelyn L., b. April 18, 1846; 3. 
Marion D., b. Dec. 30, 1848. 

5. Chester, b. July 24, 1820. He is a mason in Jamesville ; m. Jan. 20, 1845, 

Maria Hamilton of Manlius. She d. Dec. 23, 1852, leaving dau. Mary 
Adellah, b. March 19, 1849. 

6. Hiram, b. Dec. 13, 1823 ; a farmer of Jamesville. He m. Jan. 13, 1847, 



LUCIUS SHATTUCK ALFRED SHATTUCK. 237 

Phyann Fowlpr of Manlius ; and has had, 1. George A., b. Aug. 7, 1848; 2. 
Frank W., b. March 30, 1853. 

7. Caroline O., b. Sept. 2, 1825; m. April 11, 1849, Alfred Blanchard, of Ceresco, 

Fond Du Lack Co., Wisconsin. Has George, b. Feb. 25, 1850. 

8. Adaline M, b. July 2, 1827: m. Dec. 23, 1846, John Olmstead. 

9. Angeline, b. May 31, 1830 ; m. April 5, 1850, Andrew M. Simonds, a farmer of 

Onondaga. Have had, 1. William, b. Jan. 2, 1851 ; 2. Ida, b. March 25, 1854. 

280. Lucius Shattuck, s. of Joseph, (p. 154,) was b. in Deer- 
field, Oct. 15, 1791; and d. in Cohocton, Steuben Co., N. Y., 
Nov. 20, 1852, ge. 61 y. 1 m. 5 d. He was a shoemaker. He 
was lame, owing to an affection which was first observed when 
twenty-two years old. In other respects he enjoyed good health, 
until the appearance of an abscess on his right hip, which caused 
his death in about eight weeks. He was a democrat in politics, 
and an universalist in religious belief. 

He m. 1, Feb. 6, 1814, Hitty Chamberlin, b. in Litchfield, 
Herkimer Co., N. Y., May 11, 1795, dan. of John Chamberlin of 
JarTrey, and Abigail Nichols of New Ipswich, N. H. She d. in 
Cohocton, July 12, 1847, ae. 52 y. 2 m. 1 d. 

He m. 2, May 5, 1848, Elizabeth Cornell, b. in Jonas, (now 
Tyre,) Seneca Co., N. Y., April 15, 1828, dau. of Simeon Cornell 
and Rhoda Smith. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY HITTY CHAMBERLIN, BORN IN COHOCTON. 

1. Alfred L., b. Dec. 29, 1814 ; m. July 29, 1839, Mary J. Blood. He is a mer- 

chant in Cohocton. Has had three children. 

2. Harriet A, b. March 24, 1817; m. Sept. 8, 1835, Alexander Sayles of Painted 

Post, Steuben Co., N. Y. Have had 7 children. 

3. Samuel N., b. June 17, 1819. He is a farmer in Somerset, Hillsdale Co., 

Michigan; has been twice married, and has had three children. 

4. John &, b. March 23, 1823 ; d. Nov. 5, 1842, re. 19 y. 7 m. 12 d. 

5. Milo H., b. March 7, 1826; d. Oct. 12, 1843, re. 17 y. 7 m. 5 d. 

6. Stephen D.,b. April 5, 1828; m. Dec. 26, 1850, R. A. Mills. He is a mer- 

chant in Cohocton. 

7. Sophia Ann, b. Nov. 29, 1830; d. May 9, 1832, re. 1 y. 5 m. 10 d. 

8. Lorenzo B., b. July 10, 1833. He is a clerk at Painted Post. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ELIZABETH CORNELL, BORN IN COHOCTON. 

9. Florence E., b. March 23, 1849. 10. Frank P., b. Sept. 30, 1852. 



281. Alfred Shattuck, s. of Joseph, (p. 154,) was b. in 
Deerfield, Mass., Aug. 15, 1794, and d. in Plymouth, Wayne Co., 
Michigan, Aug. 13, 1847, se. 53 years. 

He m. at Avoca, Steuben Co., N. Y., May 28, 1820, Sarah V. 
Collyer, b. in Albany, N. Y., Nov. 22, 1799. 



238 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY SARAH V. COLLYER, BORN IN ■ 

1. Franklin S., b. Sept. 17, 1821. 8. Caroline H.,b. Jan. 2, 1832; 

2. Rosamond C, b. Nov. 7, 1822 ; d. May 23, 1832. 

m. Sept. 19, 1852, Wm. Hinsdale. 9. William M., b. April 24, 1834. 

3. Sarah C, b. Feb. 24, 1824. 10. Lucius L., b. Nov. 7, 1836. 

4. Dewitt C, b. Aug. 6,1825. 11. Fletcher K, b. Sept. 1,1838; 

5. Alfred J., b. Nov. 14, 1826. d. Dec. 11, 1838. 

6. Gilbert M., b. May 9, 1828. 12. Ellen A., b. Feb. 1, 1843. 

7. Samuel K, b. Feb. 24, 1830; 

d. Nov. 3, 1850. 



282. Truman Shattuck, s. of Joseph, (p. 154,) was b. in 
Pompey, Onondaga Co., N. Y., April 4, 1798. He first settled 
as a farmer in Cohocton, Steuben Co., but in 1849 removed to 
Jackson, Jackson Co., Michigan, where he now resides. 

He m. Dec. 27, 1821, Huldah Lathrop, b. Nov, 29, 1798. 
dau. of Ichabod Lathrop and Esther Pixley of Pompey. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY HULDAH LATHROP, BORN IN COHOCTON. 

1. Henry D., b. Jan. 5, 1823. 

2. A son, b. Feb. 28, 1825 ; d. in infancy, unnamed. 

3. Harvey S., b. May 3, 1827 ; m. July 5, 1832, Jane Lee of Cohocton, and now 

lives in Jackson, Michigan. 

4. Esther C, b. March 25, 1832. 



283. Oliver Shattuck, s. of Oliver, (p. 154,) was b. in 
Deerfield. May 11, 1778, and now resides in Hawley. 

He m. Sept. 23, 1803, Phebe Bangs. She d. in Springfield. 
Sept. 25, 1845, se. 65. Desire Bangs, the United States pensioner 
in 1840, at Springfield, was her mother. They had two children 
that d. in infancy. 

284. Polly Shattuck, dau. of Oliver, (p. 154,) was b. in Deer- 
field, Sept. 19, 1781, where she d. Jan. 9, 1844, ae. 62 y. 3 m. 20 d. 

She m. May 23, 1804, Oliver Patch, a farmer in Hawley, b. in 
Groton, Nov. 30, 1778, s. of Oliver Patch and Alathea Blood, dau. 
of Silas Blood. Oliver, senior, was s. of Ebenezer Patch and 
Sarah Wright, (p. 144.) He was wounded in his right shoulder 
in the battle of Bunker Hill. 

HER CHILDREN, BY OLIVER PATCH, BORN IN HAWLEY. 

1. Lucy Longley, b. Sept. 3, 1805; m. April 27, 1837, Leonard Strong, b. Feb. 4, 

1807, s. of William Strong, who d. April 12, 1849, se. 87, and Rhoda Skinner, 
who d. April 5, 1853, ce. 83. They have Joseph William, b. Sept. 15, 1840. 

2. Henry, b. Nov. 1, 1800 ; m. April 19, 1829, Dolly D. Stearns, b. Jan. 21, 1800. 

He d. in Lowell, Jan. 4, 1849, re. 42 y. 2 m. 3 d. Had Lucy Ann, b. Aug. 
19, 1836, and two that d. in infancy. 



JUSTUS SHATTUCK. 239 

3. Fidelio, b. Feb. 14, 1808; m. Nov. 9, 1834, Jane Wilson. He removed in 

1833 to Gambia, Ohio, and in 183G to Columbus, where he d. June 1, 1836, 
sb. 28 y. 3 m. 17 d. 

4. Electa Shattuck, b. July 23, 1810; m. Oct. 17, 1837, David Strong, s. of David 

Strong and Esther Thayer, and a descendant of Elder John Strong-, one of 
the first settlers of Northampton. Have had, 1. Henry George, b. March 3, 
1839; 2. Melvin Holbrook, b. June 19, 1841 ; 3. Caroline Eliza, b. April 26, 
1847. 

5. Franklin, b. July 3, 1815; m. Jan, 19, 1843, Ann Brown, b. July 4, 1819, dau. 

of John Brown and Hannah Mayo of Eastham. He settled in Boston as a 
carpenter in 1836, but his dwelling-house is in West Medford. Have had, 
1. Emerette Ophelia, b. March 8, 1844; 2. Herbert Llewellyn, b. Oct. 16, 
1845, d. Nov. 10, 1847; 3. Charles Albert, b. Oct. 1, 1848, d. Dec. 4, 1848; 
4. Oscar Llewellyn, b. Jan. 13, 1852. 



285. Justus Shattuck, s. of Oliver, (p. 154,) was b. in Deer- 
field, March 1, 1783. He was a clothier, and first settled in Deer- 
field, but about 1822 removed to Hamilton, Madison Co., N. Y. ; 
and subsequently to Norwich, Chenango Co., where he d. Dec. 
28, 1834, se. 51 y. 9 m. 27 d. 

He m. Sept., 1805, Polly Robinson, b. Feb. 14, 1786, dau. of 
Jeremiah Robinson and Martha Ford. She d. Sept. 29, 1839, 
ae. 53 y. 7 m. 15 d. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY POLLY ROBINSON, BORN IN PLAINFIELD AND HAMILTON. 

1. Einily, b. April 22, 1807 ; d. in Hamilton, Jan. 27, 1834, se. 26 y. 9 m. 5 d. 

She m. Jan. 1, 1830, Calvin Sawday, b. March 6, 1809, by whom she had 
Burdet Wesley, b. Jan. 27, 1832. He m. 2d wife. 

2. Clarissa R., b. May 4, 1809; m. March 6, 1827, James W. Partridge, b. 

Oct. 12, 1804, s. of Joseph P. and Lucy Niles. He first settled in Lebanon, 
Madison Co., N. Y., but removed to Georgetown, same Co., and now resides 
there. Have had, 1. Emily M., b. Jan. 25, 1829, m. Jan. 1, 1850, Josiah 
Hay ward of Georgetown ; 2. Deette O., b. April 27, 1838. 

3. Lucy Longley, b. June 9, 1811 ; m. Oct. 28, 1829, Sherman W. Sawday, b. 

March 10, 1805, brother of Calvin. He is a blacksmith in Poolville, in 
Hamilton, Madison Co. They have had, 1. Venilia D.,b. Aug. 19, 1831, d. 
Aug. 23, 1835; 2. William E., b. March 5, 1834, d. April 2, 1834; 3. 
Delphurnia V., b. April 21, 1835; 4. Imogene C, b. Nov. 5, 1840; 5. 
Latimar L., b. Sept. 18, 1842. 

4. Venilia, b. Aug. 28, 1813; m. March 20, 1833, Rollin Colson, b. Dec. 13, 

1807, s. of Ebenezer Colson and Lovina Packard of Hamilton. He is a 
blacksmith in Poolville. Have Sarah Sophia, b. March 29, 1838. 

5. Mary, b. March 19, 1816; m. Jan. 31, 1843, Alonzo Snow, b. Feb. 14, 1815. 

6. Sarah Ann, b. May 23, 1819; m. Oct. 13, 1841, Justus Swift, b. March 8, 

1819, a farmer of Lebanon. Have Charles La Grand, b. March 17, 1850. 

7. William Justus, b. Aug. 31, 1822. He first settled in Boston, but removed to 

Plainfield, where he now resides as a farmer. He m. April 4, 1848, Laura 



240 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

O. Pratt, b. Sept. 4, 1827. They have had, 1. Orlo W., b. June 20, 1849 ; 
2. Ella A., b. July 5, 1852. 

8. James F, b. June 26, 1824; m. Sept. 19, 1848, Lucinda A. Eaton, b. Oct. 

16, 1827, dau. of Nathan Eaton and Charlotte Edson of Poolville. Have 
Orville Ambrose, b. Oct. 13, 1850. 

9. Orville J, b. Aug. 19, 1826. Unmarried. Returned in 1852 from California. 

10. Alberto C, b. Nov. 2, 1828; d. of lung fever at Plainfield, Oct. 15, 1852. 

He m. Jan. 1, 1852, Florilla D. Warner, b. Feb. 11, 1830, and had Alberto, 
b. Dec. 22, 1852. 

11. Harriet D., b. May 10, 1833. 

286. Pliny Shattuck, s. of Oliver, (p. 154,) was b. in Deer- 
field, Dec. 8, 1784. He was bred a blacksmith, and first settled 
in Whitingham, Vt., but in 1831 removed to Cherry Creek, Chau- 
tauque Co., N. Y., where he d. of pleurisy, Oct. 25, 1845, se. 60 
y. 10 m. 17 d. 

He m. Oct. 8, 1807, Dolly Houghton Rice, b. Oct.' 17, 1785, 
dau. of Samuel Rice of Claremont, Franklin Co., Mass. She d. 
at Cherry Creek, Sept. 18, 1847, ee. 61 y. 11 m. 1 d. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY DOLLY HOUGHTON RICE, BORN IN WHITINGHAM. 

1. Jerome B., b. March 11, 1809; m. Aug. 5, 1832, Orpha Rush of Cherry Creek ; 

settled as a blacksmith in Pine Grove, Pa., where he d. of consumption, Aug. 
20, 1841. Had, 1. William Wallace; 2. Henry; 3. George. 

2. Dolly H., b. Aug. 20, 1810; m. Aug. 28, 1831, Jonathan James. He d. in 

Cherry Creek, Nov. 18, 1851, ee. 41 y., without issue. He was a physician in 
Cherry Creek. 

3. Oliver Martin, b. Feb. 26, 1812; m. June J9, 1841, Sabina Racy of Cherry 

Creek. 

4. Frederick Augustus Simms, b. Dec. 22, 1813. He is a farmer in Cherry Creek ; 

m. Sept. 15, 1839, Mary Ann Racy, b. Jan. 13, 1817, sister to his brother's 
wife. They have had, 1. Samuel, b. Nov. 13, 1839; 2. Everett, b. Feb. 15, 
1841; 3. Lucius Henry, b. Oct. 10, 1843, d. Dec. 10, 1843; 4. Henry, b. 
March 7, 1845 ; 5. Charles, b. March 6, 1847 ; 6. Clarinda, b. Sept. 26, 1848 ; 
7. Harriet, b. May 16, 1850; 8. Alburtus, b. Jan. 4, 1852. 

5. Lawrence Eugene, b. July 16, 1816; a farmer in Cherry Creek; m. April 13, 

1836, Angeline A. Ames, b. Feb. 26, 1817; and they have, 1. Lawrence E., 
b. April 11,1838; 2. Lydia F., b. Sept. 7, 1839; 3. Jerome B., b. March 27, 
1841 ; 4. Amy A., b. Feb. 10, 1843; 5. Roselle, b. Nov. 12, 1852. 

6. Lucy Parker, b. Nov. 7, 1818 ; m. May 27, 1838, Pearl C. Kimball. He is a 

carriage-maker, and first settled in Cherry Creek, but in 1847 removed to 
Jamestown. Have had, 1. Sarah Matilda, b. May 16, 1841 ; 2. Alice Caro- 
line, b. Oct. 1, 1845; 3. Maurice P., b. July 22, 1848; 4. Frank, b. Aug. 
17, 1852. 

7. Harriet Augusta, b. July 3, 1822; m. Oct. 26, 1848, Kimberly Davis of Stock- 

ton, where he resides as a farmer. Has Eunice Theresa, b. Nov. 19, 1849. 

8. Philemon Rice, b. June 5, 1824; m. Oct. 21, 1852, Phebe A. Pickett of 

Stockton, where he resides as a farmer. 



HENRY SHATTUCK HARRIET SHATTUCK. 241 

2S7. Henry Shattuck, s. of Oliver, (p. 154,) was b. in Deer- 
field, May 13, 1786, where he resided as a farmer until 1833, 
when he removed to Amherst, where he d. June 22, 1851, se. 65 
y. 1 m. 9 d. 

He m. 1, Oct. 13, 1811, Olive P. Turner, b. in Charlestown. 
Mass., Aug. 30, 1790, dau. of Micah Turner and Mary Pratt. 
She d. in Deerfield, Oct. 4, 1828, se. 38 y. 1 m. 4 d. 

He m. 2, May 21, 1829, Tirza Porter, b. in Weymouth, July 
9, 1798, dau. of Samuel Porter and Mary White. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY OLIVE P. TURNER, BORN IN OEKRFIELD. 

1. Harriet, b. May 20, 1812; d. Dec. 27, 1812, a>.7ra.7 d. 

2. Harriet, b. Feb. 5, 1814 ; m. Nov. 30, 1837, Calvin Russell, b. in Hadley, Sept. 

18, 1812. He is a trader in Montague. 

3. Levi Hubbard, b. Sept. 1, 1816, in Fayston, Vt. ; resides in Corning, Steuben 

Co., N. Y., as Superintendent of the Tioga Railroad. He m. Oct. 6, 1841, 
Sarah L. Pack, b. Aug. 29, 1822, dau. of Hezekiah and Abigail Pack. 
They have had, 1. Amelia Jane, b. July 25, 1842, d. Feb. 21, 1844 ; 2. Mary 
Ann, b. June 27, 1844 ; 3. Emma Jane, b. March 1, 1847; 4. Henry F., b. 
Sept. 5, 1848 ; 5. Sarah Ida, b. Feb. 23, lb55. 

4. Mary Ann, b. April 30, 1820 ; m. April 8, 1847, Charles N. M. Lincoln, b. 

Aug. 29, 1822, s. of Charles Lincoln, Jr. and Martha B. Minott. He is a teller 
in the Merchants Bank in Boston. 

5. Joseph Henry, b. Sept. 16, 1825 ; m. April 5, 1849, Elizabeth A. Cutter, b. 

Oct. 31, 1825, dau. of Elim Cutter and Mary Gaylord. He is a farmer in 
Hadley, and has had, 1. Charles Lincoln, b. March 15, 1850; 2. Calvin 
Russell, b. Oct. 9, 1852. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY TIRZA PORTER, BORN IN DEERFIELD AND AMHERST. 

6. Olive, b. Feb. 5, 1833 ; d. April 2, 1833, 33. 1 m. 27 d. 

7. Edwin White, b. Aug. 12, 1834. 

8. Ellen Maria, b. Dec. 16, 1842 ; d. April 4, 1843, as. 3 m. 28 d. 



288. Harriet Shattuck, twin with Henry, dau. of Oliver, 
(p. 154,) was b. in Deerfield, May 13, 1786, and now (1853) 
resides in Richmond, Richmond Co., N. Y. 

She m. 1, Jan. 5, 1808, Luther Longley, b. Aug. 15, 1785. 
He d. in Hawley, June 12, 1832, se. 46 y. 9 m. 27 d. 

She m. 2, March 27, 1835, Alexander Ward. He d. March 
12, 1841. 

She m. 3, Oct. 20, 1848, Justin Allis, a wealthy farmer, 

HER CHILDREN, ALL BY LUTHER LONGLEY, BORN IN HAWLEY- 

1. Calvin S., b. Nov. 20, 1809; m. Sept. 1, 1832, Eliza Joy, h. Deo. 11, 1810. 

They reside in Hawley, and have had, 1. Ann Eliza, h. April 23, 1833; 2. 

Sylvia H., b. Sept. 30, 1835 ; 3. Persis W., b. Sept. 18, 1837, d. Dec. 20, 1837 ; 

4. A son, unnamed, b. April 19, 1839, d. same day ; 5. A son, unnamed, b, 

31 



242 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

July 10, 1840, d. July 22, 1840; 6. Caroline E., b. Dec. 15, 1842; 7. Julia 
M., b. July 6, 1845. 

2. A daughter, b. March 25. 1812 ; d. unnamed, March 27, 1812, a?. 2 d. 

3. Luther, b. May 5, 1814; resides in Sterling, Cayuga Co., N. Y. ; m. 1, Nov. 

18, 1837, Caroline Streeter. She d. May 13, 1839, without issue. He m. 2, 
Oct. 9, 1841, Elizabeth McDougle, and has had, 1. James Luther, b. Sept. 
6, 1843, d. April 12, 1845; 2. Oscar Eugene, b. Jan. 3, 184G. 

4. Alice L., b. Aug. 3, 1816. 

5. Harriet M, b. July 9, 1818. 

6. Oliver S., b. July 30, 1820 ; resides in Cummington ; m. Nov. 26, 1844, Eliza- 

beth Mechins, b. May 12, J827. They have had, 1. Sarah Jane, b. Aug. 
12, 1846; 2. Charles Luther, b. May 12, 1849, d. Aug. 12, 1852. 

7. Samuel N., b. Feb. 9, 1823; resides in East Hampton; m. Aug. 22, 1849, 

Harriet M. Bassett, and has had, 1. Alice M., b. Oct. 15, 1850; 2. Martha B., 
b. Jan. 23, 1853. 

8. Olivia R., b. May 13, 1825 ; rn. Oct. 6, 1842, Usal Bisbee of Cummington, b. 

Sept, 11, 1818, and has had, 1. Hariet L., b. Jan. 8, 1846; 2. Rhoda A., b. 
Aug. 9, 1849. 

9. Emily L., b. March 3, 1828. 



289. Electa Shattuck, dau. of Oliver, (p. 154,) was b. in 
Hawley, July 5, 1788, and now resides in that town. 

She m. July 3, 1817, Capt. John King, b. Aug. 5, 1782, s. of 
John King and Mercy Vincent. He was a farmer in Hawley, 
where he d. Dec. 12, 1850. Rev. Jonas King, missionary to 
Greece, was his nephew; for whose college education Capt. King 
became responsible. He, however, struggled through without 
much assistance from his uncle. 

HER CHILDREN, BY JOHN KING, BORN IN HAWLEY. 

1. A daughter, b. July 24, 1818; d. unnamed, July 25, 1818, se. 1 d. 

2. Electa, b. March 6, 1820; m. May 8, 1838, Jonathan Ward, b. Feb. 4, 1814, 

s. of Jonathan Ward and Susanna Taylor. They reside in Geneva, Wal- 
worth Co., Wis., and have had, 1. Catharine, b. Aug. 15, 1839, d. Aug. 17, 
1839; 2. Mary Electa, b. Nov. 22, 1841; 3. Samuel Franklin, b. Jan. 10, 
1844, d. Dec. 20, 1846; 4. John King, b. Sept. 24, 1845, d. April 14, 1846; 
5. Thera Adalaide, b. Sept. 14, 1847, d. March 23, 1849; 6. Emeline Eliza- 
beth, b. July 15, 1849; 7. Jonathan Taylor, b. July 20, 1851. 

3. Thera Shattuck, b. Oct. 3, 1822 ; m. Oct. 12, 1842, Jonas Holden, b. May 27, 

1816, s. of Levi Holden and Mary Longley ; a farmer in Hawley. They 
have had, 1. Sarah Eldridge, b. Dec. 28, 1845; 2. Mary Jenette, b. March 
1, 1848, d. Aug. 22, 1851. 

4. John Vincent, b. June 30, 1823. 

5. A daughter, b. July 24, 1825; d. unnamed, the same day. 

6. Mary Patch, b. June 24, 1827. 



290. Calvin Shattuck, s. of Oliver, (p. 154,) was b. in Haw- 
ley, July 30, 1790, and has resided in Springfield. 



CALVIN SHATTUCK LUCY BARRON SHATTUCK. 243 

He m. ill Ludlow, March 10, 1818. Betsey Sprague, b. in 
Andover, Ct., July 16, 1798, dau. of Daniel Sprague and Betsey- 
Porter. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY BETSEY SPRAGUE, BORN IN SPRINGFIELD. 

1. A daughter, b. Dec. 30, 1818; d. unnamed, Jan. 1, 1819, re. 2 d. 

2. Elizabeth, b. Mar. 5, 1820 ; m. in Springfield, July 11, 1843, Artemas 

Bi^elow, s. of Hopestill Bigelow and Charlotte Bates. He graduated at the 
Wesleyan University, Middletown, Ct., in 1838, and has since been Pro- 
fessor of Natural Science in the Wesleyan Institute, Newark, N. J. A val- 
uable contribution from iiis pen appears in Silliman's Journal for March, 
1853. They have had, 1. Frank Rolstone, b. Feb. 12, 1847 ; 2. Mary Eliza- 
beth, b. April 4, 1849. 

2. Calvin Sprague, b. Sept. 8, 1822. He graduated at the Oneida Institute in 

1844 ; studied theology at the Lane and Auburn Seminaries ; graduated at 
the latter in 1848; ordained as an evangelist at Lisle, Broome Co., N. Y., 
Oct. 1, 1849; and has been pastor of the Orthodox Congregational Church 
in Union Village, Washington Co., since Nov. 4, 1850. 

3. Emily Caroline, b. May 14, 1824; m. in Springfield, Oct. 6, 1846, Frank 

Forbes Battles, s. of Joseph Battles and Judith Baxter French. 

4. Lucius Allis, b. July 14, 1826. He was a clerk in Boston, but in 1854 be- 

came cashier of a bank in Madison, Wisconsin. 

5. William Porter, b. March 8, 1829; d. Nov. 8, 1831, re. 2 y. 8 m. 

6. Porter Sprague, b. Nov. 16,1831. 

7. Frederick Reynolds, b. Mar. 14, 1833. 

8. William, b. May 5, 1836. 



DESCKXDASITS OF T1SE IiSTTLJETOitf BRANCHES. 

291. Lucy Barron Shattuck, dau. of Dr. Benjamin, (p. 156,) 
was b. in Templeton, April 10, 1774 ; and now (1854) resides 
with Dr. White, her son-in-law, in Watertown, N. Y. 

She m. July 19, 1796, Dr. Josiah Howe, b. in Milton, March 
19, 1771, s. of Lemuel Howe and Joanna Richards. He studied 
medicine with Dr. Shattuck, and settled in Templeton, where he 
became eminent in his profession, and where he d. Jan, 24, 1843, 
as. 71 y. 10 m. 5 d. 

HER CHILDREN, BY JOSIAH HOWE, BORN IN TEMPLETON. 

1. Josiah, b. April 23, 1797; d. June 17, 1808, re. 11 y. 1 m. 24 d. 

2. Benjamin S., b. Aug. 7, 1799; d. Sept. 17, 1825, re. 26 y. 1 m. 10 d. 

3. Lemuel Barron, b. May 25, 1802; m. Jan. 1, 1828, Ruth Ann Richardson, 

and had, 1. Lucy Barron, and 2. Catharine M., twins, b. Sept. 19, 1831 ; 3. 
Ann Richardson, b. May 10, 1838. 

4. Lucy Barron, b. Aug. 28, 1806 ; m. Dec. 4, 1827, Dr. John White. He lived 

in Westminster, where he was born, until 1852, when he removed to Water- 
town, Jefferson Co., N. Y., where he now resides. Has had, 1. Mary Lane, 
d. ; 2. Lucy Shattuck, d. ; 3. John Lane ; 4. Ellen Richards ; 5. Josiah Howe ; 
6. Mary Miles ; 7. Charles Hudson ; 8. Abby Matilda. 



244 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

5. Rebecca Elizabeth, b. Sept. 8, 1809; m. May, 1835, Rev. Samuel W. Clarke, 

and now resides in Amherst, N. H. 

6. Josiah, b. June 27, 1812; graduated at Dartmouth College in 1832, and at the 

Law School at Harvard in 1836; and is now settled in his profession in the 
city of New York. 

7. George Cheyne, b. Aug. 20, 1815 ; m. Dec. 25, 1838, Mary Ann Buttrick of 

Templeton. No children. 

292. Jonathan Shattuck, s. of Dr. Benjamin, (p. 157,) was 
b. in Templeton, March 11, 1779. He is a farmer, and first 
settled in Warren, Yt., where he lived several years, but after- 
wards returned to the paternal homestead in his native town, 
where he now resides. 

He m. in Templeton, Feb. 22, 1803, Betsey Richardson, b. 
in 1782, dau. of Capt. John Richardson and Rebecca Moore. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY REBF.CCA RICHARDSON, BORN IN WARREN. 

1. Lucy Barron, b. Nov. 26, 1803. 

2. Rebecca Moore, b. April 9, 1806. 

3. Betsey Richardson, b. July 12, 1808 ; d. April 9, 1809, re. 8 m. 27 d. 

4. Betsey Richardson, b. Feb. 2, 1810 ; d. Dec. 14, 1812, ae. 2 y. 10 m. 12 d. 

5. Lydia Richardson, b. Dec. 7, 1812. 

6. Martha Washington, b. Dec. 5, 1815; d. Jan. 31, 1821, re. 5 y. 1 m. 26 d. 

7. Eliz. Cheever Davis, b. Dec. 1, 1818. 

8. Jonathan Benjamin, b. Jan. 11, 1821 ; d. March 20, 1831, re. 10 y. 2 m. 9 d. 

293. Dr. George Cheyne Shattuck. s. of Dr. Benjamin Shat- 
tuck, (p. 157,) was b. in Templeton, July 17, 1783 ; and d. of a dis- 
ease of the heart, at his residence in Boston, corner of Cambridge 
and Staniford streets, March 18, 1854, ae. 70 y. 8 m. 1 d., — eminent 
for his professional skill, and for his munificent public and pri- 
vate charities. 

He was graduated at Dartmouth College in 1803 ; and received 
from that institution, in due course, the degree of Master of Arts, 
and in 1806 that of Doctor of Medicine. He also received a 
medical degree from Harvard College, and one from the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania in 1807. Immediately after, he settled in 
Boston, where he soon obtained an extensive practice in his pro- 
fession. In 1853 the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws was 
conferred upon him by Dartmouth College. 

Public office was distasteful to Dr. Shattuck, yet he was chosen 
one of the consulting physicians of the city of Boston at the first 
creation of the office in 1833, and was reelected annually until 
his death. He was president of the Massachusetts Medical So- 



GEORGE CHEYNE SHATTUCK. 245 

ciety four years — 1836 to 1839 inclusive ; and he presided over 
the American Statistical Association six years — 1845 to 1851. 

In 1806 he wrote a Dissertation on Mortification ; and, in 1807, 
two other Dissertations, one on the Structure and Pathology of 
the Skin, and the other on Biliary Concretions. Each of these 
dissertations obtained one of the Boylston Medical Prizes, and 
aided much in establishing his reputation as a scholar and a 
learned physician. In 1808 they were published together in a 
volume. In 1828 he delivered the Annual Address before the 
Massachusetts Medical Society, which was published in their 
Transactions. These were his most important printed works. 
He did not aspire to authorship, yet he was willing to encourage 
others in their literary labors. In 1836 he published at his own 
expense a volume of original medical dissertations by distin- 
guished physicians, and gave a copy to each member of the Mas- 
sachusetts Medical Society. And in various other ways he was 
a most liberal patron of literature and science. The following 
extracts from an interesting letter of Ira Young, Professor of 
Natural Philosophy and Astronomy in Dartmouth College, dated 
July 13, 1854, relate to his benefactions to that institution : — 

" His contributions to the College in various ways have been 
frequent, and very liberal, amounting in the aggregate to a sum 
probably not less than $12,000. On the subscription list of 1827 
for raising $50,000, his name stands against $500, and in the en- 
deavor in 1842 to raise $30,000, he gave $500 more. 

"In 1835-6 he presented the portraits of the defenders of the 
College Charter, — Hon. Jeremiah Mason, Jeremiah Smith, Daniel 
Webster, and Joseph Hopkinson ; and a few days before his 
decease, added that of the Hon. Rufus Choate. These portraits 
are all by distinguished artists, and are conspicuous ornaments to 
our College Library. 

" His donations of books to the Library have been numerous, 
and many of them highly valuable. In addition to occasional 
presents of single volumes, and the writings of such men as John 
Adams and Daniel Webster, he gave in 1822, (in connection with 
Stephen Beane, Esq.,) several volumes of Foreign, Mathematical, 
and Astronomical works, including some of the more important 
writings of Euler, Lagrange, Lacroix, Lalande, and Laplace. 
In 1852 and 1853 he gave for the purchase of books, to be used 



246 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

by the officers of the College, the sum of $2,050, of which 
$1,200 was for the department of Natural Philosophy and Astron- 
omy, and $850 for that of the Latin Language and Literature. 
This donation was in connection with a similar one from the 
Rev. Roswell ShurtlerT, D. D., of $1,100 for the department of 
Intellectual and Moral Philosophy, and Political Economy. In 
addition to this, he also contributed $100 for the payment of 
books previously purchased for the Library, in Europe. 

"In the autumn of 1852 he made the munificent donation of 
$7,000, on the condition that the Trustees of the College would 
furnish the additional means of fully carrying out the objects 
which he proposed, requiring, according to estimate, an expendi- 
ture of about $11,000. These were, the erection of an Astro- 
nomical Observatory, the furnishing it with the requisite instru- 
ments, the purchase of additional Philosophical Apparatus, and 
the sending an agent to Europe to procure the books and instru- 
ments above mentioned. 

" Of the Observatory, he is the founder, inasmuch as the 
$7,000 just covers the estimated expense of the building and 
instruments, excepting the Equatorial Telescope, with its ap- 
purtenances, which had been previously purchased. Although 
he peremptorily refused to have it named the Shattuck Observa- 
tory, still, as may be seen by one of the accompanying resolu- 
tions of the Trustees, his name will be permanently associated 
with the building, its instruments, and, I may add, with its 
Library. * 

"It is worthy of remark, that all the above donations, with 
the exception of the two subscriptions of $500 each, were unso- 

* All of these donations were duly acknowledged in the Proceedings of the Trustees. The 
following is a copy of their Resolves, passed Dec. 23, 1852, relating to the donation for the 
Observatory : — 

" Resolved, That the Board of Trustees receive with profound gratitude the donation of Dr. 
George C. Shattuck of Boston, of seven thousand dollars, for the purpose of erecting an Observ- 
atory and the purchase of Instruments ; and also a donation of one thousand dollars, in addition 
to his previous donation, for the purchase of books for the Library 5 and that they tender to him 
their warmest acknowledgments for this renewed evidence of his devotion to the interests of 
science, and of his attachment to his Alma Mater. 

" Resolved, That a suitable tablet be placed in a conspicuous part of the Observatory, with an 
inscription which shall show by whose bounty it was erected, and serve as a public record of the 
munificence of the distinguished donor; and that his name be inscribed upon any instruments 
that may be purchased with the balance of his donation. 

" Resolved, That the Trustees hereby engage fully to carry out the objects of the donations as 
specified in the letter of the Hon. John Aiken to President Lord, and the Letters of Professor 
Young to Dr. Shattuck : — That the Prudential Committee make such preparation as may be 
necessary for the erection of the Observatory as directed by Dr. Shattuck ; and that Professor 
Young be requested to proceed to Europe as soon as arrangements can be made to purchase 
the instruments, and such books as Dr. Shattuck and Dr. Shurlleff shall direct." 



GEORGE CHEYNE SHATTUCK. 247 

licitecl by the College, being the spontaneous offerings of the mu- 
nificent donor." 

His donations to Harvard College at different times were over 
$26,000. In 1844 he gave $100 for the purchase of the Mineral 
Cabinet ; in 1846 and 1851, $200 to the Observatory ; in 1847, 
$500 for the New Medical College ; in 1853, $500 for Professor 
Agassiz' Collection; and other sums at other times. In 1853 he 
gave seven shares in the Stark Mills in Manchester, N. H., and 
seven shares in the Atlantic Mills in Lawrence, both together 
valued at $14,000, the income of which is to be appropriated for 
the support of a Professor of Pathological Anatomy in the Medi- 
cal Department of the College. And in his will he bequeathed 
to the Trustees of the College twenty shares in the Cocheco 
Manufacturing Company, valued at over $10,000, "for the ben- 
efit of such persons of superior merit, pursuing their studies at 
said College (graduates or undergraduates,) as in their opinion 
may require and deserve assistance in the study of Mathematics 
or any of its branches, or in the study of Languages, or either of 
them." This bequest has been set apart by the Trustees to 
constitute four Scholarships, and denominated " Shattuck Schol- 
arships."* 

To aid the Boston Athenaeum in placing it upon its present 
foundation he paid at different times $5,500. The cost of the 
shares in that institution is $300 each. He subscribed for one 
share for himself, and for four shares which he presented to other 
persons. Jan. 17, 1854, he gave five shares to the town of Little- 
ton, and five to the town of Templeton, in token of his remem- 
brance of the birth-places of his father and himself. These 
shares are to be forever held in trust for the following purposes : — 
" That the selectmen of said two towns respectively, and their 
successors for the time being, shall permit the use of their five 
shares respectively, from year to year, by any one five persons 
resident in said towns respectively, to be selected by them from 
the classes of clergymen, physicians, lawyers, teachers, and sci- 
entific farmers and mechanics, it being understood that the said 
shares themselves are to be forever inalienable." In addition to 
the cost of the shares, he anticipated the annual assessment of 

* The income of this fund was first appropriated in 1854, and the first beneficiaries were 
two members of the senior class, and two of the sophomore class. 



248 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

$5 on each share by the payment in advance of an additional 
$1,000, thus securing the permanent right to each of those shares 
to take books from the library. Dr. Shattuck had previously 
offered to found a library in each of these towns, provided a fire- 
proof building for its accommodation should be erected. This 
not meeting with the ready concurrence of the inhabitants, the 
alternative above described was adopted. 

In his will he bequeathed one share of the Cocheco stock, or 
over $500, to each of the following eleven objects, amounting in 
the aggregate to more than $5,500 : — Howard Benevolent So- 
ciety ; Boston Female Asylum ; Boston Asylum and Farm School ; 
Boston Children's Friend Society ; American Board of Commis- 
sioners for Foreign Missions ; Benevolent Fraternity of Churches ; 
American Education Society ; American Statistical Association ; 
American Academy of Arts and Sciences ; West Boston Religious 
Society ; and the Roman Catholic Bishop of Boston. The last 
item is expressed to be " in token of my sense of the great in- 
justice done by the unindemnined destruction of the Ursuline 
Convent at Charlestown, a charitable institution, which was de- 
voted to objects of benevolence and the cause of education." 
He also bequeathed the income of his other manufacturing stocks 
for three years, in equal shares, to the three following societies, 
supposed to be worth to them more than $30,000, or $10,000 
each : — One third to the Massachusetts Medical Society ; one 
third to the Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Association ; and 
one third to the Massachusetts Agricultural Society. These are 
specimens of his more public charities. Yery many other insti- 
tutions were also the recipients of his bounty in his life-time. 

From a brief Memoir of Dr. Shattuck by Dr. Edward Jarvis of 
Dorchester, once a student in his office, read before the American 
Statistical Association, and published in their Transactions, we 
make the following extracts as illustrations of his character : — 

" He commenced the active practice of his profession in Bos- 
ton in 1807. He immediately gained acquaintances, and these 
soon became friends. He was early admitted to the confidence 
of many families, and was employed by a circle of warm sup- 
porters. These multiplied year after year, until, at an earlier 
period than usually falls to the lot of even the favored, he 
found himself on the high tide of professional success. He was 



GEORGE CHEYNE SHATTUCK. 249 

then established in full employment, and was among the most 
extensive and laborious practitioners of medicine in Boston. 
Being incessantly called upon, he gave all his powers of body 
and mind to the visitation and care of the sick ; and through 
every season, by day and by night, he was at the service of the 
world, of every class and grade of society, — among the favored 
of fortune, among the cultivated and the high-minded, among 
the beloved of many friends, among the poor, the destitute, even 
among the abandoned and dissolute, those who had none to love 
them, and whose worst enemies were their own selves, — among 
all these he went about doing good, healing their diseases, ad- 
ministering comfort, and relieving want where that existed. 

"Dr. Shattuck was a very popular physician in this city, and 
had an extensive reputation in the country. Yery many sought 
his advice from other and distant towns, and his success in the 
management of disease sustained the good name which drew 
so many to him. He was a student of books, when he had 
leisure to attend to them. He had large opportunities of ob- 
serving the phenomena of the disordered system. He did not, 
however, aim at the highest scholarship in the science of his 
calling, nor at the most thoroughly disciplined exactness in his 
investigations of morbid symptoms ; but he had a rare tact and 
great knowledge of mankind, and seemed to see through difficul- 
ties and arrive at his conclusions by shorter processes than most 
men are accustomed to use. Having quick perceptions, he looked 
at once to the end. His conclusions, therefore, were rather the 
results of a sort of intuition than the cautiously drawn deductions 
of reason. 

" Beside his professional knowledge and success, which se- 
cured the confidence of his employers in his management of 
disease, there was such an affectionate kindness of manner, so 
much gravity and wisdom in his conversation, such a rare sin- 
cerity of speech, and he manifested so much interest in the per- 
sons with whom he had intercourse, that he won the strong 
attachment of those who put themselves under his care ; and 
when they had trusted him once, they desired to confide in him 
more and more, and to lean upon him again and again. 

" Dr. Shattuck was ever giving, and giving liberally and dis- 
creetly. He was no mere lavish and careless giver. He gave 
32 



250 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

to do good, and always, if possible, a greater and more per- 
manent good than the mere temporary supply of a want. He 
would not minister to extravagance or folly. He would not en- 
courage idleness. He offered no bounty to impracticable objects 
or unsuitable plans of life. But he was remarkable for the fitness 
and utility of his gifts. 

" He sought no publicity in his charities: the private channels 
and objects of generosity were more agreeable to his taste. He 
loved most to aid men to eke out their means — to add a little 
more power to complete an almost accomplished but staggering 
purpose. To those who honestly and faithfully put forth all 
their energies to do a good and suitable work, which was a little 
beyond their strength or means, he was a friend at hand just at 
the time when they began to need, and when, without such a 
coadjutor as he was, they might have faltered and perhaps failed. 
He was more pleased in dispensing his means in this way than 
in any other. Thus the aged minister, who had saved more souls 
than money, and whose friends had gone down to the grave be- 
fore him — the scantily sustained but industrious waiter on pro- 
fessional success — the struggling, industrious student in college — 
the straitened widow, the poor laborer, the wood-sawyer, whose 
earnings and capital would not enable him to replace his broken 
or exhausted tools — all these, and such as these, everywhere 
within his wide range, were subjects of his observation and re- 
cipients of his aid, in private ways, and oftentimes in ways so 
secret as to elude all search for the source of the blessings which 
had been received." Many mechanics have stated to us that 
it had been their good fortune to work for many liberal-minded 
men, but of all such men Dr. Shattuck was the most liberal. 

" One anecdote will illustrate the manner of giving which 
pleased him most. While I was a student in his office, on the 
1st of January, Mr. K., his tailor, called with his bill. Dr. Shat- 
tuck was out, and I was alone in the office. As I was well ac- 
quainted with Mr. K., he showed me the Doctor's bill, which, he 
said, he did not feel at liberty to show to or speak of to others. 
There was a bill against Dr. Shattuck for clothing received 
within a single year, of over four hundred dollars ! Dr. Shattuck 
dressed economically. It was impossible that the clothing of 
himself and his son. could cost more than a fraction of this bill. 



GEORGE CHEYNE SHATTUCK. 251 

Mr. K. explained. He said that every little while there came 
men, gentlemen, laborers, children, into his store, with an order 
from Dr. Shattuck, almost always in these words : ' Please give 
this man a coat, or vest, or pair of pantaloons, or greatcoat, cloak, 
or a suit of clothes suited to his condition.' The last phrase was 
the only condition prescribed ; and Mr. K. gave such clothing as 
the man's occupation, station and age seemed to require. In this 
way Mr. K. said that his clothing bill amounted to about four 
hundred dollars every year, and had for a long time. 

" Many invalids, of every class, were in the habit of calling on 
Dr. Shattuck for professional advice, especially in cases of chronic 
disease. Among these were frequently the students of theology, 
at Andover and Cambridge, and young men in college, men in 
apparently straitened circumstances, and poor women with their 
children. He very kindly heard all their tales of suffering, gave 
his advice for their self-management, and then wrote a prescrip- 
tion for medicine ; all the while surveying his patients' outer 
man as carefully as he had inquired into their inner man. After 
writing the prescription, he wrote a note and sealed and directed 
it to his tailor, and then he very courteously said : 'Now, sir, will 
you be good enough to carry this prescription to the apothecary, 
134 Washington street, and while they are putting up the medi- 
cine, will you do me the favor to carry this note to Mr. K., No. 
5, Congress street ?' There was no fee to be paid for his profes- 
sional advice. The grateful patient, wishing to make some return 
for the good physician's kindness, gladly consented to carry the 
note as he wished. When they delivered the note to Mr. K., in 
Congress street, they learned to their surprise, that, instead of 
diminishing their debt of gratitude, they increased it by so doing ; 
for they were to receive clothing in addition to healing, from the 
hands of Dr. Shattuck, and without cost to themselves." A gen- 
tleman who had been a student in his office, being attacked with 
a disease which was likely to terminate fatally, was advised by 
his physician to return to his friends in the country, live gener- 
ously, and take wine occasionally as a stimulant. Not long after- 
wards a messenger called at his residence and left a quarter-cask 
of the best old Madeira wine, but declined to give the name of 
the person from whom it was sent. It was not, however, diffi- 
cult to identify the generous benefactor as Dr. Shattuck. 



252 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

The North American Review (Jan., 1855, p. 33,) selects Dr. 
Shattuck as the type among physicians of a "Finished Life" — 
"A life," says the writer, "so filled with useful and generous 
deeds, with such devotedness to his profession, which he held 
more and more in honor, and to all the best interests of man and 
society, that it is a comfort and a privilege to be permitted to 
dwell upon it in our recollections." 

As further illustrations we make the following extracts from a 
Discourse on the occasion of his death, by Rev. C. A. Bartol, 
preached in the West Boston Church, where he worshipped, and 
where he was a communicant : — 

" He began his career, as perhaps it is best every young man 
should, having nothing in particular to trust to but his own talent 
and fidelity, with, as he said, 'the healthy stimulus of prospective 
want ;' and waiting quietly for his first patients, attending slowly 
to case after case, he laid silently, stone by stone, the foundation 
of his fame. Every truly noble building rests on just such a 
basis of deep and secret diligence ; and, as a great merchant once 
said, that the making of the first thousand dollars cost him more 
perplexity than all the rest of his immense fortune, so it is with 
the first achievement, by manifest, undeniable, and unmistakable 
power of all professional success." — "Extraordinarily distinguished 
for insight into the soul as well as body ; reading character as he 
did health and disease ; leaping through obstructions to his point, 
with an electric spark of genius that was in him ; clothing his 
conclusions sometimes with a poetic color, and sometimes with 
the garb of a quaint phraseology ; employing now a pithy prov- 
erb, and now a cautious and tender circumlocution, to utter what 
could scarce have been otherwise conveyed, in a method of con- 
versation, which in its straight lines, or through all its windings, 
I never found otherwise than very instructive, — an intuitive sa- 
gacity 'and perfect originality marked all his sayings and doings. 
He could never be confounded with any other man. Borrowing 
neither ideas nor expressions, he was always himself. Yet there 
was nothing cynical or recluse or egotistical about him. I never 
heard him boast himself or despise another. He had a large and 
warm heart, with room in it for many persons and all humanity. 
Though he was so peculiar, much of his heart was the common 
heart, as the most lofty mountains have in them most of the 



GEORGE CHEYNE SHATTUCK. 253 

common earth. He had this precious singularity, that he never 
seemed to belong to any one class or little social circle, but to 
stand well and beneficently related to all. While not a few are 
absorbed in some single relation, he observed and acted well in 
the multitude of his relations to his fellow-men. He was re- 
markable for his broad look and observance of all the interests, 
material or moral, mechanical or spiritual, of the world, and was 
equally at home in a question of finance or an enterprise of re- 
ligion. I know not where, in any individual, to look for a larger 
amount of sterling treasure." 

He was a firm believer in the Christian religion. He loved 
the church and reverenced its pastors. And in dying he threw 
himself humbly upon the mercy of God, who had so long blessed 
him, and upon Christ, through whom he hoped to obtain immor- 
tal life. As a Christian he was catholic, in the enlarged and lib- 
eral sense of the term. He belonged to no one sect or denomi- 
nation of Christians. He extended his sympathy and hand of 
friendship to all the faithful preachers of the Gospel. " I regard 
ministers," he said, "not of one name, but of all." Once being 
examined under oath, as to some records he might have made, he 
said that, " by the grace of God, the name of a minister was never 
entered with a charge upon his books" ! " But a reverence for 
the Most High was in him distinct from all other principles. 
His will towards men was strong. But he seemed to have no 
will towards God. His will vanished before the Supreme ; and 
he would have none but the First and All-presiding, and seemed 
to think there was none beside. As a physician, he looked not 
to his medicines alone but to God, for success, and prayed before 
he prescribed. So it was with him, with ever-increasing interest to 
the last. ' Pray with me,' was commonly his first salutation as I 
entered his sick chamber. ' I want your prayers : they are a 
great comfort and consolation to me.' ' Pray not for my recov- 
ery.' ' I am going to God.' ' I wish, in your prayer, to go as a 
sinner.' — And, at the last, having spoken his love to those most 
closely related to him, just before he went, ' Time, Eternity, 
Eternity, Eternity, ,' were his expiring words : knowing, as he re- 
tained possession of his mind, that he was just stepping over that 
mysterious causeway, hid from mortal eyes, the sight of which 
no fleshly vision could bear, which separates one from another." 



254 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

Dr. Shattuck m. 1, Oct. 3, 1811, Eliza Cheever Davis. She 
was b. in Boston, Jan. 9, 1790, and d. June 15, 1828, se. 38 y. 
5 m. 6 d. Her father, Caleb Davis, a distinguished merchant of 
Boston, was b. in Woodstock, Ct., and d. July 6, 1797, se. 58. 
Her mother was Eleanor Cheever, who was b. Feb. 1, 1750; m. 
Sept. 8, 1787, Caleb Davis, and d. Jan. 29, 1825, se. 74 y. 11 m. 
28 d. ; dau. of William Downs Cheever and Elizabeth Edwards. 

He m. 2, Aug. 17, 1835, Amelia H. Bigelow, dau. of Abra- 
ham Bigelow, Esq. of Cambridge, who was for many years clerk 
of the courts in Middlesex county. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ELIZA CHEEVER DAVIS, BORN IN BOSTON. 

1. George Cheyne, b. July 22, 1813 ; m. April 9, 1840, A. H. Brune of Balti- 

more. 

2. John Derby, b. Feb. 21, 1815 ; d. Aug. 14, 1816, re. 1 y. 5 m. 23 d. 

3. Caleb Davis, b. Dec. 18, 1816 ; d. Jan. 14, 1820, re. 3 y. m. 26 d. 

4. Eleanor Elizabeth, b. Jan. 27, 1819 ; d. Jan. 5, 1842, re. 22 y. 11 m. 8 d. 

5. Lucy Cheever, b. Jan. 29, 1823; d. Dec. 22, 1835, re. 12 y. 10 m. 23 d. 

6. John Derby, b. May 22, 1825 ; d. Jan. 28, 1826, re. 8 m. 6 d. 



294. Elizabeth Shattuck, dau. of Timothy, (p. 158,) b. in 
Littleton, Aug. 28, 1777, d. in Goshen, Addison Co., Vt., Jan. 
23, 1855, se. 77 y. 4 m. 25 d. 

She m. about 1800, Silas Hooker, b. July 21, 1775, s. of 
Daniel Hooker and Mary Gates of Stow. He was a shoemaker, 
and, in 1803, settled in Brandon, Vt. He d. in Goshen, Feb. 3, 
1846, a3. 70 y. 6 m. 12 d. 

HER CHILDREN, BY SILAS HOOPER, BORN IN STOW AND BRANDON. 

1. Mary, b. Nov. 16, 1801 ; d. in Brandon, June 15, 1803, re. 1 y. 6 m. 29 d. 

2. Luke, b. July 2, 1803 ; m. March 9, 1833, Clarissa Wilcus, and is a farmer in 

Bangor, Franklin Co., N. Y. 

3. Timothy, b. Aug. 18, 1805 ; d. at Brandon, July 27, 1815, re. 9 y. 11 m. 9 d. 

4. Silas Gates, b. Nov. 5, 1807 ; a fanner, unmarried, in Goshen. 

5. Betsey Elizabeth, b. Nov. 5, 1808; d. Sept. 16, 1809, re. 10 m. 11 d. 

6. Mary Shattuck, b. Feb. 1, 1810; m. Feb. 13, 1834, Torrid Ormas Buttles, a 

farmer of Goshen. They have three children. 

7. Stephen Shattuck, b. June 17, 1812; a farmer, unmarried, in Goshen. 

8. James, b. Aug. 17, 1815; d. March 8, 1819, re. 3 y. 6 m. 21 d. 

9. Hannah Elizabeth, b. June 15, 1818 ; m. March 14, 1843, Edmond Goodnough. 

He is a clerk in a store in Brandon. 
10. Martha Sherman, b. April 30, 1821 ; unmarried, in Goshen. 

295. Timothy Shattuck, s. of Timothy, (p. 158,) was b. in 
Littleton, April 29, 1779, and settled as a farmer near his father's, 
in East Landaff, N. H., where he now (1853) resides. 



. REBECCA, STEPHEN, AND HANNAH SHATTUCK. 255 

He m. Jan. 28, 1812, Betsey Fletcher, b. June 12, 1786, 
dau. of James Fletcher and Lydia White of Acton, Mass. She 
d. in East Landaff, Feb. 26, 1851, as. 64 y. 8 m. 14 d. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY BETSEY FLETCHER, BORN IN EAST LANDAFF. 

1 & 2. Twin Girls, b. 1812; d. unnamed, soon after birth. 

3. John, b. 1815 ; d. about 6 months old. 

4. Timothy, b. 1817; d. about 5 weeks old. 

5. A Girl, b. 1820 ; d. near birth. 

6. Lydia, b. June 10, 1823. She went through the regular course of 

study at the Mount Holyoke Female Seminary at South Hadley, graduated 
in 1851, and has since been employed as a teacher in that institution. 

7. William L., b. Dec. 11, 1825 ; m. Sept. 26, 1850, Ann C. Woodbury, and have 

Helen W., b. March 31, 1853. He is postmaster in East Landaff. 



296. Rebecca Shattuck, dau. of Timothy, (p. 158,) was b. 
in Littleton, March 30, 1781, and d. in Stow, Nov. 30, 1846, 
se. 65 y. 8 m. 

She m. Nov. 26, 1806, Abraham Whitcomb, b. May 15, 1781, 
s. of Abraham and Rebecca Whitcomb. He now resides with 
his son Goodnow. 

HER CHILDREN, BY ABRAHAM WHITCOMB, BORN IN STOW. 

1. Joseph, b. Nov. 29, 1807 ; m. Dec. 13, 1832, Hannah Vose. He and his 

brother Brown are chairmakers in East Princeton. 

2. Mary, b. Mar. 27, 1809 ; d. in Stow, Aug. 5, 1830, se. 21 y. 4 m. 8 d. 

3. Benjamin, b. Jan. 28, 1812. He is a farmer in Stow, unmarried. 

4. Mercy, b. Oct. 21, 1813 ; m. Dec. 24, 1835, Josiah C. Brown. 

5. James, b. Oct. 22, 1817; m. Jan., 1844, Fidelia Brown. He d. in East 

Princeton, Aug. 3, 1854, ee. 36 y. 9 m. 11 d. 

6. John, b. March 4, 1819. He is a farmer in Stow. 

7. Martha, b. April 27, 1821; m. Nov., 1851, Luke R. Goodnow of Stow. 



297. Stephen Shattuck, s. of Timothy, (p. 158,) b. April 7, 
1783, was a farmer in East Landaff, where he d. Nov. 28, 1811, 
ge. 28 y. 7 m. 21 d. 

He m. in 1806, Joanna Judd of Landaff, and had — 

1. Perses, b. in 1808 ; d. May 23, 1813, se. 5 years. 

2. Stephen,b. in 1809; d. June 10, 1811, se. 2 years. 



298. Hannah Shattuck, dau. of Timothy, (p. 158,) b. May 
4, 1785, d. in Littleton, Jan. 13, 1815, se. 29 y. 8 m. 9 d. 

She m. April 8, 1807, Thaddeus Grimes of Littleton, and had 

1. Eliah, b. May 8, 1S08 ; d. in Acton ; had two children. 

2. Elizabeth F.,b. Dec. 11, 1809; unmarried, in Littleton. 

3. Hiram, b. May 24, 1813 ; m. . She is dead. 



256 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

299. Martha Shattuck, dau. of Timothy, (p. 158,) was b. in 
Littleton, Feb. 19, 1788, and d. in Boxborongh, May 9, 1812, 
as. 24 y. 2 m. 20 d. 

She m. April 14, 1807, Simon Blanchard, b. in Littleton, April 
3, 1784, s. of Calvin and Abigail Blanchard. He is a farmer in 
Boxborough. They had two children. 

1. Simon, b. Jan. 29, 1808 ; m. April 23, 1839, Elizabeth Dix Fletcher of Box- 

borough. He is a farmer in Acton, and has, 1. William, b. April 3, 1840; 
2. Ellen Ann, b. Sept. 13, 1851. 

2. Martha, b. Aug. 23, 1810 ; m. April 3, 1834, Samuel Sawin. He is a farmer 

in Stow. Has, 1. Samuel D., b. Feb. 2, 1835; 2. Martha E., b. Sept. 4, 
1836, d. Oct. 2, 1836; 3. John T., b. Dec. 3, 1837; 4. Martha M., b. April 
10, 1842; 5. Simon B., b. Nov. 23, 1846. 



300. Benjamin Shattuck, s. of Timothy, (p. 158,) was b. in 
East Landarf, N. H., Feb. 25, 1797, and in 1820, settled near 
Red Beach, Robbinston Post-Office, Calais, Me., where he has 
since resided as a farmer and lumber dealer. 

He m. in Robbinston, Nov. 13, 1828, Mirah Bond, b. in Gard- 
ner, Me., Nov. 28, 1800, s. of Jonas Bond of Lincoln, Mass., and 
Lydia Hapgood of Petersham. (Bond's Memorials, p. 53.) 

HIS CHILDREN, BY MIRAH BOND, BORN AT RED BEACH. 

1. Mirah, b. Sept. 7, 1829. 4. George Cheyne, b. Oct. 28, 1836. 

2. Benjamin, b. Feb. 16, 1833. 5. William, b. Dec. 20, 1839. 

3. Elizabeth R, b. Jan. 19,1835. 



301. Rachel Shattuck, dau. of Edmond, (p. 158,) was b. in 
Pepperell, Mass., March 9, 1771, and -is now (1853) living in 
Essex, Yt. 

She m. Samuel Hazleton, b. in 1770, s. of Samuel Hazleton 
and Mary Farley of Hebron, N. H. He was a farmer in Essex, 
Chittenden Co., Yt., where he d. in 1833, se. 63. 

HER CHILDREN, BY SAMUEL HAZLETON, BORN IN ESSEX. 

1. Abigail, b. 1789 ; m. in 1807, Noah Hobart. He settled in Granville, 

Licking Co., Ohio, where he d. in 1853. 

2. Rachel, b. 1791. Now living in Essex. 

. 3. Luke, b. ]793. A planter in Natchitoches, La. ; d. in 1828. 

4. Samuel, b. 1795. Not been heard from for many years. 

5. John, b. 1797 ; m. in 1822, Fanny Bates; a farmer in St. Albans, Lick- 

ing Co., Ohio. 

G. Betsey, b. 1799; m. in 1817, Slater, now of Harlem, Winnebago 

Co., 111. 

7. Alvah, b. 1801 ; m. in 1840, Mrs. Martha Phelps of Essex. 

8. Edward S., b. 1804 ; d. in 1812. 



EDMOND SHATTUCK BENJAMIN SHATTUCK. 257 

9. Sally, b. 1805; m. in 1822, Jonathan Noyes; d. in Ohio in 1852. 

10. Poll}), b. 1808; m. in 1826, Hezekiah Kendall, and lives in Illinois. 

11. Wesley, b. 1810. He is a farmer in Essex, Vt. 

12. Arihw,h. 1814, d. 1841. 13. Laura, b. 1818, d. 1820. 



302. Edmond Shattuck, Esq., s. of Edmond, (p. 158,) was 
b. in Pepperell, Oct. 1, 1772, and d. of consumption in Groton, 
N. H., March 13, 1816, a?. 43 y. 5 m. 12 d., two months after his 
father. A farmer. He was chosen one of the selectmen of 
Groton in 1801, and reelected each year until his death; was 
town clerk from 1805 to the close of life; was a justice of the 
peace during the same period ; and was otherwise conspicuous 
as the leading man of the town. 

He m. Sarah Milliken, dan. of James Milliken of Peter- 
borough. She is now living in Bellows Falls, Vt. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY SARAH MILLIKEN, BORN IN GROTON. 

1. Edmond, b. June 27, 1813; m. Aug. 19, 1851, Amelia Caroline Thurston, dau. 

of Charles Thurston and Margaret Fish of Cooperstown, N. Y. He is a 
bookbinder, and the head of the extensive manufactory of Shattuck & Co. of 
Hartford, Ct. 

2. Sarah Elizabeth, b. July 11, 1815; d. at Walpole, March 17, 1827, 8e. 11 y. 

8 m. 6 d. 

303. Dr. Benjamin Shattuck, s. of Edmond, (p. 158,) was 
b. in Cockermouth, (now Groton,) N. H., June 30, 1776. He 
first settled in his native town, but, in 1825, removed to Essex, 
Vt. ; in 1832 to Troy, Bradford Co., Pa. ; and in 1834, to Altay 
Village, Tyrone, Steuben Co., N. Y., where he has since resided. 
He has been a physician. 

He m. Sept. 5, 1802, Mary Stone, b. April 26, 1778, dau. of 
Thomas Stone and Mary Woodbury of Henniker, N. H. In 
June, 1853, these parents said that they " had had 10 children, b. in 
Groton, 38 grandchildren, and 3 great-grandchildren, of whom 
36 were living, and 15 had died ;" as follows : — 

1. Merrick, b. June 18, 1803; a cooper in Columbia, Pa. He m. Mary Ruggles, 

b. Feb. 6, 1811, dau. of Moses and Rhoda Ruggles of Westford, Vt. Has, 1. 
Lucius E., b. April 5, 1833; 2. Louisa A., b. May 2, 1838. 

2. Mary, b. June 10, 1805; rn. May 6, 1827, Leonard Ruggles, b. May, 1827. 

She d. April 26, 1831, ae. 25 y. 10 m. 16 d. One of her two children d. 
Henry, the other, is living. 

3. Benjamin, b. June 16, 1807. He is a carpenter, and has wrought in the city of 

New York, but is now in Elmira, Chenango Co., N. Y. He m. May 8, 1828, 
Sarah Ruggles, b. Feb. 6, 1809, sister of Rhoda and Leonard R., above men- 
33 



258 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. ' 

tioned. Have, 1. Marietta, b. March 28, 1831, m. Feb. 14, 1850, James P. 
Dunham; 2. Samanthia B., b. Nov. 11, 1834, m. Sept., 1852, Austin Mitchel 
of Troy, Pa. ; 3. Laura, b. Feb. 11, 1842; 4. Emma, b. June 28, 1844; and 
three sons and two daughters that d. young. 

4. George W., b. March 10, 1809 ; m. Nov. 14, 1833, Susan Maynard, b. April 

23, 1815, dau. of Shebuel and Polly Maynard. He is a chairmaker in Troy, 
Pa. Has had, 1. Shebuel Maynard, b. Jan. 15, 1835; 2. Mary Catharine, b. 
Oct. 16, 1837; 3. John Victor, b. March 27, 1842; 4. Laura Isabel, b. Oct. 
5, 1843; 5. Benjamin Franklin, b. Aug. 3, 1847; 6. George Otta, b. June 

24, 1852, d. Nov. 23, 1852. 

5. Lydia, b. April 9, 1811 ; m. Leonard Ruggles — his 2d wife. His 1st wife 

was her sister abovementioned. He is a farmer in Troy, Bradford Co., Pa. 
Has had 9 children, 2 of whom are living — 1. John D., b. Jan. 17, 1833; 
2. Harriet A., b. Aug. 24, 1834. 

6. John, b. May 20, 1813; m. Ititha Degrong; was a clothier in Canada, where 

he d. Nov. 13, 1840, leaving Abraham and Ellen. 

7. Harriet JVeioell, b. April 8, 1815; m. Feb. 28, 1842, Silas Kendall of Tyrone, 

N. Y., b. in Gardner, Mass., Jan. 5, 1800. Have, 1. Alba, b. Oct. 23, 1844 ; 
2. George, b. Aug. 27, 1849. 

8. Abigail, b. April 25, 1817; m. Clark B. Vaughan, s. of Benjamin V. of Bar- 

rington, N. Y. He is a farmer and cooper. • 

9. Ruth, b. Jan. 8, 1820 ; m. Aug. 11, 1839, Reuben Austin, s. of Silas and Han- 

nah A. of Tyrone. In 1853 they removed to Michigan. Have, 1. John 
Wesley, b. July 9, 1841 ; 2. Edmond Shattuck, b. Oct. 9, 1844. 

10. Cyrus, b. April 23, 1822; m. Nov. 21, 1843, Mary Clark, b. Oct. 17, 1818. 
They live in Altay Village, Tyrone. Have, 1. Alzada, b. Dec. 21, 1844; 2. 
George Sidney, b. March 1, 1847; 3. Henry, b. May 19, 1850. 



304. Abigail Shattuck, dau. of Edmond, (p. 158,) was b. in 
Groton, April 17, 1788, and is now (1853) living in Essex, Yt. 

She m. Sept. 11, 1823, Samuel Keeler, a farmer in Bradford, 
Vt., b. Dec. 13, 1770, d. Nov. 28, 1837, fe. 66 y. 11 m. lo d. 
His father, James Keeler, b. June 13, 1748, d. April 3, 1826 ; 
his mother, Abigail Whitlock, b. Jan. 20, 1750, d. March 12, 
1830. She was his 2d wife. He m. 1, March 29, 1796, Polly 
E. Castle, b. Sept. 20, 1777, d. Jan. 15, 1823, leaving one s. b. 
Sept. 1, 1812. 

HER CHILDREN, BY SAMUEL KEELER, BORN IN BRADFORD, VT. 

1. Polly Esther, b. Aug. 27, 1824; m. June 1, 1848, George Clinton Jewell. 

He went to California in April, 1852. 

2. Ebenezer, b. Jan. 18, 1826; d. Feb. 8, 1826, se. 21 days. 

3. Elizabeth, b. Dec. 13, 1828 ; m. Dec. 26, 1847, George Baxter Sinclair, a farm- 

er in Essex, b. March 23, 1823. Have had, 1. James Wayland, b. Aug. 19, 
1848; 2. Edward Frank, b. July 28, 1850; 3. George Arthur, b. Dec. 22, 
1851 ; 4. John Keeler, b. Oct. 20, 1853. 



JONATHAN SHATTUCK MOSES SHATTUCK. 259 

305. Jonathan Shattuck, s. of Jonathan, (p. 159, ) was b. in 
Oxford, Mass., Sept. 20, 1768. He learned the carpenter's trade 
in Chesterfield, N. H., then the residence of his father, and in 
1799 removed from thence to Townshend, Vt., where he wrought 
at his trade and on a farm the remainder of his life. He d. Nov. 
20, 1827, £e. 59 y. 2 m. 

He m. Oct., 1796, Mehitable Fairbanks, dan. of Zenas Fair- 
banks and Mehitable Wood of Chesterfield. She d. in Townshend, 
Nov. 3, 1827. They were members of the church, and six of 
their children, named below, have followed their example. 

1. Harriet, b. July 31, 1797; m. Dec. 28, 1820, Alpheus Bugbee. They settled 

as farmers in Middlesex, Washington Co. 

2. Iri, b. Aug. 31, 1799; d. unm. in Townshend in 1827, then captain of an 

infantry company, and town constable. 

3. Elijah P., b. Dec. 28, 1801 ; m. April 5, 1825, Nancy Boutelle of T.; a farmer. 

He has been town clerk and otherwise useful as a public man in Townshend. 

4. Louisa, b. Sept. 25, 1803 ; m. Feb. 24, 1835, Joseph Day, who settled as a 

farmer in Chesterfield, N. H. 

5. Samuel F., b Nov. 23, 1805 ; m. in Oakham, Mass., Dec. 31, 1834, Lewis Har- 

rington, and is a farmer in Worcester. 

6. Asa C, b. Sept. 25, 1808; m. in Athens,Vt., Dec. 6, 1836, Mary Ann Oak, and 

is a farmer in Athens. He has been town clerk, and otherwise honored by 
his townsmen. 

7. Edmond, b. Feb. 22, 1812; in. Jan. 31, 1838, Lucy A. Lincoln, and is settled 

as a farmer in Townshend. 

8. Adaline, b. Aug. 5, 1814; m. May 15, 1839, Luther G. Shepherd, who is now 

settled as a farmer in Worcester, Mass. 

9. Mary E., b. Nov. 27, 1817; m. July 12, 1841, Ephraim C. Walker, who is a 

farmer in Townshend. She d. Dec. 23, 1843. 



306. Moses Shattuck, s. of Jonathan, (p. 159,) was b. in 
Oxford, Nov. 20, 1776, and was a wheelwright in Swanton, Frank- 
lin Co., Vt., where he d. June 17, 1832, as. 55 y. 6 m. 27 d. 

He m. Hannah Brigham, who was b. Feb. 27, 1779, and d. 
Nov. 22, 1817, as. 38 y. 8 m. 25 d. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY HANNAH BRIGHAM, BORN IN SWANTON. 

1. Maria, b. Aug. 15, 1802 ; m. Andrew Durgee, a farmer of Sheldon, Vt. She 

d. Aug. 12, 1820, SB. 17 y. 1 1 m. 27 d. He is also dead. 

2. Sophronia, b. Jan. 22, 1804 ; m. Emory Rice, a furniture dealer at St. Albans, 

Vt. She d. May 26, 1820, je. 22 y. 4 m. 4 d. 

3. Moses, b. March 29, 1805 ; a carpenter, and in 1834 settled in Eden, Erie Co., 

N. Y. He m. 1, May 28, 1828, Lydia M. Josylin, b. Oct. 15, 1807. She d. 
May 31, 1846, a>. 38 y. 7 m. 16 d. They had, 1. Sophia F., b. March 15, 
1829; 2. Mary L., b. Jan. 6, 1832, d. Oct. 13, 1832; 3. Eugene R., b. May 



260 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

8, 1842, d. June 15, 1844. He m. 2, Oct. 17, 1848, Elizabeth I. Redfield, b. 
June 1, 1829, and has Leila E., b. March 22, 1851. 

4. Royal, b. Sept. 5, 1806; a carpenter in Eden, N. Y., since 1834. He m. 1, in 

Buffalo, June 8, 1834, Delia M. Smith, b. March 10, 1818. She d. in Eden, 
May 20, 1839. He m. 2, Sept. 5, 1839, Sarah A. Olds, b.May 21, 1816; 
He has had, 1. Charles M., b. Sept. 8, 1835 ; 2. Delia M., b. March 24, 1843 ; 3. 
George M., b. May 14, 1845; 4. James L., b. Feb. 18, 1849; 5. John C, b. 
Dec. 12, 1852. 

5. Hannah, b. Dec. 9, 1807; m. Reuben Rice, a cabinet-maker in St. Albans, Vt. 

She d. March 14, 1841, ae. 33 y. 3 m. 5 d. He is dead. 

6. Lydia, b. April 23, 1810; m. Addison Page, a farmer of Bakersfield, Vt. 

7. Benjamin, b. June 20, 1811 ; a carpenter of Eden. He m. 1, Nov. 20, 1841, 

Matilda Bunting, b. in Eden, Nov. 20, 1823, dau. of Levi and Christian 
Bunting. She d. May 20, 1844. He m. 2, Feb. 10, 1847, Helen M. Pratt, b. 
Aug. 16, 1824, and has, 1. Millard B., b. Nov. 15, 1848, d. Nov. 10, 1853; 2. 
Sarah A.,b. Nov. 13, 1851 ; 3. William H., b. Aug. 9, 1852. 

8. Charles, b. Dec. 25, 1812; drowned, Sept. 1841, re. 28 y. 9 m. 

9. Maria, 2d, b. Aug. 25, 1816; m. Martin Webster, a farmer of Hubbards- 

ton, Vt. 



307. Josiah Shattuck, s. of Jonathan, (p. 159,) was b. in 
Chesterfield, N. H., Oct. 20, 1781, is now (1853) a farmer in 
Bakersfield, Vt. 

He m. Oct. 25, 1810, Susan B. Boutwell, b. in Leominster, 
Mass., Feb. 4, 1792, dau. of William and Tabitha Boutwell. 
Both are members of the congregational church. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY SUSAN B. BOUTWELL, BORN IN BAKERSFIELD. 

1. Harriet S., b. March 4, 1812 ; d. Dec. 2. 1812, re. 8 m. 28 d. 

2. William B., b. Jan. 18, 1816 ; m. March 28, 1843, Emily Maynard, and is set- 

tled as a farmer in Bakersfield. 

3. Harriet A., b. Feb. 9, 1818 ; m. March 15, 1837, James Maynard, a farmer in 

Bakersfield. 

4. Jason L., b. May 5, 1820; m. May 1, 1844, Lucy R. Farnsworth; a farmer of 

Bakersfield. 

5. Noel K., b. May 9, 1822; nf. July 12, 1853, Emily A. Purdy. He is a school 

teacher in Mountville, Loudon Co., Va. 

6. Orry L., ) b. Oct. 9, 1824. Resides, unm., on the paternal homestead. 

7. OrrillaL.,S Twins. d. Sept. 24, 1845, re. 20 y. 11 m. 15 d. 

8. Laura A., b. Nov. 3, 1826; m. Dec. 2, 1849, Horace H. Farnsworth. He is 

a carpenter, and a teacher of common schools and music schools in the win- 
ter season. 
9. Henry, )h. Feb. 9, 1829. Resides in Boston. 

10. Henrietta, S Twins. d. Aug. 16, 1845, re. 16 y. 6 m. 7 d. 

11. Lydia S., b. Oct. 3, 1831; m. William H. Drake, b. in New London, Ct. He 

is a machinist, and now (1855) resides at Bellows Falls, Vt. 



BENJAMIN SHATTUCK JARED SHATTUCK. 261 

308. Benjamin Shattuck, s. of Jonathan, (p. 159.) was b. in 
Townshend, Vt., March 20, 1789. He first settled as a farmer in 
Bakersfield, but now resides in Brandon, Franklin Co., N. Y. 

He m. in S wanton, N. Y., Jan. 9, 1820, Lydia Jackson, b. in 
Chesterfield, N. H., Nov. 3, 1789. She and several of her chil- 
chren are members of the Methodist church. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY LYDIA JACKMAN, BORN IN BAKERSFIELD, VT. 

1. Fanny,h. Oct. 22, 1821 ; m. April 6, 1841, N. H. Armington, b. in Lansingburg, 

Rensselaer Co., N. Y., Nov. 8, 1814. He is a merchant in Bakersfield. 

2. Rufus TFatson, b. June 17, 1824 ; is now a trader in Worcester, Mass. 

3. Mary Ann, b. March 8, 1826 ; m. June 28, 1846, John N. Pomeroy, b. May 5, 

1820. He is a merchant in Bakersfield, with N. H. Armington, and post 
master. She d. Oct. 11, 1847, re. 21 y. 7 m. 3 d. 

4. Eliza Jane, b. April 18, 1828 ; a tailoress in Boston. 

5. David J., b. March 8, 1830 ; a pedler in Worcester. 

6. George TV., b. Jan. 19, 1833; clerk for Armington & Pomeroy. 



309. Jared Shattuck, only s. of Timothy, (p. 160,) was b. in 
New Haven, now North Haven, Ct., April 27, 1773, and d. in 
Meadville, the county seat of Crawford Co., Pa., July 16, 1837, 
as. 64 y. 2 m. 19 d. He first entered the store of Mr. Spelman in 
Durham (p. 160) as an apprentice and clerk, and after that gen- 
tleman's failure, and when about fifteen years of age, he went to 
Philadelphia, and soon after to St. Thomas, one of the West 
India Islands, where he became a successful merchant and ship 
owner. 

On the 13th of May, 1800, one of his ships, called the Mer- 
cator, with a cargo, bound from St. Thomas to Jacmel and Port 
Republican, was captured while endeavoring to enter Jacmel, by 
the United States armed vessel of war, called the Experiment, 
William Maley, commander ; and under direction of a prize mas- 
ter was ordered to Cape Francois. Before arrival she was cap- 
tured as a prize on the high seas by the British private armed vessel 
of war, the General Simcoe, sent to Jamaica, and there con- 
demned by the Court of Admiralty, on the 28th of June follow- 
ing. Mr. Shattuck brought an action against Maley in the dis- 
trict court of Pennsylvania, for the recovery of the damages he 
had sustained. It is stated in the detailed report of the case, 
(3 Cranch's Reports, 458,) that Mr. Shattuck "was born in the 
state of Connecticut in the year 1774, and when he was between 
fifteen and sixteen years of age, viz., about the end of 1789 or 



262 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

beginning of 1790, he emigrated to the island of St. Thomas, 
one of the dominions of the king of Denmark and Norway, with 
a view to settle and establish his permanent residence in that 
island ; that he served his apprenticeship there with a mercan- 
tile house for about six years, and from his first arrival has con- 
stantly and permanently, and now continues to reside there ; 
that on the 10th of April, 1797, he became a naturalized Danish 
subject and burgher of said island, and shortly afterwards inter- 
married with an inhabitant of that place, by whom he has sev- 
eral children, all living in that island; and that he did acquire, and 
now holds real estate there, and is there permanently settled and 
established, and carries on the trade and business of a merchant." 
Upon these facts the District Judge decided the case against Mr. 
Shattuck. From this decree he appealed to the circuit court of 
the United States, and this court reversed the decree of the dis- 
trict court, and decided that he was entitled to restitution, with 
damages and costs. The case was remitted to the district court 
for further proceeding, when the clerk, with the assistance of 
two merchants, audited the claim, and returned an estimate of 
the value of the Mercator and cargo, and the damage sustained 
by Mr. Shattuck, amounting to $41,658 67. It was carried to 
the supreme court of the United States, where it was decreed in 
his favor on the 8th of March, 1806. Chief Justice Marshall 
delivered the opinion of the court. The final award, however, 
amounted to $25,017 44 only. This claim, even as awarded by 
the court, was not immediately settled ; and in 1810 Mr. Shat- 
tuck returned to the United States, and brought the subject be- 
fore Congress ; and after three years more delay an act was passed 
on the 2d of February, 1813, authorizing the payment to him 
of $33,864 55, as the principal and interest then estimated to 
be due. (United States Statutes, Little & Brown's edition, Vol. 
VI., p. 116.) 

The wife and family of Mr. Shattuck, in the mean time, re- 
sided in New Haven ; and preferring that city to the place of her 
nativity, they continued there a few years afterwards. During this 
period he purchased of the Holland Land Company over 50,000 
acres of land in Western Pennsylvania, and in 1817 removed to 
Meadville, where he subsequently resided as a merchant and a 
dealer in lands. He was elected auditor for the county, and held 



JARED SHATTUCK. 263 

a very respectable social position among his fellow citizens. Capt. 
Gad Peck, a noted man in New Haven, was associated with him 
in some of his business transactions. 

He m. 1, in St. Thomas, Sept. 12, 1799, Marie Madelaine 
Sophie De Vincent, b. in San Domingo, Jan. 13, 1784, dau. of 
Alexander De Vincent the governor of that island. She d. in 
Meadville, Oct. 6, 1832, ae. 48 y. 8 m. 23 d. Her father, Governor 
Vincent, left St. Domingo and. went to the island of St. Thomas, 
where he d. in 1807 or 8. Her mother, Sophie Chappotin, d. in 
France in 1813 or 14. 

He m. 2, in Meadville, Dec. 28, 1836, Mrs. Grace H. Plumb of 
New Haven. She d. in Albany, N. Y. 

HIS CHILDREN, ALL BY HIS FIRST WIFE, BORN IN ST. THOMAS AND NEW HAVEN. 

1. Louise Sophie, b. April 24, 1801 ; m. in Meadville, Feb. 21, 1820, George Selden, 

b. in Vienna, Va., Aug. 17, 1796. He was a lawyer in Meadville, where he 
d. April 28, 1835, ae. 38 y. 8 m. 11 d. They had— 1. Adelaide Louise,b. April 
12, 1821, m. May 7, 1840, Arthur Cullum, a lawyer of Meadville; 2. George 
Shattuck, b. Dec. 3, 1822, now an attorney at law in Pittsburgh, Pa., m. 
Sept. 22, 1842, Elizabeth Wright Clark ; 3. Mary Elizabeth, b. May 3, 1824, 
d. Oct. 16, 1831, ae. 7 y. 5 m. 13 d ; 4. Sophie Matilda, b. Jan. 27, 1829, m. 
May 12, 1853, Leon Choppotin Magaw, a merchant in Meadville. 

2. Alexander De Vincent, b. Mar. 26, 1802; d. Sept. 15, 1803, ae. 1 y. 5 m. 19 d. 

3. Casper Augustus, b. Aug. 6, 1804 ; d. Aug. 20, 1808, ae. 4 y. m. 14 d. 

4. Lewis Frederick, b. Sept. 10, 1806; d. June 10, 1808, ae. 1 y. 9 m. 

5. Henry Gustavus, b. Feb. 21, 1808; d. March 11, 1818, ae. 10y.0m.20d. 

6. William Porth, b. Dec. 20, 1810 ; resides in Meadville, unmarried, and 

has been a railroad contractor. He represented his district in the State 
Legislature in 1843. 

7. Matilda Charlotte, b. Dec. 7, 1814; m. in Meadville, July 29, 1833, Rev. 

Alexander McLeod, D. D., formerly a physician, now an Episcopalian cler- 
gyman. They resided in Meadville until about 1850, when he removed to 
Huntington, Pa., where they now reside. They have had, b. in Meadville, 1. 
David Dick, b. Feb., 1836, d. May, 1853; 2. Sophie De Vincent, b. Aug. 31, 

1837; 3. Ann Agnew, b. Jan., 1839, d. Jan. 27, 1843; 4. Alexander, b. , 

d. Jan. 5, 1843; 5. Louise Matilda, b. , d. Sept. 18, 1842. 

8. Leon De Vincent, b. Jan. 26, 1817. He is a merchant in Meadville ; m. Dec. 

12, 1839, Elizabeth Ann Burt, b. in Smithville, Jefferson Co., N. Y., Oct. 7, 
1819. Her father, Capt. Rodney Burt, was b. in Deerfield, Ms., May 23, 1782, 
m. Sept. 17, 1812, Nancy Morris, b. in East Haven, May 3, 1789, settled in 
Smithville, but in 1837 removed to Meadville. Mr. Shattuck's children 
have been — 1. Adelaide Louise, b. April 19, 1842; 2. Mary Eunicia, b. Jan. 
15, 1844 ; 3. Leon De Vincent, b. July 6, 1846 ; 4. Sophie Elizabeth, b. June 
19, 1849, d. Aug. 20, 1849, ae. 2 m. 1 d. ; 5. Sophie Selden, b. Sept. 9, 1850 ; 

6. Rodney Burt, b. Sept. 27, 1852, d. Dec. 31, 1853, a?. 1 y. 3 m. 4 d. ; 

7. William Porth, b. July 16, 1854. 



264 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

310. Roxanna Shattuck, dau. of Timothy, (p. 160,) was b. 
March 1, 1778, and is now (1855) living in Ithaca, Tompkins 
Co., N. Y. 

She m. Dec. 16, 1795, Jesse Grant, b. in Litchfield, Ct., 
Oct., 1776, s. of Jesse Grant and Deborah Barnes. He was a 
hotel keeper, first in Durham, N. Y., and afterwards in Ithaca, 
where he d. July 14, 1852, se. 75 y. 6 m. 

HER CHILDREN, BY JESSE GRANT, BORN IN AND ITHACA. 

1. Maria, b. Sept. 80, 1798; m. in 1817, Benjamin Drake, merchant of Ithaca. 

2. Charlotte, b. Feb. 6, 1801 ; m. Feb. 1, 1819, Arthur S. Johnson, a lawyer of 

Ithaca ; and they have — 1. Arthur A. ; 2. Frances R., m. April 20, 1853, Dr. 
J. K. Chamberlayne of Cazenovia, N. Y. ; 3. Mary J. ; 4. William, m. Dec. 
2, 1852, Harriet Van Wyck of New York city, where they live; 5. Charles 
Henry ; 6. Frederick Henry ; 7. George H. ; 8. Charlotte Louise. 

3. Chancey Lewis, b. Oct. 4, 1807; m. Mary Hargin. Merchant in Ithaca. 

4. William Granhy, b. Jan. 2, 1809; d. in infancy. 

5. William Granhy, b. Sept. 10, 1810; m. Louisa Ashley. Merchant in Ithaca. 
6 &l 7. Twin daughters ; d. in infancy. 

8. Hewy James Jasper, b. Sept. 6, 1815; m. Harriet Hanmer. He is a tobac- 
conist in Ithaca. 
9. Ann, ; d. in infancy. 

10. Harriet Ann, b. May 23, 1824 ; m. Rev. Albert Schuyler Graves, a Methodist 
clergyman, now of Utica, Oneida Co., N. Y. 



311. Harriet Shattuck, dau. of Timothy, (p. 160,) was b. in 
Durham, Ct., May 19, 1791, and d. in New Haven, Dec. 6, 1842, 
se. 51 y. 6 m. 17 d. She visited her brother Jared at St. Thomas, 
where 

She m. Johann Frederick Uhlhorn, then a resident of St. 
Thomas, but b. in Bremen, Germany, Nov. 30, 1785. He was 
a successful merchant, "respected and beloved;" and, retiring 
from active business, came to New Haven, Ct., for the benefit of 
his health and for the purpose of educating his children, where 
he d. Aug. 12, 1822, as. 36 y. 8 m. 12 d. Monuments are erect- 
ed in the New Haven cemetery to the memory of Mr. and Mrs. 
Uhlhorn, and three of their deceased children. 

1. Casper Frederick, b. in St. Thomas, April 7, 1811 ; m. Sarah Maria, dau. of 

Capt. James Goodrich of New Haven, and settled as a miller and produce 
dealer in Oswego, N. Y. 

2. John Edivard, b. in St. Thomas, Aug. 7, 1812; resides in New Orleans, unm. 
,3. diaries Lewis, b. in St. Thomas, May 31, 1814; graduated in the Medical 

Department of Yale College in 1844 ; m. Julia Bunch Hunt of New Orleans, 
and is now a practising physician in that city. 



HARRIET SHATTUCK WILLIAM SHATTUCK. 265 

4. Harriet Antoinette, b. Aug. 20, 1815; d. July 11, 181G, re. 10 m. 21 d. 

5. Francis Henry, b. in New Haven, on a temporary visit to that city, Sept. 2. 

1816; m. Susan M. Drake of Ithaca; settled as a miller in Oswego, where 
he d. March 7, 1853, re. 36 y. 6 m. 5 d. 

6. Robert Barnes, b. Sept. 4, 181 8 ; d. at St.Thomas, Sept. 16, 1821 , re. 3 y. m. 12 d. 

7. William Christopher, b. in St. Thomas, April 20, 1820; m. Gertrude Van 

Courtlandt Verplank, dau. of Beekman Verplank Hoffman, commander in the 
United States navy. He is now a cotton broker, settled in New York city. 

8. Julius Augustus, b. Nov. 23, 1821 ; d. in New Haven, Sept. 12, 1822, re. 9 m. 19 d. 



312. Dea. William Shattuck, only child of William, (p. 161,) 
was b. in New Ipswich, N. H., Jan. 5, 1774. He removed with 
his step-father, Simeon Hildreth, to Bradford, and in 1830 to 
Meriden, N. H., where he d. Oct. 30, 1847, ss. 73 y. 9 m. 25 d. 
He was a deacon in the Congregational church in Bradford, one 
of the selectmen several years, and was universally beloved and 
respected for his many excellent traits of character, as a man and 
a christian. 

He m. April 10, 1799, Jane Stevens, b. in Boscawen, N. H., 
Dec. 16, 1776, dau. of John Stevens and Elizabeth Jack man. 
She is now living in Meriden. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY JANE STEVENS, BORN IN BRADFORD. 

1. Simeon H, b. April 9, 1800 ; m. 1, S. Eaton ; 2, C. A. Richards, ... 507 

2. Mary, b. July 13, 1801 ; d. unm, June 18, 1849, re. 47 y. 11 m. 5 d. 

3. Dustin, b. Feb. 7, 1803 ; d. in Meriden, unm., April 8, 1833, re. 30 y. 2 m. 

1 d. He kept a grocery store in Boston in 1827 and 8, and after wards re- 
moved to New Bedford, and was in the mercantile business there until the 
year of his death. 

4. William, b. Oct. 16, 1804. In 1832 he settled in Meriden ; but in 1850 re- 

moved to Newport, and in 1852 to California, where he now resides. He m. 
May 5, 1828, Delia Presby of Bradford. They had, 1 . David Dustin, b. May 28, 
1830, merchant in California; 2. Francis Willard, b. Jan. 11, 1832; 3. John 
Henry, b. Oct. 28, 1833; 4. Lucy Ann, b. Sept. 1, 1835; 5. Martha Jane, b. 
March 2, 1837; 6. William Harrison, b. March 27, 1840, d. Dec. 30, 1846; 
7. Charles Curtis, b. Dec. 28, 1842; 8. Rodney Presby, b. Dec. 5, 1844; 9. 
Harriet Eliza, b. Nov. 12, 1847; 10. Milton Harrison, b. Aug. 13, 1849; 11 
William Carlos, b. Nov. 30, 1851. 

5. Jane, b. Jan. 24, 1807; d. unmarried, May 13, 1830, re. 23 y. 3 m. 19 d. 

6. Elizabeth,h. March 3, 1809; m. Feb. 12, 1832, Leonard Stearns, a scythe- 

snath maker in North Enfield, N. H. Has, 1. Mary Jane, b. April 20, 1833 ; 
2. Lucius Everett, b. April 1, 1835; 3. Harriet Maria, b. Jan. 19, 1839; 4. 
George Leonard, b. April 11, 1844; 5. John Webster, b. Oct. 9, 1846; 6. 
William Shattuck, b. July 20, 1849. 

7. Elvira, b. May 17, 1811 ; in. Nov. 20, 1839, Benjamin Wood, a farmer of 

34 " 



266 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

Lebanon, N. H. Have, 1. Charles Augustus, b. Aug. 10, 1841 ; 2. Martha 
Jane, b. June 8, 1843; 3. William Shattuck, b. Aug. 1, 1844. 

8. Maria, b. May 21, 1813 ; m. Jan. 1845, George W. Stearns, a farmer and 

mechanic of Johnson, Vt. Have, 1. Milo Leonard ; 2. Henrietta Louella ; 
3. George Francis. 

9. Hannah, b. Feb. 22, 1815; m. Nov. 1, 1841, Cyrus Baldwin, teacher of the 

Kimball Union Academy in Meriden, N. H. Have had, 1. Henrietta 
Louella, b. Aug. 16, 1842, d. April 19, 1849; 2. George Frederick, b. Feb. 
18, 1844, d. Jan. 25, 1848; 3. Marietta Jane, b. March 26, 1849, d. Oct. 30, 
1849; 4. Emily Esta, b. Feb. 5, 1851 ; 5. Charles Francis, b. Nov. 11, 1852 ; 
6. Mary Elizabeth, b. Oct. 31, 1853, d. Oct. 20, 1854. We are indebted to 
Mr. Baldwin for this account of the descendants of Dea. William Shattuck. 



313. Peter Shattuck, s. of Peter, (p. 162,) was b. in New 
Ipswich, July 15, 1778. He was a farmer, and first settled in 
Lunenburg, Mass., but in 1806 removed to Canaan, N. H. ; in 
1820 to Lebanon; and in 1830 to Bridgewater, Vt., where he 
was accidentally killed by a tree falling upon him, April 20, 
1835, se. 56 y. 9 m. 5 cl. 

He m. in Lunenburg, Jan. 1, 1803, Ruxbey Whiting, b. April 
20, 1782, dau. of Lemuel and Mary Whiting. She d. in Bridge- 
water, Oct. 23, 1851, 8e. 69 y. 6 m. 3 d. She was a member of 
the Methodist church. 



HIS CHILDREN, BY RUXBEY WHITING, BORN IN 



1. Peter, b. in Lunenburg, Dec. 19, 1804 ; and in 1830 settled in Bridgewater, Vt, 

and is now considered one of the best farmers in that town. He has been one 
of the selectmen. He m. Ruth H. Freeman of Orford, N. IL, dau. of Caleb 
F., and has had, 1. George P., b. Dec. 12, 1830, d. May 12, 1832; 2. Roxey, 
b. June 6, 1835; 3. Abel Storrs, b. Feb. 11, 1839; 4. Cyrus E., b. Jan. 9, 
1844, d. March 10, 1850. 

2. Roxey, b. in Canaan, N. H., Oct. 26, 1807; m. Sept. 1, 1835, Cyrus P.Forbes 

of Lyme. He is a farmer in Lebanon, N. H. Have had, 1. Edward Payson, 
b. July 5, 1836; 2. Sarah Jane, b. May 7, 1838 ; 3. Cyrus Perry, b. Jan. 6, 
1841 ; 4. Mary Elizabeth, b. Jan. 7, 1843 ; 5. Harlan Page, b. March 8, 1845 ; 
6. Olive Granger, b. June 11, 1850. 

3. Mary Jl., b. in Canaan, Sept. 24, 1810 ; m. March 19, 1833, John White, s. of 

William and Rachel W. He is a farmer, now of Bridgewater, Vt., both 
members of the Methodist church. Have, 1. Mary E., b. Dec. 8, 1833; 2. 
Lucinda S., b. May 21, 1835 ; 3. George H., b. Dec. 24, 1837, d. tb. 11 weeks ; 
4. George H., b. Dec. 24, 1838, d. as. 7 months ; 5. John A., b. Dec. 24, 1839 ; 
G. Ruth S., b. Feb. 5, 1841; 7. Henry C, b. Nov. 7, 1843; 8. Roena B., b. 
March 27, 1845; 9. Martha J., b. Jan. 7, 1847; 10. George, b. June 8, 1848; 
11. Charles M., b. Aug. 3, 1850; 12. Alice G., b. March 28, 1853. 

4. Lemuel, b. in Canaan, Nov. 7, 1815. He is a teacher, and first settled in 

Lebanon, N. H., but, in 184 J, removed to Bridgewater, Vt., where he has 



PETER, LYDIA, AND RUTH SHATTUCK. 267 

since resided, except in the spring and autumn terms, when he is engaged in 
teaching Mathematics and Natural Sciences in the Green Mountain Liberal 
Institute in Woodstock. He m. March 8, 1840, Sarah Ann Champion, b. 
Feb. 23, 1819, dau. of John C. and Harriet Abbott of Hartford, Vt., (see 
Abbott Genealogy, p. 112,) and has, 1. Helen Maria, b. May 4, 1845; 2. 
Edward Herbert, b. July 17, 1852. We are indebted to him for this account 
of the descendants of Peter Shattuck. 
5. Lucinda G., b. Jan. 30, 1822 ; m. Oct. 23, 1849, Charles Amiza Martin, a farm- 
er, now of Lebanon, N. H. Has Abbie Eveline, b. Dec. 18, 1854. 



314. Lydia Shattuck, dan. of Peter, (p. 162,) b. in New 
Ipswich, April 14, 1781, is now (1853) living in Thetford, Yt. 

She m. Nov. 4, 1804, Samuel Jackman, a mason of Thetford, 
where he d. Oct. 6, 1852. 

HER CHILDREN, BY SAMUEL JACKMAN, BORN IN THETFORD. 

1. Jasper, b. Aug. 12, 1805; m. April 6, 1836, Lydia Hammond, s. of Elijah and 

Lydia H. He is a mason in Thetford. 

2. Ruth, b. Nov. 15, 1808; m. Sept. 9, 1828, William Tucker, s. of William and 

Olive Tucker. He is a farmer in Thetford. 

3. Lydia, b. Aug. 24, 1810 ; m. March 20, 1829, Samuel Davidson, s. of Samuel 

and Sally Davidson. He is a farmer in Colebrook, Vt. 

4. Emetine M, b. Aug. 17, 1812; m. April 18, 1837, Eber N. Clark, s. of Ben- 

jamin and Abigail Clark. He is a shoemaker in Norwich, Vt. 

5. Submit, b. Jan. 15, 1815; m. Aug. 12, 1840, Charles Crocker, s. of James and 

Achsa C. He is a sheriff and town clerk in Thetford. 

6. Jerome B., b. March 28, 1817 ; m. Dec. 7, 1848, Sophia Wood, dau. of Otis and 

Rebecca Wood. They reside in Thetford. 

7. Caroline, b. March 17, 1819 ; resides in Thetford. 

8. Rosalind,b. May 1, 1821 ; m. Oct. 24, 1851, David G. Watson, s. of Ezra and 

Mary Watson. They live in Lowell, Vt. 

9. Coryden, b. March 10, 1823; m. Nov. 28, 1848, Angeline Melay, dau. of 

Jesse and Amanda Melay. They live in Thetford. 

10. Royal Washington, ) b. March 31, 1828 ; d. Feb. 22, 1833, ee. 4 y. 11 m. 22 d. 

11. Riel Wellington, S Twins. d. April 6, 1833, ?e. 5 y. m. 6 d. 



315. Ruth Shattuck, dan. of Peter, (p. 162,) was b. in New 
Ipswich, April 10, 1783, and d. inThetford,Nov., 1837, se. 54 y. 7m. 

She m. Moses Howe, s. of Nehemiah and Sarah Howe, of Thet- 
ford, where he d. Jan. 20, 1817, as. 40. 

HER CHILDREN, BY MOSES HOWE, BORN IN THETFORD. 

1. Moses Annis, b. March 8, 1810. He is a Methodist minister at Lowell, Mass., 

of very respectable rank. 

2. JYehemiah H., b. July 7, 1815; d. 1834, ae. 19 y. 

3. Ruth L., b. Jan. 16, 1817 ; m. 1848, Samuel T. Averill, a machinist in Spring- 

field, Mass. 

4. Sabra, b. ; m. April 17, 1845, John Cox, a farmer of Woodstock. 



268 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

316. Abigail Shattuck, dau. of Peter, (p. 162,) was b. in 
New Ipswich, June 9, 178-, (obscure, but probably 1786.) She 
d. in Boscawen, June 8, 1842. 

She m. Samuel P. Sweet, s. of Abraham and Priscilla S. of 
Bradford, N. H. They removed to Boscawen, where he is a 
fanner and stone-cutter. 

HER CHILDREN, BY SAMUEL P. SWEET, BORN IN BOSCAWEN. 

1. Priscilla, b. July 8, 1804; d. Aug., 1806, ae. 2 y. 1 m. 

2. Abraham T.,b. Feb. 8, 1807. He went into the Western Country in 1829, 

and has not been heard from for 20 years ; supposed to be dead. 

3. Priscilla, b. March 2, 1809 ; m. Summer Jewett, a farmer of Steubenville, O. 

4. Sophronia, b. April 25, 1811; m. Nathaniel Gokin, a stone-cutter of Boscawen. 

5. Simeon H.,b. April 27, 1813; m. Sarah Ann Hannaford ; a stone-cutter of 

Lowell, Mass. 

6. Elvira, b. May 20, 1815 ; m. Henry Sweet, a farmer of Boscawen. 

7. Carter G., b. May 7, 1817; d. Aug. 12, 1825, se. 8 y. 3 m. 5 d. 

8. Moses, b. Sept. 11, 1819; m. Mary Ann Rice, a stone-cutter of Lowell, 

Mass. 

9. Abigail, b. Oct. 29, 1821 ; m. Samuel W. Watson, a carpenter of Bos- 

cawen. 

10. Samuel, b. May 8, 1824 ; m. Diantha Cook ; a stone-cutter of Lowell, Ms. 

11. Carter G., b. Sept. 2, 1827. He is a trader in the West. 

12. Livonia, b. Sept. 1, 1829; m. Lorenzo Jewett, a farmer of Jeddo, Ohio. 

317. Stephen Shattuck, s. of Peter, (p. 162,) was b. in 
New Ipswich, Aug. 27. 1788, and settled as a farmer in Bethle- 
lem, N. H., where he now resides. 

He m. Jan., 1816, Rachel Nurse of Littleton, N. H., b. Aug. 
1, 1796. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY RACHEL NURSE, BORN IN BETHLEHEM. 

1. Abigails., b. Sept. 8, 1816; m. Dec. 11, 1842, W. D. Rollins of Bath, N.H. 

2. Persis K, b. Sept. 3, 1818; m. John Hamlin, removed to Milan, N. H., 

where she d. Aug. 18, 1844, a?. 25, leaving one child. 

3. Peter R, b. June 8, 1820 ; d. Feb. 25, 1850, ©. 29 y. 8 m. 17 d. 

4. Amanda M, b. Aug. 20, 1822; m. Jan. 17, 1847, Laban Ainsworth of Little- 

ton, N. H. 

5. John M, b. July 2, 1824 ; d. Aug. 13, 1825, aj. 1 y. 1 m. 11 d. 

6. Frances B., b. Mar. 14, 1827; d. Aug. 22, 1828, ae. 1 y. 5 m. 8 d. 

7. Charles C, b. Feb. G, 1829; a farmer of Bethlehem. 

8. Susanna H., b. Sept. 1, 1831. 10. Sabrina H., b. April 14, 1837. 

9. Milo F., b. Sept. 11, 1834. 11. William S., b. Feb. 15, 1840. 

318. Richard Prentice Shattuck, s. of Sherman, (p. 162,) 
was b. in New Ipswich, N. H., Feb. 15, 1791, and is now a 
shoemaker and farmer in West Boscawen, where he has resided 
since 1812. 



RICHARD P., CHARLOTTE, AND OLIVER P. SHATTUCK. 269 

He m. July 16, 1811, Abigail Parnsworth, b. in Dublin, 
March 29, 1793, dau. of Timothy Farnsworth and Elizabeth 
Robb of Peterborough. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ABIGAIL FARNSWORTH, BORN IN DUBLIN AND BOSCAWEN. 

1. Jane While, b. Sept. 5, 1811. She m. 1, Nov. 15, 1832, Prescott Couch, b. 

May 17, 1809. He was killed in a sawmill, April 4, 1837, ce. 27 y. 10 m. 17 d. 
She m. 2, Oct. 23, 1838, John G. Simpson, b. in Concord, N. H., April 9, 1808. 
He is a farmer, and weighs 249 lbs. Her weight is 186 lbs. She had by 
her first husband one son, b. Feb. 10, 1835, who was scalded to death, July 
15, 1837; and by her second husband, 2. Mary Jane, b. Aug. 19, 1839; 3. 
Charles Brown, b. March 28, 1841. 

2. A son, b. June 30, 1815 ; d. on day of birth. 

3. Sarah Downing, b. July 11, 1817. She m. Oct. 7, 1846, Samuel Hale, b. Dec. 

9, 1810, a carpenter and farmer. He d. April 17, 1854. They had, 1. a 
daughter, b. Nov. 2, 1848, d. in infancy; 2. Geo. Clark, b. April 11, 1851. 

4. Mary Briggs, b. June 25, 1820. She m. Dec. 6, 1842, George J. Elliot, b. 

Feb. 12, 1817, a farmer. They have, 1. John Simpson, b. Aug. 1, 1845; 2. 
Deighton Bowers, b. Aug. 23, 1847 ; 3. Abigail Shattuck, b. Nov. 7, 1852. 

5. Timothy Farnsworth, b. Nov. 23, 1822. He is a farmer; m. May 11, 1847, 

Permelia C. Sweatt, b. April 29, 1826. They have, 1. Frank Pierce, b. April 
17, 1848; 2. David Sweatt, b. Jan. 13, 1850 ; 3. Lorany, b. June 5, 1854. 

6. William Eaton, b. Sept. 3, 1824. He is a painter and stone-cutter; m. Oct. 1, 

1845, Nancy Ann Corser, b. Sept. 29, 1823. They have, 1. Richard Pren- 
tice, b. May 2, 1846; 2. Ambrose Lawrence, b. April 28, 1849; 3. Helen 
Prebble, b. March 11, 1851 ; 4. Thomas Prebble, b. May 26, 1853. 

7. Maiah Boy den, b. April 3, 1835. 

8. A daughter, b. April 6, 1837; d. on day of birth. 

319. Charlotte Shattuck, dau. of Sherman, (p. 162,) b. in 
Bradford, N. H., Dec. 29, 1795; m. Nov. 15, 1818, Alpheus 
Sawyer, b. Oct. 19, 1796. He is a farmer in Whitefielcl, and 
has had — 

1. Mary B., b. July 25, 1819; m. Jan., 1847, G. W. Cole of Manchester. 

2. Franklin B.,h. April 19, 1823; m. Nov. 30, 1853, Juliette G. Blanding of 

Bethlehem. 

3. CyrellA., b. Nov. 20, 1825; m. June, 1853, Esther Smith of Stanstead, 

Canada East. 

4. John B., b. April 8, 1835; d. March 25, 1838, se. 2 y. 11 m. 17 d. 

320. Oliver P. Shattuck, s. of Sherman, (p. 162,) was b. in 
Bradford, Feb. 17, 1797, and m. Oct. 13, 1820, Charlotte 
Whittier of Boscawen, and has had — 

1. Oliver P., b. Feb. 7, 1821 ; m. Feb. 25, 1852, his cousin Charlotte S. Shattuck, 

(Family 321.) They reside in Littleton. 

2. Jane b. ; m. Witcomb Nurse; d. May, 1852. 

3. Joanna. 6. Wesson. 

4. Huldah. 7. Susan. 

5. Cyrell. 8. Franklin, d. Feb. 1854. 



270 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

321. William Shattuck, s. of Sherman, (p. 162,) was b. in 
Jaffrey, N. H., Sept. 21, 1803. He was a carpenter, and first 
settled in Littleton, but in 1832 removed to Whitefield, and in 
1838 to Dalton, where he d. May 11, 1840, ae. 36 y. 7 m. 20 d. 

He m. Sept. 21, 1826, Rebecca Page, b. in Meredith, Aug. 31, 
1804, dau. of Josiah Page and Lydia Drake. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY REBECCA PAGE, BORN IN LITTLETON AND WHITEFIELD. 

1. Josiah P., b. Dec. 10, 1827; m. May 28, 1854, Betsey C. Warner, b. in 

Whitefield, Nov. 17, 1827, dau. of Hon. Simeon Warner and Louisa Huntoon. 

2. Lydia A., b. June 26, 1829. 

3. Charlotte S., b. July 22, 1831 ; in. her cousin O. P. Shattuck, (see last Family.) 

4. Richard P., b. Oct. 23, 1833. 

5. Hannah, b. Nov. 14, 1835. 

6. George IK, b. Feb. 28, 1839; d. May 6, 1840, s.ly.3 ra. 8 d. 



DESCENDANTS OE TMK CONNECTICUT BilAXCHES. 

322. Lydia Shattuck, dau. of Randall, (p. 163,) was b. in 
Chatham, Ct., Sept. 23, 1770, and d. in Wheeler, Steuben Co., 
N. Y., May 3, 1843, ae. 72 y. 7 m. 10 d. 

She m. in Torrington, Ct., in 1797, Nathan Rose, b. in 
Wyoming, Pa., April 17, 1775. He was a blacksmith, and first 
settled in German Flats, Herkimer Co., N. Y., but in 1806 re- 
moved to Augusta, Oneida Co.; in 1814 to Reading, Steuben 
Co. ; in 1815 to Benton, now Milo, Yates Co. ; in 1818 to 
Wheeler, Steuben Co., where he d. Oct. 23, 1831, ae. 56 y. 6 m. 
6 d. His father, Timothy Rose, was a native of Massachusetts; 
m. Mary Wheeler of Boston, or its vicinity; and soon after set- 
tled in Wyoming Valley, near Wilkesbarre, now in Luzerne Co., 
on the Susquehanna river in Pennsylvania, where he had pur- 
chased an extensive tract of land. He resided there until July 
3, 1778, when that place was destroyed by the tories and In- 
dians ; and the people — men, women and children — were indis- 
criminately massacred, under circumstances of the most horrid 
barbarity and torture. He was then killed, and his wife and four 
of his children captured. His dwelling-house and other buildings 
were burned in their presence. They were afterwards exchanged 
for other prisoners, and returned to Boston, where the widow m. 

■ Rice. His children were, 1. Nathaniel, a physician in 

Oneida Co., d. inl840, leaving two sons and eight daughters; 2. 
Nathan, the subject of this notice ; 3. Timothy, a blacksmith, d. in 
Cincinnati; 4. a daughter, who m. a Capen, and d. in Onondaga 



LYDIA, RANDALLL, AND MARY SHATTUCK. 271 

Co. These children, though justly entitled, never obtained pos- 
session of their father's estate in Wyoming. 



HER CHILDREN, BY NATHAN ROSE, BORN IN 



1. Laura, b. Oct. 23, 1798; m. in Wheeler, in 1819, David Finch, and d. in 

Canadice, Ontario Co., Nov. 30, 1834, se. 36 y. 1 m. 7 d. Had 5 children, 
3 now living. 

2. Hiram JY., b. March 25, 1800. He is a farmer in Wheeler; m. April 21, 

1829, Rebecca Hoytof Galway, Saratoga Co., and had 1 son and 7 daughters, 
3 of whom d. in infancy. 

3. Maria, b. Sept. 19, 1802; m. in Wheeler, Oct., 1823, David Barney. She d. 

Aug. 4, 1827, ae. 24 y. 10 m. 15 d. Had 2 children, both dead. 

4. Harriet, b. Nov. 30, 1805 ; a tailoress, unmarried, in Bath, Steuben Co. 

5. Herman S., b. March 6, 1807. In 1833 he settled as a trader in Avoca, Steu- 

ben Co., where he has since resided ; was elected a justice of the peace in 

1844, '48 and '52, and still holds the office. He m. in Avoca, Sept. 17, 1845, 
Adaline Barto. No issue. 

6. Sherman H, a twin with the above; first settled as a farmer in Wheeler, but 

removed to Howard, same county, where he has been a justice of the peace 
six years. He m. 1, in Wheeler, Sept. 30, 1829, Mahala Rose, (no known 
relative.) She d. June 24, 1837, having had twin daughters, both of whom 
married. He m. 2, March 22, 1838, Mahala G. Striker of Wheeler, and had 
3 daughters and 4 sons ; 2 youngest, twin boys. 

7. Erastus, b. May 12, 1810 ; is a farmer in Wheeler; m. Nov. 17, 1842, Mary 

Ann Smith of Wheeler, and has 1 son and 2 daughters. 

323. Randall Shattuck, s. of Randall, (p. 163,) was b. in 
Chatham, Ct., May 4, 1774, and settled in Torrington, Litchfield 
Co., where he d. of consumption, July 6, 1799, se. 25 y. 2 m. 2 d. 

He m. Sally Scoville, dau. of Ephraim Scoville and Sally 
Saxton, successively of Colchester and Winstead. She d. Aug. 
9, 1834, as. 66. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY SALLY SCOVILLE, BORN IN TORRINGTON. 

1. Ransley, ) b. July 7, 1799 ; d. Dec. 20, 1803, aa. 4 y. 5 m. 13 d. 

2. Randall, ) Twins. He is a cabinet and chair-maker in Hotchkissville, 

Colebrook, Ct. ; m. Jan. 3, 1822, Aurelia Eggleson, b. in Colebrook, April 6, 
1802, dau. of Frederick E. and Anna Cook. They have had, 1. Ransley, b. 
May 3, 1823, resides with his father, (and m. May 12, 1844, Priscilla Per- 
ceval, b. in Halifax, Yorkshire, England, May 15, 1823, adopted dau. of 
Lorin Perceval, and has had, 1. Charles L., b. July 10, 1845, d. Aug. 25, 

1845, ae. 1 m. 15 d. ; 2. Henrietta M., b. Sept. 4, 1848 ;) 2. Henry, b. Jan. 10, 
1827, d. Aug. 21, 1849, jb. 22 y. 7 m. 11 d. ; 3. Mary E., b. April 22, 1836. 

324. Mary Shattuck, dau. of Randall, (p. 163,) b. in Chat- 
ham, Oct. 30, 1775, d. in Torrington. She m. Uriah Gates, 
and had — 

1. Maria, b. ; m. Johnson, and is dead. 

2. Harriet, b. ; m. Lemus Sage, d. in Torrington. No living issue. 



272 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

325. Thankful Shattuck, dau. of Randall, (p. 163.) was b. 
in Chatham, Oct. 14, 1777, and d. in Marlborough, Dec. 8, 1822, 
a3. 45 y. 1 m. 24 d. 

He m. Edward Root, b. in Hebron, Nov. 4, 1772, s. of Daniel 
Root and Mindwell Root, his 3d cousin. Edward was a farmer in 
Haddamand Marlborough, and d. at the latter place, Nov. 28, 1841, 
se. 69 y. m. 24 d. He m. 2, Widow Amelia Jones, originally 
Andrews, who was b. June 8, 1779, and d. Feb., 1844. 

HER SIX ELDER CHILDREN, BORN IN COLCHESTER; THE TWO YOUNGEST BORN 

IN MARLBOROUGH. 

1. Edward, b. July 24, 1798; m. April 2, 1823, Calista Brainard, dau. of Calvin 

Brainard, and have had, 1. Calista L., b. April 7, 1824, m. Jan. 22, 3845, 
Alfred Brainard, Jr. of Haddam ; 2. Adaline Eliza, b. April 9, 1828 ; 3. Nancie 
Cordelia, b. Oct. 28, 1835; 4. Sarah Cynthia, b. March 25, 1839. 

2. Hannah, b. July 8, 1800; in. Jan., 1821, Josiah Mack of Hebron. She d. in 

Franklin, N. Y., Feb., 1850. Her children are dead. 

3. Chauncey Langdon, b. May 26, 1802 ; m. Cynthia N. Sumner of Hebron. 

He was killed in Ware, Mass., by a fall from a building 1 . 

4. Aristarchus Smith, b. April 14, 1804; d. of typhus fever, Aug. 27, 1826, 

ae. 22 y. 

5. Cynthia, b. April 14, 1806; m. Jan. 2, 1831, Claudius Brainard, a brother of 

Edward's wife. She d. in Gates, Monroe Co., N. Y. 

6. Ezekiel, b. Jan. 18, 1808; m. Jerusha Day of Colchester. He d. in Georgia; 

2 of his children d. of consumption in 1852 and 1853. 

7. Randall Augustus, b. Aug. 8, 1811 ; d. Aug. 1, 1816, se. 4 y. 11 m. 23 d. 

8. Sophronia, b. Nov. 6, 1814 ; m. John Finley of Marlborough, but now living in 

Glastenburgh. 

326. Amasa Shattuck, s. of Randall, (p. 163,) was b. in 
Chatham, March 22, 1779 ; and in 1800 settled as a cabinet- 
maker in Williamstown, Berkshire Co., Mass., where he d. Feb. 
8, 1852, se. 72 y. 10 m. 16 d. He was one of the board of 
selectmen several years ; and in 1844 represented the town in 
the legislature, and was otherwise respected and useful in the 
town. 

He m. in 1805, Joanna Smith, b. in Hadley, Mass., Feb. 9, 
1788, dau. of Capt. William Smith of Williamstown. She d. 
Sept. 1, 1847, se. 59 y. 6 m. 22 d. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY JOANNA SMITH, BORN IN WILLIAMSTOWN. 

1. William S., b. July 21, 1806; resides as a cabinet-maker upon the paternal 
homestead; m. 1, in 1829, Juliet Talmage, b. June 8, 1805, dau. of Capt. Asa 
Talmage of Williamstown. She d. July 12, 1830, eb. 25 y. 1 m. 4 d., twenty 
days after the birth of her only child, Juliet, b. June 20, 1830, d. Oct. 15, 
1848, 93. 18 y. 3m. 25 d. He m. 2, Nov. 1, 1831, Sally R. Bullard, b. in 
Rowe, Mass., May 18, 1810, dau. of Moses Bullard. No issue. 



AMASA SHATTUCK RUHAMAH SHATTUCK. 273 

2. Henry A., b. July 3, 1809. He is a printer, now in Troy, N. Y. ; in. in 1840, 

widow Alrnira Wellington, b. in Troy, Sept., 1809, dau. of Robert McCullen. 
They have Mary E., b. Dec. 15, 1841. 

3. Charles T., b. Feb. 25, 1811 ; unm., Judge of the Police Court in Buffalo, N.Y. 

4. Edward C, b. Mar. 31, 1813; m. in Buffalo, N. Y., Dec, 1843, Catharine 

Clark, b. in East Hampton, Mass., Dec, 1823, dau. of Lucus Clark, and 
have had, b. in Attica, 1. Eliza G., b. Nov. 13, 1844 ; 2. George C, b. June, 
1849 ; 3. Charles L., b. Jan. 1, 1851. 

5. Mary A., ? b. Dec. 26, 1814; unmarried, in Williamstown. 

6. Mason A., ) Twins. He is a machinist, now in Pittsburg, Pa. ; m. 

Sept., 1848, Sarah P. Reitzel of Lancaster, Pa., and has had, 1. Philip R., b. 
in Harrisburg, Pa., July, 1849; 2. Edward, b. in Latrobe, Pa., Oct., 1852. 

7. Benjamin F., b. Feb. 22, 1818. He is a merchant in Troy, N. Y. ; m. Sept. 

10, 1845, Caroline M. Foster, dau. of Alvah St. John Foster of Lansingburg, 
N. Y., and has had, 1. Franklin F., b. at Glenn's Falls, July, 1846; 2. Caro- 
line M., b. at do., Oct., 1847, d. March 8, 1848, se. 5 m. 

8. John M., b. May 25, 1820. He is a Daguerrian Artist in his native town ; m. 

Nov., 1844, Lucy C. Thomas, b. in Williamstown, July 10, 1824, dau. of 
William Thomas ; and have had, 1. Charles A., b. April 30, 1847 ; 2. Martha 
F., b. April 5, 1849. 

327. Ruhamah Shattuck, dau. of Randall, (p. 163,) was b. in 
Chatham, Ct., Sept. 23, 1781, and d. in Middletown, Susquehanna 
Co., Pa., April 9, 1821, se. 39 y. 6 m. 16 d. Nearly all of the 
adults of this family have been members of the Baptist Church. 

She m. in Winchester, Ct., April 12, 1798, Orange Mott, b. in 
Winchester, Oct. 17, 1772. s. of Adam Mott, who was b. in 
Wallingford, 1735, and d. at Jericho Bridge, N. Y., Sept., 1811, 
and of Abiah Philley, who d. Oct. 17, 1784. He is a tanner and 
shoemaker j and first settled in his native town, but in Feb., 1799, 
removed to Bridgewater, Oneida Co., N. Y. ; in 1804 to Yernon, 
same Co. ; and in 1812 to Middletown, Pa., where he now resides. 

HIS CHILDREN, BORN IN BRIDGEWATER, VERNON, AND MIDDLETOWN. 

1. Orange, b. March 21, 1800. He is a justice of the peace, and resides in 

Middletown, Pa. He m. 1, Oct. 30, 1823, Emeline Ball, b. in Stoekbridge, 
Mass., Nov. 10, 1804. She d. in Middletown, Pa., June 26, 1848, ee. 43 y. 
7 m. 16 d. He m. 2, Nov. 9, 1848, Ruby M. Cole, b. in Silver Lake, Sus- 
quehanna Co., Pa., March 16, 1820. He has had, 1. Olive, b. Oct. 15, 1824, 
d. Dec. 25, 1824, se. 2 m. 10 d.; 2. Lydia Emeline, b. July 26, 1850; 3. 
Ellen Louisa, b. May 5, 1853. 

2. Julia, b. Aug. 18, 1802 ; m. in Middletown, Dec. 31, 1822, Wileox Chase, b. in 

Little White Creek, Washington Co., N. Y., Sept. 23, 1795, s. of Nehemiah 
Wilcox and Mary WoodAvard. He is a farmer, now of Towanda, Bradford 
Co., Pa. Has had, 1. Mary Ruhamah, b. Nov. 23, 1823, m. Dec. 23, 1847, 
Jacob Kennedy, Baptist minister, now of Mehoopany, Wyoming Co., Pa., 
and has 3 children ; 2. Matilda Ann, b. Jan. 31, 1825, m. Jan. 13, 1849, 
35 



274 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

Warren Brewster, now of Sterlingville ; 3. Orange Mott, b. Nov. 27, 1826, m. 
Jan. 2, 1853, Minerva Haverly ; 4. Salmon Lathrop, b. Dec. 15, 1828; 5. 
Sabra Caroline, b. July 2, 1831, m. Feb. 10, 1852, John C. Goodwin, now of 
Barreville, McHenry Co., 111. ; 6. Cyrenus Fuller, b. June 16, 1834 ; 7. Harriet 
L., b. Jan. 12, 1837. 

3. Sabra, b. Sept. 27, 1804; d. unm. in Middletown, Jan. 9, 1831, m. 26 y. 3 m. 

12 d. 

4. Manila, b. Sept. 20, 1806 ; m. Jan. 5, 1826, Salmon Lathrop, b. in Rush, 

Susquehanna Co., March 9, 1802. He is a shoemaker in Mauch Chunk, 
Carbon Co., Pa. ; and has had, 1. Sabra M., b. May 21, 1827, m. July 3, 
1851, John G. Bossert of Mauch Chunk; 2. Julia Ann, b. Jan. 5, 1830; 3. 
Almira, b. Aug. 23, 1832; 4. Elon G., b. Sept. 15, 1834; 5. Harriet L., b. 
June 12, 1839; 6. Rosaline, b. Oct. 5, 1841, d. Sept. 15, 1842, ae. 11 m. 10 
d.; 7. Ellen R., b. May 4, 1843. 

5. Linus, b. June 6, 1808. He is a physician; m. in 1837, Jane Frost, who d. in 

Detroit, Michigan, about 1845 or 1850. Had Victor and Holmes. 

6. William Kent, b. Oct. 29, 1810. He is a Baptist minister in Hyde Park, 

Luzerne Co., Pa.; m. Nov. 11, 1834, Abigail Skinner, b. in Forkston, 
Wyoming Co., Jan. 27, 1807 ; and have had, 1. Mary Melicent, b. Oct. 4, 
1835 ; 2. Francis Wm., b. Jan. 24, 1837; 3. Henry Augustus, b. Dec. 1, 1838 ; 
4. Eugenio Kincaid, b. Aug. 1, 1841; 5. Smith Bixby, b. Jan. 22, 1843. 
Her first two were b. in Exeter, the others in Hyde Park. 

7. Chester Riley, b. July 5, 1813. He is an attorney at law in Upper Sandusky, 

Ohio; m. May 17, 1838, Eleanor Chase, b. in New Lebanon, N. Y., March 
14, 1812; and have had, 1. Harriet Elizabeth, b. Oct. 12, 1839; 2. Eugene, 
b. Oct. 14, 1846, d. July 9, 1850, se. 3 y. 8 m. 25 d.; 3. Ellen, b. March 
14, 1851. 

8. Harriet, b. March 12, 1816; m. in Erie, Pa., July 21, 1842, Lauren L. 

Robinson, b. in North East, Pa., Feb. 10, 1814. He is a merchant. Has 
Lauren Dwight, b. in Belvidere, Boon Co., 111., April 6, 1846. 

9. Amasa Shattuck, b. June 22, 1818. He is a merchant tailor in Waverly, Tioga 

Co., N. Y. ; m. Nov., 1840, Mary Baldwin, b. in Montrose, Susquehanna Co., 
Pa., May 15, 1819; and have had, 1. Harriet Eliza, b. Feb. 14, 1843; 2. 
Mary Ellen, b. Aug. 11, 1844 ; 3. Charles Amasa, b. May 23, 1846; 4. Wm. 
Nehemiah, b. Sept. 23, 1848 ; 5. Samuel Baldwin, b. June 22, 1853. 



328. Asa Shattuck, s. of Randall, (p. 163,) was b. in Chatham, 
Ct., April 29, 1784. He is a cooper, and removed with his father 
in 1795 to Middletown, in 1797 to Winchester, in 1801 to 
Torrington, in 1812 to Smithville, Chenango Co., N. Y., and in 
April, 1830, to German, same Co., where he has since resided. 
His dwelling-house in Smithville, during the absence of himself 
and wife, was destroyed by fire Jan. 14, 1823, and an infant 
child perished in the flames. His books and papers were also 
burned. The fire was supposed to have been caused by a defect 
in the fire-place. 



ASA SHATTUCK DAVID SHATTUCK. 275 

He m. April 14, 1808, Clarissa Loomis, b. Nov. 6, 17S2, dau. 
of Isaiah and Jerusha Loomis of Harwinton, Litchfield Co., Ct. 
Their three eldest children d. of scarlatina, and were buried on 
the same day in one grave. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY CLARISSA LOOMIS, BORN IN SEVERAL PLACES. 

J. Mary, b. Feb. 24, 1809; d. Sept. 9, 1813, ae. 4 y. C m. 15 d. 

2. Asa, b. Sept. 8, 1810; d. Sept. 9, 1813, se. 3 y. m. 1 d. 

3. Jerusha, b. June 18, 1812; d. Sept. 10, 1813, se. 1 y. 2 m. 22 d. 

4. Tilor, b. March 3, 1814; d. Aug. 20, 1819, 83. 5 y. 5 m. 17 d. 

5. Eliza, b. Feb. 10, 1816; d. Sept. 16, 1818, se. 2 y. 7 m. 6 d. 

6. David T.,b. Jan. 25, 1819. 

7. Laura, b. Nov. 14, 1820 ; m. Oct. 8, 1843, Adam Tice, a farmer in Ger- 

man; and have had, 1. Randall C, b. Sept. 11, 1844; 2. David S., b. May 
26, 1846; 3. Eliza A., b. Oct. 2, 1847; 4. Ellen L., b. June 20, 1850. 

8. A child, b. Sept. 14, 1822; was burned, Jan. 14, 1823, unnamed, se. 4 m 

9. Ruhamah, b. Nov. 6,1823. 10. Eliza E., b. Jan. 18, 1825. 



329. David Shattuck, s. of Randall, (p. 163,) was b. in 
Chatham, March 8, 1786. He learned the tanner's and shoe- 
maker's trade in Torrington, and afterwards worked in Williams- 
town and Adams in Mass., and in 1811 in Torrington. In Jan., 
1812, he removed to Smithville, Chenango Co., N. Y. ; in 1822 
to Cincinnatus, Cortland Co. ; and in 1835 to Marathon, same 
county, where he has since owned mills and a tannery, and 
carried on the manufacture of boots and shoes. His establish- 
ment was materially injured by an uncommon flood, Aug. 13, 
1853. In 1812 he joined the northern army as a musician ; and 
at the battle of Queenstown, Nov. 13th, the whole regiment to 
which he belonged, excepting 12 men, were killed, or taken 
prisoners. He was stationed in the hospital on the American 
side, and assisted the surgeon in the care of the sick. 

He m. in Adams, Mass., April 14, 1810, Esther Bailey, b. in 
Chester, Mass., Sept. 11, 1792, dau. of Harvey and Esther B. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ESTHER BAILEY, BORN IN . 

1 . Esther Arselia, b. Sept. 19, 1 8 1 1 . 

2. Mary Eliza, b. Feb. 21,1818. 

3. Harvey Randall, b. July 5, 1820. He resides with his father; m. in Ware, 

Mass., Sept. 3, 1844, Cornelia Lucinda Clements; and has had, 1. Isadore 
Georgiana, b. Sept. 20, 1846 ; 2. Clementine A., b. March 9, 1850, d. July 
27, 1853, 8B. 3 y. 4 m. 18 d. 

4. Lydia Miranda, b. April 23, 1824; m. July 9, 1850, Daniel E. Whitmore of 

Columbus, Chenango Co., N. Y. They are both teachers of an Academy in 
Orleans, Ontario Co. Have Daniel Webster, b. Sept. 27, 1853. 



276 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

330. Sally Shattuck, dau. of William, (p. 163,) b. in Torring- 
ton, Litchfield Co., Ct., July 13, 1782, m. Feb. 20, 1804, Warren 
Foote of Norfolk, b. Aug. 6, 1778. He was a farmer in Erie 
Co., Pa., where he d. June 12, 1843, as. 64 y. 10 m. 6 d. He 
commanded a military company in the war of 1812. They had 
8 children who reside in Erie Co. 

1. William, b. Oct. 19, 1807; d. Feb. 2, 1808, se. 3 m. 13 d. 

2. Eliza, b. June 3, 1810; m. Nov., 1839, Harry O. Root, b. 1808; and have 

had, 1. Warren, b. Dec, 1840; 2. George, b. 1842, d. June, 1844; 3. P. 
Allen, b. May, 1849; 4. Sarah, b. Nov., 1850. 

3. William S., b. Sept. 19, 1812; m. Dec., 1839, Ann S. Davidson; live in 

Monroe, Ashtabula Co., Ohio, and have had, 1. Antoinette, b. Aug., 1843; 

2. Adaline, b. March, 1846; 3. Adah, b. 1848. 

4. Zeruah, b. March 30, 1815; m. May 1, 1836, Cyrus Reed, b. Dec, 1804; 

and have had, 1. Rachel, b. July 13, 1837; 2. Henrietta, b. Sept., 1840; 

3. Sarah, b. 1841; 4. Catharine, b. 1843. 

5. George, b. May 21, 1818 ; m. in 1846, Roxanna Sawtell, and have had, 1. Alfred, 

b. Aug., 1843; 2. George Nerr, b. March, 1852. 

6. Warren, b. April 26, 1821 ; m. Nov., 1849, Martha J. Whiteford, and have had, 

1. Virgil W., b. Oct. 28, 1850; 2. Frank D., b. June 26, 1852. 

7. Perry, b. Aug. 13, 1824 ; m. Jan. 2, 1851, Mary E. Ewing, b. May 25, 1828, 

and have, 1. Sarah M., b. July 5, 1852; 2. Lizzie Jane, b. Oct. 8, 1854. 

8. Sarah H., b. July 10, 1827 ; m. April 30, 1850, Foster Bell, b. 1823, and have 

Alice A., b. June 15, 1851. 



331. Spencer Shattuck, s. of William, (p. 163,) was b. in 
Torrington, June 1, 1784, and settled as a farmer, first in Tor- 
rington, but about 1814 removed to Erie Co., Pa., where he d. 
Aug. 18, 1852, a3. 68 y. 2 m. 17 d. 

He m. Dec. 6, 1809, Sally Burton, b. in Middlebury Ct., 
March 10, 1789. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY SALLY BURTON, BORN IN ERIE. 

1. William B., b. Nov. 20, 1810; was a farmer in Erie, Erie Co., Pa., where he 

d. May 10, 1845, se. 34 y. 5 m. 20 d. He m. Aug. 9, 1838, Julia A. Barnes, 
b. 1812; and had, 1. Sarah J., b. Jan. 29, 1841 ; 2. Julia A., b. Aug. 6, 1843. 

2. Emily, b. April 26, 1813 ; m. Jan. 25, 1838, James Arbuckle, b. Aug. 12, 1808 ; 

and have had, 1. Spencer S., b. March, 1839; 2. Catharine, b. Dec. 12, 1841, 
d. May 19, ]844 ; 3. Mary Ann, b. July 6, 1845 ; 4. Margaret M., b. March 
12, 1847; 5. John P., b. Feb. 2, 1848. 

3. Mary Ann, b. Jan. 4, 1816; m. March 12, 1840, Dean Parker, and have had, 

l.Henry, b. Jan. 3, 1842; 2. Sarah A., b. 1844; 3. Jonas S., b. June 12, 
1845 ; 4. Frank, b. May, 1848 ; 5. Mary S., b. April 25, 1851 ; 6. Peter Allen, 
b. Jan., 1853. 

4. Henry, b. March 5, 1818; m. Dec. 1, 1842, Emily Parker, b. Nov. 3, 1817. 

She d. Sept. 16, 1852, a3. 34 y. 10 m. 13 d. Had, 1. Irene D., b. Dec. 24, 



ANSEL SHATTUCK ANNIS SHATTUCK. 277 

1847; 2. William S., b. May 17, 1846; 3. Enoch A., b. Dec. 24, 1847; 

4. Jonas H., b. July 3, 1849; 5. John B., b. July 2, 1851, d. Dec. 9, 1852, 
se. 1 y. 5 m. 7 d. 

5. Sally, April 2, 1820; m. April 25, 1849, Joshua Zimmerman, b. March 9, 
1815, and have Alfred, b. Jan. 24, 1853. He d. May 1, 1855, ce. 40 y. 1 m. 22 d. 

332. Ansel Shattuck, s. of William, (p. 163,) was b. in 
Torringford, (a part of Torrington,) June 19, 1786, and was a 
farmer in his native town and in Winchester until 1848, when he 
removed to Unionville, Hartford Co., where he now resides. 

Hem. 1, Sept., 1808, Lusena Barnes of Bristol, Ct., dau. of Levi 
Barnes and Huldah Granniss. She d. July 7, 1820, ae. 25. 

He m. 2, Nov., 1820, Maria Burr, dau. of Salmon Burr and 
Mary Ensign of Torrington. She d. July 29, 1840, as. 41. 

He m. 3, March, 1841, Hannah Church, dau. of John and 
Hannah Church of Winchester. She d. April 10, 1847, as. 66. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY LUSENA BARNES, BORN IN TORRINGTON AND WINCHESTER. 

1. Adah, b. Feb. 27, 1814; m. Dec. 11, 1832, Wagar W. Lyman, b. in Stanford, 

Dutchess Co., N. Y., June 12, 1812, s. of Levi Lyman of Bridgeport and 
Sarah Cornwall of Stanford. They first settled in New Hartford, Ct., but 
removed to Chester, Randolph Co., 111., where they now live. During their 
removal the boat which contained their goods was sunk ; and many articles, 
including their family Bible and family record, were lost. They had, b. in 
New Hartford, 1. Adah Elizabeth, b. May 11, 1834, m. Feb. 22, 1852, Horace 
James Hostetter of Port Perry, Mo., and has Lucy Alice, b. June 14, 1853 ; 2. 
Jane Ann, b. Feb. 6, 1836, m. May 7, 1850, Albert S. Parmer of Chester, 
Randolph Co., 111. 

2. Esther, b. Sept. 8, 1816 ; m. Hiram Bascom ; lives in Unionville, and have had, 

1. Sarah Maria, d. ; 2. Hiram Robert, d. ; 3. Sarah Maria; 4. Elizabeth. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY MARIA BURR, BORN IN TORRINGFORD. 

3. Lusena, b. Dec. 1823; m. William A. Grant, s. of Augustus Grant and Orril 

Cone. They live in Torrington, and have Maria. 

4. Susan, ) b. Aug. 9, 1826 ; d. in Unionville, May 5, 1852, m. 25 y. 8 m. 26 d. 

5. Sarah, S Twins. m. Oct. 10, 1847, Phineas B. Goodwin, s. of Ozias 

Goodwin and Abigail Bradley. They live in Unionville, and have had, 1. 
Caroline, b. Oct. 26, 1848, d. July 26, 1853 ; 2. A daughter, b. Dec. 16, 1850, 
d. Jan. 1, 1851, unnamed ; 3. Susan S., b. Feb. 12, 1852. 

333. Annis Shattuck, dau. of William, (p. 163,) b. in Tor- 
rington, Jan. 28, 1793 ; m. Sept. 28, 1820, William Arbuckle, 
b. Feb. 9, 1793. He is a farmer, and they now reside in Erie. 

HER CHILDREN, BY WILLIAM ARBUCKLE, BORN IN ERIE. 

1. Caroline, b. July 5, 1822; m. Aug. 1, 1844, Robert Davidson, b. 1812, and 
have, 1. Annis Sarah, b. June 23, 1845; 2. Adaline Sophronia, b. Oct. 5, 
1846 ; 3. Irene Priscilla, b. Feb. 29, 1848 ; 4. Robert Bruce, b. Sept. 4, 1849 ; 

5. Cornelia Ann, b. April 24, 1851 ; 6. Caroline Hannah, b. June 4, 1853 ; 
7. William Arbuncle, b. Dec, 1854. 



278 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

2. Sophronia M, b. May 24, 1824 ; m. Nov. 13, 1851, John F. Allen. 

3. Joseph JV., b. Oct. 3, 1826; m. Nov. 18, 1852, Emeline L. Langdon. 

4. William S., b. Nov. 22, 1828 ; a carpenter in Erie. 

5. Cornelia A., b. Dec. 10, 1830 ; d. July 3, 1849, se. 18 y. 6 m. 23 d. 

6. Hannah C, b. Feb. 5, 1833 ; d. Sept. 4, 1851, se. 18 y. 6 m. 29 d. 

7. Burkley P., b. Aug. 12, 1825. 



334. Chauncey Shattuck, s. of William, (p. 163.) was b. in 
Torrington, Aug. 16, 1795. He was a farmer, and in 1829 settled 
in Erie, Erie Co., Pa., about 5 \ miles from Erie Harbor. He d. 
in Green, Oct. 17, 1853, se. 58 y. 2 m. 1 m. We are indebted to 
him for our account of his father's descendants. 

He m. Sept. 5, 1827, Sarah M. Rowley, b. in Winsted, Jane 
28, 1802. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY SARAH M. ROWLEY, BORN IN WINSTED AND ERIE. 

1. Virgil Rowley, b. Aug. 5. 1828 ; m. June 10, 1851, Huldah L. Woolley, b. Jan. 

31, 1829, and have Rosina L., b. July 1, 1852. 

2. Hannah S., b. April 26, 1831 ; m. Feb. 18, 1851 , Artemas Severence, Jr. 

3. Harriet C, b. June 6, 1833 ; m. March 4, 1852, David Church. 

4. Homer Van Buren, b. Oct. 10, 1835. 

5. Sarah M., b. Oct. 5, 1841 ; d. Feb. 21, 1842, as. 4 m. 16 d. 

6. Warren Dunham, b. Feb. 13, 1844. 



335. David P. Shattuck, s. of Thomas, (p. 164,) was b. ill 
New Canaan, Ct., Jan. 25, 1786. He was a farmer, and first 
settled in Smithville, Chenango Co., N. Y., where he lived 14 
years. In 1823 he removed to Cincinnatus, Cortland Co. ; in 
1827 to Pitcher, Chenango Co. ; in 1833 to Henrietta, Monroe 
Co. ; in 1834 to Alabama, Genesee Co., and in 1854 to Homer, 
Calhoun Co., Michigan, where, in 1853, he bought 280 acres of 
land. Most of his children reside in his neighborhood. In 1851 
he had an attack of paralysis, from which he never entirely re- 
covered. He d. in Homer, Nov. 12, 1854, as. 68 y. 9 m. 17 d. 
A correspondent remarks — " If { an honest man is the noblest 
work of God,' he was one of them. His father was so before 
him ; and he brought up his children to walk in the same path. 
All are staunch democrats, and those that are married have mar- 
ried such." 

He m. in Smithville, Nov. 6, 1807, Asenath Phelps, b. in 
East Haddam, Ct., July 12, 1793, dau. of Jonathan Phelps, (b. 
Feb. 14, 1763,) and Charity Beckwith, (b. March 27, 1765,) dau. 
of Nathaniel Beckwith of that place. These parents were living 



DAVID P. SHATTUCK. 279 

in 1855, at the ages of 92 and 90 years. She was 14 y. 3 m. 
24 d. old at her marriage, and had several grandchildren before 
the birth of her own youngest child. 



HIS CHILDREN, BY ASENATH PHELPS, BORN IN ■ . 

1. Harriet Statira, b. Jan. 14, 1809. She has resided, unm., with her parents. 

We are indebted to her for our account of her father's descendants. 

2. Julia Ruhamah, b. March 31, 1811 ; m. in Henrietta, Monroe Co., Jan. 1, 1834, 

Ira Hall of Smithville, and in 1835 removed to Alabama, Genesee Co., 
where she d. Nov. 1, 1850, a3. 39 y. 7 m. 1 d. She had, 1. Franklin Burdett, 
b. April 23, 1835, d. April 3, 1836, a?. 11m. 10 d. ; 2. Charles Franklin, b. 
Dec. 25, 1836, d. June 4, 1838, ee. 1 y. 5 m. 9 d.; 3. Antoinette Elizabeth, 
b. July 1, 1841 ; 4. Charles Adams, b. March 18, 1842; 5. Harriet Isabella, 
b. June 7, 1843 ; 6. Haskell Burdett, b. Aug. 4, 1845 ; 7. Franklin Adelbert, 
b. June 5, 1847; 8. Ira, b. Oct. 1, 1850. The youngest was adopted by 
Daniel Walker of Alabama, and named Ira Hall Walker ; the others are 
living with their mother's friends. Mr. Hall is living in Kalamazoo, Mich. 

3. Charity Beckwith, b. April 20, 1813; m. in Condon, Alleghany Co., Pa., May 

1, 1829, Charles Adams of Greene, Chenango Co., N. Y. They are both 
members of the Christian church, of which he is a deacon. He is a farm- 
er; lived eight years in Greene, and in 1838 removed to Shelby, Orleans 
Co., thence to Alabama, and thence, in 1853, to Homer, Calhoun Co., 
Mich. They have had, 1, Joseph Beckwith, b. Nov. 9, 1830, m. Dec. 25, 
1852, Roby Duel of Alabama— she d. Feb. 19, 1855; 2. David Leroy, b. 
March 22, 1832; 3. Philo, b. Oct. 27, 1833; 4. Charlotte Asenath, b. March 
7, 1835; 5. Charles Henry, b. Nov. 23, 1836, d. in Green, Nov. 15, 1837, 
ae. 11 m. 22 d.; 6. Martha Jane, b. Jan. 27, 1841; 7. Arvilla Betsey, b. 
Aug. 25, 1842; 8. Sarah Eliza, b. April 16, 1845; 9. Alice Rebecca, b. 
March 7, 1848; 10. Frances Ann Jenette, b. Oct. 12, 1849; 11. Floyd 
Adelbert, b. Sept. 8, 1852, d. Sept. 18, 1852, se. 10 d. 

4. Joseph Beckwith, b. Sept. 24, 1815 ; first settled as a farmer in Alabama, but, 

in 1853, sold his estate and removed to Newton, Calhoun Co., Mich. He 
in. in Alabama, Nov. 6, 1835, Angeline Baker, b. in Pompey, March 16, 
1817, dau. of Nathan Baker and Mahala Shattuck, (Family 370.) They 
-have had, 1. Charlotte Indamora, b. Sept. 14, 1836, d. Nov. 17, 1851, se. 15 
y. 2 m. 3 d. ; 2. Laura Eliza Arnot, b. June 20, 1840 ; 3. Nathan Baker, b. 
May 6, 1842; 4. David Phelps, b. Dec. 18, 1845; 5. Joseph Adelbert, b. 
Feb. 22, 1853 — he was accidentally shot by a hired man, May 13, 1855 ; 6. 
Sarah Angeline, b. April 5, 1855. 

5. John Forbes, b. Dec. 5, 1817. He is a farmer, first in Alabama, but now of 

Sheridan, Calhoun Co., Mich. ; m. Dec. 31, 1836, Emily Melissa Rozelle, 
and has had, 1. Agnes Theresa, b. Dec. 8, 1847; 2. Elias Eugene, b. June 
25, 1849 ; 3. Forbes Rozelle, b. March 4, 1851 ; 4. Ralph, b. Aug. 24, 1854. 

6. Samuel Haskell, b. Nov. 27, 1819 ; m. Jan. 1, 1847, Barbary Gorton, only 

dau. of Lancaster Gorton, Esq. of Alabama ; and has had, 1. Francis Marion, 
b. Nov. 6, 1847; 2. Florence Maria, b. April 19, 1850. 

7. Clarissa Cornelia, b. March 19, 1822 ; m. in Alabama, Dec. 25, 1847, Harvey 

Clinton Baker of Lockport, b. in Pompey, Dec. 3, 1818, s. of Joseph Baker 
and Lucy Shattuck, (Family 369.) In 1853 they removed to Michigan, and 



280 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

settled near Battle Creek, and have one child — Lucy Asenath Roxanna 
Jenette, b. Aug. 26, 1849. 

8. Charles Lyman, b. in Cincinnatus, April 28, 1824. He is a farmer in 

Alabama; m. Dec. 24, 1847, Rhayder Gowy, only child of Jacob Winslow, 
Esq., and have Jacob Winslow, b. Jan. 4, 1849. 

9. Sarah Ann, b. Nov. 10, 1847; m. Sept. 14, 1853, Dr. Edwin Amsden of East 

Gainsville, Wyoming Co., N. Y. 

10. Eliza Jane, b. Feb. 24, 1830 ; m. Jan. 2, 1851, Gardner Clark of Homer, 

Mich., and have had, 1. Clara Juliette, b. Feb. 9, 1853; 2. Jane Louisa, b. 
Nov. 12, 1854, d. March 3, 1855. 

11. Roxanna Short, b. Aug. 27, 1832, in Pitcher. 

12. Andrew Jackson, b. Feb. 24, 1834 ; m. Jan. 19, 1855, Isadore Hatch of Homer. 

13. Frances Ann Jenette, b. Sept. 7, 1836, in Alabama. 



336. Olive Shattuck, dau. of Thomas, (p. 164,) was b. in 
New Canaan, Ct., May 5, 1787, and now resides, a widow, in 
Smithville. 

She m. June 6, 1806, Rodney Phelps, b. in Lyme, Ct., May 
19, 1787, s. of Jonathan Phelps and Charity Beckwith. He d. in 
Illinois, Aug. 21, 1846, ae. 59 y. 3 m. 2 d. 

HER CHILDREN, BY RODNEY PHELPS, BORN IN SMITHVILLE. 

1. Dianiha, b. Oct. 27, 1807; m. March 11, 1830, Amos Hotchkiss of Smithville. 

2. Smith, b. Aug. 16, 1809 ; m. Nov., 1831, Julia Hotchkiss. 

3. Rhoda, b. Oct. 1, 1810; m. May, 1843, Cornelius McGee, who resides at 

Smithville. She d. there, April 1, 1846, se. 35 y. 6 m. 

4. Athalinda, b. Sept. 12, 1812; m. June 12, 1834, Thomas J. Reed. 

5. Thomas, b. Sept. 18, 1816. 

6. Mary, b. June 29, 1820. 

7. Sherman, b. Aug. 11, 1822; m. May, 1848, Ann Eliza Lionberger. They 

live at Fountain Green, Hancock Co., Illinois. 

8. Edwin, b. April 10, 1824. 



337. Clarissa Shattuck, dau. of Thomas, (p. 164,) was b. 
in Catskill, Aug. 31, 1790, and d. in Smithville, Dec. 31, 1823, 
se. 33 y. 4 m. 

She m. N. Beckwith Phelps, a brother of Rodney and Ase- 
nath, above mentioned. He m. 2, Catharine A. Gutchess, by 
whom he had 7 more children — Susan, Harriet Jane, Amelia, 
Clarissa, Samuel, Charity, and Helen. 

HER CHILDREN, BY N. B. PHELPS, BORN IN . 

1. Samantha, b. Aug. 2, 1809 ; m. Jan. 9, 1834, Ira B. Gutchess of Victory, 

Cayuga Co. ; has had 8 children, 2 of whom are dead. 

2. Jonathan, b. Nov. 21, 1811 ; m. 1, Harriet Wheeler. She d. in childbirth, one 

year after marriage. He m. 2, Rachel Mandeville of Ovid, N. Y. ; lives in 
Shelby, Orleans Co., and has had G children, one of whom is not living. 



CALVIN SHATTUCK LYMAN SHATTUCK. 281 

3. Olive Maria, b. July 15, 1813; d. Aug. 15, 1834, se. 21 y. 1 m. 

4. Asenath, b. May 15, 1816; m. Dec. 28, 1838, Heman Crowell of Conquest, 

Cayuga Co., and has 6 children. 

5. Charles Giles,h. Sept. 9, 1818; ro. Jane Letts of Shelby, Orleans Co., and 

lives in Royalton, Niagara Co., N. Y. 

6. Matilda, b. ; d. aged 2 years. 

7. Alexander Bryant, b. Aug. 3, 1823; m. 1, Jan. 3, 1849, Catharine Eliza 

Crowell. She d. July 16, 1851, leaving one child. He m. 2, Isabella 
Crowell, sister of his 1st wife. 



338. Calvin Shattuck, s. of Thomas, (p. 164,) was b. in 
Catskill, Feb. 5, 1793. He was a farmer in Greene, Chenango 
Co., where he d. of paralysis, Sept. 27, 1853, se. 60 y. 7 m. 22 d. 

He m. Jan. 1, 1812, Anna Brooks, b. in Connecticut, Nov. 3. 
1796, dau. of Josiah and Anna Brooks. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ANNA BROOKS, BORN IN GREENE. 

1. Smith, b. ; d. in Greene, young. 

2. Mahala, b. Oct. 29, 1816. 

3. Olive, b. Mar. 15, 1820 ; m. Jan. 9, 1840, Henry Adams, a farmer in Greene. 

She d. Sept. 12, 1848, ee. 28 y. 5 m. 27 d. 

4. Laura, b. Dec. 30, 1822 ; m. May 27, 1846, Erastus Hotchkiss. 

5. David, b. Sept. 20, 1823; m. Oct. 10, 1848, Hannah Gross. 

6. Harriet, b. Oct. 24, 1827; m. Oct. 10, 1848, Ambrose Taft. 

7. Almeda, ) b. March 12, 1828 ; m. Oct. 6, 1848, George Hotchkiss. 

8. Allen, S Twins. 

339. Lyman Shattuck, s. of Thomas, (p. 164,) was b. in 
Catskill, Sept. 12, 1795. He first settled as a blacksmith in 
Greene, or Smithville, but in 1828 removed to Homer, Cortland 
Co. ; in 1833 to Hamilton, Madison Co. ; in 1836 to Michigan ; 
and now (1853) lives in Commerce, Oakland Co. 

He m. in Greene, Jan. 22, 1815, Julia Ann Phelps, b. in 
Saratoga, July 12, 1797, sister of the above persons of the name. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY JULIA ANN PHELPS, BORN IN GREENE, HOMER, AND HAMILTON. 

1. Lorin, b. Jan. 28, 1810; d. in Parma, Mich., May 17, 1836, a?. 20 y. 3 m. 19 d. 

2. Statira H., b. June 26, 1818 ; m. in Parma, Oct. 13, 1836, John Grow. 

3. Susan W., b. Jan. 10, 1820; m. in Milford, Oakland Co., Mich., Jan. 22, 1840, 

Carlton Sanders, a merchant. She d. in Fond Du Lac, Wis., Oct. 18, 1847, 
se. 27 y. 9 m. 8 d., having had, 1. Floyd A., b. April 10, 1843; 2. Ellen G., 
b. Dec. 24, 1847. 

4. Eliza M., b. Jan. 12, 1824 ; m. in Pontiac, Mich., Nov. 12, 1850, Samuel W. 

Fuller, a merchant, now residing in Beloit, Rock Co., Wis., s. of John and 
Hannah Fuller. 

5. Maria C, b. Oct. 21, 1827. She m. 1, in Milford, Mich., Aug. 20, 1846, 

Hermon C. Noble. He d. at Lansing, Jan. 9, 1848. She m. 2, Feb. 14, 1852, 
Thaddeus Smith, a merchant in Commerce. She had Frank Noble, b. July 
24, 1848, d. July 12, 1851, je. 2 y. 11 m. 18 d. 
36 



282 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

6. Alfred, b. Aug. 13, 1829; is a farmer in Commerce. 

7. Charles M, b. Sept. 20, 1831; d. in Hamilton, N. Y., Aug. 7, 1833, £e. 1 y. 

10 m. 17 d. 

8. Mary G., b. Aug. 2, 1834; m. April 25, 1852, George Whitney. 

9. Charlotte J., b. May 29, 1837. 

10. Adelbert B., b. July 18, 1840 ; d. March 10, 1841, £e. 7 m. 22 d. 

340. Mary C. Shattuck, dau. of Thomas, (p. 164,) b. in 
Smithville, Jan. 19, 1822 ; m. Aug. 27, 1844, Henry Hoyt, b. in 
Greene, Chenango Co., N. Y., Oct. 21, 1822, s. of Chauncey 
Hoyt, b. in Walton, Delaware Co., and grandson of Thaddeus 
Hoyt of Norwalk, Ct. His mother was Amelia Raymond, b. in 
Walton. He is a chairmaker and painter in Greene, Chenango 
Co., where his two children were born. Mr. Hoyt has the family 
Bible, containing the record of his father and grandfather Shat- 
tuck's families. 

1. Esther Amelia, b. June 12, 1847; d. Sept. 13, 1847, se. 3 m. 1 d. 

2. Mary Amelia, b. Sept. 13, 1849. > 

. 

341. Caleb Shattuck, s. of Robert, (p. 164,) was b. in 
Colchester, Ct., May 24, 1782, and settled as a farmer in Hamil- 
ton, Madison Co., N. Y., where he d. June 6, 1813, as. 31 y. 
m. 12 d. Grave-stones, erected to his memory, mark his grave, 
near his parents. 

He m. March 3, 1805, Rhoda Simons, b. in Litchfield, Ct., and 
then widow of Mr. Fuller of Hamilton. She m. for her 3d 
husband, Sept. 27, 1814, Norman Haugh, and resided in Scriba, 
Oswego Co., N. Y. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY RHODA SIMONS, BORN IN HAMILTON. 

1. Eliza, b. March 9, 1806; m. June 15, 1823, Calvin Merritt. They removed to 

Geauga Co. in Ohio ; and from thence, in 1845, to Belvidere, Boone Co., 111. 
She d. in April, 1851, se. 45 y., leaving 2 sons and 6 daughters. 

2. Anna, b. March 28, 1808; m. Dec. 16, 1824, Martin Wheeler. She d. May 

27, 1847, ee. 39 y. 2 m., leaving 3 sons and 2 daughters. 

3. Esther, b. April 15, 1810; m. 1, Jan. 14, 1829, Newell Cook, who d. in Ohio. 

She m. 2, Nov. 1, 1845, Jonathan Bryant of Birmingham, Ohio. 

4. Gardon Fuller, b. April 3, 1812. He is a farmer, and has commanded a vessel 

sailing from Oswego to Chicago. He m. Jan. 2, 1837, Amelia Davis of 
Oswego, and has had, 1. Anna, b. Aug. 30, 1838; 2. Eunice, b. June 22, 
1840; 3. Harriet, b. Aug. 16, 1846; 4. Elizabeth, b. Aug. 1, 1852. 

5. Caleb, b. Jan. 14, 1814 ; m. 1, Nov. 4, 1833, Rosette Gilman of Pulaski. She 

d. May 10, 1851, se. 32 y. He m. 2, Jan. 4, 1853, Harriet E. Doolittle of 
Juddo, Orleans Co., N. Y. He had, 1. Josephine, b. April 1, 1838; 2. 
Rosina, b. Sept. 22, 1840; 3. Sarah E., b. July 21, 1843; 4. Allen, b. April 
15, 1846; 5. Annis C, b. July 19, 1848. 



ERASTUS, ALFRED, AND NANCY SHATTUCK. 283 

342. Erastus Shattuck, s. of Robert, (p. 164,) was b. in 
Colchester, Ct, Jan. 9, 1785, and first settled as a farmer in 
Hamilton, N. Y.,but removed about 1833 to " Shattuck's Grove," 
Belvidere, Boone Co., 111., where he d. March 7, 1845, as. 60 y. 
1 m. 28 d. 

He m. July 12, 1807, Zoda Scoville, dau. of Judah Scoville 
and Mary Loomis, early settlers of Hamilton, formerly of Col- 
chester, Ct. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ZODA SCOVILLE, BORN IN HAMILTON. 



1. Cdinda, b. Nov. 10, 1808 

2. Almon, b. June 24, 1811 

3. Scoville, b. Feb. 6, 1814 

4. Erastus, b. May 5, 1816 

5. Judah, b. Feb. 24, 1820 

6. Clarissa, b. Sept. 28, 1822 

7. Chauncey, b. April 4, 1828 



m. Jan. 1, 1835, John Hendee ; 6 children, 
m. Jan. 15, 1834, Emily Brown; 6 children, 
m. May 6, 1840, Almira Randall ; 3 children, 
d. June, 1829, as. 13 y. 1 m. 
m. Oct. 2, 1843, Harriet Lord ; 3 children, 
m. Oct. 8, 1843, Charles B. Lord ; 5 children. 
d. June, 1842, se. 14 y. 2 m. 



343. Alfred Shattuck, s. of Robert, (p. 164,) was b. in 
Colchester, Ct., July 11, 1789. He is a carpenter, and first set- 
tled in Hamilton, N. Y., but in 1818 removed to Concord, Geauga 
Co., Ohio, and in 1835 to Belvidere, Boone Co., 111., where he 
now resides. 

He m. Jan. 4. 1813, Olive Orton, b. in Litchfield, Ct., Nov. 
10, 1788, dau. of Azariah Orton and Sybil Cleveland, many years 
residents of Florence, Oneida Co., N. Y., formerly of Litchfield, Ct. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY OLIVE ORTON, BORN IN HAMILTON AND GEAUGA. 

1. Harlyn, b. March 3, 1815; m. April 1, 1843, Ruth E. Murray. He is a car- 

penter in Napierville, Du Page Co., 111. Has 5 children. 

2. Emeline, b. July 17, 1817; m. 1, April 28, 1835, William Gault. He d. Oct. 

6, 1848. She m. 2, Oct. 28, 1850, Jonas Hait. She had 6 children by her 
1st, and 2 by her 2d husband. 

3. Annis, b. Dec. 26, 1819; m. June 19, 1841, Charles Hamilton; 4 children. 

4. Nancy P.,b. April22, 1820; m. Feb. 24, 1849, Matthias Stone; 3 children. 

5. Foster K, b. June 22, 1823; m. Aug. 30, 1847, Harriet Brett of Spring. 

6. Maria, b. Sept. 15, 1829; m. Feb. 7, 1850, Wm. Holembeck; 2 children. 

7. Anna, b. Sept. 14, 1832; m. Nov. 18, 1851, George W. Avery. 

8. GeorgeM.,b. Oct. 9, 1834. 

There were three other children belonging to this family that d. in infancy. 
One, b. March 5, 1814; one, b. Oct. 8, 1825; and one, b. Sept. 10, 1827. 



344. Nancy Shattuck, dau. of Robert, (p. 164,) was b. in 

Colchester, Ct., July 25, 1791, and now resides in Hamilton, N.Y. 

She m. April 26, 1807, Roswell Porter, b. in Winsted, Ct., 



284 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

July 9, 1785, s. of Eleazer Porter and Susanna Rowley, then 
residents of Hamilton. He d. in Hamilton, April 7, 1853, ae. 67 

y. 8 m. 2S d. 

HER CHILDREN, BY ROSWELL PORTER, BORN IN HAMILTON. 

1. A daughter, b. Jan. 3, 1809; d. Jan. 4, 1809, se. 1 d., unnamed. 

2. Ably Ann, b. Oct. 20, 1810; m. Jan. 19, 1831, William Champlin, b. in 

Montgomery Co., but then of Hamilton, s. of Michael Champlin and Mary 
Enos. Have 1 son and 5 daughters. 

3. Lovisa L., b. Oct. 28, 1813; m. Jan. 10, 1837, Preston H. Smith, a farmer in 

Hamilton. She d. Jan. 22, 1850, se. 36 y. 2 m. 24 d., leaving 2 sons and 2 daus. 

4. M Maria, b. March 4, 1816; m. Aug. 27, 1837, Daniel H. Dunham. 

5. Esther E., b. Oct. 22, 1818; m. Feb. 17, 1836, Moses M. Nash. He is a 

farmer, has had 6 children ; 4 d. in infancy. 

6. Orlando, b. April 19, 1822 ; m. Dec. 14, 1851, Lefe E. Cross. 

7. Memo W., b. Feb. 26, 1827 ; m. June 30, 1846, Maria Ann Muir. 

8. Wm. Stratford,b. Jan. 2, 1832; m. Jan. 9, 1853, Theresa Shepardson. 



345. Esther Shattuck, dau. of Robert, (p. 164,) was b. in 
Colchester, Dec. 25, 1793, and has resided at Winsted, Hamilton, 
and other places. 

She m. 1, Sept., 1811, Erastus Rowley, b. in Winsted, Ct., 
s. of Ebenezer R. and Abigail Knowlton. 

She m. 2, James Muir of Hamilton, s. of John M. and Mary Fain. 

HER CHILDREN, BY ERASTUS ROWLEY, BORN IN WINSTED, AND GEAUGA CO., O. 

1. Robert S., b. Aug. 25, 1814 ; m. 1835, Sophia Taylor of Clarendon, O. 

2. Simeon D., b. April 17, 1817; m. Aug. 7, 1843, Harriet Miller of Illinois. 

3. Norman C, b. Mar. 20, 1820; m. Nov., 1843, Esther Grassfield of Otsego. 

4. Lucy Ann, b. Aug. 29, 1822; m. April 4, 1842, B. M. Babbott of Hamilton. 

5. Seymour A., b. May 28, 1825 ; d. April 9, 1844, m. 18 y. 10 m. 11 d. 



346. Robert Shattuck, s. of Robert, (p. 164,) was b. in 
Colchester, May 29, 1796, and d. in Lavonia, Wayne Co., Mich., 
Aug., 1838, se. 42 y. 2 m. 

He m. in 1821, Lois Bean, b. in N. H., but then residing in 
Solon, Cortland Co., dau. of Josiah Bean. She m. 2, Joseph 
Jones of Homer, N. Y. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY LOIS BEAN, BORN IN . 

1. Lorenzo, b. 1822. 

2. Melissa, b. Oct., 1824; m. June 30, 1846, Charles D. Muir of Elgin, 111. 

3. Lavern, b. Feb., 1827; m. Dec. 25, 1847, Orlando Jones of Homer. 

4. Harriet, b. July, 1829; m. 1, in 1849, Giles Crittenden; and 2, John Weeks, 

both of Cincinnatus, and both dead. No issue. 

5. Deivitt C, b. 1832. 

G. Chauncey, b. 1834. 7. William, b. 1837. 



MARY, LOOMIS, LORENZO, AND JOSIAII SHATTUCK. 285 

347. Mary Shattuck, dau. of Robert, (p. 164,) b. in Col- 
chester, Ct.j April 3, 1799, m. March 13, 1818, Allan Colson, 
and reside in Belvidere, 111. They have had — 

1. Allan Belos, b. Nov. 19, 1819; m. Barbary Ann May. 

2. Jerusha Ann, b. April 7, 1821 ; m. John Fox. 

3. Marshall, M., b. July 28, 1823 ; d. Aug. 10, 1824, re. 1 y. m. 12 d. 

4. Lorenzo &, b. July 30, 1825. 6. Rollin &, b. June 21, 1832. 

5. Loomis R., b. June 21,1827; 7. James Martin, b. Jan. 10,1835. 

m. Matilda Bennett. 8. Erastus L., b. Oct. 1,1838. 

348. Loomts Shattuck, s. of Robert, (p. 164,) was b. in 
Hamilton, Madison Co., N. Y., Jan. 6, 1803. He is a carpenter, 
and resides in Belvidere, 111. 

He m. July 4, 1824, Lydia Brown, and has had — 

1. Lucy Maria, b. Oct. 10, 1824; d. July 7, 1826, re. 1 y. 8 m. 27 d. 

2. Ann Maria, b. July 13, 1826; d. Aug. 5, 1826, re. 22 d. 

3. Eliza Ann, b. May 5, 1827; d. June 12, 1827, re. 1 m. 7 d. 

4. Loomis, b. Dec. 23, 1831 ; d. June 23, 1835, re. 3 y. 6 m. 

5. Lorenzo, b. July 1, 1833. 

6. Helen, b. April 29, 1836. 8. Mary Jane, b. Nov. 29, 1841. 

7. Alfred, b. Sept. 25, 1838. 9. Lydia Ann, b. Jan. 12,1847. 

349. Lorenzo Shattuck, s. of Robert, (p. 164,) was b. in 
Hamilton, June 14, 1805. He was a shoemaker. When twen- 
ty-four years of age he was accidentally shot in his thigh, and 
was obliged to have his leg amputated. He d. in Freeport, 
Stevenson Co., 111., Aug. 20, 1850, ae. 45 y. 2 m. 6 d. 

He m. Sept. 19, 1833, Hannah Streeter, and had — 

1. Lorenzo L., b. May 31, 1836. 5. Martha Ann, b. March 8, 1844. 

2. Learendus L., b. June 20, 1838. 6. Theresa E, b. July 15, 1846. 

3. Levi L., b. May 26, 1840. 7. Adelia E, b. Jan. 1, 1849; 

4. Lauristan L., b. Aug. 27, 1842. d. Aug. 27, 1850, re. 1 y. 7 m. 26 d. 

350. Josiah Shattuck, s. of David, (p. 165,) was b. in Col- 
chester, Ct., Feb. 7, 1791. He was a farmer, and in 1817 settled 
in Middlebury, then Genesee, now Wyoming Co., N. Y., where 
he d. April 2, 1842. as. 51 y. 1 m. 25 d. 

He m. Jan. 7, 1817, Parthenia Wells, b. in Hebron, Ct., Oct. 
11, 1795. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY PARTHENIA WELLS, BORN IN MIDDLEBURY. 

1. Clarissa P., b. Dec, 22, 1817 ; m. April 6, 1835, V. D. Eastman, and settled in 

Wethersfield, Wyoming Co., N. Y. 

2. David TV., b. March 3, 1821 ; m. Jan. 1, 1843, Irena Gay, and is a farmer in 

Warsaw, Wyoming Co., N. Y. 

3. Lysander, b. April 17, 1828 ; m. Sept. 19, 1852, Ann M. Vanderheyden, and is 

a farmer in Warsaw. 



286 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

351. Gilbert Shattuck, s. of David ; (p. 165,) was b. in 
Colchester, Ct., Feb. 1, 1793. He learned the carpenter's trade 
in Hebron, Ct., and in 1816 removed with his elder brother to 
Middlebury, N. Y. In 1818 he bought a farm in Avon, Liv- 
ingston Co., where he lived until 1831, when he removed to 
Ypsilanti, Washtenaw Co., Mich., where he resided upon a farm 
until 1845. He then settled in the adjoining town of Ann Arbor, 
where he now resides, and keeps a boot and shoe store. In 1835 
he was a delegate to the convention to form the constitution of 
the new state of Michigan ; in 1844 was a representative in the 
legislature ; and in 1845 and 1846 was sheriff of the county of 
Washtenaw. 

He m. in Colchester, Jan. 9, 1817, Hannah Lannyssa Post, b. 
Oct. 31, 1798, dau. of Ezekiel A. and Hannah Post of Hebron, 
Ct., and has had, 

1. Hannah Gear, b. in Middlebury, May 20, 1818, and d. at Ypsilanti, unmarried, 

Aug. 25, 1844, se. 26 y. 3 m. 5 d. 

2. Frances Helen, b. in Avon, N. Y., March 4, 1830; m. in Ann Arbor, July 8, 

1849, David Wooster, M. D., b. June 10, 1825, and a graduate of the 
Cleveland, Ohio, Medical College. In 1850 he went to California; and now 
lives near Maysville, as a physician, farmer, and miner. 



352. Rev. Artemas Shattuck, s. of David, (p. 165,) was b. in 
Colchester, Ct., March 10, 1795, and was first a farmer with his 
brothers in Middlebury, N. Y. He was naturally a man of the 
most remarkable energy and perseverance. While here, an ex- 
traordinary event occurred which subdued his energy, and affected 
the whole subsequent history of his life. A correspondent re- 
marks, in communicating the following facts, "You can judge 
whether there was any Shattuck blood in him." 

While he was cutting some forest trees one fell upon a high stump, 
and became entangled with other trees. In endeavoring to cut, 
disengage, and bring it to the ground, it suddenly fell, and the 
trunk upon which he stood split, and his foot was caught in the 
cleft. As it fell over the stump he was raised several feet from 
the ground and suspended with his head downwards; and in 
such a position that he could not touch the ground, nor get upon 
the top of the trunk of the tree for support. His axe in the mean 
time had fallen, and was not within his reach ; he was thus with- 
out means to extricate himself. In this condition he cried for 



ARTEMAS SHATTUCK. 287 

help, but cried in vain, until his voice failed him and 'he could 
cry no longer. He soon began to suffer extreme pain, not only 
in his foot, which remained clenched in the cleft of the tree, but 
also from headache and general exhaustion, caused by his unnat- 
ural position and the great exertion he had put forth to make 
himself heard and to obtain relief. He was in the woods, three 
fourths of a mile from any human being, and the weather was 
extremely cold. What was he to do ? Unless he could be im- 
mediately extricated death seemed inevitable. There appeared 
no alternative. Summoning all his fortitude he resolved upon 
an act, which if he should succeed in performing there would 
be a feeble hope, and only a feeble one, of saving his life. He 
might perish if he did it, he must if he did it not. He took from 
his pocket an old Barlow knife, and first cut off the leg of his 
boot and stocking, and with a piece of quality which he had in 
his vest pocket he bound his ankle as tightly as possible, to stop 
the current of blood. Then, with his knife, he unjointed his 
own ankle, and left his foot cut and separated from his leg in 
the cleft of the tree ! By the trunk of the tree he reached the 
ground, and crawled to his dinner-basket, and bound up the 
stump with a napkin. He cut a stick and hobbled or crawled 
upon his hands and knees through the snow towards home. 
When he had arrived within a few rods of his house he was dis- 
covered by his family ; and, exhausted and fainting, was brought 
to his room and resuscitated. A surgeon was obtained from 
Batavia, a distance of fifteen or eighteen miles, by whom his 
limb was again amputated, and in due time he recovered. Three 
of his brothers, Josiah, Gilbert, and Giles, were with him during 
his illness.* 

Mr. Shattuck afterwards turned his attention to study ; emi- 
grated to North Carolina in 1819; joined the Baptist church in 

* Some account of this event, unassociated with any name, was published in the Presbyterian 
newspaper of Philadelphia, in the winter of 1850-51, under the title of" A curious fact." This fact 
was stated to be, that when Mr. Shattuck " became conscious, he said, ' Go immediately to the 
woods and cut out my foot, for it is suffering most excruciating 1 pain.' They did so, and 
brought the foot to the house. He then said it was cold, and wished it put into warm water. 
This request was also granted. It was not, however, done in the room in which he lay, yet as 
soon as the foot touched the water he exclaimed, 'it burns me — the water is too hot. ; And upon 
examination it was found to be so. The water was then made cooler, and he was satisfied." 
We have great doubts as to the authenticity of this statement, or of the correctness of its philoso- 
phy. We have read considerably in medical literature, and have conversed with many 
scientific surgeons on the subject 3 and have yet to learn a well-authenticated case in which 
an application to an amputated limb has sensibly affected the living individual from whom it 
was taken. 



288 SIXTH GENERATION AND CHILDREN. 

1820, and commenced preaching in 1821. We have not a full 
account of his subsequent history. In the Baptist Register for 
1835 his name appears as minister of the Friendship and Mechan- 
ic's Hill Church in Moore Co., N. C. It is said "he lived in a 
very poor county, and worked for a very poor living on poor 
land. 5 ' In 1842-3 he removed to Carrollton, Miss., upon the 
invitation of his brother, who gave him a farm, from which he 
made one good crop ; but losing his wife and youngest child he 
sold his place, and started on his return to North Carolina. 
Meeting with some Baptist friends in Georgia he accepted their 
invitation to a pastoral charge. 

He m. 1, in 1824, in Moore Co., N. C, "a most amiable and 
industrious wife," by whom he had a son Alvin, b. in 1826. 
He had also another son, b. in Carrollton in 1843. She and her 
youngest son d. in Carrollton in the fall and winter of 1843-4. 
It is said that he married again, and that he and his son now 
reside in Georgia, but we have been unable to obtain their history 
or location. The American Baptist Register for 1852 gives the 
names of "A. Shadock" (probably Shattuck) as pastor of the 
" Eight Mile Creek" Church in Mobile, Alabama; and of "A. P. 
Shattuck," pastor at Villanow, Walker Co., Geo. They may be 
the father and son abovementioned, though we have been unable 
to obtain answers to letters of inquiry on the subject. 



353. Giles Shattuck, s. of David, (p. 165,) was b. in Col- 
chester, Ct., Jan. 24, 1798, and now keeps a hotel in the adjoin- 
ing town of Marlborough. 

He m. Sept. 30, 1821, Nancy Eggleston, b. June 20, 1799, 
dau. of Moses and Mary Eggleston of Avon, -N. Y. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY NANCY EGGLESTON, BORN IN COLCHESTER. 

1. Francis W., b. Sept. 28, 1822; d. July 22, 1827, ce. 4 y. 9 m. 24 d. 

2. Francis E., b. Oct. 16, 1828. 

3. Mary, b. Dec. 21, 1831 ; m. Dec. 17, 1849, James D. Edmonds, M. D., a 

graduate of Berkshire Medical College. They reside in Moodus, Ct. 

4. George, b. Nov. 26, 1836. 



354. Hon. David Olcott Shattuck, s. of David, (p. 165,) 
was b. in Colchester, Ct., March 21, 1800. He improved the 
advantages of education afforded by the common schools of his 
neighborhood ; and in 1824 removed from his native town to 
North Carolina, and became a preacher in the Methodist church. 



DAVID OLCOTT SHATTUCK. 289 

In 1825 he was stationed at Black River in the Neuse District, in 
connection with the Virginia Conference, residing principally in 
Dnpin County, N. C. In 1829 he removed to Brownsville, 
Haywood Co., Tenn., and in 1833 to Carrollton, Carroll Co., 
Miss. He was Judge of the District or Circuit Court of the 
Second District of Mississippi four years, 1837 to 1841, and dur- 
ing the same time was presiding elder of the extensive district of 
Greene, in the Methodist Church. In 1841 he was the whig 
candidate for governor of Mississippi, but belonging to the politi- 
cal party then in the minority in that State, he failed of an 
election. In 1843 he was elected professor of law of the Cen- 
tenary College in Jackson, Louisiana, and from 1845 to 1849 
was president of that institution. In 1845 he had the honorary 
degree of LL. D. conferred upon him by the Wesleyan University 
of Middletown, Ct. In 1849 he resigned his office as president 
of the Centenary College, and emigrated to California with three 
of his sons ; and the remainder of his family followed him in 
1852. In the fall of 1850 he was elected one of the judges of 
the Superior Court of San Francisco, but resigned in 1851, and. 
became a farmer in Sonoma. In 1853 he reopened a lawyer's, 
office in San Francisco, where he still resides. In 1854 he was 
reelected judge of the Superior Court, which office he now h®lds.. 
A correspondent with great propriety remarks, that " the few sta- 
tions he filled prospered under his administration, and he retired, 
from all regretted by the people. He never sought office. He 
never had any other ambition to gratify than a strong and ardent 
desire to be useful to his countrymen. He practised law to sup- 
port his family — he preached to do good, without being burden- 
some — he succeeded in both these professions beyond his expecta- 
tions at first, but in doing good he did not equal his desires." 

He m. 1, in 1824, Lydia Watrus of Colchester, Ct. She d. 
without issue, Nov. 12, 1824, soon after marriage. 

He m. 2, in 1827, Elizabeth A. Sanders of Wake Co., N. C, 
b. Jan. 23, 1803, dau. of Hardy Sanders and Edith Turner. They 
have had 10 children. The 2 oldest were b. in Dupin Co., N. C. ;. 
the 3d, 4th, 5th and 6th, in Carrollton, Miss. ; and the 2 youngest 
in Jackson, La. 

1. Frcuicis William, b. Feb. 15, 1828; m. in Sonoma, June 15, 1853, Olivia 
Ewing. He is a lawyer, and was elected by the citizens of Sonoma judge 
of the county court for four years, from April, 1854. 
37 



290 SEVENTH GENERATION AND DESCENDANTS. 

2. Diclcson P., b. Nov. 2, 1829. Farmer in Sonoma. 

3. David Olcott, b. Sept. 12, 1831 ; m. in Sonoma, Oct. 12, 1853, Parlee Sneed, 

then 14 years old. He is a farmer in Sonoma. 

4. John Summerfield, b. Sept., 1833 ; graduated at Centenary College, July, 1851, 

and is now a lawyer in San Francisco. 

5. Mary Elizabeth, b. Aug., 1836; m. Jan. 1, 1854, Charles Spencer, Esq., for- 

merly of Trinity, La. ; a graduate of Centenary College, and now the law 
partner of his father-in-law, in San Francisco. 

6. James West, b. Oct., 1837. 

7. Jane Tindall, b. Oct., 1839. 9. Elizabeth Sanders, b. Jan., 1844. 

8. Albert Gallatin, b. Nov., 1841. 10. Robert Perry, b. April, 1846. 



355. Dorothy Shattuck, dan. of David, (p. 165,) b. in Col- 
chester, Ct., May 7, 1804; m. May 28, 1828, David Foote, b. 
April 22, 1796, s. of Nathaniel Foote and Abigail Foote, dau. of 
Israel Foote, all of the same place. He is a carpenter and farmer 
in his native town. 

HER CHILDREN, BY DAVID FOOTE, BORN IN COLCHESTER. 

1. Nathaniel, b. Aug. 8, 1831. He graduated at the Berkshire Medical College 

Nov. 24, 1852, and is now a surgeon, physician, and dentist in Salem, New 
London Co., Ct. He m. Nov. 28, 1852, Abby Jane Bigelow, b. Nov. 27, 
1830, dau. of Guy Bigelow of Colchester. 

2. Mary, b. Jan. 14, 1847. 



356. Amander Shattuck, s. of Moses, (p. 166,) was b. in 
Davenport, Delaware Co., N. Y., Sept. 18, 1815, and is now 
settled as a carpenter in South Worcester, in Worcester, Otsego 
Co., N. Y. 

He m. March 24, 1838, Almira Killmer, b. Jan. 6, 1822, dau. 
of William Killmer and Martha Ingram. They have had — 

1. Sally, b. Mar. 23, 1839. 4. Lorenzo, b. May 8, 1848. 

2. Raymond, b. Dec. 25, 1842. 5. Harvey, b. May 30, 1850. 

3. Mary, b. Sept. 22, 1845. 



DESCENDANTS OE THIS ELDER PEI»l»EREIiIi BRANCHES. 

357. Abijah Shattuck, s. of Jonathan, (p. 167,) b. in Pep- 
perell, Jan. 16, 1770, was a farmer upon his paternal homestead, 
where he d. Aug. 19, 1846, as. 76 y. 7 m. 3 d. In running to 



ABIJAH SHATTUCK JONATHAN SHATTUCK. 291 

drive his neighbor's cattle from his field he fell and instantly 
expired. 

He m. March 11, 1798, Nancy Sanderson. She d. May 10, 
1831, ae. 57. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY NANCY SANDERSON, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Abijah, b. Oct. 28, 1799 ; d. July 25, 1801, ae. 1 y. 8 m. 27 d. 

2. Andrew, b. June 7, 1802; was a farmer and carpenter in Townsend, where 

he d. Oct. 5, 1844, se. 42 y. 3 m. 28 d. He was a deacon in the Methodist 
church. He m. Sept- 26, 1830, Rebecca Green, dau. of Solomon Green, and 
granddau. of Simeon Green and Mary Shattuck, (p. 117.) and had, 1. Zoa 
G., b. Jan. 3, 1832, d. Sept. 6, 1834, a?. 2 y. 8 m. 3 d. ; 2. Andrew S., b. 
March 19, 1834, d. Feb. 13, 1845, ae. 10 y. 10 m. 24 d. ; 3. Imilda Leona, b. 
March 28, 1836, d. March 5, 1845, se. 8 y. 11 m. 7 d. ; 4. Rinaldo Henry, b. 
March 18, 1838. The mother m. 2, May 1, 1845, Walter Russell. 

3. Abijah, b. April 13, 1804 ; was a farmer on his father's homestead, where he 

d. March 14, 1843, 83. 38 y. 11 m. 1 d. He m. Dec. 1, 1828, Kezia Blood, 
b. Jan. 3, 1807, dau. of Nathan Blood ; and had, 1. Kezia Electa, b. June 2, 
1832; 2. Nancy Sanderson, b. July 23, 1834; 3. Abijah Edwin, b. Nov. 3, 
1840. 

4. Nancy, b. June 6, 1806 ; m. Oct. 31, 1824, Asahel Green of Townsend, brother 

of Rebecca, above mentioned; resides in Lunenburg, and has had, 1. An- 
drew, b. Nov. 22, 1825, d. April 23, 1830, se. 4 y. 5 m. 1 d. ; 2. Mary Ann,b. 
July 30, 1827, d. Oct. 26, 1839, a?. 12 y. 2 m. 26 d. ; 3. Henry, b. March 28, 
1829, d. Sept. 13, 1829, se. 5 m. 15 d. ; 4. Jane, b. Aug. 8, 1830; 5. Louisa, b. 
March 26, 1832, d. Nov. 1, 1839, 83. 7 y. 7 m. 15 d.; 6. Andrew Jackson, b. 
Dec. 1, 1834; 7. Thomas Jefferson, b. Oct. 26, 1836; 8. Abijah Shattuck, b. 
Dec. 26, 1838 ; 9. Elizabeth Snow, b. Oct. 26, 1840 ; 10. Mary, b. May 8, 
1842; 11. Everett, b. April 2, 1844. 



358. Jonathan Shattuck, s. of Jonathan, (p. 167,) was b. in 
Pepperell, Nov. 9, 1771, and now resides, as a miller and farmer, 
on Sucker Brook, on the place of his birth. 

He m. 1, Sept. 19, 1793, Betsey Giles, b. April 5, 1771, dau. 
of James Giles and Betsey Green of Townsend. She d. June 8, 
1841, a3. 70 y. 2 m. 3 d. 

He m. 2, April 23, 1842, Mary Blood, widow of Nathan Blood, 
and dau. of Benjamin Brooks. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY BETSEY GILES, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Betsey, b. Oct. 25, 1794 ; m. Joel Tarbell of Mason, N. H., and had, 1. Harri- 

son; 2. Mary; 3. William. She d. Oct. 29, 1829, se. 35. 

2. Giles, b. March 28, 1797. He is a farmer, and removed from Pepperell in 1834. 

He lived in Hubbardston and Barre until 1838, when he settled in Petersham, 
where he now resides. He m. Aug. 6, 1817, Sally Heald, b. Oct. 13, 1788, 
widow of Joseph Heald, and dau. of John Nutting; and has had, 1. Sarah N., 
b. Oct. 9, 1818, m. May, 1840, Peter Ward of Petersham— she d. Jan. 9, 1843, 



292 SEVENTH GENERATION AND DESCENDANTS. 

se. 24 y. 3 m. ; 2. Charles Edward, b. July 18, 1820, d. Feb. 11, 1828, se. 7 y. 
6 m. 23 d. ; 3. William Varnum, b. Feb. 20, 1822, d. at sea in 1848, ». 26 y. ; 
4. Henry A., b. March 18, 1826, m. Nov. 18, 1849, Electa Piper, b. March 14, 
1825; 5. Charles Edward, b. May 12, 1829, m. Dec, 1850, Elizabeth Sander- 
son, b. May 7, 1834; 6. James Sumner, b. Sept. 16, 1831, m. Nov. 6, 1852, 
Ellen Sanderson, b. Jan. 2, 1833. These were sisters, and daughters of 
Jonathan Sanderson. 

3. Mia, b. Dec. 1, 1798; m. May 7, 1823, Joseph Hall, s. of William Hall and 

Polly Mcintosh, b. in Brookline, March 12, 1795, where he lives. They have 
had, 1. Mary, b. Jan. 16, 1825, m. Nov. 26, 1846, Abraham S. Batterly ; 2. 
Martha, b. Jan. 6, 1827, m. Nov. 25, 1847, Joseph W- Peterson— she d. July 
17, 1849, a3. 22 y. 6 m. 11 d. ; 3. Joseph Alonzo, b. Oct. 18, 1828, m. July 1, 
1851, Maria M. Foster; 4. Henry A., b. Aug. 22, 1830; 5. Catharine E., b. 
Nov. 20, 1832, m. 1, Jan. 15, 1850, John A. Gutterson, who d. Oct. 6, 1853— 
she m. 2, April 5, 1855, Joseph A. Hovey of Pepperell ; 6. Charles P., b. 
Jan. 20, 1839. 

4. William, b. Feb. 3, 1801 ; a cooper in Pepperell, where he d. Feb. 9, 1848, se. 

47. He m. Nov. 30, 1326, Mary Blood, b. Nov. 29, 1801, dau. of Nathan 
Blood, and had, 1. Mary Elizabeth, b. April 21, 1828, m. Aug. 26, 1847, 
George W. Doane of Dana ; 2. Sybil Augusta, b. Aug. 16, 1829, d. Oct. 26, 
1839, a-. 10 y. 2 m. 10 d. ; 3. William Augustus, b. June 30, 183] ; 4. Abigail 
Lorenza, b. Sept. 9, 1833; 5. Irving Temple, b. April 27, 1836; 6. Arietta 
Ellenwood, b. July 16, 1838 ; 7. Eugenia Sybil Augusta, b. March 20, 1842 ; 
8. Lemuel Hubert, b. June 21, 1846, d. Nov. 24, 1847, 33. 1 y. 5 m. 3 d. 

5. Martha, b. June 18, 1803; m. Dec. 30, 1827, Josiah S. Tucker, a blacksmith 

of Brookline, and resides in Ashburnham. 

6. Charles P., b. May 17, 1805. He was a shoemaker in Pepperell, where he d. 

Jan. 14, 1839, 33. 33 y. 7 m. 27 d. He m. April 3, 1828, Thirza Shattuck, b. 
Feb. 13, 1804, (p. 217,) and had, 1. Charles Samson Wilder, b. Jan. 14, 1833, 
m. Nov. 16, 1854, Sarah A. Willard; 2. Thirza Ann Maria, b. Jan. 9, 1835, 
m. Jan. 18, 1854, William A. Chapman, b. May 4, 1829, and have William 
E., b. March 8, 1855; 3. Mary Jane Frances, b. May 1, 1837, m. Dec. 7, 
1854, Otis J. Tarbell, b. May 17, 1834. Mrs. Thirza S. m. 2, Nov. 30, 1842, 
Charles Hutchinson. 

7. Varnum, b. May 27, 1807 ; d. Oct. 25, 1820, 33. 13 y. 4 m. 28 d. 

8. Mary, b. May 26, 1809 ; d. Oct. 31, 1820, 33. 11 y. 5 m. 5 d. 

9. Putnam, b. May 4, 1813. He is a shoe manufacturer in Pepperell ; m. 

Jan. 29, 1832, Mary A. Gibson, dau. of Abraham Gibson, and has had, 1. 
Marietta, b. Feb. 21, 1833, m. Nov. 28, 1850, Samuel H. Chapman— has one 
child, b. June 2, 1852; 2. Francina, b. Aug. 5, 1836; 3. Charles Putnam, b. 
July 29, 1839, d. Sept. 10, 1843, 33. 4 y. 1 m. lid.; 4. John Gibson, b. July 
19, 1841 ; 5. Charles Putnam, b. Nov. 27, 1843; 6. Orinana,b. Jan. 27, 1 
7. Josephine, b. May 19, 1850. 



359. Sally Shattuck, dau. of Jonathan, (p. 167,) b. in Pep- 
perell, June 5, 1773, m. in Groton, April 10, 1798, John Kemp, 
b. March 3, 1771. He is a miller in South Gardner. His chil- 
dren have been — 



SALLY SHATTUCK VRYLING SHATTUCK. 293 

1. Jonathan, b. Oct. 13, 1799; d. 6. John, b. Oct. 22,1809. 

Nov. 8, 1840, &e. 41 y. m. 25 d. 7. Luanda, b. June 22, 1812 ; d. 

2. Sally, b. Aug. 4, 1801 ; d. July Sept. 8, 1815, se. 3 y. 2 m. 16 d. 

4, 1832, ». 30 y. 11 m. 8. JYancy, b. Aug. 26, 1814. 

3. Betsey, b. April 19, 1803. 9. Lucy, b. Jan. 26, 1816. 

4. Emma, b. May 1,1805. 10. Abijah, b. Oct. 13, 1817; d. Dec. 

5. Olive, b. Oct. 9, 1807. 17, 1817, se. 2 m. 4 d. 



360. Vryling Shattuck, s. of Jonathan, (p. 167,) was b. in 
Pepperell, Sept. 29, 1774, and has since resided there as a car- 
penter and farmer. He has been captain of a military company, 
and one of the selectmen of the town. 

He m. Feb. 15, 1808, Lucinda Parker, b. Aug. 27, 1784, dau. 
of Lemuel Parker of Pepperell. She d. of typhus fever, Jan. 13, 
1844, ge. 59 y. 4 m. 16 d. They both united with the church in 
1820. She was an eminently worthy woman, — an ornament to 
her sex in all stations of life in which she moved. 

HE HAD BY LUCINDA PARKER, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Vryling Davis, b. Feb. 11, 1809. He settled first as a carpenter and farmer 

in his native town, but is now a grocer in Boston; m. April 21, 1836, Sally 
Maria Cutter, dau. of Daniel Cutter and Sally Jones of JafFrey, and has had, 
1. Josephine Maria, b. April 3, 1837 ; 2. Edward Cutter, b. July 30, 1839, d. 
April 4, 1842, se. 2 y. 8 m. 4 d.; 3. Henry Vryling, b. Nov. 20, 1841 ; 4. 
Lucy Vrylena, b. Feb. 10, 1844. 

2. Edmond Parker, b. July 19, 1811 ; a farmer in Pepperell; m. May 18, 1837, 

Rachel R. Cutter of Jaffrey, sister to his brother's wife, and has had, 1. Mary 
Abbey, b. Sept. 1, 1840; 2. Sarah Jones, b. Sept. 4, 1842; Elizabeth 
Parker, b. Feb. 20, 1844; 4. Susan Maria, b. March 19, 1846, d. March 26, 
1848, ee. 2 y. m. 7 d. ; 5. Lucy Maria, b. May 21, 1848 ; 6. Edmond Cutter, 
b. April 20, 1851; 7. Daniel Cutter, b. April 29, 1854. 

3. Jonathan Chamberlain, b. Sept. 10, 1813. He graduated at Dartmouth College 

in 1842, and afterwards at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of New 
York City, and settled as a physician in Brookline, N. H., where he now 
resides. He m. Dec. 4, 1850, Phebe Ann Cummings, b. in Antrim, N. H., 
Feb. 23, 1819, dau. of Samuel Cummings and Joanna Wyman. 

4. Lemuel Parker, b. Feb. 7, 1816 ; d. Aug. 13, 1818, se. 2 y. 6 m. 6 d. 

5. Lemuel Parker, b. Jan. 3, 1819; d. in Pepperell of the typhus fever, Nov. 22, 

1843, se. 24 y. 10 m. 19 d. He was a man of remarkable intellectual powers, 
and at his death was a medical student connected with Dartmouth College. 

6. Mary Lucinda, b. Dec. 7, 1821; m. May 9, 1844, Col. Samuel P. Shattuck, 

(p. 198,) and have Mary Lucinda Parker, b. Jan. 7, 1849. 

7. Elizabeth, b. Feb. 8, 1824 ; d. Feb. 13, 1824, se. 5 days. 

8. Samuel Augustus, d. April 26, 1825. He is a farmer in Pepperell ; m. Jan. 

29, 1850, Clarinda Tucker, dau. of Samuel Tucker and Clarinda Ames. 

9. Elizabeth Nichols, b. Jan. 8, 1828, m. Oct. 24, 1854, Charles Shattuck, s. of 

Nathaniel, (Family 378.) 



294 SEVENTH GENERATION AND DESCENDANTS. 

361. Thomas Chamberlain Shattuck, s. of Jonathan, (p. 
167,) was b. in Pepperell, Oct. 22, 1779, and settled as a car- 
penter and farmer upon a southerly portion of the old Shattuck 
estate, where he now resides. He and his wife are members of 
the Baptist Church. 

He m. Nov. 8, 1812, Lucy Blood, b. July 5, 1787. Her 
father, Capt. Edmund Blood, s. of John Blood, was b. July 5, 
1764, and d. Nov. 26, 1843, se. 79 y. 4 m. Her mother was Lucy 
Taylor, dan. of Daniel Taylor and Elizabeth Burge. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY LUCY BLOOD, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Lovell, b. July 7, 1814. He is a carpenter and farmer; m. Oct 27, 1840, 

Martha Clark, b. Nov. 28, 1814, dau. of Josiah Clark of Quincy and Susan 
Corey of Groton. He has had, 1. Martha Ann, b. Oct. 25, 1843, d. May 18, 
1848, a3. 4 y. 6 m. 23 d. ; 2. Albert Thomas, b. Oct. 30, 1845; 3. Carrie 
Frances, b. Feb. 7, 1851. 

2. Lucy Ann, b. June 23, 1817; m. April 13, 1848, Shubael Ross Herrick, then 

of Chesterfield, N. H. He is a Baptist Clergyman. He was town clerk 
in Pepperell in 1853. Have Mary Caroline, b. March 5, 1849. 

3. Edmund Thomas, b. Oct. 24, 1820 ; unm. He was accidentally killed, June 

24, 1847, as. 26 y. 8 m., while blasting a rock, by a premature discharge. 

4. Caroline Abia, b, Aug. 24, 1829. She went through the regular course of 

studies at the Charlestown Female Seminary, graduated Aug. 1, 1850, and 
has since been a teacher of the Pepperell Academy. 

362. Nathan Blood Shattuck, s. of Eleazer, (p. 168,) was 
b. in Ashby, April 27, 1781, and has since resided upon the 
paternal farm. 

He m. 1, March 15, 1815, Artemesia Wilkins, b. March 10, 
1785, in Wilton, N. H. She d. in Ashby, Nov. 3, 1822, £e. 37 y. 
7 m. 23 d. 

He m. 2, May 22, 1823, Esther Smith, b. March 25, 1787, in 
Winchendon, dau. of John Smith and Sarah Lawrence of Lex- 
ington. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ARTEMISIA WILKINS, BORN IN ASHBY. 

1. David,b. May 12, 1817. He settled as a machinist in Nashua, N. H., but 

removed in 1853 to Boston. He m. May 8, 1842, Elizabeth W. Marshall, b. 
Jan. 21, 1822, in Bradford, N. H. Had Helen Maria and Ellen Sophia, 
twins, b. March 2, 1844. The former d. Aug. 16, se. 5 m. 14 d., and the 
latter Aug 23, 1844, se. 5 m. 21 d. 

2. Seth Chapin, b. April 17, 1819; m. May 26, 1841, Lucinda Irish of Waterloo, 

Albany Co., N. Y., b. July 15, 1822. He has had, 1. George Washington, b. 
April 15, 1843; 2. Elestus, b. Feb. 3, 1845; 3. Harriet Elizabeth, b. Sept. 
19, 1846; 4. Artemisia Maria, b. Oct. 21, 1848; 5. Albert Emery, b. Aug. 
27, 1850; 6. Cordelia, b. Jan. 27, 1852. 

3. Elizabeth Shed, b. Aug. 26, 1820 ; m. 1, Sept. 12, 1849, Emery Goodrich. He 



LYDIA, JOEL, AND NABBY SHATTUCK. 295 

was b. in Groton, July 5, 1817, where he d. Oct. 6, 1850, ae. 33 y. 3 m. 1 d. 
Interred in Ashby. Had one son, Emery Shattuck G., b. June 16, 1850, d. 
April 15, 1853, se. 2 y. 9 m. 29 d. She m. 2, March 6, 1855, Ezra Green. 

4. Rebecca, b. July 19, 1822; d. Dec. 17, 1822, se. 4 m. 28 d. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ESTHER SMITH, BORN IN ASHBY. 

5. Maria Rice, b. June 22, 1826 ; d. Oct. 2, 1826, ae. 3 m. 6 d. 

6. John Smith, b. Feb. 20, 1828 ; a machinist in Boston ; m. Jan. 22, 1854, Eliza- 

beth Hilton, b. May 4, 1825, and has Elvira Ella, b. Feb. 2, 1855. 

7. Albert, b. June 17, 1831. He is a farmer in Ashby; m. June 22, 1853, 

Julia Irena Foster, dau. of Gardner and Mary Foster of Townsend. 

363. Lydia Shattuck, dau. of Eleazer, (p. 168,) b. in Ashby, 
Nov. 9, 1782, m. Amos Lawrence, and lived sometime in Caven- 
dish, Vt. Had— 

1. Edith, b. Jan. 4, 1807; 2. Lydia, b. Jan. 5, 1809; 3. Levi, b. Dec. 14, 1810; 
4. Eleazer, b. Feb. 17, 1812 ; 5. Hepzibah, b. Oct. 3, 1816. 

364. Joel Shattuck, s. of Eleazer, (p. 168,) was b. in Ash- 
by, Aug. 21, 1784, and settled as a farmer in Pepperell, where 
he now resides. 

He m. 1, Jan. 21, 1808, Betsey Jewett, dau. of Caleb Jewett 
and Mary Green of Pepperell. She was b. Dec. 10, 1778, and 
d. Dec. 8, 1846, ee. 68. 

He m. 2, April 14, 1847, Nancy Parker, b. Feb. 20, 1795, 
widow of Charles Parker of Provincetown, and dau. of William 
Bell of Boston. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY BETSEY JEWETT, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Betsey, b. Nov. 21, 1808; m. March 29, 1829, Nathan Lawrence, by whom 

she has had 6 children : — 1. Nathan A., b. Feb. 1, 1830 ; 2. Asher E., b. June 
25, 1831, d. Nov. 2, 1840, ae. 9 y. 4 m. 7 d. ; 3. Mary E., b. May 27, 1833 ; 4. 
George H., b. Oct. 18, 1834 ; 5. James C, b. March 19, 1838 ; 6. Abel J., b. 
Nov. 26, 1846. 

2. Joel Jewett, b. Sept. 3, 1810; m. Mary Jane Lawrence. 

3. Asher, b. June 7, 1812 ; d. Aug. 19, 1812, se. 2 m. 12 d. 

4. Caleb, b. Dec. 3, 1813. 

5. Mary Green, b. Feb. 28, 1815 ; d. July 31, 1816, ae. 1 y. 5 m. 3 d. 

6. Mary B., b. Sept. 24, 1817; m. April , Joseph N. Huff, by whom she 

had, 1. Adelaide Imogene ; 2. Sarah Josephine. 

7. Phila, b. Jan. 22, 1820; d. Jan. 13, 1846, 83. 25 y. 11 m. 21 d. 

8. Sarah, b. Mar. 8, 1822 ; d. April 13, 1846. ae. 24 y. 1 m. 5 d. 

365. Nabby Shattuck, dau. of Eleazer, (p. 168,) b. in Ashby, 
Feb. 22, 1786 ; m. Feb. 21, 1809, her cousin, Capt. Jonathan 
Blood, b. Nov. 12, 1781, s. of Joshua Blood of Pepperell. He 
d. in Townsend, Feb. 5, 1839 ; interred in Ashby. They had 
Jonathan Jr., b. April 7, 1810 ; m. Sept. 18, 1833, Betsey Jefts. He d. Feb. 21, 

1838, ae. 27 y. 10 m. 14 d., leaving Marcus M., b. Dec. 23, 1834. 



4 
296 SEVENTH GENERATION AND DESCENDANTS. 

366. David Shattuck, s. of Eleazer, (p. 168,) was b. in 
Ashby, May 11, 1794, and d. of consumption, in Jerusalem, 
Yates Co., N. Y., Nov. 1, 1820, ae. 26 y. 5 m. 20 d. 

He m. Oct. 13, 1816, his cousin Hepzibah Shattuck, b. in 
Mason, N. H., Feb. 27, 1794, dau. of Ebenezer, (p. 169,) by 
whom he had 2 children. 

She m. 2, in Rushville, Ontario Co., Feb. 27, 1823, Thomas 
Finney, b. Jan. 6, 1781, in the city of New York. He is a farmer. 
In 1834 they removed from Jerusalem to Redford, Wayne Co., 
Michigan, where they now reside. 

HER CHILDREN, BY DAVID SHATTUCK, BORN IN ITALY AND JERUSALEM. 

1. Mary Alzina, b. in Italy, Aug. 4, 1817 ; ra. Dec. 19, 1835, Anson Burrell 

Chipman, a farmer, s. of William Chipman. She d. of consumption in 
Owasso, Shiawassee Co., Mich., May 29, 1841, ae. 23 y. 9 m. 25 d. 

2. Alonzo Madison, b. in Jerusalem, Feb. 20, 1820. 

HER CHILDREN, BY THOMAS FINNEY, FIRST BORN IN HOPEWELL, NEXT FOUR 
IN JERUSALEM, TWO YOUNGEST IN REDFORD. 

3. Walter, b. Nov. 2, 1823 ; m. Jan. 5, 1845, Mary Ann Cook, b. Jan. 29, 1825 ; 

and has had, 1. Frances Caroline, b. June 29, 1850 ; 2. Henry, b. Feb. 5, 1853. 

4. Nelson, b. Aug. 24, 1826; a blacksmith; m. Dec. 25, 1847, Electa Grant; 

resides in Plymouth, Wayne Co., Mich., and has had, 1. Cornelia Ann, b. 
Nov. 12, 1851 ; 2. Harriet Eva, b. May 10, 1852. 

5. Harriet, b. Aug. 25, 1828 ; m. June, 1853, Henry Hayter. She d. July 31, 1854, 

ce. 25 y. 11 m. 6 d. Their only child Henry, d. Aug. 6, 1854, 83. 3 m. 2 d. 

6. Sylvanus, b. Feb. 7, 1831 ; a farmer in Shiawassee ; m. April 14, 1850, Matilda 

Grant, b. Nov. 1, 1830. She d. in Shiawassee, Sept. 23, 1851, 33. 20 y. 10 
m. 22 d. ; had Francis Sylvester, b. Sept. 12, 1851. He m. 2, Aug. 21, 1852, 
Nancy Grant, b. Sept. 25, 1837, sister of Matilda. Both were daughters of 
Samuel Grant of Shiawassee. 

7. Clarissa, b. June 10, 1833; d. of scarlet fever, Aug. 10, 1849, as. 16 y. 2 m. 

8. Caroline Elizabeth, b. Feb. 7, 1836. 9. Lucy Ann, b. Dec. 10, 1841. 

367. Ebenezer Shattuck, s. of Ebenezer, (p. 169,) was b. in 
Pepperell, Oct. 15, 1785, and removed with his father to Jerusa- 
lem, Yates Co., N. Y. He was a mason, and d. in Mendon, 
Monroe Co., Aug. 3, 1840, ae. 54 y. 9 m. 18 d. 

He m. Dec. 20, 1813, Cynthia Sweetland, dau. of Benjamin 
Sweetland of Sangerfield, Oneida Co. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY CYNTHIA SWEETLAND, BORN IN . 

1. Andalucia, b. in West Bloomfield, Ontario Co., Nov. 19, 1816 ; m. Sept., 1836, 

James A. Marshall. She d. in Chicago, 111., May, 1837, a?. 20 y. 6 m. 

2. Marcia Rosanna, b. in Benton, Jan. 25, 1820 ; m. April, 1838, James A. Mar- 

shall, above named. He is an auction and commission merchant in Chicago. 

3. Mary Melicia, b. in Mendon, March 27, 1822 ; m. in Mendon, Edwin Judson, 

now a dentist in Chicago. 

4. William Alvah, b. in W. Bloomfield, March 16, 1833 ; a carpenter in Chicago. 



SEWALL, LUCY, AND MAHALA SHATTUCK. 297 

368. Sewall Shattuck, s. of Ebenezer, (p. 169,) was b. in 
Pepperell, June 1, 1787. He is a blacksmith, and now resides in 
Jerusalem. 

He m. Oct. 19, 1820, Rebecca Updengreffes, b. Dec. 30, 
1791, dau. of Jacob Updengreffes. 

HIS CHILDREN. BY REBECCA UPDENGREFFES, BORN IN JERUSALEM. 

1. Darwin, b. April 9, 1822; farmer in Jerusalem; m. Dec. 15, 1847, Christiana 

Henderson, b. Sept. 19, 1827, dau. of James Henderson, and has had, 1. 
Charles Emerson, b. Sept. 8, 1848 ; 2. Sarah Abigail ; 3. Mary Isabella, b. 
Aug. 15, 1852. 

2. Sewall Emerson, b. May 27, 1825. He is a dentist in Hornellsville, Steuben 

Co. ; m. April 29, 1850, Harriet Jane Hinman, b. June 29, 1825, dau. of John 
B. Hinman, and have had Harriet, b. Nov. 5, 1854. 

3. Sarah Mahala, b. March 4, 1827; m. July 27, 1846, John Townsend, a farmer 

in Jerusalem. Have William Henry, b. July 1, 1847. 



369. Lucy Shattuck, dau. of Ebenezer, (p. 169,) was b. in 
Mason, N. H., Dec. 4, 1789, and d. at Manlius, Onondaga Co., 
N. Y., Dec. 6, 1836, se. 47 y. m. 2 d. 

She m. Jan. 9, 1814, Joseph Baker, a farmer in Pompey, s. of 
Elder Nathan Baker, a Baptist Clergyman in that place. 

HER CHILDREN, BY JOSEPH BAKER, BORN IN . 

1. Lucy Norton, b. June 19, 1815; d. Dec. 6, 1836, a?. 21 y. 5 m. 17 d. 

2. Orin Joseph, b. Dec. 31, 1816; d. June 8, 1825, as. 8 y. 5 m. 8 d. 

3. Harvey Clinlon,b. Dec. 3, 1818; m. Dec. 25, 1847, C. C. Shattuck, (p. 279.) 

4. Charlotte, b. Nov. 19, 1820 ; m. Oct. 13, 1839, Addison Baker, s. of 

Nathan Baker and Mahala Shattuck. (See below.) 

5. George Franklin, b. Nov. 13, 1822; resides in Battle Creek, Michigan. 

6. Hiram Joseph, b. Oct. 21, 1824 ; resides in Battle Creek, Michigan. 

370. Mahala Shattuck, dau. of Ebenezer, (p. 169,) was b. 
in Mason, N. H., Jan. 29, 1792; and d. in Modena, Plattekill, 
Ulster Co., N. Y., June 6, 1829, ae. 37 y. 4 m. 7 d. 

She m. Nathan Baker, a brother of Joseph. He first settled 
in Pompey, but removed to Racine, Wisconsin. 

HER CHILDREN, BY NATHAN BAKER, BORN IN POMPET. 

1. Angeline, b. Mar. 16, 1817; m. Joseph B. Shattuck, (p. 279.) 

2. Addison, b. Mar. 26, 1818 ; m. his cousin Charlotte Baker, (see above.) They 

reside in Racine, Wisconsin. 

3. Clarissa, b. Mar. 11, 1819; m. March 3, 1839, Zeno Gould. He owns mills 

ia Pembroke, Genesee Co. Have 4 daughters. 

4. Emetine, b. Jan. 31, 1821 ; m. July 11, 1847, Stephen Ranceer. 

5. Mahala, b. Jan. 6, 1823; m. in 1842, O. Willie Guitree of Battle Creek. 

6. Caroline, b. Feb. 19, 1825; d. Jan. 7, 1843, ae. 17 y. 10 m. 18 d. 

7. Nathan, b. April 29, 1830 ; resides in California. 

38 



298 SEVENTH GENERATION AND DESCENDANTS. 

371. Aaron Woods Shattuck, s. of Ebenezer, (p. 169,) was 
b. in Mason, N. H., March 26, 1799, and is now a bricklayer in 
Jamestown, Chautauque Co., N. Y. 

He m. Nov. 27, 1824, Lydia Cole, b. in Fairfield, Feb. 5, 
1800, dan. of Joseph Cole of Jerusalem. 

Margaret, their only dan., b. Sept. 5, 1825 ; m. Jan. 22, 1846, Alvin Bullock, a 
mason and farmer, and have De Forest, b. Nov. 8, 1847. 



372. George Wheeler Shattuck, a twin with the above, 
(p. 169,) first settled as a farmer and bricklayer in Jerusalem, but 
in 1843 removed to Farmington, Oakland Co., Mich., where he 
now resides. 

He m. Jan. 8, 1824, Rachel Davis, b. April 26, 1806. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY RACHEL DAVIS, BORN IN JERUSALEM AND FARMINGTON. 

1. George Keith, b. Nov. 4, 1824 ; a farmer ; m. June 17, 1847, Jane Francis of 

Jerusalem, and has had, 1. George A., b. April 10, 1848; 2. Matilda, b. 
May 21, 1851 ; 3. Rachel A., b. Aug. 12, 1852. 

2. Orin Baker, b. Feb. 27, 1828 ; a mason ; m. Sarah Van Brocklin ; reside at 

Southfield, Oakland Co., Mich., and have, 1. Helen M., b. April 28, 1851 ; 2. 
Joel D., b. May 30, 1852. 

3. Joel Davis, b. Nov. 2, 1829 ; m. Sept., 1851, Phebe Kelly, and have Benjamin 

Holmes, b. April 12, 1854. 

4. Harrison Wheeler, b. Sept. 19, 1833. 6. Caroline Amanda, b. Dec. 1, 1841. 

5. Guy Alanson, b. June 23, 1835. 7. Angeline Corwin, b. Feb. 17, 1844. 



373. Clarissa Shattuck, dau. of Ebenezer, (p. 169,) b. in 
Mason, N. H.. May 16, 1804, m. Joseph Fitch, a cooper and 
farmer in Fayetteville, Manlins, Onondaga Co., N. Y. 

HER CHILDREN, BY JOSEPH FITCH, BORN IN MANLIUS. 

1. A. T., b. July 30, 1833; d. Aug. 16, 1834, se. 1 y. m. 16 d. 

2. Joseph A. T., b. Jan. 1, 1835. 

3. Clinton Baker, b. July 3, 1837. 5. George Irwin, b. April 14, 1845. 

4. Frances A., b. Sept. 9, 1843. 6. Isabella Sophia, b. May 4, 1847. 



374. John Shattuck, s. of John, (p. 172,) was b. in New- 
Ipswich, July 10, 1785, and has been a farmer and stone mason. 
He lived in Concord and Lincoln from 1806 to 1812, and at the 
latter date settled upon the paternal estate in New Ipswich. He 
removed from thence in 1823, and has since lived principally in 
Lowell, Cambridge, Boston, and Marblehead. 

He m. Oct. 14, 1813, Hepzibah Jones Prescott, b. in Concord, 
Sept. 20, 1784. She d. in Boston, Jan. 17, 1847, as. 62 y. 3 m. 



JOHN SHATTUCK ABEL SHATTUCK. 299 

27 d.j and was interred in Mount An burn Cemetery. She was 
the dan. of Willonghby Prescott and Elizabeth Hey wood, grand- 
dau. of Col. John Prescott and Anna Lynde, and great-granddan. 
of Dr. Jonathan Prescott. Elizabeth Hey wood was a descendant 
of John Heywood, one of the earliest settlers of Concord. Anna 
Lynde was dan. of Nathaniel Lynde, Esq., who m. Susanna, dau. 
of Governor Willonghby, and s. of Simon Lynde, who m. Han- 
nah Nudigate, from London. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY HEPZIBAH J. PRESCOTT, BORN IN NEW IPSWICH. 

1. Mariamne Hubbard, b. Feb. 3, 1815. She d. in East Cambridge, May 28, 

1848, a. 33 y. 3 m. 25 d. 

2. Elizabeth Prescott, b. Sept. 8, 1816. 

3. John, b. May 28, 1818 ; d. in New Ipswich, Nov. 4, 1818, se. 5 m. 6 d. 

4. John Henry, b. Oct. 24, 1819 ; m. June 13, 1849, Sarah W. Shattuck. He is 

a merchant, 3 and 4, Commercial street, Boston, but his dwelling-house is at 
Newton Corner. 

5. Caleb, b. Sept. 10, 1821 ; d. in Lowell, March 13, 1825, se. 3 y. 6 m. 3 d. 

375. Abel Shattuck, s. of John, (p. 172,) was b. in Ashby, 
June 14, 1788. He was a shoemaker, and first settled in New 
Ipswich, but in 1826 removed to Lowell, where he d. June 2, 
1842, se. 53 y. 11 m. 18 d. He was interred in the cemetery at 
Nashua, N. H. He and his wife united with the church, Feb. 2, 
1812, and he was ever active and influential in the various be- 
nevolent and religious movements of the day.* 



* A funeral sermon was preached on the occasion of his death by Rev. Mr. Burnap, the pastor of 
the Appleton Street Church, where he worshipped, from whichwe make the following extract : — 
"Mr. Abel Shattuck was born in Ashby, June 14, 1788, but was removed to New Ipswich in 
childhood, where his early life was spent. There, in 1812, he became a subject of renewing' 
grace and publicly professed his faith in Christ. He immediately assumed the responsibilities 
of an active Christian, and was among the first to engage in labors of the Sabbath School in 
our country. He was ardent, courageous and persevering in his Master's work, and never 
seemed to lose sight of the great object for which the Christian lives. 

" In 1826 he removed to Lowell, then a little village almost destitute of religious privileges, 
and was one of a little band to establish prayer meetings, and to commence that holy system of 
effort which has resulted in the salvation and glory of so many thousands. In the formation of 
the first church he was one 5 and when that was tilled to overflowing he was one of the colony 
to form this church. While his health permitted he was one of its active and devoled members. 
He was alwa3's an attentive hearer of the word; and the great truths of the gospel kindled living 
fire in his soul. He was habitually spiritually minded, and his soul seemed always to sympathize 
with words of the Holy Ghost. To him they were spirit and they were life. Like other men 
he was subject to the errors and infirmities of our nature; but he had a tender conscience, and 
easily melted into penitence when he was sensible of aberration. He was far from viewing 
himself as a perfect man, or from being puffed up with self-complacency. He expected to be 
saved as a lost sinner, and was ever ready to extol that grace by which the guilty could be 
pardoned, and sanctified, and saved. God manifest in the flesh was his salvation and his joy, 
and the history of redeeming grace was his delightful theme. His soul seemed ready to unite 
in the song of Heaven : ' Unto him that loved us and washed us in his own blood be glory 
forever.' Our departed brother was always deeply interested for the church. Though for a 
long time he has not been permitted to unite with us in our social devotions or public solemni- 
ties, he has never forgotten his covenant with God and with his brethren. In the many inter- 
views which I have had with him, he has expressed deep solicitude and warm attachment. 
Zion was engraved on his heart, and some of his last expressions were in our behalf. He was 
faithful unto death, and forsook not his brethren until his Lord called him away. Let his name 
be engraven on our hearts until we meet him again." 



300 



SEVENTH GENERATION AND DESCENDANTS. 



He m. Oct. 22, 1811, Mary Bedlow, b. April 17, 1790, dau. of 
Stephen Bedlow of Ashby, and granddau. of Stephen Bedlow and 
Ellen Webb of Weymouth. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY MARY BEDLOW, BORN IN NEW IPSWICH AND LOWELL. 

1. Mary Eleanor, b. July 23, 1812; m. Oct. 17, 1833, Joseph Nahor, b. June 24, 

1807, s. of Hugh Nahor and Elizabeth Chase of Litchfield, N. H. They 
resided in Nashua and Lowell. In 1 849 he went to California. Have had, 
1. Alfred Hugh, b. Nov. 7, 1834 ; 2. Ellen Statira, b. April 17, 1838, d. Sept. 
21, 1841, re. 3 y. 5 m. 4 d.; 3. Lewis Henry, b. Oct. 7, 1840, d. Feb. 28, 
1841, a3. 4 m. 21 d. ; 4. Henry Abel, b. Feb. 15, 1843, d. March 18, 1844, se. 
1 y. 1 m. 3 d. ; 5. Mary Elizabeth, b. June 25, 1845 ; 6. Waldo Francis, b. 
June 18, 1847, d. Dec. 27, 1849, 83. 2 y. 6 m. 9 d. 

2. Abel Hervey, b. Oct. 3, 1814 ; d. in Lowell, Aug. 30, 1826, m. 11 y. 10 m. 27 d. 

3. George, b. Nov. 6, 1816 ; d. in N. Ipswich, May 22, 1818, a3. 1 y. 6 m. 16 d. 

4. Haniette, b. April 29, 181 8 ; m. June 4, 1845, Caleb G. Weaver, b. at Plym- 

outh, Vt, Sept. 21, 1822, s. of Caleb W. of R. I., and Betsey Clark of Ct. 
He is a furniture dealer in Lowell. Have Caroline Isabel, b. April 4, 1850. 

5. George Waldo, b. May 30, 1821. He was several years a teacher of one of 

the grammar schools in Lowell, but in 1853 resigned the station, and is now 
a partner in the firm of A. L. Brooks & Co., lumber dealers in Lowell. He 
m. July 1, 1846, Sarah Jane Holden, dau. of Artemas Holden and Ann Bow- 
ers of Lowell, and have had, 1. Emma Harriet, b. March 30, 1847; 2. Jane 
Holden, b. May 16, 1851 ; 3. Mary Annie, b. Sept. 4, 1854. 

6. Horace B., b. March 20, 1825. He is a merchant in Lowell. 

7. Elmira, b. Oct. 23, 1830 ; m. April 19, 1855, Moses Allen Johnson, b. in 

Lynn, April 2, 1826, s. of Daniel J. and Comfort Allen. He is Assistant 
Superintendent of the Lowell Company. 

376. Col. Daniel Shattuck, s. of John, (p. 172,) was b. in 
Ashby, July 10, 1790, and for the last forty-nine years has re- 
sided in Concord. It was a favorite wish of his father and him- 
self, that he should receive a public education, and be quali- 
fied for professional life ; and in his early youth he went through, 
at the New Ipswich Academy, the studies preparatory to his ad- 
mission to college. Circumstances, however, transpired, which 
led to a relinquishment of their original design. In 1806 he left 
home, and entered the store of Messrs. J. and J. H. Davis in 
Concord, as an apprentice and clerk, and continued there six 
years. In 1812 he purchased, entirely on credit, in company 
with Bela Hemmenway, the stock and stand of Dea. John White, 
who had long been a trader in that town, and commenced busi- 
ness for himself, under the firm of Hemmenway & Shattuck. 
Mr. Hemmenway died Jan. 17, 1816, and Mr. Shattuck after- 
wards conducted his business either alone, or in company with 
Dea. White, or his brother, under the style of Daniel Shattuck & 



DANIEL SHATTUCK. 301 

Co., until 1844, when he retired from its active management. 
By his integrity, sagacity, and strict attention to business he has 
been distinguished for his success as a merchant, and for his skill 
as a financier. Although in politics a uniform and consistent 
whig, and belonging to the party generally in the minority in 
the town and county, he has been considered one of the leading 
citizens, and has often been selected to execute various important 
public trusts. He was a representative in the legislature in 1831, 
and a member of the senate in 1834 and 1836, and has held a com- 
mission of justice of the peace. He was chosen treasurer of the 
Middlesex Agricultural Society in 1821, and many subsequent 
years, and was afterwards three times elected its president, He 
has been a director or president, and the principal business man- 
ager, of the Middlesex Mutual Fire Insurance Company, from its 
first foundation in 1826 ; and during his administration has in- 
troduced several improvements in the general regulations of 
such institutions. He has been president of the Concord Bank 
from its first incorporation in 1832. He procured the act of in- 
corporation of the Middlesex Institution for Savings in 1836, 
and has since been one of its trustees and principal managers. 
He was chairman of the committee for the erection of the Con- 
cord Monument, to commemorate the events of the 19th of April, 
1775, and was the author of the inscription on its tablet. These 
are some of the public stations he has held. His motto of life 
has been, to " consider well and then execute faithfully all mat- 
ters entrusted to him.'*' 

He m. April 23, 1816, Sarah Edwards, b. Sept. 28, 1794, dau. 
of Abraham Edwards, Esq. and Rebecca Houghton of Ashby. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY SARAH EDWARDS, BORN IN CONCORD. 

1. Charles Henry, b. March 21, 1817; d. of dysentery, Sept. 17, 1817, as. 5 m. 

26 d. 

2. Sarah Elizabeth, b. March 11, 1818; d. of consumption, Feb. 14, 1844, 83. 25 

y. 11 m. 3 d.* 

3. Hem-y Livingston, b. March 17, 1823; m. Nov. 9, 1847, Mary H. Barrett, b. in 

Concord, Oct. 20, 1828, dau. of Sherman Barrett and Mary H. Worthington. 
He is now a farmer in Concord. Have had Kate Elizabeth, b. June 6, 1852. 

4. Frances Jane, b. March 11, 1829; m. May 15, 1849, Louis A. Surette, b. in 

Argyle, Yarmouth Co., Nova Scotia, Dec. 29, 1820, s. of Athanasius Surette 
and Louise D'Entremont. He is a merchant in Boston, but resides in Con- 



* A beautiful obituary notice of the character of this daughter, written by Rev. Barzillai 
Frost, was published in the Christian Register of Boston, for March 2, 1844. 



302 SEVENTH GENERATION AND DESCENDANTS. 

cord. Has had, 1. Ida Elizabeth, b. Dec. 7, 1850, d. of dysentery, Aug. 6, 

1852, re. 1 y. 7 m. 29 d. ; 2. Daniel Shattuck, b. March 14, 1853, d. Oct. 2, 

1853, re. 6 m. 18 d. ; 3. Louis D'Entremont, b. June 2, 1854. 
5. Ellen Miles, b. Jan. 6, 1835. 



377. Lemuel Shattuck, s. of John, (p. 172,) was b. in 
Ashby, Oct. 15, 1793 ; removed with his parents, before complet- 
ing his first year, to New Ipswich, N. H., and resided there and 
in the adjoining towns during his minority and until 1815, as a 
farmer, manufacturer, and school teacher. In 1817 he resided in 
Troy and Albany, New York, and in 1818 to 1822 in Detroit, 
Michigan, as a teacher; in 1823 to 1833, in Concord, Mas- 
sachusetts, as a merchant ; in 1834 in Cambridge, as a book- 
seller; and since 1834, in Boston, as a publisher and bookseller, 
until his retirement from a regular business. He never had the 
benefit of much public instruction. The common school in the 
district to which his father belonged was at a considerable dis- 
tance from his dwelling-house, and was generally very imperfect- 
ly taught, and continued only a part of the year. He seldom 
attended more than five or six weeks in one season. The chief 
educational privileges which he enjoyed in his youth, were in 
the school of mutual instruction, composed of his elder brothers 
and his sisters, kept in intervals of leisure in an industrious and a 
laborious early life-time, in his father's own household. Two 
quarters in the academy completed his public education. What- 
ever knowledge he has possessed besides has been acquired al- 
most entirely in his private study, by his own unaided efforts, at 
such times as could be spared from active labor and business, or 
from sleep. And he has great satisfaction in stating as the result 
of his own experience, that any person, by having a judicious 
plan for saving the odd moments of life and appropriating them 
to reading good books or the acquisition of useful information, 
may obtain a large fund of knowledge, which will be a qualifica- 
tion for greater usefulness in any station, and be the source of 
great gratification and happiness in more mature and declining 
life. 

If he was to allude to the events of his life some reader might 
perhaps consider it as savoring too much of egotism, which is as 
distasteful to him as it can be to any one else ; and yet there may 
be many of his kindred with whom he is not personally ac- 



LEMUEL SHATTUCK. 



303 



qnainted, who may desire to know something more of the author 
of these Memorials than the mere mention of his existence and 
connections. And since his name has been intimately associated 
with several printed works, and with some measures of general 
interest, he hopes to be justified if he should briefly refer, for this 
purpose, in these Family Memorials, to a few only of those 
which have attracted the most public attention. Several other 
works, the production of his pen, and some measures which he 
originated, or with which he has been connected, less publicly 
known, will be passed unnoticed. 

Besides other offices to which he has been chosen, he was a 
member of the City Council of Boston for 1837, and the five sub- 
sequent years, until he declined a reelection. He has held a com- 
mission of a justice of the peace, and has been several years a 
representative from Boston in the State Legislature. In 1830 he 
was chosen a member of the Massachusetts Historical Society, 
and about the same time a member of the American Antiquarian 
Society ; and he was one of the original founders both of the 
American Statistical Association and of the New England His- 
toric-Genealogical Society. He has also been a member of 
various literary, benevolent, and other associations. In all the 
public positions in which he has been placed, he has never 
shrunk from the performance of any labor that seemed to be 
required, with or without emolument ; and he never hesitated to 
propose new measures, or a modification of old ones, if in his 
judgment, after being maturely examined, they promised to be 
of utility. In carrying these measures into execution he has 
often been a laborer for the public, and sometimes to the sacrifice, 
perhaps to too great an extent, of his own personal interest. He 
has often sowed the seed, cultivated the field, and reared the 
fruit for others to harvest. He has been willing to do good for 
the sake of doing good ; and if others appropriated his labors to 
themselves, and any honor or profit that might be attached to 
them, he has seldom complained. He would never stoop to 
intrigue for, or solicit office, how well soever he might be quali- 
fied for it by natural endowment, or educational capability, or how 
much soever it might be merited by personal services already 
rendered. In this respect he has differed from many others. He 
has looked with great disapprobation, and not without apprehen- 



304 SEVENTH GENERATION AND DESCENDANTS. 

sion for the future welfare of our country, upon the corrupt 
practices by which unworthy men and unworthy measures have 
often been pushed by unworthy means into public favor. 

In 1818, he organized at Detroit the first Sabbath School ever 
opened in Michigan; and superintended it during the four sub- 
sequent years of his residence in that city. He afterwards organ- 
ized and superintended for many years a similar school in Concord. 

While a member of the School Committee in Concord he re- 
organized the public schools in that town, introduced a new sys- 
tem for the division of the public school-money, and prepared 
and printed a new code of school regulations. One of these reg- 
ulations required that school registers, prepared under such forms 
as he prescribed, should be furnished to the teachers at the com- 
mencement, to be returned at the end of each successive school 
term ; and another, that the committee should make written reports 
annually to the town concerning the schools ; and in 1830 he pre- 
pared, presented, and published their first report. These meas- 
ures were original with him ; and, so far as his knowledge ex- 
tends, this was the first Annual School Report of that description 
ever presented in a public town meeting in Massachusetts. Be- 
fore that time it had not been considered one of the duties of 
such committees to make a report of their doings concerning the 
matters entrusted to them. A similar regulation was subsequently 
introduced in Cambridge, Northborough, and other places ; and it 
operated so well that at his suggestion, while a member of the 
Legislature, the law of April 13, 1838, requiring its adoption 
throughout the State, was passed. And it may with perfect 
confidence be said, that no measure, aside from the establishment 
of the Board of Education itself, has done so much for the im- 
provement of the public schools of the State. 

In preparing some articles relating to the important historical 

incidents for which Concord is celebrated, for the newspaper then 

published in that town, he met with so much matter, not only of 

local but of general interest and value, that he conceived the idea 

of preparing a separate work on the subject. And this idea was 

matured in his publication, entitled — 

" A History of the Town of Concord, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, from 
its earliest settlement to 1832; and of the adjoining Towns, Bedford, Acton, Lin- 
coln, and Carlisle ; containing various notices of County and State History not 
before published. Boston : Russell, Odiorne & Co., 1835. 8vo. pp. 400." 



LEMUEL SHATTUCK. 305 

This work was one of the pioneer histories of its class ; and in 
plan and execution had some original features.* It was prepared 
in hours snatched from active business and from sleep, daring the 
last four years of the author's residence in Concord. 

While making the investigation necessary for the preparation 
of this volume he became acquainted with the condition of the 
public records in many towns, and learned to his regret that the 
registration of births, marriages and deaths, was generally neg- 
lected ; and that comparatively few public or private registers 
of the kind were made. Viewing it as a matter of general in- 
terest and importance, he called public attention to the subject 
by communications in the newspapers ; and in 1841 published a 
work under the title : — 

" A Complete System of Family Registration. Part First, containing charts, 
forms, and directions for registering, on a new and simple plan, the birth, mar- 
riage, and death of the several members of the family, and for ascertaining and 
exhibiting their connections, relative situation, heirs at law, ancestors, descend- 
ants, and generation. Part Second, containing forms and suggestions for regis- 
tering other particulars, proper or useful to be retained in remembrance, relative 
to any member of a family." 4to. 

After several editions of this work had been published the ster- 
eotype plates were destroyed by fire. Another work, upon a 
new and more simple plan, has been prepared, and will soon ap- 
pear, under the following double title : — 

" Blank Book Forms for Family Registers, devised and constructed upon a 
new, simple, and comprehensive Plan, and designed for genera] Use in every 
Family ; including Suggestions and Directions for an improved System of Family 
Registration." 4to. 

The page following this general title contains another title, 

partly blank, for a specific family, to be filled out by the name of 

the one who may use it for its own records, thus expressed : — 

" The Family Register of the Ancestors, Connections, and Descendants of 
, first compiled and arranged by , and continued by ." 

The registration laws of the State were first brought under the 

consideration of the Legislature at the request of Mr. Shattuck, 

and resulted in the passage of the act of March 3, 1842. He 

furnished some of the materials for the First and Second Reports 

* William Lincoln, Esq. in his History of Worcester, says, " The general plan of arrangement 
has been imitated from Mr. Shaltuck's History of Concord. It would have been greatly desira- 
ble that the excellency of this model could have been more generally copied." A favorable 
review of the work appeared in the North American Review for April, 1836, and in other 
periodicals. 

39 



306 SEVENTH GENERATION AND DESCENDANTS. 

under this act. The Fourth Report, on a new plan, was pre- 
pared entirely by him ; and the Appendix contained some gen- 
eral views on the subject, also published in a separate form, 
entitled : — 

"Letter to the Secretary of State on the Registration of Births, Marriages, and 
Deaths in Massachusetts." 8vo. pp. 42. 

While a member of the Legislature in 1849, a revision of the 

laws was made agreeably to his recommendations as chairman of 

a committee, in his report, entitled : — 

" Report of the Joint Special Committee of the Legislature of Massachusetts, 
appointed to consider the expediency of modifying the Laws relating to the Reg- 
istration of Births, Marriages, and Deaths, presented March 3, 1849." pp. 58. 
House Document, No. 65. 

At the special request of the Secretary of State he designed 

and prepared the blanks to carry this new law into execution, 

and wrote the pamphlet entitled : — 

" Instructions of the Secretary of State to Town and City Clerks, Registrars, 
and others, relating to the Registration of Births, Marriages, and Deaths, em- 
bracing the Laws of the Commonwealth on the subject." 8vo. pp. 32. 

The plan of the Reports made under these new regulations was 
devised by him, though the execution of this plan, having been 
intrusted to others, has not been entirely such as he desired. He 
also originated the plan, and drew the ordinance, which was 
passed by the city of Boston, for carrying the laws into operation 
in that city, and for creating the office of City Registrar. 

The system of public registration here described, though it at 
first met with some opposition, has since become generally popu- 
lar, and is now considered a necessity. Similar systems have 
more recently been introduced into other States, and are likely 
to become general throughout the whole Union. If faithfully 
carried out, henceforward the rights of property will be more 
securely guarded, the natural history and laws of human life will 
become more generally known, and genealogists and biographers 
will have a more easy and sure pathway to the information they 
may desire. 

In 1837 he devised the plan for arranging, printing, and pre- 
serving the " Documents of the City of Boston, printed by order 
of the several Departments of the City Government," which was 
begun in 1838, and has since been continued in one or more an- 
nual volumes upon the same plan. And he then introduced a 



LEMUEL SHATTUCK. 307 

resolution, which was passed, providing for exchanging such doc- 
uments for those of other cities, intending that they should form 
a nucleus for the commencement of a city library. At the same 
time he collected and caused to be bound a few sets of such doc- 
uments as could be found of the four previous years, which had 
been printed without system, and left to chance for their preser- 
vation. He also prepared a "Municipal Register, containing the 
Rules and Orders of the City Council, recent Ordinances and 
Laws, and a List of the Municipal Officers of the City of Boston 
for 1841." This was the first publication of its kind, and has 
since been continued annually, under the same general title, and 
upon a similar plan. He also obtained the passage of the Resolve 
by the State Legislature of April 25, 1838, providing for interna- 
tional exchanges of State documents and publications, for those 
of other states and governments. In 1849, as a member of the 
Legislative Library Committee, he wrote the Report, (House 
Document, No. 71,) recommending a modification of the plan for 
enlarging and managing the State Library. 

During his connection with the city government of Boston he 
labored with others to reduce the public debt, and to secure an 
economical administration of its affairs ; and the condition of the 
finances in 1842 and the three following years, as compared with 
the then previous and the now existing debts, will show with 
what results. When the great question of introducing water into 
the city was discussed, honestly believing that the specific meas- 
ure then proposed for the acceptance of the citizens would not 
be expedient, he wrote, at the request of others, two pamphlets in 
opposition to it. The first was entitled : — 

"Letter from Lemuel Shattuck, in answer to Interrogatories of J. Preston, in 
relation to the Introduction of Water into the City of Boston Boston : Samuel 
N. Dickinson, Printer, 1845." 8vo. pp. 40. 

The second, which appeared anonymously, was entitled : — 

" How shall we vote on the Water Act ?" 8vo. pp. 24. 

These pamphlets were extensively circulated among the peo- 
ple, and the defeat of the measure was attributed mainly to their 
influence. Another act, less objectionable, was afterwards passed 
and accepted by the city, without opposition. 

Among various other matters which received his careful ex- 
amination while connected with the city government, were the 



308 SEVENTH GENERATION AND DESCENDANTS. 

then existing Bills of Mortality. The result of this examination 

appeared in his publication, entitled: — 

" The Vital Statistics of Boston, containing an Abstract of the Bills of Mortality 
for the last twenty-nine years, and a General View of the Population and Health 
of the City at other periods of its History. Philadelphia: Lea & Blanchard." 8vo. 
pp. 36. Extracted from the American Journal of Medical Sciences for April, 1841. 

In 1845 he was employed to superintend the taking of the 
census of Boston ; and he then originated and introduced, for the 
first time in this country; a new plan for the enumeration — that 
of taking the name and description of every person enumerated ; 
and among other characteristics specifying the birthplace of each, 
and thus distinguishing the native from the foreign population. 
The elementary facts thus obtained were afterwards abstracted 
in a variety of statistical tables and statements, giving much 
new information of value which' had not and could not be ob- 
tained under the old method of taking a census before in use. 
The result of his labors appeared in a volume entitled : — 

"Report to the Committee of the City Council, appointed to obtain the Census 
of Boston for the year 1845, embracing Collateral Facts and Statistical Research- 
es, illustrating the History and Condition of the People, and their Means of Prog- 
ress and Prosperity. Boston : John H. Eastburn, City Printer, 1846." 8vo. pp. 
280, with Maps and Plates. 

This report has been highly commended ; and it served as a 
model for similar reports in Charleston, S. C, New Orleans, and 
other cities. 

As Chairman of the Legislative Committee he wrote their report, 

recommending for the State census a modification of the plan 

followed in Boston, entitled : — 

"Report on the Subject of the State Census of 1850, by the Special Committee 
of the Legislature of Massachusetts, presented April 7, 1849." 8vo. pp. 46. 
House Document, No. 127. 

In November, 1849, he was invited by the Census Board at 
Washington to visit that city, to assist in preparing the plan for 
the National Census of 1850 ; and the first, second, third, fifth, and 
sixth (five of the six) blank schedules used in that census, with 
the accompanying instructions, were designed and prepared prin- 
cipally by him. The act of Congress, also, relating to the cen- 
sus, was passed, with a few modifications, substantially as he 
drew it.* 

* See Compendium of (he Seventh Census of the United States, for 1850, p. 13. The plan 
for taking the census of the Slates of New York and Massachusetts for 1855, has been copied 
substantially from that he prepared for the National Census of 1850. 



LEMUEL SHATTUCK. 309 

Iii 1849 he wrote the Report of the Committee to whom was 
referred the Memorials of the Massachusetts Medical Society, 
relating to a Sanitary Survey of the State, (House Document, 
No. 66,) and, during the same year, he was appointed by the 
Governor and Council, Chairman of the Commissioners under a 
Resolve of the Legislature, passed by the recommendation of this 
Committee. This appointment was entirely unsolicited and un- 
expected, and was not accepted without doubt and hesitation. 
At the request of his associates on the commission, he collected 
the materials for their report, and it was designed and written 
entirely by him. It appeared in a volume, entitled : — 

" Report of a General Plan for the Promotion of Public and Personal Health, 
devised, prepared, and recommended by the Commissioners appointed under a 
Resolve of the Legislature of Massachusetts, relating to a Sanitary Survey of the 
State, presented April 25, 1850. Boston: Dutton & Wentworth, State Printers, 
1850." 8vo. pp. 544. Maps and Plates.* 

A copy of this volume was distributed to each town clerk's 

office, and most of the public libraries in the State. The Ap- 

* From a printed legislative report, (House Document, No. 212. for 1852,) recommending 1 
the payment of the expenses of this Commission, we make the following extracts relating to the 
value of this work : — 

"The report of the Commissioners has been noticed in many of the leading periodical publi- 
cations, and we infer that no document ever emanated from the State that has been more gen- 
erally commended. The following extracts from some of the most important medical reviews 
in other States indicate the opinions of those who have read the work and are competent to 
judge of its merits : — 

"The book before us, although under the uninviting title of a 'report/ is yet, in truth, an 
epitome of sanitary science. * * * We will not say the duty of the Commission has been well 
discharged ; this would be far too feeble praise ; for, although expecting much, the report far 
exceeds our expectations. * * * We doubt if there has appeared any work for many a year 
in our country that is of more real interest to the community than this, whether we regard it as 
replete with suggestions for the promotion of personal health, or as a great political document 
intended to show the mode whereby the physical and intellectual powers of a people may be 
fully developed. Its being the first of the kind ever published in this country, imparts to it an 
interest of more than ordinary notice; its being the best of the kind ever published, adds greatly 
to this interest and to the reputation of the author, and we feel assured that the objects aimed 
at must ultimately be attained when so presented." — N. Y. Journal of Medicine, March, 1851. 

"This report is the result of that enlarged policy which characterizes the action of the legis- 
latures of some of our older States, and which we hope soon to see infused among the western 
legislatures upon the subject, particularly of public health. * * * It is the fullest document yet 
issued on this side the Atlantic on the subject of sanitary regulations ; it is worthy of the noble 
State from which it emanated, and the Commission has cause to congratulate itself upon the 
manner its duties have been performed." — Western Lancet, Cincinnati, March, 1851. 

" We have thus given, at considerable length, the substance of this able and valuable report. 
After all that has been done by the people and governments of some countries of Europe, and 
after all that has been done by individuals and societies in America, this report is the first ap- 
proach to legislation from any government in this country. * * * We commend this report 
with all its plans and details, its facts and arguments, to the careful consideration of physicians 
and philanthropists, of political economists and legislators, with the confident belief that the 
condition of man will be improved and the interests of humanity advanced, as well as public 
and private wealth increased, by its adoption." — American Journal of Medical Sciences, April, 

A commendatory review of the report is contained in the London " British and Foreign 
Medico-Chirurgical Review" for January, 1852, the leading quarterly medical review of the 
world. 

Reviews, commending this work, appeared also in other medical journals, and in the North 
American Review. Christian Examiner, New Englander, and in various other periodical publi- 
cations and newspapers. 



310 SEVENTH GENERATION AND DESCENDANTS. 

pendix to this Report contains various illustrations of its most 
important principles, and among others three papers relating 
respectively to Lawrence, Attleborough, and Lynn, embracing 
an historical view of the population, sanitary condition, and sta- 
tistics of those places, and their means of health, wealth, and pros- 
perity. They were designed to show the manner in which such 
reports might be made concerning every town in the Common- 
wealth. Each of these papers was published in a separate pam- 
phlet, and extensively circulated in those towns, under the fol- 
lowing titles : — 

1. " Sanitary Survey of the Town of Lawrence. By the Chairman of the 
Commissioners appointed under a Resolve of the Legislature of Massachusetts 
relating to a Sanitary Survey of the State. Reprinted from the Report of the 
Commissioners." 8vo. pp. 24. Maps and Plates. 

2. " Sanitary Survey of the Town of Attleborough. By the Chairman of the 
Commissioners," &c. 8vo. pp. 32. 

3. " Annual Report of the Board of Health of Lynn. By the Chairman of the 
Commissioners," &c. 8vo. pp. 30. 

It may be proper to give the titles of two of his other works, 

which have been useful in the respective places for which they 

were designed. One is entitled : — 

" The Domestic Book Keeper and Practical Economist : Suggesting how to 
live independently, and how to be independent while we live : Containing Di- 
rections and Forms for a new method of keeping an account of the receipts and 
expenditures of Individuals and Families. Designed for those who are willing to 
know how they live, and who desire to live better. Boston : 1843." Small 4to. 
pp. 36, besides blank forms. 

The other is entitled : — 

"The Scholar's Daily Journal, containing simple Forms for recording each 
day's Lessons, and for exhibiting, at one view, the Attendance, Character, and 
Intellectual Progress, during each Month : embracing Introductory Suggestions 
and Rules of Behavior for Good Scholars, designed for Public Schools, Acade- 
mies, Colleges, and Home Instruction. Boston : Published by Lemuel Shattuck. 
1843." Small 4to, pp. 12, besides forms for records, &c. 

These comprise a part of his publications. All which have 

borne his name, or which purport to be written by him, have 

been wholly his own works, and he alone has been their author. 

None were written by others and assumed by himself as his own. 

He might specify more particularly the circumstances under 

which they appeared, and some of their most important contents ; 

but this would be inconsistent with his present purpose. They 

must be left to speak for themselves. He might also go into 



LEMUEL SHATTUCK. 311 

further details concerning the history of his somewhat changea- 
ble and eventful life — his successes and his failures, his struggles 
and his achievements ; and exhibit some of the incidents and 
causes which have been influential in making him what he has 
been, and in placing him in the different positions which he has 
occupied. Many of these incidents have been topics of interest 
in the home circle, and among his immediate connections and 
friends, and might perhaps be so to his other kindred ; but if 
further publicity is given to them, it would be more congenial to 
his feelings that it should be done through some other medium 
than in this volume. He has no disposition to make himself too 
conspicuous even here. Lessons of usefulness might be derived 
from the history of almost every life, how humble soever it may 
have been ; and in the proper place and at the proper time they 
should be imparted for the benefit and improvement of others. If 
any one should consider what is here presented as egotistical and 
offensive to good taste, let him pass these pages unread. He 
trusts, however, that no such one will be found among his kin- 
dred. They will probably agree with him in believing that the 
author of these Memorials is as well qualified as any one else to 
speak of his own labors, and will approve of this brief sketch 
which he has written concerning some passages of his own his- 
tory. He might have said more, but, in justice to himself, he 
could scarcely have said less. 

The matters here noticed came under his consideration inci- 
dentally, amid other occupations ; and he endeavored to give 
them, as he endeavors to give all matters intrusted to him, the 
thought and study which they seemed to require for their full 
comprehension, and to ascertain their utility in practical life. 
And he has great satisfaction in knowing that the results of the 
few measures he has proposed, so far as they have been tested by 
experiment, have already equalled his original expectations. They 
relate to the health, education, elevation, progress, and history of 
man ; and though they may not seem to the superficial observer to 
be of great importance, nor to have had the temporary popularity 
of some measures inflated into undue importance often by dem- 
agogues for political purposes, yet their permanent good effects 
will be apparent years hence, when others shall have been for- 
gotten. 



312 SEVENTH GENERATION AND DESCENDANTS. 

He m. Dec. 1, 1825, Clarissa Baxter, b. in Boston, Feb. 11, 
1797, dau. of Hon. Daniel Baxter, a native of Q,uincy, and of 
Sarah White, dau. of Capt. James White of Weymouth. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY CLARISSA BAXTER, BORN IN CONCORD AND BOSTON. 

1. Sarah White, b. July 30, 1827; m. J. Henry Shattuck, (page 299.) 

2. Rebecca Elizabeth,*. July 7, 1829; d. Jan. 27, 1851, ae. 21 y. 6 m. 20 d. 

3. Clarissa Baxter, b. Aug-. 19, 1831 ; m. Nov. 1, 1853, Isaac Frank Dobson, an 

Insurance Agent in Boston, b. in East Greenwich, R. I., Sept. 5, 1828. 
Have had Fanny Rebecca, b. Dec. 31, 1854, d. Aug. 8, 1855, 93. 7 m. 8 d. 

4. Miriam Stedman, b. Aug. 4, 1833. 

5. Frances Minot, b. April 12, 1835 ; d. June 26, 1850, ae. 15 y. 2 m. 14 d. 

The remains of the beloved dead repose in Mount Auburn. 



378. Nathaniel Shattuck, Esq., s. of Nathaniel, (p. 173,) 
was b. in Pepperell, Oct. 5, 1792, and settled as a wheelwright in 
Brookline, N. H. He commanded a military company from 1821 
to 1828 ; was a selectman of the town 7 years, 1837 to 1847 ; 
town clerk 5 years, from 1842 to 1847 ; appointed justice of the 
peace in 1840, and of the quorum in 1850 ; and was a representa- 
tive in the legislature in 1853. 

He m. Dec. 30, 1812, Betsey Green, b. July 19, 1785, widow 
of Jonas Green, and dau. of Elijah Shattuck, (p. 148.) She d. 
Jan. 9, 1855, as. 69 y. 5 m. 20 d. She m. 1, in 1804, Jonas 
Green, by whom she had one child, — William Reed Green, b. 
May 15, 1805, m. Betsey Wallace of Greenfield, N. H., and d. 
Oct. 19, 1841, ae. 36 y. 5 m. 4 d., having had, 1. Lucy Ann; 2. 
Betsey ; 3. William Edward, all of whom d. in the year 1842. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY BETSEY (SHATTUCK) GREEN, BORN IN BROOKLINE. 

1. Nathl. Varnum, b. June 5, 1813; d. Oct. 14, 1817, se. 4 y. 4 m. 9 d. 

2. Eliab Bennett, b. May 15, 1817; m. Nov. 30, 1843, Indiana Spaulding, b. in 

Townsend, May 23, 1819. Have Orin Varnum, b. June 30, 1845. 

3. JYatM. Vernon, b. May 26, 1819 ; d. June 4, 1825, ae. 6 y. m. 8 d. 

4. Thirza Ann, b. July 12, 1821 ; d. Aug. 30, 1825, 83. 4 y. 1 m. 18 d. 

5. Fernando, b. July 1, 1823; m. Nov. 25, 1851, Charlotte Flint Gould of 

New Ipswich, N. H., b. Nov. 10, 1825. Have had, 1. Rinaldo Cortes, b. Oct. 
11, 1852, d. May 2, 1854, a*. 1 y. 6 m. 5 d. ; 2. Eldorus Cobb, b. May 13, 1855. 

6. Catharine Augusta, b. Sept. 12, 1825; m. Sept. 12, 1842, Abraham Lawrence 

of Pepperell. Had Henrietta Caroline, b. Sept. 25, 1850. He d. June 16, 
1854, 83. 41. 

7. Betsey Ann Caroline, b. Jan. 3, 1828 : d. Dec. 26, 1854, ee. 26 y. 11 m. 23 d. 

8. Charles Elijah, b. May 6, 1830 ; m. Oct. 24, 1854, Elizabeth N. Shattuck, (p. 293.) 



379. Gardner Shattuck, s. of Nathaniel, (p. 173,) was b. in 
Pepperell, March 5, 1795, and settled as a farmer in Brookline, 



REBECCA, ABEL, AND SARAH SHATTUCK. 313 

where he d. almost instantaneously of apoplexy as he was walk- 
ing to one of his neighbors, Sept. 18, 1854, ee. 59 y. 6 m. 13 d. 

He m. Dec. 17, 1817, Silence Warren, b. Nov. 30, 1788, 
dau. of Joseph Warren of Ashby. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY SILENCE WARREN, BORN IN AND BROOKLINE. 

1. William Gardner, b. May 14, 1819; resides in Framingham — a farmer; m. 

April 8, 1841, Harriet Burdett Dyer, and have had, 1. Henry Gardner, b. 
Feb. 19, 1842; 2. Caroline Augusta, b. April 12, 1843; 3. William Herman, 
b. June 30, 1844; 4. Joseph Chapman, b. Nov. 25, 1846; 5. Mary Elizabeth, 
b. March 26, 1848; 6. George Francis, b. Oct. 8, 1851. 

2. Samuel Warren, b. Aug. 9, 1821; a farmer in Brookline ; m. March 14, 1843, 

Sarah Ann Hartwell, b. Aug. 26, 1822; and have had, 1. Emily, b. April 2, 
1843; 2. Sarah, b. June 10, 1845, d. May 3, 1850, aa. 4 y. 10 m. 23 d.; 3. 
Warren, b. March 29, 1847, d. Sept. 7, 1849, ae. 2 y. 5 m. 8 d.; 4. Ned, b. 
Oct. 18, 1849 ; 5. Herman, b. Jan. 28, 1852. 

3. Nathaniel Herman, b. June 6, 1825; resides in Brookline; was appointed 

justice of the peace in 1853; m. Sept. 17, 1845, Charlotte Ann Crozier, b. 
Sept. 17, 1825; and have had, 1. Ella Marion, b. March 26, 1851, d. Sept. 6, 
1852, a3. 1 y. 5 m. 10 d. ; 2. Hubert Warren, b. Jan. 16, 1853. 

4. Olive Louisa, b. Nov. 11, 1827. 

5. Mary Hannah, b. Feb. 13, 1831 ; d. in Boston, Nov. 20, 1832, as. 1 y. 9 m. 7 d. 



380. Rebecca Shattuck, dau. of Nathaniel, (p. 173,) b. in 
Pepperell, May 11, 1797; m. April 29, 1824, Lemuel Hall, and 
settled in Brookline, where they now live. 

HER CHILDREN, BY LEMUEL HALL, BORN IN BROOKLINE. 

1. Rebecca Jane, b. June 16, 1826; d. Nov. 23, 1850, m. 24 y. 5 m. 7 d. 

2. James Henry, b. Aug. 11, 1827. 5. Hervey Martyn, b. May 18, 1836. 

3. Lemuel Franklin, b. July 16, 1829. 6. Hannah Emeline, b. Oct. 27, 1838. 

4. John Bryant, b. July 12, 1832. 7. Claria Ann, b. Oct. 20, 1840. 



381. Abel Shattuck, s. of Nathaniel, (p. 173,) was b. in 
Pepperell, July 24, 1802, and now resides in Brookline. 

He m. 1, March 15, 1827, Deverd Verder, b. April 17, 1798, 
She d. in Brookline, Oct. 30, 1840, eb. 42 y. 6 m. 13 d. 

He m. 2, May 10, 1842, Sally Burnham, b. Sept. 24, 1799. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY DEVERD VERDER, BORN IN 

1. Mary Elizabeth, b. Dec. 5, 1827; m. June 3, 1846, William Henry Mention of 

Pepperell, and have Mary Elizabeth, b. Oct. 23, 1849. 

2. Abel Kendall, b. Nov. 21, 1829; m. Mary Charlotte Nutting, b. July 24, 1834, 

and have Mary Sophia and Harriet Maria, twins, b. April 12, 1854. 



382. Sarah Shattuck, dau. of Noah, (p. 174,) b. Oct. 6, 
1795, m. April 1, 1817, Jeremiah L. Perham, b. March 29, 1797, 
40 



314 SEVENTH GENERATION AND DESCENDANTS. 

s. of Jonathan, (p. 119.) She d. Oct. 17, 1838, ae. 43 y. m. 11 
d. He m. 2, Oct. 5, 1840, Rebecca Ranney, b. May 19, 1813. 

HER CHILDREN, BY JEREMIAH L- PERHAM, BORN IN . 

1. Eliza L., b. Aug. 31, 1817 ; m. Dec. 22, 1842, J. M. Powers of Athens, Vt., b. 

Oct. 29, 1818, and have had, 1. Sylvia O. P., b. Jan. 8, 1844 ; 2. Jeremiah 
A., b. June 4, 1848 ; 3. Alonzo P., b. June 18, 1820, d. March 28, 1839, 
ae. 18 y. 9 m. 10 d. 

2. Sylvia V., b. June 18, 1820 ; d. March 28, 1839. 

3. Augusta C, b. May 5, 1822; in. Jan. 1, 1843, Norman C. Marsh, and have 

had, 1. Miranda M., b. Oct. 22, 1844; 2. Royal M., b. Oct. 24, 1850. 

4. Sarah M, b. Aug. 27, 1825. 5. Fanny S., b. May 16, 1830. 



DESCENDANTS OF THE HOLLIS BRANCHES. 

383. Lemuel Shattuck, s. of William, (p. 175,) was b. in 
Hollis, and resided in Brattleborongh, Vt., Troy, N. Y., and 
other places. 

He m. June 13, 1802, Rachel Fish. She d. in Boston, Sept. 
17, 1850, ae. 72. They had— 

1. Isaac Stilman, b. m. 1, Mary Eddy of North Adams, by whom he had 

Charles, now of Troy, N. Y., and one other. He m. 2, Louisa . He 

is now dead. 

2. Pamelia Lucinda, b. m. Orin Turner of Northfield. 

3. Clarissa H., unmarried, in Boston. 

4. Unidoca Gould, m. John Wilson of Milford. 

5. Madison James, m. and resides in Putney, Vt. 

6. Anna, m. George Baird of Boston. 

7. Jackson Andrew, drowned in Brattleborough, aged 12. 

8. Chorinda L., m. John Stimpson of Northfield. 

9. Mom*oe James, m. June 1, 1843, Elizabeth Knott. 
10. Washington George, died in early life. 



384. Jeremiah Shattuck, s. of Nathaniel, (p. 175,) was b. in 
Hollis, Aug. 23, 1775, and resided in Nashua, N. H., where he d. 
Aug. 8, 1814, a3. 38 y. 11 m. 15 d. 

He m. Abigail Stearns, b. in Tewksbury in 1773, dau. of 
Oliver Stearns and Susanna Winch. She m. 2, Thaddeus Wil- 
son of Pembroke, N. H. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ABIGAIL STEARNS, BORN IN NASHUA. 

1. Abigail, b. March 7, 1794; m. in 1815, Jonathan Hobart of Hollis. He d. 

in 1835. 

2. Jeremiah, b. Feb. 6, 1796; m. in 1818, Mary Hobart of Hollis. He was a 

farmer, and d. in 1831. 

3. Andrew, b. April 2, 1798; m. May 10, 1817, Phebe Jewell of Hollis, and is a 

grocer and provision dealer in Nashua. 



JEREMIAH SHATTUCK JOHN SHATTUCK. 315 

4. Nathaniel, b. March 31, 1800. He first settled in Boston as a wood and lum- 

ber dealer, but in 1828 removed to Pepperell, where he has since resided as 
a farmer. He m. in Groton, Nov. 23, 1823, Zoa Parker Green, b. June 15, 
1803, and has had, 1. Nathaniel Waldo, b. Aug. 15, 1824, now a carpenter 
in Brooklyn, N. Y. ; 2. Harriet Ann, b. Aug. 26, 1826, m. Sept. 29, 1847, 
Dennis Page of Shirley ; 3. Eveline, b. Jan. 10, 1829 ; 4. Edward Green, b. 
Dec. 5, 1831, now of Boston; 5. Clara Frances, b. Feb. 18, 1834, d. Sept. 
25, 1837, re. 3 y. 7 m. 7 d. ; 6. Frances Victoria, b. Oct. 22, 1838; 7. Julia 
W., b. April 2, 1846. 

5. Hiram, b. Feb. 13, 1802. In 1839 he was married, and settled in New Al- 

bany, Floyd Co., la., and was engaged in steamboating on the western 
rivers. 

6. Oliver Stearns, b. Nov. 20, 1803. He was engaged in trade, in the state of 

Arkansas, in 1839, but has not since been heard from. 

7. Eliza, b. June 3, 1805; m. 1, in 1826, Benjamin Cutler of Nashua, who d. in 

1827. She m. 2, Nathan Brown of Hollis. 

8. Eunice, b. April 3, 1807 ; m. in 1827, Calvin Wright, now of Nashua. 

9. Benjamin F., b. March 12, 1809 ; m. in 1833, Lucinda Smith of Maine. He 

was a blacksmith, and d. Nov. 30, 1834, se. 25 y. 8 m. 18 d. 

10. Louisa Emetine, b. Feb. 6, 1811 ; d. in the autumn of 1832, unmarried. 

11. Frilan Pollard, b. Dec. 16, 1812; when last heard from, about 1850, he 

resided in New Orleans. 



385. John Shattuck, s. of Nathaniel, (p. 175,) was b. in 
Groton, March 22, 1778, where he d. May 20. 1848, ae. 70 y. 
1 m. 28 d. He was a farmer and millwright. 

He m. Nov. 16, 1797, Mary Bennett, b. in Groton, Feb. 4, 
1776, dau. of Thomas Bennett. She d. Nov. 7, 1852, se. 76 y. 
9 m. 3 d. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY MARY BENNETT, BORN IN GROTON. 

1. A child, d. in infancy, unnamed. 

2. Mary,h. March 6, 1797; d. Jan., 1829. She m. May 18, 1820, Simeon 

Blanchard, and settled in Nashua, N. H., and had, 1. Simeon, b. Feb. 4, 
1823 ; he studied to be a surgeon, and has been employed on one of the 
islands of the Pacific in the service of the United States ; 2. Angelina, b. 
Aug. 24, 1827, m. Warren Turrell, and settled in Nashua. 

3. John, b. Jan. 22, 1802; resided in Dunstable, Mass., where he d. Aug. 3, 

1835, se. 33 y. 6 m. 11 d. He m. in 1827, Diodama Woods, b. in Dunsta- 
ble, Jan. 22, 1807, and has had, 1. and 2. James L. and John L., twins, b. 
Jan. 5, 1829. The former is a farmer in Pennsylvania, and the latter in 
Illinois. 3. Maria Prudence, b. Dec. 9, 1830; 4. Matilda Ann, b. July 13, 
1833, m. George L. Shipley, March 4, 1854. 

4. Lucetta, b. Jan. 28, 1804 ; m. in Boston, Oct. 20, 1824, James Cutler of 

Dunstable; resides in Petersham, and has had, 1. James B., a cotton man- 
ufacturer in Lancaster; 2. John, d. 1851 ; 3. Lucetta, m. Charles L. Polly 
of Fitchburg ; 4. Betsey ; 5. Francis ; 6. George ; 7. Isaac ; 8. Thomas ; 9. 
Elvira A. 



316 SEVENTH GENERATION AND DESCENDANTS. 

5. Eunice, b. Oct. 20, 1806; d. Feb. 19, 1826, re. 19 y. 3 m. 29 d. 

6. Almira, b. Sept. 10, 1809; m. Oct. 16, 1828, Merrick Shattuck, s. of Job, (p. 

182.) She d. July, 1832. Siie had 2 children, that d. before their mother. 

7. Elizabeth Bennett, b. Sept. 3, 1812 ; d. May, 1823, re. 10 y. 7 m. 

8. Nathaniel, b. Oct. 6,1814; m. June 25, 1840, Sophronia Spaulding 

of Lempster, N. H. He is a carpenter in Charlestown, and has had, 1. 
Adda Sophronia, b. Feb. 25, 1844, d. Nov. 19, 1853, re. 9 y. 8 m. 24 d. ; 
2. Nathaniel S., b. Oct. 7, 1848. 

9. William Tuttle, b. Aug. 29, 1816. He is a stone mason, and has resided in 

Charlestown, Randolph, Groton, and Fitchburg. He m. Oct. 15, 1837, 
Abigail F. Story of Charlestown, b. Dec. 15, 1820, and has had, 1. Sarah 
S., b. Feb. 9, 1838; 2. Abigail A., b. Dec. 1, 1840; 3. William H., b. 
June 18, 1844 ; 4. Eveline A., b. Oct. 5, 1848 ; 5. Thomas H., b. Feb. 15, 
1851, d. Oct. 3, 1852 ; 6. Elizabeth, b. Feb. 6, 1853. 
10. Sarah, b. Dec. 7, 1818; m. Solomon Story of Charlestown. 



386. William Shattuck, s. of Nathaniel, (p. 175,) was b. in 
Groton, Nov. 12, 1796; and has resided since 1814 in Boston, 
first as a grocer in East and Leverett streets, and afterwards as a 
real estate broker. His dwelling-house is now in Somerville. 

He m. March 5, 1818, his cousin Eunice Hazen, b. Oct. 17, 
1793, dau. of Benjamin Hazen. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY EUNICE HAZEN, BORN IN BOSTON. 

1. William P., b. Dec. 5, 1818. He has resided in Augusta, Me. ; has been a 

physician and lecturer on chemistry and other subjects, and is now at the 
head of the Waterford Hydropathic Institute, Waterford, Me. He m. Aug., 
1840, Eliza Holbrook, dau. of Marcus Holbrook of Chesterfield, N. H. She 
and her infant child d. Feb., 1841. He m. 2, May, 1845, Elizabeth Lincoln 
of Bangor, Me. Have no children. 

2. Otis B., b. Jan. 29, 1821 ; d. in Boston, March 11, 1822, re. 1 y. 1 m. 12 d. 

3. Eunice S., b. Dec. 15, 1822; d. of consumption, Dec. 3, 1836, re. 13 y. 11 m. 

18 d. 

4. Lewis W., b. Jan. 14, 1828; now "Professor of Self Defence" in the "Sedg- 

wick Metropolitan Academy and Gymnasium" in the city of New York ; m. 
Nov. 27, 1854, Mary Hendley of New York. 

5. Mary C, b. May 13, 1830 ; m. June 18, 1850, William Watson, a carpenter 

of Boston. Have had, 1. William Lewis, b. Oct. 4, 1852 ; 2. Edward W., b. 
Sept. 25, 1854, d. Jan. 12, 1855, re. 3 m. 17 d. 

6. George S., b. Jan. 4, 1832 ; d. June 14, 1836, re. 4 y. 5 m. 10 d. 



387. Sarah Shattuck, dau. of Zachariah, (p. 175,) was b. in 
Hollis, May 4, 1774, and now resides in that town. 

She m. Feb. 12, 1795, Aaron Hardy, b. in Tewksbury, Oct. 
24, 1771, s. of Aaron Hardy and Abigail Dutton. He removed 
in the month of his marriage to Lempster, N. H., where he re- 



SARAH SHATTUCK ISAAC SHATTUCK. 317 

sided as a farmer forty years, until 1835, when he returned to 
Hollis, where he d. almost instantaneously, while walking out on 
his farm, Sept. 17, 1849, se. 77 y. 10 m. 23 d. He was a deacon 
in the church at Lempster thirty-four years, and was otherwise 
honored and respected by his fellow-townsmen. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY AARON HARDY, BORN IN LEMPSTER. 

1. Aaron, b. Dec. 1, 1795; graduated at Dartmouth College in 1822. He was 

a teacher and student of theology, but d. before ordination, in South Caro- 
lina, Oct. 21, 1826, re. 30 y. 10 m. 20 d. 

2. James, b. Dec. 30, 1797; m. Jan. 1, 1824, Lucy Hurd of Lempster. He first 

settled in Parishville, St. Lawrence Co., N. Y., but now resides in Hollis. 

3. Reuben, b. Dec. 10, 1799; m. Jan., 1826, Harriet Hurd of Lempster. He is 

now a farmer in Townsend, Mass. 

4. Sarah, b. May 7, 1802 ; d. in Lempster, Jan. 2, 1833, re. 30 y. 7 m. 25 d. 

5. A daughter, b. Mar: 18, 1804 ; d. unnamed, April 28, 1804, re. 1 m. 10 d. 

6. Mary, b. Mar. 17, 1805. She resides in Hollis. 

7. Phene, b. June 3, 1807 ; d. Aug. 19, 1809, se. 2 y. 2 m. 16 d. 

8. Hiram, b. Feb. 12, 1810; m. April, 1840, Permelia Kittredge of Hollis, 

where he resides as a farmer. 

9. Truman, b. April 12, 1812; m. in 1837, Maria Ellen Beal of Salisbury, and 

is a merchant in Manchester, Mass. 

10. John, b. June 19, 1814; m. Jan. 1, 1846, Hannah Farley of Hollis. He d. 

Jan. 7, 1848, se. 33 y. 6 m. 18 d. She d. April 5, 1849. 

11. Solon, b. April 3, 1816 ; m. Martha Chenery of Medford, and is a merchant in 

West Cambridge. 



388. Isaac Shattuck, s. of Zachariah, (p. 175,) was b. in 
Hollis, April 9, 1778, and first settled in Washington, N. H., as a 
trader, but in 1824 removed to West Cambridge, Mass., and, in 
1837, to South Woburn, now Winchester, where he d. of con- 
sumption, April 21, 1852, se. 74 y. m. 12 d. 

He m. Sept. 17, 1807, his cousin Hannah Moore, b. Oct. 21, 
1788, (p. 179.) She is now living in Winchester. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY HANNAH MOORE, BORN IN WASHINGTON. 

1. Isaac, b. April 17, 1809- He has been a merchant in Boston; m. Jan. 24, 

1839, Lucy Augusta Cutter of West Cambridge, and has Mary Augusta, b. 
Oct. 22, 1839. 

2. Hannah, b. May 10, 1812. 

3. Mary Jane, b. April 18, 1814; m. 1, Oct. 1, 3833, Amos H. Burgess of West 

Cambridge. He d. Aug. 17, 1837, having had, 1. Jacob Henry, b. Sept. 13, 
1834, d. Sept. 10, 1835, re. 11 m. 27 d. ; 2. Mary Henrietta, b. March 28, 
1837, d. Feb. 13, 1839, re. 1 y. 10 m. 15 d. She m. 2, April 21, 1842, James 
Gibson of Medford, by whom she has had, 1. Hannah Josephine, b. Jan. 22, 
1843; 2. George Henry, b. Feb. 7, 1846; 3. Charles Edward, b. June 21, 
1848 ; 4. Louis Elmore, b. May 8, 1851. 



318 SEVENTH GENERATION AND DESCENDANTS. 

389. Abel Shattuck, s. of Zachariah, (p. 176,) was b. in 
Hollis, Sept. 21, 1782, and is now a farmer in Nashua, N. H. 
He m. Alice Little of Hillsborough ; and has, — 

1. Abel Gilman, b. May 12, 1812. 

2. Esther, b. Dec. 15, 1813 ; m. April 13, 1851, John Burrows of Milford. 

3. Zachariah, b. Jan. 26, 1816. 

4. George, b. Jan. 24, 1818; m. Dec. 5, 1848, Hannah E. Wood. 

5. Joseph, b. Mar. 11, 1820. Carpenter in Winchester, Mass. 

6. Sophronia, b. 7. Mary, b. 



390. Amos Shattuck, s. of Zachariah, (p. 176,) was b. in 
Hollis, Jan. 11, 1793, and now lives as a farmer upon the place 
of his birth. 

He m. July 10, 1817. Margaret Ball, b. July 9, 1796. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY MARGARET BALL, BORN IN HOLLIS. 

1. Mary, b. April 27, 1818. 2. Elizabeth, b. Jan. 31, 1820. 

3. Margaret, b. Feb. 17, 1822 ; d. of consumption, Jan. 25, 1846, se. 23 y. 1 1 m. 8 d. 

4. Sarah, b. June 2, 1825 ; d. of consumption, Jan. 22, 1846, ee. 20 y. 7 m. 20 d. 

5. Amos F., b. July 9, 1832. 6. Myra A., b. Aug. 27, 1836. 



DESCENDANTS OF TEIE GROTON BRANCHES. 

391. Job Shattuck, s. of Job, (p. 181,) was b. in Groton, Jan. 
22, 1782, and d. of the scarlet fever, Feb. 20, 1813, ae. 31 y. 
m. 28 d. 

He m. April 19, 1803, Polly Prescott Sawtell, b. Jan. 11, 
1784, dau. of Elnathan and Ruth Sawtell. She united with the 
church in 1814. She m. 2, April 15, 1821, Luther Shattuck, 
b. Feb. 1, 1794, a brother of her first husband, (p. 181.) 

HER CHILDREN, BY JOB SHATTUCK, BORN IN GROTON. 

1. Job, b. Oct. 8, 1803; d. Aug. 29, 1804, ae. 10 m. 21 d. 

2. Mary, b. May 25, 1805; m. Jan. 5, 1830, James Bennett, and reside in Belvi- 

dere, Boon Co., 111., and have had, James A., Samuel, John H., Mary 1., 
George S. 

3. Ruth, b. April 5, 1807; m. March 7, 1827, Stephen Kendall of Groton; and 

have had Charles, Daniel, S. Maria, M. Jane, Elizabeth, and Emeline. 

4. Jane, b. March 20, 1809 ; now living- unm. in Groton. 

5. George Martin, b. March 26, 1811 ; m. Oct., 1841, Sarah A. Scott. He d. in 

Maiden, Sept. 17, 1851, 83. 40 y. 5 m. 21 d. Had M. Adalaide and George H. 

6. Job, b. March 13, 1813; d. March 3, 1822, se. 8 y. 11 m. 20 d. 

HER CHILDREN, BY LUTHER SHATTUCK, BORN IN GROTON. 

7. Elizabeth Ann, b. March 30, 1823; m. Jan. 20, 1842, Joseph N. Hoar, b. in 

Concord, June 25, 1812, s. of Joseph Hoar. He now keeps the hotel in 
Groton. Have had Emily A., Lilla M., M. Josephine, Charlotte E., and 
Jane Eva. 

8. Samuel Augustus, b. Oct. 27, 1825; m. April 15, 1852, Sarah Parker Shat- 

tuck, b. Jan. 2, 1831, dau. of William, (Family 395.) 



SAMSON, RACHEL, WARREN, AND WILLIAM SHATTUCK. 319 

392. Samson Shattuck, s. of Job, (p. 181,) was b. in Groton, 
Nov. 17, 1787, where he d. May 11, 1837, se. 49 y. 5 m. 24 d. 

He m. in 1812, Joanna Sawtell, b. Feb. 3, 1790, sister to his 
brother's wife. She d. June 3, 1831, as. 41 y. 4 m. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY JOANNA SAWTELL, BORN IN GROTON. 

1. Sumner, b. Feb. 18, 1813; m. April 9, 1839, Emeline Bennett, and d. in 

Groton, without issue, Feb. 22, 1854, se. 41 y., from inflammation of the 
stomach, supposed to have been occasioned by the lodgment of cherry stones. 

2. Elnathan, b. Nov. 2, 1816; d. Jan. 1, 1817, ee. 1 m. 29 d. 

3. Albert, b. Dec. 10, 1818; a carpenter in Brookline, N. H. ; m. June, 1846, 

Sybil R. Shattuck of Pepperell, and has Mary E., b. June 21, 1848. 

4. Wm. H., b. Sept. 16, 1820 ; unm. A painter in Cherry Valley, Boone Co., 111. 

5. Amos L., b. Sept. 14, 1824 ; carpenter in G., m. Jan. 20, 1853, Sarah L. Sheple. 

6. Andrew Sawtell, b. Oct. 16, 1830; d. Oct. 26, 1830, se. 10 days. 



393. Rachel Shattuck, dau. of Job, (p. 181,) b. Aug. 28, 

1799, d. in Groton, Jan. 3, 1844, se. 44 y. 4 m. 5 d. ; m. James 
McLean, and had, born in Groton : — 

1. Rachel, b. Oct. 2,1817. 6. Mary E., b. July 17,1829. 

2. Harriet, b. Jan. 17, 1820. 7. George, b. June 22, 1832. 

3. James, b. April 20, 1821. 8. Sumner, b. Aug. 15, 1833. 

4. Wm. Gragg, b. Jan. 26.1823. 9. Luther L., b. Oct. 24,1836. 

5. Rachel, b. Nov. 20, 1826. 10. Charles, b. Aug. 30, 1840. 



393. Warren Shattuck, s. of Job, (p. 182,) was b. in Groton, 
Feb. 10, 1803, and in 1830, settled in Brookline, N. H. 
He m. March 29, 1825, Olive Proctor, b. March 2, 1807. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY OLIVE PROCTOR, BORN IN GROTON. 

1. Warren Elliot, b. Dec. 5, 1825; m. Elvira Davis, dau. of Seth Davis of 

Townsend, and have Ella Annette, b. July 1, 1851. 

2. Job, b. July 29, 1827; m. Elvira Worcester, b. Feb. 11, 1830, and have had, 

1. Imogine Eldora, b. Oct. 27, 1850 ; 2. Isadore Viola, b. July 10, 1853. 



395. William Shattuck, s. of William, (p. 183.) was b. in 
Groton, Dec. 12, 1789, and is a farmer in his native town. He 
represented the town in the Legislature in 1853 and 1854. 

He m. May 13, 1819, Sarah Parker, b. Oct. 19, 1801, only 
child of Jacob Lakin Parker (who d. June 22, 1827, ae. 71,) and 
Sarah Bennett. She d. Dec. 22, 1841, se. 40 y. 2 m. 3 d. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY SARAH PARKER, BORN IN GROTON. 

1. Frances Ann, b. May 1, 1820; m. in 1842, George May, b. Sept. 3, 1818, and 
have had, 1. George William, b. Jan. 10, 1843 ; 2. Henry Frank, b. Dec. 9, 
1845 ; 3. Sallie Jane, b. Jan. 9, 1848. 



320 SEVENTH GENERATION AND DESCENDANTS. 

2. Jacob Parker, b. March 27, 1S22. Resides in Portland, Me. 

3. Maria Antoinette, b. April 29, 1824; m. April 4, 1844, B. Franklin Nutting, 

b. June 4, 1820, and have had, 1. Eugene F., b. June 11, 1845; 2. E. 
Josephine, b. July 19, 1848. 

4. Wm. Alexander, b. May 7, 1826. With his brother in Portland. 

5. Mary Jane, b. Sept. 2, 1828. 

6. Sarah Parker, b. Jan. 2, 1831 ; m. April 15, 1852, S. A. Shattuck, (p. 318.) 

7. Charles, b. May 8, 1833 ; preparing for college. 

8. Eugene, b. Jan. 7, 1831. 

9. A child, b. Sept. 15, 1833 ; d. unnamed, Sept. 18, 1838, se. 3 days. 
10. Josephine Flor a, b. Sept. 15, 1839. 



396. Simon Shattuck, s. of William, (p. 183,) was b. in 
GrotoD, Feb. 25, 1793, and in 1819 settled in Perry, Franklin 
Co., Ohio, about 6 miles from Columbus, where he is an exten- 
sive and wealthy farmer. 

He m. Aug. 5, 1819, his cousin Sarah Simpson, b. in Winslow, 
Me., June 9, 1798, dau. of Benjamin Simpson, (p. 182.) 

HIS CHILDREN, BY SARAH SIMPSON, BORN IN PERRY. 

1. Mary Ann, b. May 15, 1820 ; d. May 30, 1820, se. 15 days. 

2. Harriet Ann, b. July 12, 1822; m. June 13, 1847, Benjamin Franklin Jaquith, 

a shoe dealer of Boston. Have had, 1. Frank Shattuck, b. Feb. 25, 1853 ; 
2. Harry James, b. April 14, 1855. 



m. Jonathan Tipton of Harrisburg, Ohio, 
d. May 3, 1826, m. 1 m. 3 d. 
d. Sept. 13, 1829, se. 2 y. 6 m. 
d. May 18, 1833, se. 3 y. 11 m. 24 d. 
d. July 20, 1839, jb. 7 y. 7 m. 8 d. 
d. Aug. 14, 1835, ee. 2 y. 6 m. 26 d. 
9. MaryMargaret,b. July 12, 1837. 10. Geo. Gustavus, b. Sept. 13, 1839. 



3. Rebecca Dana, b. Sept. 16, 1824 

4. Jerome, b. Mar. 30, 1826 

5. Alexander, b. Mar. 13, 1827 

6. Daniel, b. May 24, 1829 

7. Tho. Tufton, b. Dec. 12, 1831 

8. Simpson, b. Jan. 18, 1833 



397. Margaret Shattuck, dau. of William, (p. 183,) was b. 
in Groton, Sept. 9, 1795, where she d. Aug. 30, 1853, se. 57 y. 
11 m. 21 d. 

She m. Dec. 20, 1820, George Brigham, a harness maker in 
Groton. She was his 2d wife. He was b. in Marlborough, Oct. 
19, 1784. His father, Daniel Brigham, s. of Winslow Brigham, 
d. Oct. 11, 1818, Ee. 58. Thankful, his mother, d. Dec. 14, 
1824, as. 58. He m. 1, June 10, 1810, Betsey Morse, b. March 
14, 1791, and d. March 6, 1820, by whom he had, 1. Betsey, b. 
May 10, 1811, m. April 12, 1834, Jonathan Preston of Boston; 
2. George D., b. May 2, 1813, m. April 23, 1837, Jane Kilborne. 

HER CHILDREN, BY GEORGE BRIGHAM, BORN IN GROTON. 

1. Margaret Ann, b. Jan. 2, 1822: m. Dec. 8, 1846, Rev. Joseph Smith, now of 



ALEXANDER, ROSILLA, AND NOAH SHATTUCK. 321 

Newton Corner, and have had, 1. Robert Boynton, b. Oct. 21, 1847; 2. 
William, b. Nov. 17, 1851, d. July 1, 1852, as. 7 m. 14 d.; 3. a dau., b. 
Sept. 25, 1853. 

2. Mary Loriiig, b. Nov. 2, 1823; m. Dec. 20, 1843, Gardner Morse, Esq. of 

New Haven, b. April 11, 1809, s. of Stephen Morse, and have had, 1. Eliot 
Howe, b. July 20, 1846; 2. Mary Adelaide, b. June 5, 1848; 3. Joseph 
Bulkely, b. Oct. 3, 1850; 4. Charles Theodore, b. April 4, 1853. Mr. 
Morse was the 5th cousin of his wife's mother, and descended from Susanna 
Shattuck, (p. 66.) (See Memorials of the Morses, p. 87.) 

3. William Boynton, b. May 18, 1827; m. June 17, 1849, Pamelia Wentworth of 

Starksborough, Vt. They reside in Norwich, Ct. 

4. Jane Laura, b. Oct. 22, 1829. 

5. Theodore, b. June 29, 1833. 6. Charles Sumner, b. Sept. 15, 1835. 



398. Alexander Shattuck, s. of William, (p. 183,) was b. in 
Groton, Sept. 9, 1797, and in June, 1819, settled in Clinton, 
Franklin Co., Ohio, near Columbus, where he owns and manages 
an extensive farm. He has raised 100 acres of corn in one year. 

He m. in Washington, Ohio, Feb. 17, 1830, Flora Andrews, 
b. in Burlington, Hartford Co., Ct., July 24, 1808, dau. of Timo- 
thy Andrews and Clarissa Beckwith. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY FLORA ANDREWS, BORN IN CLINTON. 

1. Mary Jane, b. Dec. 2, 1830 ; m. Sept. 13, 1852, Clays B. Wilson of Findley. 

2. William, b. April 10, 1832. 7. Sabra Amelia, b. April 2,1840. 

3. Ann Eliza, b. Feb. 1, 1834. 8. Margaret Lluellen, b. July 10, 1842. 

4. Flora, b. June 15, 1835. 9. Celia Rebecca, b. May 17, 1844. 

5. Josephine, b. Nov. 22, 1836. 10. Sarah Eunice, b. Dec. 2, 1845. 

6. Geo. Jackson,b. Aug. 1, 1838; 11. Julia Town, b. Nov. 21, 1847. 
d. Feb. 4, 1840, a?. 1 y. 6 m. 3 d. 12. Virginia Dodge, b. Sept. 22, 1849. 



399. Rosilla Shattuck, dau. of Daniel, (p. 185,) b. Nov. 10, 
1799, d. in Lexington, Dec. 15, 1845, ee. 46 y. 1 m. 5 d. 

She m. May 17, 1821, James Minot Colburn, b. in Tyngs- 
borough, Dec. 26, 1797, s. of Abiel Colburn and Sarah Minot. 
He m. 2, Eliza Lakin, b. Sept. 16, 1807, (p. 200.) He has had— 

1. Charles Minot, b. Feb. 20, 1822; m. May 24, 1846, Mary Jane Allen. 

2. Alfred Hall, b. Sept. 8, 1823 ; d. in Lexington, March 12, 1847, se. 23 y. 

6 m. 4 d. 

3. Martha M., b. Aug. 22, 1825 ; d. in 1828, a3. 3 years. 

4. James Francis, b. Oct. 14,1827. 

5. Martha Jane, b. April 20, 1831 ; d. March 21, 1852, ae. 20 y. 11 m. 1 d. 

6. Sarah Maria, b. Oct. 21, 1836. 7. Sumner J. B., b. April 8, 1839. 



400. Noah Shattuck, s. of Noah, (p. 186,) was b. in Groton, 
Sept. 14, 1799, where he now resides as a farmer. 
41 



322 SEVENTH GENERATION AND DESCENDANTS. 

He m. April 27, 1823, Prudence Wright, b. Feb. 2, 1806, dau. 
of Artemas Wright, b. Aug. 4, 1780, and Prudence Corey, (p. 131.) 

HIS CHILDREN, BY PRUDENCE WRIGHT, BORN IN GROTON. 

1. Augusta P., b. Dec. 25, 1824 ; m. April 11, 1847, James Lewis of Mt. Vernon, 

N. H., b. July 3, 1820; and have had, 1. Herbert M., b. Feb. 4, 1848; 2. 
Frederick W., b. Nov. 10, 1852. 

2. Noah Gilman, b. Dec. 18, 1828. 4. Charles A., b. Jan. 13, 1834. 

3. George H., b. July 9, 1831 ; 5. Henry P., b. Aug. 19, 1844. 

d. May 12, 1832, ee. 10 m. 3 d. 6. Arthur W., b. Oct. 6, 1848. 



401. Walter Shattuck, s. of Noah, (p. 186,) was b. in 
Groton, Aug. 9, 1801, where he is a merchant with his brother, 
under the firm of W. & G. Shattuck. 

He m. May 9, 1827, Roxanna Fletcher, b. Dec. 7, 1804, 
dau. of David Fletcher and Mary Allen. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ROXANNA FLETCHER, BORN IN GROTON. 

1. Martha Roxanna, b. April 1, 1828. Has been a teacher in North Carolina. 

2. David Walker, b. Feb. 3, 1830 ; d. Jan. 3, 1851, s. 20 y. 11 m. 

3. Mary Allen, b. Aug. 3, 1831 ; d. Nov. 21, 1835, a?. 4 y. 3 m. 18 d. 

4. Susan French, b. June 12, 1833. 

5. Almira Ann, b. Aug. 4, 1834 ; d. March 20, 1835, se. 7 m. 16 d. 

6. Noah Fletcher, b. Mar. 25, 1836; d. April 22, 1842, se. 6 y. m. 27 d. 

7. George Francis, b. July 28, 1838. 9. Abbott Allen, b. May 4, 1843. 

8. Samuel Walker, b. Feb. 18, 1841. 10. Mary Fletcher, b. Oct, 25, 1845. 



402. Andrew Shattuck, s. of Noah, (p. 186,) was b. in 
Groton, Dec. 28, 1805, and is a farmer in that town. 

He m. April 24, 1832, Cynthia Stone, b. in Harvard, April 30, 
1804, dau. of Joseph Stone and Rachel Green. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY CYNTHIA STONE, BORN IN GROTON. 

1. Cynthia Maria, b. Mar. 21, 1833. 

2. Anna Augusta, b. March 6, 1835; d. Oct. 3, 1848, ae. 13 y. 6 m. 27 d. 

3. Andrew Payson, b. April 20, 1837. 

4. Sarah Baldtvin, b. April 27, 1839. 

5. James Fowle B., b. Feb. 2, 1845. 

6. Henry A. Richards, b. ; d. Sept. 30, 1847. 

7. Harriet Newell, b. July 23, 1850. 



403. Susanna Shattuck, dau. of Noah, (p. 186,) b. May 3, 
1807, m. 1, April 25, 1832, Dr. Richard Williams, who was b. 
Jan. 12, 1803, and d. Oct. 6, 1842, ae. 39 y. 8 m. 24 d., in Milford, 
N. H. She m. 2, March 21, 1844, Leonard Chase, b. in Milbury, 
Mass., Aug. 4, 1810. He is a merchant and manufacturer in 
Milford. 



GEORGE, CAROLINE, WILLIAM, AND NORMAN SHATTUCK. 323 
HER CHILDREN, BY DR. RICHARD WILLIAMS, BORN IN MILFORD. 

1. George Richards, b. Feb. 4, 1833. 

2. John Sheple, b. Aug. 20, 1840 ; d. Sept. 1, 1840, se. 11 days. 

3. Gordon, b. Oct. 18, 1841. 

HER CHILD, BY LEONARD CHASE, BORN IN MILFORD. 

4. Frank W., b. Dec. 8, 1845. 



404. Col. George Shattuck, s. of Noah, (p. 186,) was b. in 
Groton, May 1, 1809, and is a merchant in that town. He is a 
justice of the peace, and has held various town offices. 

He m. Aug. 4, 1835, Louisa Capell, b. April 6, 1800. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY LOUISA CAPELL, BORN IN GROTON. 

1. George Richards, b. Dec. 20, 1836. 

2. Elizabeth Mitchell, b. Sept. 12, 1838. 

3. Catharine Mary Ann, b. Sept. 15, 1842. 



405. Caroline Shattuck, dau. of Noah, (p. 186,) b. Oct. 14, 
1811, m. May 12, 1831, John H. Hartwell, b. Nov. 11, 1806, s. 
of Samuel Hartwell and Caroline Matilda Wright, (pp. 130, 131.) 

HER CHILDREN, BY JOHN H. HARTWELL, BORN IN GROTON. 

1. Susanna Shattuck, b. Jan. 4, 1833. 4. William Chaplin, b. Aug. 2, 1838 ; 

2. John Albro, b. Jan. 21, 1834. d. Oct. 16, 1839, ae. 1 y. 2 m. 14 d. 

3. Mary Ann, b. Aug. 10, 1835. 5. Samuel Noah, b. Feb. 21, 1845. 



406. William Shattuck, s. of Noah, (p. 186,) was b. in 
Groton, June 5, 1816, where he now resides as a farmer. 

He m. Dec. 10, 1839, Lucy Burgess, b. in Harvard, July 20, 
1819, dau. of Merritt Burgess and Miranda Wood. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY LUCY BURGESS, BORN IN GROTON. 



1. William, b. Sept. 18, 1840. 

2. Lucy, b. March 2, 1842. 

3. Josephine, b. Jan. 25, 1 844. 

4. Noah, b. June 17, 1846. 



5. Henrietta, b. Nov. 22, 1848. 

6. Anna, b. May 14, 1851. 

7. Maria, b. Aug. 20, 1853. 



407. Norman Shattuck, s. of Noah, (p. 186,) was b. in 
Groton, Sept. 6, 1818, and is now a farmer in that town. 

He m. Jan. 19, 1838, Mary A. Brown, b. Sept. 23, 1820. 
Mary Elizabeth, only child, b. in Groton, Aug. 14, 1841. 



DESCENDANTS OF THE HINSDALE BRANCHES. 

408. Charlotte Shattuck, dau. of Cyrus, (p. 187,) was b. 

Oct. 2, 1783 ; d. in Hinsdale, Oct. 23, 1833, as. 50 y. m. 21 d. 

She m. Nehemiah Church, a shoemaker of Keene, and had, — 



324 SEVENTH GENERATION AND DESCENDANTS. 

1. Tirza, b. June 4, 1815; m. Nov., 1839, John Robbins of Boston. 

2. Albert G.,b. Dec. 17, 1816; m. Ellen Davids of Keene, N. H. 

3. Sarah, b. ; d. se. 3 years. 

4. Charlotte, b. Oct. 23, 1821 ; d. in Athol, Sept. 17, 1845, se. 23 y. 10 m. 24 d. 

5. Cyrus, b. July 21, 1826 ; resides in Hinsdale. 



409. Cyrus Shattuck, s. of Cyrus, (p. 187.) was b. in Hins- 
dale, N. H., Dec. 6, 1793, and in 1819 removed to Guildhall, Vt., 
and in 1846 to Fredonia, Chautauque Co., N. Y., where he now 
resides. 

He m. May, 1816, Catharine Perkins, dau. of Calvin Per- 
kins, Esq., and has had, — 

1. Nancy Babcock, b. June 27, 1817; m. Dec. 26, 1839, William H. Brigham, a 

lumber merchant, and first settled in Sheriden, but removed in 1849 to 
Dunkirk. Have Catharine M., b. June 25, 1845. 

2. Alvin, b. April 12, 1821 ; was in the United States naval service in the South 

Pacific, from 1839 to 1842, commenced the study of medicine in 1844, grad- 
uated at the Ohio Medical College in 1848, and settled in Westfield, 
Chautauque Co., N. Y. He has an office also in Buffalo. He m. Jan. 18, 
1843, Jane Patterson, dau. of David Patterson of Sheriden, Vt., and has had, 
1. Henry Perkins, b. Nov. 27, 1844; 2. Eva Jane, b. May 6, 1851. 



410. Phena Shattuck, dau. of Makepeace, (p. 188,) b. in 
Hinsdale, Sept. 7, 1777; m. in 1797, Walter C. Stearns, b. 
July 1, 1774, s. of Nathaniel Stearns of Hinsdale, and afterwards 
of Wardsborough, Vt. They now live upon the old Shattuck 
homestead in Hinsdale. 

1. Fanny, b. Dec. 23, 1797 ; m. 1827, Oliver Adams. Reside in Hinsdale. 

Have 3 sons and 6 daughters, one of whom is married. 

2. Roxanna, b. Oct. 31, 1799; m. 1827, Asaph Spencer. Reside in Sardinia, 

Erie Co., N. Y. Have 2 sons, 2 daughters, and 2 granddaughters. 

3. John, b. Aug. 10, 1801 ; m. 1825, Esther Webster. Resides on the paternal 

farm. Have had 4 sons, 5 daughters, and 1 grandchild. 

4. Emily, b. April 3, 1803 ; m. Major Caleb Spencer of Hinsdale. Have had 

9 children, 6 living, and 2 grandchildren. 

5. Rhoda, b. 1805; was drowned in 1822, ae. 17. 

6. Eliot, b. April 6, 1807; m. 1835, Betsey Darling of H. Have 1 dau. 

7. Maria, b. Feb. 12, 1809; m. David Blanchard of Hinsdale; 3 children. 

8. Grotia, b. May 5, 181 1 ; m.Wm. Spencer. She d. April 30, 1838 ; 2 daus. 

9. Nathaniel, b. Jan. 24, 1814; m. 1838, Sarah Phelps of Holden, Mass. Re- 

side in Worcester, and have 1 son and 2 daughters. 

10. Hiram, b. Jan. 14, 1816; d. Dec. 26, 1825, m. 9 y. 11 m. 12 d. 

11. Walter, b. Dec. 26, 1818; not married. Resides in Worcester, Mass. 

12. Mary, b. May 7, 1820 ; m. 1838, Wm. Spencer for his 2d wife. His 1st 

was her sister Grotia. He d. in 1841 ; 1 dau. She m. 2, Isaac Allen. 

13. Charlotte, b. Mar. 20, 1822; m. 1847, Dr. Fred. Bayden; d. 1850. No chil. 



ALPHEUS, CHESTER, STEPHEN, AND GEORGE SHATTUCK. 325 

411. Alpheus Shattuck, s. of Makepeace, (p. 188,) was b. 
in Hinsdale, April 11, 1790, where he now resides. 
He m. in 1816, Clarinda Elmore, and has had, — 

1. Alexander, b. April 2, 1816; m. in 1836, Annis Elmore. 

2. Clarinda, b. Aug. 30, 1819; m. in 1844, George Smith. 

3. Alpheus, b. Sept. 3, 1821 ; unmarried, in Hinsdale. 

4. James, b. June 30, 1824 ; m. in 1852, Lorinda Evans. 

5. Calvin, b. Dec. 15, 1826 ; unmarried, in Hartford, Ct. 



412. Chester Shattuck, s. of Gideon, (p. 188.) was b. in 
Hinsdale, Jan. 17, 1785, and is now a farmer in Michigan. 

He m. in Ticonderoga, March 11, 1811, Laura Hendrick, b. 
June 23, 1791. They have had,— 

1. Wm. Chandler, b. March 4, 1812. 5. Luther Dyer, b. June 30, 1827; 

2. Sidus, b. June 2, 1814; d. Aug. 30, se. 2 ra. 

d. Sept. 6, 1814, a>. 3 m. 4 d. 6. Nelson E., b. April 14, 1832. 

3. Lucinda, b. May 2, 1818. 7. Darwin, b. July 30, 1835. 

4. Leonard Aaron, b. May 2, 1825. 



413. Stephen Shattuck, s. of Gideon, (p. 188,) was b. in 
Hinsdale, May 23, 1792. He was a farmer in Ticonderoga, 
where he d. April 17, 1844, se. 51 y. 10 m. 24 d. 

He m. Jan. 25, 1825, Abigail Newton, dau. of Joel Newton 
and Hannah Brace. She d. in Dresden, N. Y., May 20, 1852. 

1. Alonzo. b. April 25, 1825. 5. Albert, b. Oct. 10, 1835. 

2. Edwin, b. Nov. 15, 1829. 6. Alvin, b. Feb. 11, 1838. 

3. Chester,b. June 12, 1831. 7. Henry, ) b. March 3, 1840. 

4. Arad, b. July 15, 1833. 8. Harriet, S Twins. 



414. George Shattuck, s. of Gideon, (p. 188,) was b. in 
Ticonderoga, Nov. 13, 1795, and in 1835 removed from thence to 
Northfield, Summit Co., Ohio, and in 1850 to Jefferson, Noble 
Co., la., where he now resides as a farmer. 

He m. Sept. 12, 1822, Electa Beldin, b. Nov. 16, 1801. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ELECTA BELDIN, BORN IN TICONDEROGA AND NORTHFIELD. 

1. Persis B., b. Jan. 8, 1824 ; m. Feb. 2, 1844, Christopher C. Stone, b. Jan. 2, 

1822, and have had, b. in Northfield, 1. Melvin H., b. Aug. 20, 1845; 2. 
Amelia C, b. Sept. 25, 1847, d. Sept. 27, 1849; 3. Almy A.,b. Dec. 12, 1849. 

2. Charlotte T., b. Sept. 9, 1825; m. April 22, 1847, Matthias L. Swem, b. April 

22, 1820, and have had Alice O., b. Nov. 15, 1849. 

3. Ira H, b. Oct. 10, 1827. 

4. Elista B., b. Sept.25, 1829; m. Feb. 22, 1850, Ann Oakley, b. Sept. 1, 1830, 

and have Walter and George. 

5. Phebe A., b. Sept. 22, 1831. 7. Henrietta E., b. May 25, 1838. 

6. Erastus B., b. April 22, 1834. 8. PlanceliaM., b. Sept. 24, 1841. 



326 SEVENTH GENERATION AND DESCENDANTS. 

415. Arad Shattuck, s. of Gideon, (p. 188,) was b. in 
Ticonderoga, March 22, 1798, and is now a farmer in that town. 

He m. in Pawlings, Dutchess Co., April 10, 1828, Hester 
Brill, b. May 16, 1809, dau. of Joseph Brill and Hannah 
Wooden. Have had, — 

1. Albert, b. April 18, 1829. 5. Samuel, b. May 12, 1836; d. 

2. Mary, b. June 5, 1830. Jan. 5, 1838, ae. 1 y. 7 m. 23 d. 

3. Roswell, b. July 29,1832; 6. Joseph, b. April! 1, 1839. 
d. Feb. 10, 1834, re. 1 y. 6 m. 11 d. 7. William T., b. April 24, 1841 . 

4. Sylvester, b. July 2, 1834. 8. Laura, b. May 26, 1846. 

9. Arpha, b. Nov. 7, 1850. 



416. Samuel Shattuck, s. of Gideon, (p. 188,) was b. in 
Ticonderoga, March 3, 1800, and resides there as a farmer. 

He m. Feb. 2, 1825, Polly Ward, b. Oct. 8, 1803, dau. of 
Zachariah C. Ward and Betsey Willard. Have had, — 

1. Melissa, b. Nov. 29, 1825 ; m. May 22, 1849, Levi P. Covil of Ticonderoga. 

2. Chandler W., b. Mar. 15, 1828. 

3. Laura, b. Sept. 22, 1829 ; m. March 8, 1849, James M. Delano of Ti. 

4. Emeline, b. April 22, 1832. Q.Edwin, b. July 22, 1839. 

5. Martin, b. Oct. 31, 1835. 7. Geo. Washington, b. Dec. 21, 1843. 



DESCENDANTS OF THE MARLBOROUGH BRANCHES. 

417. Walter Shattuck, s. of Thaddeus, (p. 189,) was b. in 
Lancaster in 1779, and d. in West Boylston, May 8, 1843, ae. 64. 
A cooper. 

He m. Betsey Morse, b. April 25, 1783. (Morse Memorials, 
p. 32.) Had,— 

1. Jonathan, b. Jan. 21, 1807; m. Anna Knight, b. Dec. 13, 1812. Reside in 

Bolton, and have had, 1. Emory H., b. May 15, 1837 ; 2. Mary E., b. Aug. 20, 
1838; 3. Sarah F., b. Jan. 7, 1840; 4. Anna H., b. May 25, 1844. 

2. Silas, b. Oct. 22, 1809; m. Nov. 8, 1844, Nancy Osgood, b. May 22, 1810. 

He is a combmaker in Leominster, and has had, 1. George, b. March 22, 
1838; 2. Martha Ann, b. Sept. 21, 1841 ; 3. Ellen A., b. July 20, 1843; 4. 
James Addison, b. May 28, 1847. 



418. Asaph Shattuck, Esq., s. of Ezra, (p. 189,) was b. in 
Leyden, Dec. 6, 1780, and in 1806 settled as a farmer in Floyd, 
Oneida Co., and now resides there. He has been a justice of the 
peace, and held other public offices. 

He m. Nov., 1801, Mary Dorrell, b. in Warwick, Dec. 11, 
1780, dau. of William Dorrell, (who d. in Leyden, Aug. 28, 1846, 
ae. 94,) and Mary Chase. 



ASAPH SHATTUCK RUFUS SHATTUCK. 327 

HIS CHILDREN, BY MARY DORRELL, BORN IN LEYDEN AND FLOYD. 

1. Laura, b. Oct. 28, 1802; m. April 1, 1827, Curtis Wilcox, and has, 1. Mary, 

b. Nov. 19, 1829; 2 and 3, Asaph and Amelia, twins. 

2. Sylvia, b. Nov. 23, 1804 ; m. Feb. 28, 1827, Chancellor R. L. Stevenson. She 

d. May 21, 1845, ae. 40 y. 5 m. 28 d. Had, 1. Cornelia, b. 1828, m. March, 
1850, Jesse Avery ; 2. Asaph, b. April, 1831 ; 3. James, b. June 13, 1833 ; 
4. Chandler; 5. George; C. Luther. 

3. Ezra, b. July 27, 1806 ; m. Dec. 25, 1833, Sarah Button. He is a saw-miller 

in Marcy, Oneida Co., N. Y. No issue. 

4. Asaph, b. Aug. 4, 1808; m. March 24, 1835, Mary Button, sister of the above, 

and resides in the same place, as a farmer. No children. 

5. William, b. Oct. 2, 1810; d. Oct. 7, 1833, se. 23 y. m. 5 d. 

6. Lois, b. Jan. 14, 1814 ; m. Feb. 29, 1852, Noble Wilcox of Marcy. He had 

been married before, and had 3 children. 

7. Lydia, b. Oct. 4, 1815; m. Dec. 31, 1837, George W. Baker, and has Emma, 

b. Oct., 1838. Resides in Norfolk, Va. 

8. Calvin, b. Sept. 30, 1819; m. Dec, 1845, Elizabeth Reed, and has Sarah 

Frances, b. July 8, 1849. He is a wheelwright in Marcy. 

9. Luther, b. June 16, 1822; m. Jan. 28, 1846, Cynthia Holmes, and has Martin 

Luther, b. June 16, 1848. He is a farmer in Floyd. 



419. Rufus Shattuck, s. of Ezra, (p. 189,) was b. in Ley- 
den, June 20, 1782, where he has lived as a clothier and farmer. 

He m. 1, Nov. 26, 1801, Anna Dorrell, b. Oct., 1782, sister 
of Mary, before mentioned. She d. May 1, 1831, ae. 48 y. 7 m. 

He m. 2. Oct. 16, 1831, Lydia Dorrell, b. April 2, 1797. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ANNA DORRELL, BORN IN LEYDEN. 

1. Anna, b. Sept. 30, 1804 ; d. Oct. 14, 1814, ae. 10 y. m. 14 d. 

2. Almira, b. July 13, 1806 ; m. Socrates Wild, b. March 5, 1803, a clothier in 

Leyden. She d. June 20, 1830, ae. 23 y. 11 m. 7 d. He d. Sept. 19, 1838, 
se. 35 y. 6 m. 14 d. Their only child d. before its father. 

3. Mary, b. May 27, 1808 ; m. Nov. 26, 1828, Charles W. Newcomb, b. Nov. 

30, 1806 ; a farmer in Leyden. She d. Dec. 23, 1852, ae. 44 y. 6 m. 26 d. 
Had, 1. Mary A., b. May 17, 1829, d. May 4, 1830 ; 2. Susan A., b. Oct. 11, 
1834 ; 3. Jonathan S., b. Jan. 24, 1836 ; 4. Charles S., b. Aug. 19, 1839; 5. 
Henry W., b. March 14, 1843 ; 6. Charlotte N., b. June 16, 1845, d. Sept. 
15, 1852; 7. Almira F., b. Dec. 22, 1849. 

4. Rufus W, b. Feb. 22, 1810 ; d. Aug. 30, 1812, ae. 2 y. 6 m. 8 d. 

5. Richard, b. Oct. 2, 1811. He is a clothier and saw-miller in Clarksburg; m. 

May 30, 1837, Tryphena H. Nash, b. Aug. 13, 1812. No children. 

6. William, b. May 8, 1814 ; d. Sept. 8, 1832, ae. 18 y. 4 m. 

7. Maria L., b. July 27, 1824. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY LYDIA DORREL, SISTER OF HIS FIRST WIFE, BORN IN LEYDEN. 

8. Laura, b. Sept. 22, 1832; d. March 18, 1833, ae. 5 m. 26 d. 

9. Rufus, b. March 2, 1834. 11. Laura E., b. May 20, 1837. 
10. Luther D.,h. July 27,1835. 12. James Ezra, b. Feb. 6,1843. 



328 SEVENTH GENERATION AND DESCENDANTS. 

420. Ezra Shattuck, s. of Ezra, (p. 189,) was b. in Leyden, 
May 16, 1785, and in 1831 removed to Gainesville, then Genesee, 
now Wyoming Co., N. Y., where he d. June 3, 1834, ee. 49 y. 
m. 17 d. 

He m. March 28, 1806, Sybil Connaele. She d. in Gaines- 
ville, Nov. 18, 1853. Her father, Samuel Connable, b. in Boston, 
March 26, 1762, d. in Gainesville, Feb. 2, 1845. Her mother, 
Susan Frizzell, d. Dec. 2, 1849. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY SYBIL CONNABLE, BORN IN LEYDEN. 

1. Alvah P., b. Dec. 19, 1806; m. Dec. 2, 1834, Mary Electa Packer. 

2. Samuel H., b. Oct. 28,1808; m. Sept. 22, 1842, Rebecca Zerviah Packer, 

(p. 189.) He is a farmer in Gainesville, and has Charles Packer, b. Nov. 
29, 1845; 2. Mary Electa, b. Oct. 11, 1850. 

3. Sylvia, b. Sept. 1, 1810 ; d. in Leyden, Oct. 12, 1811, a?. 1 y. 1 m. 11 d. 

4. Sybil D., b. Aug. 23, 1812; m. in Castile, Wyoming Co., Sept. 1, 1834, Daniel 

T. Curtis. They removed in 1836 to Avon, Mich., where she d. Aug. 9, 
1839, ae. 26 y. 9 m. 16 d. Had, 1. Sylvia R., b. Sept. 13, 1835 ; 2. Sarah E., 
b. Dec. 29, 1836 ; 3. Sybil Diana, b. April 29, 1839. 

5. Ezra R, b. Aug. 20, 1814 ; d. at Gainesville, April 1, 1835, a?. 20 y. 7 m. 11 

d. ; m. May, 1834, and had Sarah P., b. Jan. 22, 1835, d. May, 1835, as. 4 m. 

6. Alonzo Alexander, b. Aug. 14, 1816, d. Oct. 28, 1849, se. 33 y. 2 m. 14 d. He 

m. Sept.. 1838, Hannah M. Porter, and had, 1. Ellen, b. March, 1841 ; 2. 
Ezra A., b. June 23, 1844 ; 3. Sarah, b. Feb. 1848. 

7. Sylvia R, b. May 14, 1818 ; d. Dec. 10, 1837, se. 19 y. 6 m. 26 d. 

8. Emeline S., b. Sept. 2, 1820 ; d. June 29, 1838, a3. 17 y. 9 m. 27 d. 

9. Mary Ann, b. July 2, 1822 ; d. Nov. 22, 1838, se. 16 y. 4 m. 20 d. 

10. Rvfus C, b. Sept. 8, 1825 ; d. a few days old. All 4 d. in Gainesville. 



421. Luther Shattuck, s. of Ezra, (p. 189,) was b. in Ley- 
den, April 18, 1787, and d. there March 10, 1834, as. 46 y. 10 m. 
22 d. He was a carpenter and millwright, and owned the " Shat- 
tuck Mills." His death was occasioned by mortification super- 
vening a wound by a splinter in his little finger, and taking cold 
by working in the water. 

He m. Oct. 19, 1809, Margery Wilbur, b. in Leyden, Dec. 
19, 1791, dau. of John Wilbur. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY MARGERY WILBUR, BORN IN LEYDEN. 

1. Calvin W., b. Feb. 15, 1811. He is a trader in Coleraine, and owner and 
manager of the first cotton manufactory erected in Franklin County. He 
makes about 1,000,000 yards of printing cloths annually. He is a justice 
of the peace, and has held other public offices ; m. Oct. 14, 1834, Mary 
Thompson, b. in Coleraine, June 11, 1835, and has had, 1. Charles W., b. 
March 25, 1837; 2. Luther T., b. Aug. 19, 1840; 3. Therissia E., b. Nov. 
14, 1843; 4. John Waldo, b. Aug. 18, 1846. 



LUTHER, ABEL, AND JAMES SHATTUCK. 329 

2. Dyanthia, b. May 14, 1812 ; m. Aug. 24, 1837, Roswell S. Keete, b. Feb. 10, 

1811, and succeeds her father as owner of the " Shattuck Mills." Have had, 
1. Charles M., b. Sept. 24, 1838 ; 2. Henry S., b. June 24, 1841 ; 3. Simon 
S., b. Aug. 7, 1843. 

3. Cynthia, b. Sept. 24, 1813; m. Nov. 11, 1834, William Brown, b. in Leyden, 

July 23, 1806. He is a farmer in Northfield, and has had, 1. Calista M., b. 
Feb. 11, 1835; 2. Caroline C, b. Nov. 12, 1837; 3. Mary T., b. Sept. 6, 
1839 ; 4. Cynthia S., b. April 8, 1842 ; 5. John W., b. Nov. 9, 1843 ; 6. Wil- 
lard H., b. June 23, 1845; 7. Henry Kirk, b. Sept. 27, 1851. 

4. Charles A., b. Feb. 19, 1815 ; m. Lucinda Gaines. He is in Hillsdale, Mich. 

5. John E., b. June 15, 1818 ; m. Harriet Chapin. He is in Jefferson, Wis. 

6. Elum B., b. Sept. 7, 1829. He has been a merchant, in Barre. 

7. Simon L., b. April 1, 1822; m. March 31, 1844, Elizabeth F. Gaut, b. in 

Leyden, Nov. 7, 1823, and has had, 1. Martha, b. March 1, 1847; 2. John 
W., b. Oct. 15, 1849. He has been a merchant, first in Leyden, and 
now in Greenfield. He was a representative in the Legislature, from Ley- 
den, in 1853. 

8. JVancy E., b. Feb. 11, 1825. 



422. Abel Shattuck, s. of Ezra, (p. 189,) was b. in Leyden, 
June 11, 1793, and in 1822 removed to Wilna, Jefferson Co., 
N. Y., where he has since resided as a farmer. 

He m. 1, Jan. 15, 1822, Amelia D. Frizzell, dan. of Reuben 
and Anna Frizzell of Leyden. She d. March 14, 1838, ae. 48. 
He m. 2, Aug. 21, 1839, Sally Hastings, b. Dec. 4, 1809. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY AMELIA D. FRIZZELL, BORN IN WILNA. 

1. Marquis, b. Sept. 30, 1822; d. March, 1823, ae. 5 m. 

2. Angeline, b. April 20, 1824; m. Feb. 19, 1851, Sheldon E. Sperry of Wilna. 

3. Ally M, b. July 17, 1825; d. Feb., 1827, a. 1 y. 7 m. 

4. Ally M., b. Sept. 3, 1826 ; d. April, 1828, *e. 1 y. 8 m. 

5. Almira A., b. Sept. 21, 1828 ; d. April 29, 1838, se. 9 y. 7 m. 8 d. 

6. Abel E., b. Oct. 20, 1843. 

7. Bosina S., b. June 11, 1846. 8. Ashley T., b. Aug. 19, 1848. 

423. James Shattuck, s. of Ezra, (p. 189,) was b. in Leyden, 
Jan. 5, 1799, and in 1824 settled in Wilna ; a carpenter and farmer. 

He m. 1, Aug., 1818, Rachel Frizzell, b. Aug., 1796. She 
d. May 6, 1829, ee. 32 y. 9 m. 

He m. 2, in 1832, Dency Frizzell, b. June 19, 1801. She d. 
Oct. 27, 1853, a?. 52 y. 4 m. 8 d. 

He m. 3, Dec. 18, 1853, Widow Clemina Newton. 

These three wives were sisters of his brother's wife. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY RACHEL FRIZZELL, BORN IN LEYDEN AND WILNA. 

1. Caroline Maria, b. May 5, 1819; m. Erastus Hatch, a blacksmith of Wilna, 
and has had, 1. Lucy Jane, b. Sept. 12, 1844 ; 2. Henry Willard, b. Jan. 12, 
42 * 



330 SEVENTH GENERATION AND DESCENDANTS. 

1847 ; 3. Harriet Amelia, b. Jan. 13, 1851 ; 4 and 5. Erastus and Caroline 
Maria, twins, b. June 28, 1852. The mother d. Nov., 1852, a?. 33 y. 6 m. 
2. Clemina Amarancy, b. Dec. 11, 1822. 3. James, b. April 13, 1829. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY DENCY FRIZZELL, BORN IN WILNA. 

4. Jefferson, b. Feb. 4, 1835. 

5. Emily, b. May 4, 1838. 6. Calvin, b. May 1, 1842. 



424. Mary Shattuck, dan. of Abel, (p. 191,) b. in Coleraine, 
April 18, 1794, m. in 1815, Ira Donelson, b. Aug., 5, 1790. In 
1827 they removed from Coleraine to Pontiac, Oakland Co., Mich., 
where they now reside as farmers. Two of his sons are ministers 
of the Methodist church. 

HER CHILDREN, BY IRA DONALSON, BORN IN COLERAINE AND PONTIAC. 

1. Horace L., b. Mar. 30, 1816. 4. Park S., b. April 17, 1825. 

2. Abel S., b. Feb. 27, 1818. 5. Mary A., b. July 4, 1830. 

3. Ira Warren, b. Oct. 11, 1821. 6. Arza A., b. Oct. 2, 1832. 



425. Abel Shattuck, s. of Abel, (p. 191,) was b. in Cole- 
raine, Oct. 26, 1798, and is a sawmiller and farmer in Bernardston. 

He m. in 1826, Nancy Miller, b. March 15, 1803, dau. of 
Robert Miller and Nancy Bolton. Mr. Miller was much em- 
ployed in public business, and d. Dec. 26, 1826, se. 53. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY NANCY MILLER, BORN IN BERNARDSTON. 

1. Nancy M., b. Jan. 4, 1828 ; m. Francis Boylston of Greenfield, and have had 

Emma C, b. April 1, 1854. 

2. Harvey B., b. May 3, 1829; m. Nov. 12, 1853, Ellen A. Hale. 

3. Elizabeth M., b. July 8, 1831 ; m. Jan. 25, 1854, Henry Severance. 

4. Abbie F., b. Aug. 29, 1835; m. March 25, 1855, Alanson R. Strickland. 

5. Park D., b. June 23, 1841. 6. Clara A., b. Aug. 31, 1846. 



426. Ai Shattuck, s. of Abel, (p. 191,) was b. in Coleraine, 
May 8, 1804. He first settled as a farmer in Leroy, Jefferson 
Co., N. Y., but in 1837 removed to Hermon, St. Lawrence Co., 
where he now resides. 

He m. Sept. 20, 1826, Betsey Sixberry, b. Nov. 19, 1804. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY BETSEY SIXBERRY, BORN IN LEROY AND HERMON. 

1. Milo, b. Nov. 21, 1827; m. Feb. 18, 1848, Ellen Ethbridge, b. Feb. 15, 1829, 

and has had, 1. Mary, b. Sept. 24, 1848; 2. James A., b. Dec. 5, 1849 ; 3. 
Phylinda, b. Sept. 10, 1851. 

2. Ann Jane, b. April 21, 1830; m. Jan. 2, 1853, Edmund Paterson. 

3. Silas, b. June 9, 1832 ; m. July 8, 1852, Eliza Ann Child. 

4. Lydia, b. Nov. 27, 1834. 7. Park Ai, b. May 8,1841. 

5. Almira, b. June 30, 1837. 8. Caroline Eliz., b. Mar. 16, 1843. 

6. Adeline, b. March 7, 1839. 9. Sylvia Ann, b. April 27, 1847. 



MILO, TRUMAN, TRULY, AND SYLVIA SHATTUCK. 



331 



427. Milo Shattuck, s. of Abel, (p. 191,) was b. in Cole- 
raine, March 9, 1806, and in 1834 settled as a farmer in Philadel- 
phia, Jefferson Co., N. Y., but in 1853 removed to Gouverneur, 
St. Lawrence Co. 

He m. 1, in Feb., 1833, Phylinda Barrett of Leroy. She d. 
Aug. 2, 1834, in childbirth with her first child. 

He m. 2, in May, 1835, Caroline E. Parsons, b. Aug. 5, 1807. 
1. Phylinda, his only child by his first wife, was b. Aug. 2, 1834. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY CAROLINE E. PARSONS, BORN IN LEROY. 



2. Charles W., b. June 15, 1836. 

3. George P., b. Dec. 14, 1838 ; d. 

May 8, 1840, <e. 1 y. 4 m. 24 d. 



4. Adeline, b. Aug. 31, 1841. 

5. Ellen E., b. Nov. 3, 1846. 



428. Truman Shattuck, s. of Abel, (p. 191,) was b. in Cole- 
raine, June 18, 1811, and is now a farmer in that town. 

He m. 1, Sept. 1835, Amanda Coolidge. She d. Aug. 13, 
1840, aB. 24. 

He m. 2, Oct. 1841, Mary Ann Noyes of Guilford, Yt. Has — 

1. Frances, b. Oct. 23, 1836. 3. Truly Ann, b. April, 1851. 

2. Franklin B.,b. June 3,1838. 



429. Truly Shattuck, dau. of Abel, (p. 191.) b. in Coleraine, 
June 18, 1811 ; d. in Michigan in 1849, ae. 38 years. 

She m. in 1833, David Bishop, who went to California after 
her death. Her children are with her friends. 

1. Helen, b. Jan. 28, 1835 ; 4. Harriet, b. Dec. 12, 1841. 

d. 1849, ae. 14. 5. Amanda, b. Oct. 11, 1843. 

2. Ann, b. Dec. 14, 1837. 6. Lydia, b. June 6, 1845. 

3. Maiy, b. June 26, 1839. 7. Emetine Truly, b. Sept. 3, 1848. 



430. Sylvia Shattuck, dau. of Abel, (p. 191,) b. Sept. 2, 
1815; d. in Coleraine, Feb. 20, 1853, ae. 37 y. 5 m. 18 d. 

She m. Aug. 31, 1837, George W. Miller, b. Feb. 10, 1816, 
a brother of Nancy Miller, (Family 425.) Had, — 

1. Benjamin F, b. June 22, 1838. 

2. Abel, b. Sept. 22, 1839 ; d. Jan., 1853. j Thege 3 ^^ d> rf gcar _ 

3. Robert, ? Twins; d. Feb., 1853. let fever in 14 days. 

4. Silas, b. Aug. 17, 1841 ; d. Feb., 1853. ) J 

5. George W., b. July 16, 1845 ; d. April 7, 1853, se. 7 y. 8 m. 21 d. He fell 

into a pan of boiling soap the day before his death. 

6. Sylvanus, b. Feb. 18, 1853 ; d. Feb. 22, 1853, *e. 4 days. 



332 SEVENTH GENERATION AND DESCENDANTS. 

431. Joel Shattuck, s. of Samuel, (p. 191,) was b. in Ches- 
terfield, Aug. 20, 1786. He is a millwright now in his native 
town, but has resided in various other places. 

He m. Sally Pomeroy, b. Nov. 11, 1788. She d. in Phelps, 
Ontario Co., N. Y., July 11, 1825, as. 36 y. 8 m. Had — 

1. Merrick, b. in Worthington, Dec. 18, 1809; m. Sept. 26, 1832, Diana Westfall. 

He was a merchant and farmer, and d. in Lyons, Wayne Co., N. Y., much 
respected, April 3, 1852, ae. 42 y. 3 m. 15 d. Had, 1. Spencer, b. May 23, 
1834; 2. Mark, b. Jan. 3, 1836; 3. William, b. Sept. 14, 1838; 4. Sarah, b. 
July 15, 1841; 5. Helen, b. Dec. 26, 1843; 6. Mary, b. Oct. 11, 1845, d. 
Feb. 14, 1847, ce. 1 y. 4 m. 3 d. 

2. Betsey, b. in Chesterfield, Nov. 16, 1811 ; m. Dec. 17, 1833, Melancthon W. 

Hill, b. in Sharsal, N. Y., July 16, 1808. He is a farmer, and in 1846 
removed to Spring Prairie, Walworth Co., Wis., and in 1850 to Dell Prairie, 
Adams Co., 20 miles north of Fort Winnebago. They have had, 1. Sarah, b. 
Nov. 30, 1834, m. July 4, 1852, Samuel D. Jackson ; 2. Burnham, b. March 
19, 1837, d. April 1, 1837, ae. 11 d. ; 3. Thankful, b. June 30, 1839 ; 4. Mer- 
rick S., b. Nov. 22, 1842 ; 5. Jane S., b. April 8, 1847. 



432. David Shattuck, s. of John, (p. 192,) was b. in Con- 
way, April 22, 1776, and about 1797 settled as a farmer in Nor- 
wich, Chenango Co., N. Y., where he d. Jan. 10, 1811, a?. 34 y. 
8 m. 18 d. 

He m. March 28, 1799, Martha Smith, b. in Conway, Aug. 
25, 1777, dau. of Elisha Smith, b. in Hatfield, Oct. 24, 1739, and 
Abigail Church, b. in Hadley, March 7, 1738. She m. 2, Sept. 
15, 1814, Jeduthan Newton, and removed to Preston, Chenango 
Co., where she d. April, 1846, as. 68 y. 8 m. She had 3 children 
by Mr. Newton ; Olive, b. July 3, 1815 ; Abigail Maria, b. July 
17, 1817; Jeduthan, b. June 3, 1819. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY MARTHA SMITH, BORN IN NORWICH. 

1. Leroy, b. March 9, 1800 ; farmer in Norwich; m. 1, Sept. 16, 1822, Mehitable 

Cook, b. in Coventry, Ct., March 1, 1797. She d. May 1, 1831, ae. 34 y. 2 m. 
He m. 2, Jan. 26, 1832, Jerusha Cook, a twin sister of Mehitable. She d. 
June 17, 1850, 83. 53 y. 3 m. 16 d. He m. 3, Mary C. Lewis, widow of 
Thomas Lewis, b. Nov. 30, 1810. He has had, 1. David, b. Aug. 22, 1832, d. 
Sept., 1835, 93. 12; 2. John S., b. May 26, 1827, d. Sept., 1835; 3. George, 
b. June 17, 1829, d. Jan., 1835 ; 4. child, b. May 3, 1833, d. same month; 5. 
Martha L., b. Jan. 10, 1852; 6. Mary, b. Sept. 1, 1853. 

2. Betsey, b. Aug. 30, 1802 ; d. Nov. 7, 1805, 83. 3 y. 2 m. 7 d. 

3. Alvin, b. Feb. 21, 1805 ; d. Aug. 4, 1805, 83. 5 m. 13 d. 

4. Philena, b. Nov. 5, 1806; d. Aug. 6, 1807, 83. 9 m. 1 d. 

5. John, b. Aug. 30, 1808; d. Feb. 16, 1809, 83. 5 m. 16 d. 

6. John, b. Mar. 18, 1810; m. Sept. 23, 1833, Mary Knapp, b. Nov. 10, 1813, 



EPHRAIM, SAMUEL; AND DANIEL SHATTUCK. 333 

dau. of George and Mary Knapp. He has had, 1. David, b. July 26, 1834 ; 
2. Mary Frances, b. Nov. 17, 1839. He is a large farmer in Norwich, and 
a leading man in the county. 



433. Ephraim Shattuck, s. of John, (p. 192,) was b. in 
Conway, Oct. 11, 1782; and settled as a farmer in Norwich, 
Chenango Co., N. Y. He d. Aug. 19, 1830, ee. 47 y. 10 m. 8 d. 

He m. Sarah Hill, b. Dec. 22, 1778 ; and had, — 

1. Joseph K, b. Sept. 14, 1807. 5. Lucy, b. June 12, 1818; d. Dec. 

2. Betsey, b. April 21, 1809 ; d. 7, 1823, ae. 5 y. 5 m. 25 d. 
Aug. 15, 1849, ce. 40 y. 3 m. 24 d. 6. Lucy Ann, b. July 15, 1825. 

3. Harriet, b. Feb. 5,1811. 7. Ruth Melvina, b. June 3,1829. 

4. Alvira, b. Sept. 4, 1815. 

DESCENDANTS OF THE YOUNGER PEPPERELL BRANCHES. 

434. Samuel Shatttjck, s. of Samuel, (p. 195,) was b. in 
Pepperell, Sept. 17, 1781, and removed with his father to Spring- 
field, Vt. In 1816 he settled in Crown Point, Essex Co., N. Y. 
From thence he removed first to Ohio, and afterwards to Line 
Mills, Crawford Co., Pa., where he now resides. He has been 
post-master of the place. He married in Vermont, and has had, — 

1. Horatio, a farmer in Jefferson, Ashtabula Co., Ohio. Has 1 daughter. 

2. Lorenzo D., a sash and blind manufacturer in Line Mills. Has had 6 children, 

4 of whom, 2 sons and 2 daughters, are now living; 2 have died. 

3. Frederick, a trader in Sadsbury, Crawford Co., Pa. Has 1 daughter. 

4. A daughter, married and settled in Southern Ohio ; d. leaving 1 child. 

5. A daughter, married a house-joiner, but has no children. 



435. Daniel Shattuck, s. of Samuel, (p. 195,) b. in Pepperell, 
July 18, 1783, was a cooper in Springfield until 1816, and in 
Boston until 1847, when he removed to Line Mills, Crawford 
Co., Pa. 

He m. Louisa D. Organ. She d. in Boston, Jan. 16, 1844, 
se. 47. Had, — 

1. Samuel, b. Aug. 17, 1810; a printer in Boston; m. March 24, 1836, Susan 

N. Rumrill, b. Nov. 30, 1818, and has had, 1. Susan V., b. Feb. 16, 1837; 2. 
Samuel W., b. Nov. 30, 1839; 3. George W., b. June 15, 1840; 4. Joseph 
H., b. Sept. 5, 1842 ; 5. Ida G., b. Nov. 7, 1845 ; 6. Benj. T., b. Dec. 1, 1850. 

2. Charles F., b. Dec. 22, 1813. He has resided in Boston and Kittery, Me., 

now in Gardner, Mass.; m. 1, Nov. 3, 1834, Martha Foye of Portland, b. 
Aug. 16, 1816. She d. April 26, 1839, ae. 22 y. 8 m. 10 d. He m. 2, Sept. 
4, 1841, Jane B. Remick of Portsmouth, b. Aug. 18, 1818. He has had, 1. 
Louisa, b. May 4, 1835, d. July 6, 1841 ; 2. Charles Henry, b. Dec. 20, 1836, 
d. Jan. 18, 1837; 3. Charles F., b. Feb. 13, 1838; 4. Martha Jane, b. July 
28, 1842 ; 5. Marshall R., b. May 4, 1844 ; 6. Jacob R., b. July 28, 1846 ; 
7. Ada Louisa, b. July 7, 1853. 



334 SEVENTH GENERATION AND DESCENDANTS. 

3. William G., b. Sept. 23, 1815; chairmaker in Boston; m. March 17, 1841, 

Eliza R. Clark of Boston, b. April 30, 1816, and has had, 1. Lucy Elizabeth, 
b. Dec. 23, 1846; 2. Sarah Louisa, b. Feb. 28, 1849. 

4. James B., b. Aug. 7, 1817; resides in Boston. 

5. John H, b. Dec. 2, 1821 ; m. Nov. 15, 1843, Mary E. Cook of Boston, b. May 

28, 1827, and has had, 1. Charles IT., b. Nov. 23, 1844; 2. Emma E., b. 
March 3, 1846, d. same day; 3. Mary E., b. Sept. 10, 1848 ; 4. Ella C, b. 
Sept. 13, 1850, d. Feb., 1852. 



436. Hartwell Shattuck, s. of Samuel, (p. 195,) b. in Pep- 
perell, Feb. 19, 1788, removed with his father to Springfield, Vt. 
He settled first in Crown Point, Essex Co., N. Y., but removed to 
Norwich, Canada West, where he now lives, together with his 
children, as extensive farmers. 

He m. Mercy Safford, b. in Rockingham, Vt., May 10, 1788, 
dau. of Philip Safford and Elizabeth Bigelow, and has had, — 

1. George N., b. Dec. 6, 1813 ; m. Cynthia Heath, and has, 1. Millicent ; 2. An- 

geline ; 3. George. 

2. Noah, b. May 10, 1814; d. May 10, 1814, a few hours old. 

3. Lucretia, b. April 6, 1815; m. Edmund Bearss, and has had, 1. Elizabeth; 

2. Henrietta; 3. Edgar, (deceased;) 4. Mary Ellen; 5. Emma Frances. 

4. Hiram S., b. Jan. 21, 1817; m. Phebe Fuller, and has, 1. Charlotte E. ; 2. 

Emily L., (deceased ;) 3. Lucinda E. ; 4. Phebe E. 

5. Elliott, b. Sept. 15, 1819; d. Nov., 1820, ae. 1 y. 2 m. 

6. Harriet, b. March 4, 1822 ; m. John Miller, and has, 1. Albert ; 2. Amelia ; 

3. Marcia E. 

7. Joseph E., b. Feb. 14, 1824 ; m. Margaret Mclnnes, and has, 1. Hartwell A.; 

2. Agnes Lorenzo ; 3. Edgar Marshall. 

8. Elizabeth, b. April 7, 1826; d. Sept., 1826, se. 5 months. 



437. Clementina Shattuck, dau. of Samuel, (p. 195,) was b. 
in Pepperell, Sept. 4, 1791, and d. in Springfield, Vt., Dec. 27, 
1852, as. 61 y. 3 m. 23 d. 

She m. Nov., 1818, David Marble Merritt, b. in Scituate, 
May 30, 1789. He first settled in Dorchester, but, about 1820, 
removed to Springfield, Vt., where he d. Aug. 21, 1845, se. 56 
y. 3. m. 18 d. 

HER CHILDREN, BY DAVID M. MERRITT, BORN IN DORCHESTER AND SPRINGFIELD. 

1. George, b. in Dorchester, Aug. 24, 1819 ; m. March 30, 1846, Lucina Haselton 

of Andover, Vt. He resides in Springfield. 

2. Mary Ann, b. in Springfield, Aug. 29, 1822. 

3. Clementina, b. Nov. 25, 1825 ; m. Nov. 17, 1854, Sewall Haselton of 

Andover, Vt. 

4. Thomas Marble, b. April 30, 1831. 



ROXANNA, STEPHEN, AND JESSE SHATTUCK. 335 

438. Roxanna Shattuck, dan. of Samuel, (p. 195,) b. in Pep- 
perell, April 3, 1796, m. Nov. 9, 1817, Samuel Litchfield, b. in 
Scituate, May 29, 1791. He is a ship carpenter, and they now- 
live in Hingham. 

1. Caleb Lincoln, b. Oct. 7, 1818; m. Oct. 22, 1840, Mary S. Litchfield of Scit- 

uate. He is a brass founder in East Boston. 

2. Samuel H, b. Oct. 1 1, 1820. Brass founder in East Boston. 

3. Hartwell, b. Nov. 3, 1821 ; m. Joan Hiland. She d. Oct. 25, 1854. 

4. Charles A., ? b. Nov. 23, 1826. He is in California. 

5. Roxanna, $ Twins. m. Washburn Turner of Weymouth. 

6. Harvey Tho., b. Oct. 29, 1830 ; m. Mary Ann Fletcher. He is in East Boston. 

7. William, b. Nov., 1833. 8. George Washington, b. Feb. 22, 1837. 

439. Stephen Shattuck, s. of Stephen, (p. 195,) was b. in 
Pep., Aug. 10, 1785. He is a farmer, and has lived in Francis- 
town, N. H., Marlborough, Mass., Boylston, (his present resi- 
dence,) and in several other places. His 3 eldest children were 
b. in Marlborough, the youngest in Northborough. 

He m. 1, at North Reading, March, 1816, Hannah Carter, 

dau. of Carter and Stevens. She d. at Northborough, 

Aug. 8, 1824. 

He m. 2, at Northborough, Jan., 1841, Dolly Longley, d. Feb. 

14, 1794, widow of Ira B. Longley, and dau. of Carter and 

Dolly Jones. 

1. Miranda JV., b. Jan. 25, 1818 ; m. at Dubuque, Iowa, Jan. 11, 1841, Joseph 

W. Holt, formerly of Reading, Mass., now a merchant in Iowa city, Iowa. 
Has had, 1. Oscar W., b. April 23, 1843 ; 2. Hannah M., b. Oct. 10, 1845 ; 3. 
Miriam, b. May 3, 1848 ; 4. Lyman E., b. Sept. 27, 1853. 

2. Elijah C, b. Aug. 27, 1820; m. at Berlin, Sept. 25, 1848, Olive Colburn 

Wheeler, b. April 4, 1829, dau. of Levi Wheeler and Olive Colburn. He is 
a carpenter in Berlin, and has George Marshall, b. Jan. 19, 1850. 

3. Hannah A., b. May 18, 1822; d. at St. Louis, Mo., June 2, 1839, ae. 16 y. 

11 m. 20 d. 

4. Stephen A., b. June 12, 1824. He is a merchant at Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

440. Jesse Shattuck, s. of Stephen, (p. 195,) b. in Pepperell, 
Nov. 14, 1788, has resided in Francistown, Boston, Lowell, 
Worcester, and Hartford. He m. April 5, 1819, Harriet Wil- 
liams, b. March 21, 1797, dau. of Jason Williams, and has had, — 

1. Mary A. F., b. April 23, 1820 ; m. Ephraim Wood of Bury, Canada East. 

2. Wm. Henry, b. Feb. 7, 1822; m. May 1, 1843, Sarah Louden. 

3. Granville D., b. Jan. 12, 1824 ; m. Feb. 18, 1845, Caroline Gear. 

4. Harriet W., b. Mar. 19, 1826; d. July 19, 1826, se. 4 m. 

5. Franklin W., b. Sept. 1, 1827. 6. Lyman P., b. Aug. 23, 1829. 

7. Aaron Draper, b. March 9, 1832 ; a portrait painter in New York. 

8. Geo. Washington,^. March 7, 1835. 9. Joseph A., b. July 17, 1838. 



336 SEVENTH GENERATION AND DESCENDANTS. 

441. Betsey Shattuck, dau. of Stephen, (p. 195,) b. Oct. 8, 
1790, in Pepperell, m. July 4, 1817, William Lord, b. Sept. 22, 
1785, s. of Wm. Lord, a farmer in Francistown, and has had, — 

1. William Alfred, b. April 15, 1818. 

2. Elizabeth Anstiss, b. Feb. 22, 1820 ; d. Dec. 26, 1848, ee. 29 y. 10 m. 4 d. 

3. Willard Monroe, b. March 4, 1822 ; d. May 7, 1827, se. 5 y. 2 m. 3 d. 

4. Charles Gilman, b. July 20, 1824 ; d. Sept. 29, 1832, 33. 8 y. 2 m. 9 d. 

5. Emily Frances, b. Oct. 8, 1826 ; m. Oct. 11, 1848, William A. Crusy, b. in 

Marblehead, Sept. 12, 1818, a shipmaster in the East India trade. 

6. Susan Caroline, b. Nov. 1, 1831 ; d. Aug. 29, 1832, ae. 9 m. 28 d. 



442. Polly Shattuck, dau. of Stephen, (p. 195,) b. in Pep- 
perell, March 14, 1794, m. June 21, 1821, Abner Savage, b. July 
4, 1794, s. of Dea. Nathan Savage of Francistown, where he 
resides as a farmer, and has had, — 

1. Miranda S., b. April 17, 1822; m. April 30, 1840, Smith P. Davidson of 

Nashua, b. April 17, 1812, s. of Tho. Davidson of Windham, N. H. ; a farm- 
er in Windham. 

2. Albert L., b. May 21, 1824; m. Margaret J. Dow ; resides in East Cambridge. 

3. Adeline M., b. June 5, 1826 ; m. Dec. 25, 1848, Ephraim Dockham of Boston, 

b. in Frankfort, Me., May 13, 1822, s. of Ephraim Dockham. 

4. Harriet M, b. Aug. 13, 1828 ; d. Sept. 21, 1844, ae. 16 y. 1 m. 8 d. 

5. Catharine E., b. Nov. 13, 1833. 

6. Infant, b. April 10, d. May 23, 1836, ce. 1 m. 13 d. 



443. Edmund Shattuck, s. of Stephen, (p. 195,) was b. in 
Pepperell, Sept. 5, 1797, and resides in Francistown. 

He m. 1, Feb. 5, 1824, Susan Lord, b. 1799, dau. of William 
Lord of Francistown. She d. Dec. 9, 1825, as. 26. 

He m. 2, April, 1827, Polly Lord, sister of Susan. She d. 
May 19, 1827, Ee. 38. 

He m. 3, May 9, 1828, Olive Stevens, dau. of Samuel Stevens. 
All his children except one were by his 3d wife. 

1. Susan C, b. ; d. July 6, 1826, ae. 1 y. 

2. Child, b. May 27, 1829 ; d. unnamed same day. 

3. Francis E., b. March 3, 1830. 7. John L., b. Dec. 15, 1836. 

4. Adeline, b. Aug. 15, 1831. 8. Abby E., b. Nov. 15, 1838. 

5. George, b. July 4,1833; 9. Charlotte A., b. April 10, 1840. 
d. March 8, 1834, ae. 8 m. 4 d. 10. George A., b. Nov. 29, 1843. 

6. Hartwell, b. Oct. 17,1934. 11. Sidney M., b. Feb. 15,1844. 



444. Willard Shattuck, b. in Francistown, June 20, 1801, 
settled in 1831 as a stone mason in West Dedham. 



LUTHER, ALPHEUS, AND ASIA SHATTUCK. 337 



l, nui xi^u^j 



He m. April 15, 1828, Elizabeth Fuller, b. April 27, 1804. 
Has had, — 

1. Francis Willard, b. Dec. 29, 1828. 4. Sarah Elizabeth, b. Feb. 25, 183G ; 

2. 7Ymo% Fuller, b. Mar. 12, 1831. d. May 5, 1852, a?. 16 y. 2 m. 10 d. 

3. Charles Fuller, b. Feb. 25, 1834 ; 5. Martha Maria, b. Oct. 20,1839. 
d. Nov. 8, 1836, ae. 2 y. 8 ra. 13 d. 6. Edward, b. Sept. 9, 184]. 

7. ^/6erf, b. Jan. 13, 1845. 



445. Luther Shattuck, Esq., s. of Benjamin, (p. 197,) was 
b. in Brookline, N. H., July 4, 1802. In 1838 he removed to 
Haverhill, Mass., and now owns and manages mills in that town. 
While in Brookline he held various town offices, was coroner, 
and a justice of the peace. 

He m. Jan. 2, 1836, Louisa Holt, b. in Andover, Aug. 30, 
1807, dau. of Rev. Jacob Holt and Mary Frye. 

HIS CHILDREN. BY LOUISA HOLT, BORN IN BROOKLINE. 

1. Jacob H., b. June 9,1827. 3. Luther P., b. Jan. 4,1831. 

2. Enoch, b. Feb. 15,1829; 4. Kendall, b. Nov. 12, 1832. 
d. June 28, 1838, a?. 9 y. 4 m. 13 d. 5. Mary Louisa, b. Oct. 13, 1834. 

6. Josephine,h. Sept. 13, 1836. 



446. Alpheus Shattuck, Esq., s. of Benjamin, (p. 197,) was 
b. in Brookline, Oct. 15, 1805, and now resides there as a farmer 
and sawmiller. He has held various town offices; been a justice 
of the peace ; and represented the town several years in the 
Legislature. 

He m. April 1, 1822, Clarinda Wallace, b. in Brookline, 
July 1, 1799, dau. of Matthew Wallace and Betsey Mcintosh. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY CLARINDA WALLACE, BORN IN BROOKLINE. 

1. Mary Jane, b. June 9, 1823; m. April 30, 1844, Harvard Perry Bos worth. 

2. Eliza Ann, b. Jan. 2. 1825; m. May 19, 1850, Nathaniel Hobart of Brookline. 

3. Benjamin, b. Jan. 20. 1831. 4. Lucelia Parker, b. March 6, 1833. 

447. Asia Shattuck, s. of Moses, (p. 197,) was b. in Brook- 
line, Sept. 28, 1804, where he d. April 8, 1842, a3. 37 y. 6 m. 10 d. 

He m. in 1828, Jane Wallace, b. Nov. 25, 1807, sister of Cla- 
rinda, above mentioned. She d. July 6, 1842, a?. 34 y. 7 m. 11 d. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY JANE WALLACE, BORN IN BROOKLINE. 

1. James Kilburn, b. Nov. 28, 1828 ; d. March 20, 1848, se. 19 y. 3 m. 22 d. 

2. Achsah, b. Jan. 1, 1830 ; d. May 19, 1853, se. 23 y. 4 m. 18 d. 

3. Henry Milton, b. Oct. 8, 1831 ; d. April 3, 1852, se. 20 y. 5 m. 25 d. 

4. John Hutchinson, b. April 23, 1833. 

5. William Wallace, b. April 25, 1835 ; d. Sept. 9, 1853, a?. 18 y. 4 m. 14 d. 

6. Charles, b. Sept. 30, 183(3. (All by consumption.) 

43 



338 SEVENTH GENERATION AND DESCENDANTS. 

448. Nathaniel Shattuck, Esq., s. of Nathaniel, (p. 202,) 
was b. in Temple, N. H., Feb. 27, 1774, and graduated at Dart- 
mouth College in 1801. He read law two years with Hon. 
Benjamin J. Gilbert of Hanover, N. H., and afterwards with 
Hon. Timothy Bigelow of Groton, Mass., and, in 1804, was ad- 
mitted to the bar in Middlesex County. He has been engaged 
in his profession in Milford, Amherst and Mason Village, in Hills- 
borough Co., N. H. The failure of his eyesight has incapacitated 
him for active business for several years past; and he now resides 
in Lancaster, Mass. We are indebted to him for much valuable 
information concerning the family and descendants of his father. 

He m. 1, June 15, 1806, Mary Wallace, b. in Temple, April 
5, 1790, dau. of Hon. James Wallace and Betsey Kimball of 
Milford. She d. June 3, 1812, eg. 22 y. 1 m. 28 d. 

He m. 2, April 4, 1816, Sally Stanley, b. in Amherst, N. H., 
July 25, 1789, dau. of Samuel Stanley and Jane Seaton. 

HIS ONLY CHILD, BY MARY WALLACE, BORN IN MILFORD. 

1. Ann Jane, b. May 12, 1809; m. Aug-. 13, 1829, B. F. Wallace, Esq. of An- 

trim, and afterwards principal of an Academy in Bedford, N. H. She d. 
Aug. 10, 1847, a3. 38 y. 3 m. 4 d. Had 8 children. He now resides in 
Manchester, N. H. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY SALLY STANLEY, BORN IN . 

2. Manj Wallace, b. Mar. 28, 1817; d. March 6, 1819, a?. 1 y. 11 m. 8 d. 

3. Algernon Parker, b. Feb. 15, 1819; m. July 17, 1851, Caroline Sweet, b. in 

Wolcott, N. Y., July 5, 1829, dau. of William Sweet and Harriet Bisbee of 
Newark, N. Y. Has Grace Darling, b. Sept. 3, 1853. He has been a 
teacher of penmanship in various places, and is now (1854) at the New 
England Normal Institute in Lancaster, Mass. 

4. Catharine Kimball, b. Dec. 15, 1823 ; m. in Boston, April 20, 1848, Rev. Aaron 

W. Chaffin, formerly professor of languages at New Hampton, N. H., and 
now pastor of the First Baptist Church in Danvers, Mass. They have had, 

1. Lucius Willard, b. Oct. 14, 1849, d. May 13, 1852, a*. 2 y. 6 m. 29 d. ; 

2. Catharine Porter, b. March 22, 1852; 3. Herman Stuart, b. July 11, 1853. 

5. George Freeman, b. Oct. 9, 1825; d. Dec. 10, 1827, ae. 2 y. 2 m. 1 d. 

6. Henry Campbell, b. Aug. 9, 1827; d. April 6, 1828, bb. 7 m. 27 d. 

7. George Henry, b. Dec. 9, 1830. Teacher of penmanship in Western N. York. 



449. Parker Shattuck, s. of Nathaniel, (p. 202,) was b. in 
Temple, July 10, 1777, and on the 10th of June, 1801, settled in 
Weston, Windsor Co., Vt., where he now resides as a wealthy 
farmer upon the place he first occupied. 

He m. Nov. 16, 1797, Sally Spafford, b. in Temple, Nov. 
18, 1780, dau. of Eldad Spafford, a native of Rowley, Mass., and 



PARKER SHATTUCK. 339 

Lucy Spaulding, a native of Townsend. She d. in Weston, 
Dec. 11, 1851, se. 71 y. m. 23 d. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY SALLY SPAFFORD, BORN IN TEMPLE AND WESTON. 

1. Sally, b. Jan. 29, 1799; m- 1, Dec. 4, 1823, Orin Peck, a farmer of Weston. 

He was b. in Cavendish, and d. in Weston, Feb. 18, 1840. They had, 1. 
Orin H., b. June 24, 1825, d. April 27, 1828, re. 2 y. 10 m. 3 d. ; 2. James 
P., b. Jan. 20, 1827, m. March 20, 1852, Sylvia White, b. in Weston. 
May 21, 1821. (They have Phylinda, b. Oct. 21, 1852, and Sarah, b. 
Dec. 20, 1853.) 3. Sarah J., b. Feb. 10, 1822, d. July 6, 1844, re. 22 y. 
4 m. 26 d. ; 4. Shattuck P., b. March 5, 1831 ; 5. Lucy M., b. Nov. 22, 
1833; 6. Artemas O., b. Feb. 10, 1835; 7. Mary E., b. May 28, 1840. 
Sally, the mother, m. 2, Lemuel Abbott, a farmer of Windham, Vt., b. 
April 1, 1799. 

2. Parker, b. Dec. 14, 1800; a farmer in Weston; m. Dec. 1, 1827, Nancy 

Jewett, b. in Temple, May 12, 1804. They have had, 1. a son, b. Oct. 15, 
3828, d. 4 hours old; 2. Nancy Ann, b. Nov. 15, 1829; 3. Mary Jane, b. 
May 3, 1832, m. Nov. 10, 1853, Lucius Burton, a farmer of Weston, and 
have Sidney L., b. Aug. 18, 1854; 4. Fernando P., b. Jan. 7, 1834, (in 
Boston in 1855;) 5. Rhoda M., b. Nov. 8, 1836, d. Jan. 29, 1843, re. 6 y. 2 
m. 21 d. ; G. Elizabeth H., b. Sept. 3, 1841 ; 7. Sarah V., b. May 15, 1846; 
8. Flora B., b. Dec. 20, 1849. 

3. Lucy, b. Feb. 16, 1803 ; m. 1, March, 1823, James Foster, b. in Temple, and 

a farmer in Weston, where he d. Dec. 16, 1843. She m. 2, March 20, 
1845, Rev. Daniel Packer of Mount Holly, Vt., b. in Guilford, Sept. 23, 1786. 
They have had Daniel Judson S., b. Sept. 2, 1846. 

4. Ralph Russ, b. May 6, 1805; d. March 16, 1806, re. 10 m. 10 d. 

5. Daniel Spa ffbrd,b. J an. 23, 1807; a farmer in Weston; m. April 5, 1838, 

Lucy M. Abbott, b. in Weston, Sept. 13, 1808. They have had, 1. William 
Harrison, b. June 13, 1840, d. May 15, 1844, a?. 3 y. 11 m. 2 d.; 2. George 
Abbott, b. Feb. 18, 1842, d. Feb. 11, 1844, re. 1 y. 11 m. 23 d. ; 3. Ann 
Jane, b. Aug. 11, 1845; 4. Anthony, b. Dec. 19, 1849. 

6. Ashley, b. Feb. 13, 1809 ; a farmer in Weston ; m. March 6, 1834, Elvira 

Sawyer, b. in Mount Holly, Feb. 1, 1813. They have had, 1. Lucy E., b. 
June 30, 1835, m. Sept. 16, 1842, Putney S. Hannum, an axe-maker in 
Weston, and have Delia E., b. Sept, 1854; 2. Daniel A., b. May 25, 1838; 
3. Frederick A., b. Feb. 3, 1840 ; 4. Abby Jane, b. July 16, 1847 ; 5. Ade- 
line P., b. Jan. 7, 1855. 

7. Clark, b. Feb. 13, 1811; a farmer in Weston; m. Dec. 11, 1837, Louisa 

Sawyer, b. in Mount Holly, Sept. 11, 1810. They have had, 1. Harrison 
C, b. Nov. 12, 1840; 2. Francelia L., b. April 2, 1844 ; 3. Franklin B., b. 
Nov. 28, 1845; 4. George W., b. Feb. 23, 1847; 5. Jewett W., b. Nov. 
18, 1848. 

8. Moriah, b. April 12, 1815 ; d. in Weston, Jan. 23, 1835, three days after the 

birth of her children, re. 19 y. 9 m. lid. She m. Daniel Wait, a farmer of 
Weston, b. April 26, 1813, and had twin sons, b. Jan. 20, 1835, Daniel 
S., who d. one week, and John S., d. two weeks, old. 

9. Andrew Jackson, d. Feb. 2, 1817; a farmer in Weston; m. Nov. 9, 1839, 

Betsey G. Hamilton, b. in Weston, Feb. 9, 1820. They have had, 1. a 



340 



SEVENTH GENERATION AND DESCENDANTS. 



daughter, b. Feb. 9, 1840, d. 5 months old ; 2. Andrew, b. April 30, 1841 ; 
3. Parker, b. Jan. 13, 1845 ; 4. Ara, b. Aug. 3, 1846 ; 5. Winfield, b. Feb. 
6, 1852 ; 6. Betsey E., b. May 1, 1853. 
10. Virtue, b. March 17, 1819; d. March 27, 1827, es. 8 y. m. 10 d. 



450. Hannah Shattuck, dau. of Nathaniel, (p. 202,) was b. 
in Temple, May 30, 1779, and d. in Landgrave, Bennington Co., 
Vt, Dec. 5, 1851, ee. 72 y. 6 m. 5 days. 

She m. Nathan Richardson of Temple, who settled in Land- 
grave, where he d. before 1846, the precise date not ascertained. 

HER CHILDREN, BY NATHAN RICHARDSON, BORN IN . 

1. Nathaniel, b. Aug. 28, 1798. He is a merchant in Philadelphia: 9 children. 



b. Aug. 19, 1800 
b. Oct. 9, 1803 
b. Mar. 25, 1806 
b. May 5, 1808 



2. Ralph, 

3. Diantha, 

4. Dorothy, 

5. Nathan, 
f). Catharine, b. Dec. 5, 1810 

7. Roxanna, b. Jan. 30, 1812 

8. Cyrus; b. July 1, 1814 

9. Lewis, b. Oct. 16, 1815 

10. Franklin, b. Oct. 6, 1817 

1 1 . Mary Ann, b. Jan. 14, 1820. 



m. Abigail Child ; 9 children. 

m. George Wheeler of Danby, Vt. ; 5 children. 

m. Moody Roby of Peru, Vt. ; 11 children. 

carpenter in Philadelphia ; 5 children. 

m. Seth Cook of Granville, Vt. ; 8 children. 

m. Joseph Warren of Peru; d. April 1, 1843. 

d. Oct. 6, 1814, Ee. 3 m. 15 d. 

d. Jan. 1, 1823, 83. 7 y. 2 m. 15 d. 

m. . 



451. Catharine Shattuck, dan. of Nathaniel, (p. 202,) was 
b. in Temple, March 11, 1781, and now resides in Charlestown, 

N. H. 

She m. May 5, 1799, George Kimball, b. in Temple, July 6, 
1775. He first settled in Temple, but in 1806 or 7 removed to 
Mason Village, where he d. June 16, 1813, ae. 37 y. 11 m. 10 d. 
He and all his sons have been blacksmiths. 

HER, CHILDREN, BY GEORGE KIMBALL, BORN IN TEMPLE AND MASON. 

1. George, b. Jan. 23, 1800 ; m. Nov., 1823, Abigail Bisbee of Springfield, Vt, b. 

Oct 23, 1801, and have had, 1. George, b. Oct 3, 1824; 2. Maria, b. July 
14, 1827 ; 3. Francis John, b. Aug. 24, 1837. 

2. Brooks, b. Jan. 14, 1803. He lived first in Springfield, Vt, and after 1835 in 

Charlestown, N. H. ; m. Aug. 14, 1827,Priscilla Vinal Bisbee of Springfield, 
b. Nov. 23, 1809. They have had, 1. Charles Carroll, b. Oct. 2, 1829; 2. 
Abbie Kate, b. Nov. 23, 1834 ; 3. Henry Clark, b. March 22, 1837 ; 4. Ellen 
Cynthia, b. Yah. 12, 1846. 

3. Prescolt, b. Feb. 11, 1804 ; d. May 1, 1806, ae. 2 y. 2 m. 20 d. 

4. Benjamin,b. Feb. 11, 1806; d. March 6, 1806, 8a. 25 days. 

5. Prescolt, b. May 11, 1807; settled in North Chelmsford, Mass., where he d. 

Jan. 31, 1835, ae. 27 y. 8 m. 20 d. He m. Mary Spaulding of Wilton, b. Jan. 
24, 1810, and had, 1. George Prescott, b. Feb., 1830; 2. Edwin, b. Jan., 1832. 

6. Timothy Dakln, b. Nov. 11, 1809, and resides in Claremont, N. H. ; m. 1, 



OLIVER SHATTUCK POLLY SHATTUCK. 



341 



Nov., 1833, Almira Ridout of Wilton, b. July, 1808. She d. Aug., 1834, se. 
26 y. 1 m. He m. 2, Jane A. Mann of Claremont, b, in 1813, d. Feb. 22, 
1841, ae. 28 y. He m. 3, Dec., 1841, Caroline M. Mitchel, b. 1822. Had 
by his 2d wife, 1. Elizabeth Alice, b. Oct. 12, 1836; 2. Catharine Jane, b. 
Sept. 28, 1839. 

7. Clark, b. Feb. 29, 1812; d. March 23, 1812, ae. 23 days. 

8. Henry Isaacs, b. April 11,. 1813, and now resides in Weston, Vt. He m. 

March 3, 1840, his cousin Dolly Wheeler, b. in Lyndeborough, Dec. 14, 
1814, (see p. 342,) and have had, 1. Lydia Anna, b. April 28, 1841 ; 2. Alice 
Wheeler, b. Oct. 8, 1848; 3. Jane, b. Jan. 7, 1851, d. April 11, 1854, 
as. 3 y. 3 m. 4 d. 



452. Oliver Shattuck, Esq., s. of Nathaniel, (p. 202,) was b. 
in Temple, Feb. 10, 1785. He is a farmer, and in 1811 removed 
to Bakersfield, Franklin Co., Vt. ; in 1820 to Jericho, Chittenden 
Co., Vt. ; in 1823 to Malone, the capital of Franklin Co., N. Y. ; 
and in 1828 again to Bakersfield. He has commanded a military 
company, held various town offices, been a justice of the peace, 
and for the last 8 years President of the Academical Institute in 
Bakersfield. 

He m. 1, Nov. 8, 1808, Sally Start of Temple, b. March 
28, 1784. 

He m. 2, in 1842, Lucinda Spaulding of Temple. 



HIS CHILDREN, BY SALLY START, BORN IN . 

1. Mary W., b. Sept. 18, 1809; m. June 28, 1828, Asa Dean, a farmer of Bakers- 

field. She d. May 27, 1851. Had 6 children. 

2. Jerusha, b. Feb. 19, 1811 ; m. July 27, 1827, Thomas W. Scott, a farmer and 

mason in Bakersfield. 

3. Sarah, b. Feb. 25, 1813; d. March 10, 1813, a?. 13 days. 

4. Sarah R., b. Feb. 19, 1814 ; m. Jan. 8, 1835, Nathaniel Willet. 

5. Phylinda E., b. Jan. 14, 1817; m. July 6, 1843, Asahel B. Parmlee, Esq., an 

attorney at law at Malone, Franklin Co., N. Y. 
(>. Catharine S., b. June 28, 1820; d. Sept. 17, 1820, ee. 2 m. 19 d. 

7. Dolly R, b. June 8, 1822; d. April 9, 1824, a?. 1 y. 10 m. 1 d. 

8. Erasmus D., b. Dec. 31, 1824; graduated with high rank at the University 

of Vermont in Burlington, in 1828, read law, and in 1852 was admitted to 
the bar in New York ; m. Sarah Ann Strong of Fletcher, Vt., and in 1853 
emigrated to Oregon Territory, and was principal of a female seminary 
in Oregon City, and is now Professor of Ancient Languages, in the Pacific 
University at Tualatin. 



453. Polly Shattuck, dau. of Nathaniel, (p. 202,) was b. in 
Temple, Jan. 1, 1787, and d. in Wilton, N. H., Oct. 10, 1841, 
ae. 54 y. 9 m. 9 d. 



342 SEVENTH GENERATION AND DESCENDANTS. 

She m. Dec. 12, 1803, Aaron Kimball, Putnam, b. in Wilton, 
Jan. 11, 1784. He has been a carpenter in his native town until 
recently, but now devotes his time principally to farming. His 
father, Moses Putnam, was b. in Danvers, Mass., graduated at 
Harvard College in 1759, studied divinity, but was never or- 
dained. He was employed principally in teaching. He in. 
Rebecca Kimball of Boxford, and, in 1775, removed to Wilton, 
where he d. in 1801, se. 61. 

HER CHILDREN, BY AARON K. PUTNAM, BORN IN WILTON. 

1. Mary Russ, b. Sept. 17, 1809 ; d. Oct. 10, 1838, ne. 29 y. m. 23 d. 

2. Evelina, b. May 31, 1811 ; m. April 22, 1832, William Emerson, a car- 

penter of Wilton, and has had, 1. Sumner B., b. Feb. 25, 1834; 2. Charles 
A., b. Feb. 6, 1837; 3. Mary, b. Jan. 26, 1841, d. May 8, 1844, 83. 4 y. 3 
m. 12 d.; 4. Martha, b. April 25, 1843; 5. Henry L., b. Feb. 6, 1845; 6. 
Willis K., b. April 10, 1849; 7. Mary E., b. Aug. 13, 1851. 

3. Sarah, b. Feb. 15, 1813; m. Dec. 25, 1834, John Mills, a shoe-merchant in 

Milford. Has, 1. Sarah N., b. Dec. 15, 1835; 2. George T., b. Nov. 8, 
1840; 3. Charles W., b. Jan. 28, 1844. 

4. Aaron K, b. Dec. 19, 1814 ; d. Aug. 6, 1816, se. 1 y. 7 m. 17 d. 

5. Aaron K, b. Jan. 23, 1817; d. March 16, 1818, ce. 1 y. 1 m. 23 d. 

6. Levi, b. Dec. 4, 1818 ; m. June 5, 1845, Harriet E. Stevens. Has 

Elizabeth E., b. Aug. 17, 1847. Resides at Milford, but is in business 
with his brother Hervey. 

7. Hervey, b. Sept. 21, 1820; m. May 11, 1843, Lavina Hall, and has, 1. Louisa 

M., b. April 1, 1844; 2. William K., b. Aug. 7, 1846; 3. Martin W., b. 
Nov. 16, 1851. He is a furniture and lumber dealer. 

8. Daniel P., b. July 9, 1822 ; m. May 19, 1852, Emeline A. Peavey. He 

studied medicine under Dr. Cutter, at Woodstock, Vt., and in New York 
city, graduated as M. D. at the New York State College, and is now settled 
in his profession in Bethlehem, N. H. 

9. Matilda K, b. Oct. 23, 1824 ; m. Jan. 1, 1855, Samuel F. Maynard, a cabinet 

maker in East Wilton. 

10. Rufus, b. March 3, 1827. He is a cabinet maker. 

11. Anna Jane, b. July 26, 1829. She is a school teacher. 

454. Dolly Shattuck, dau. of Nathaniel, (p. 202,) was b. in 
Temple, Sept. 1, 1788, and d. in Lyndeborough, N. H., Aug. 14, 
1845, se. 56 y. 11 m. 13 d. 

She m. in Dec. 1811, Josiah Wheeler, b. in Temple, May, 
1786. In 1810 he settled as a carpenter in Lyndeborough, where 
he now resides. His father, Nathan Wheeler, was a native of 
Concord, Mass. ; and his mother, Lydia Adams, was a daughter 
of Ephraim Adams of New Ipswich. 

HER CHILDREN, BY JOTSIAH WHEELER, BORN IN LYNDEBOROUGH. 

1. Dolly, b. Dec. 14, 1814; m. Henry Isaacs Kimball, (see page 311.) 



SALLY, MILLY, AND OLIVER SHATTUCK. 343 

2. Lydia, b. June 8, 1818; m. April, 1843, Thomas Prentiss Rand. He is a 

farmer in Francistown, and has had Sarah Catharine, Frances Dolly, Lydia 
Harriet, and Nehemiah Wheeler. 

3. Josiah Kimball, b. July 15, 1822; m. in 1850, Abby J. Marsh of Hudson, N.H. 

He is a machinist in Ashland, Mass. 



455. Sally Shattuck, dau. of Nathaniel, (p. 202,) b. in Tem- 
ple, July 12, 1790, m. Joseph Putnam, who settled as a farmer 
in Lyndeborough, where he d. Aug. 1850. 

HER CHILDREN, BY JOSEPH PUTNAM, BORN IN LYNDEBOROUGH. 

1. George R., b. Oct. 24, 1817; m. and resides in Indiana. 

2. Joseph, b. May 4, 1819; m. Mary Jameson of Bradford, N. II. She d. 

March, 1849, leaving one child. 

3. James Andrews, b. Jan. 18, 1821 ; m. in 1845, Hannah Holt of Nashville; has 

one child. He is now in California. 

4. Sally, b. Jan. 28, 1823; d. Sept. 10, 1828, ®. 5 y. 7 m. 12 d. 

5. Maria, b. Nov. 12, 1825; m. Jesse Gilman, a. machinist of Nashua. They 

have had 3 children, one of whom only is living. 

6. Willard, b. April 1, 1830 ; with his mother in Lyndeborough, unmarried. 

7. Elijah, b. July 30, 1832. 8. William Henry, b. March 10, 1836. 

456. Milly Shattuck, dau. of Nathaniel, (p. 202,) b. in 
Temple, Aug. 24, 1792 ; m. June 29, 1813, John Bales, b. in 
Wilton, Feb. 26, 1790. He is a blacksmith in his native town. 

HER CHILDREN, BY JOHN BALES, BORN IN WILTON. 

1. John Abbot, b. March 8, 1814 ; d. Sept. 24, 1832, se. 18 y. 6 m. 16 d. 

2. Milly Jane, b. Nov. 1, 1817; m. April 18, 1838, Marshall Whittemore, 

b. in Wilton. He is a farmer in Greenfield. No issue. 

3. Samuel Brooks, b. July 25, 1819; m. Nov. 26, 1846, Olive K. Blanchard; a 

blacksmith in East Wilton. They have Georgiana H., b. Sept. 20, 1848. 

4. JYancy Kimball, b. June 24, 1821 ; d. Jan. 8, 1824, te. 2 y. 6 in. 14 d. 

5. Nancy Kimball b. May 4, 1824. 

6. Joanna, Moriah, b. April 25, 1828 ; m. May 1, 1851, Augustus G. Morgan. 

7. Charles Jackson, b. May 1, 1830; d. April 11, 1832, ss. 1 y. 11 m. 10 d. 

8. Martha Augusta,b. May 5, 1832; d. Sept. 30, 1832, ee. 4 m. 25 d. 

9. Charles Albert, b. Feb. 24, 1835 ; blacksmith, with his brother S. B. 
10. Martha Augusta,h. May 23, 1838 ; d. Feb. 20, 1842, m. 3 y. 8 m. 27 d. 

457. Oliver Shattuck, s. of Ebenezer Lakin, (p. 203,) was 
b. in Pepperell, June 7, 1782, and was adopted by his great un- 
cle Oliver Shattuck, (p. 101,) and settled on his farm on Oak Hill. 

He m. in Groton, Feb. 7, 1809, Hannah Tarbell. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY HANNAH TARBELL, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Catharine, b. July 24, 1809 ; d. Feb. 18, 1810, £e. 6 m. 24 d. 

2. Catharine T., b. Feb. 10, 1811 ; d. June 23, 1833, a3. 22 y. 4 m. 7 d. 

3. Luther Tarbell, b. Mar. 18, 1816 ; m. Nov. 26, 1846, Eliza Whiles, and have 

had, 1. Catharine Eliza, b. Sept. 29, 1847 ; 2. James Henry, b. May 26, 1849. 



344 SEVENTH GENERATION AND DESCENDANTS. 

458. Ebenezer Shattuck, s. of Ebenezer L., (p. 203,) was b. 
in Pepperell, Aug. 15, 1786, and lived there until 1819, when he 
removed to West Dedham, where he d. May 23, 1851, a?. 64 y. 
9 m. 8 d. He was a blacksmith, and his sons and sons-in-law, 
carpenters. 

He m. Sept. 20, 1811, Achsah Farwell Sherwin, b. in 
Townsend, April 10, 1792, dau. of John Sherwin, 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ACHSAH F. SHERWIN, BORN IN PEPPERELL AND W. DEDHAM. 

1. William Tarbell, b. Oct. 15,1812; m. June 18, 1846, Elizabeth Farris, 

and settled in Natick, where he d. Sept. 24, 1853, ee. 40 y. 11 m. 9 d. 

2. Harriet Watson, b. April 15, 1815 ; d. March 14, 1844, se. 28 y. 10 m.29 d. 

3. Walton Farwell, b. April 28, 1817 ; m. April 6, 1845, Mehitable L. White. 

4. Louisa Jane, b. Mar. 24, 1820 ; d. Jan. 11, 1842, se. 21 y. 9 m. 17 d. 

5. Charles Allen, b. April 10, 1822 ; d. April 12, 1850, se. 28 y. m. 2 d. 

6. Ann Eliza Marietta, b. July 10, 1824. 

7. Nancy Lucretia, b. Aug. 3, 1825; m. April 6, 1848, Tyler Thayer. She 

d. May 30, 1851, 83. 25 y. 9 m. 27 d. 

8. Henry Francis, b. Jan. 22, 1832. 

459. Maj. Elijah Shattuck, s. of Ebenezer L., (p. 203,) was 
b. in Pepperell, Aug. 26, 1794, and settled there as a mason. 

He m. Nov. 1319, Ellen Eliza Farrar. b. in Pep., Oct. 2, 1798. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ELLEN E. FARRAR, BORN IN PEPPERELL. 

1. Edivin Elijah, b. Oct. 22, 1821 ; d. Nov. 8, 1846, ee. 25 y. m. 16 d. 

2. Charles Farrar, b. Oct. 19, 1823. 

3. Mai-y Ellen, b. April 8, 1826 ; m. June 6, 1846, Hiram C. Woodward, and 

have, 1. Georgia Ella ; 2. Walter Edwin. 

4. Harvy Demond, b. June 30, 1828 ; d. Nov. 15, 1831, m. 3 y. 4 m. 15 d. 

5. Clara Maria, b. Aug. 23, 1831. 7. William Walton, b. Aug. 8, 1837. 

6. Henry Oliver, b. Sept. 13, 1834. 8. Caroline Farrar, b. Sept. 11, 1844. 



460. Abraham Shattuck, s. of Abraham, (p. 204,) was b. in 
Pepperell, Oct. 29, 1791. He is a blacksmith; and in 1814 
settled in Dublin, N. H. ; in 1831 removed to Marlborough; and 
in 1835 to Peterborough, where he now resides. He weighs 
254 lbs. 

He m. 1, June 22, 1814, Sophia Kendall of Dublin, b. Nov. 
1792. She d. Oct. 10, 1815, at the birth of her first child. 

He m. 2, Nov. 22, 1817, Jerusha H. French, b. Dec. 17, 1798, 
dau. of Whitcomb French of Dublin and Sally Patrick of Fitz- 
william. She d. almost instantaneously by a rupture of a blood 
vessel, July 8, 1839, a3. 40 y. 6 m. 21 d. He had 10 children : 
8 oldest b. in Dublin, the 9th in Marlborough, and the 10th in 
Peterborough. 



ASHUR SHATTUCK ABNER SHATTUCK. 345 

1. .Abraham, b. Oct. 10, 1815; d. with the mother on the day of birth. 

2. Kendall, b. Sept. 24, 1818; d. Oct. 4, 1821, se. 3 y. m. 27 d. 

3. OrvilleW., b. Aug. 23, 1820; m. Jan. 22, 1846, Emily G. Herrick, dau. of 

Jeremiah and Hannah Herrick of Marlborough, N H. They removed to 
Philadelphia, Pa., where she d. of typhus fever, July 26, 1850, leaving 2 
children; 1. Emma Elizabeth, b. March 23, 1847; 2. Ellen H., b. Jan. 31, 
1849, d. Aug. 15, 1850, ce. 1 y. 6 m. 15 d. Mr. Shattuck is one of the pro- 
prietors of the "Citizens and Eastern Express," in Philadelphia. 

4. Elizabeth G., b. Oct. 21, 1822. She graduated at the Female Medical Col- 

lege in Philadelphia in 1854, and received the degree of M. D. 

5. Julia Sophia, b. Oct. 21, 1824. Resides at Easton, Pa. 

6. Orrin Kendall, ? b. Feb. 8, 1827; d. March, 1833, se. 6 y. 1 m. 

7. Orson F., ) Twins. 

8. Mandana M., b.May 25, 1831. Resides at Easton, Pa. 

9. Joseph C, b. Feb. 29, 1835. 10. Lucius H., b. June 19, 1839. 



461. Ashur Shattuck, s. of Abraham, (p. 204.) was b. in 
Pepperell, Aug. 9, 1793, and resides in Brookline, N. H., as a 
farmer. 

He m. Nov. 28, 1816, his cousin Rachel Shattuck, dau. of 
Levi, (p. 204.) 

HIS CHILDREN, BY RACHEL SHATTUCK, BORN IN BROOKLINE. 

1. Sophia Rachel, b. April 17, 1818; m. Oct. 14, 1841, Wilkes Wright Corey, b. 

Jan. 10, 1813, s. of Nathan Corey and Deverd Wright. He is a well-to-do 
farmer in Brookline. He has been treasurer, selectman, and held other 
town offices. Have had, 1. Albert Wilkes, b. March 26, 1842; 2. Charles 
Nathan, b. Aug. 2, 1843. 

2. Ashur Winkol, b. July 19, 1820; m. June 4, 1846, Lydia K. Learned of Gard- 

ner, Mass., dau. of William L. and Rebecca Nichols. He is a chairmaker 
in Gardner. Have had, 1. Ashur Francis, b. Sept. 23, 1849; 2. William 
Learned, b. Dec. 5, 1851. 

3. Orman Francis, b. Sept. 5, 1822 ; a farmer and carpenter in Brookline, unm. 

4. Mary Elizabeth, b. Aug. 11, 1824 ; d. Feb. 2, 1826, se. 1 y. 5 m. 21 d. 



462. Abner Shattuck, s. of Abraham, (p. 204,) was b. in 
Wilton, N. H., Jan. 18, 1796. He is a farmer, first in Wilton, 
but in 1821 removed to Temple, and in 1848 to Oppenheim, 
Fulton Co., N. Y., where he now resides. 

He m. March 2, 1819, Lydia Batchelder, b. in Wilton, March 
18, 1795, dau. of Daniel Batchelder and Rebecca Abbott, natives 
of Andover, Mass. Have had 5 children, the 1st b. in Wilton, 
the others in Temple, N. H. 

1. Abner, b. Nov. 28, 1819 ; d. Aug. 12, 1843, in Montague, Mass. 

2. Daniel B., b. Dec. 20, 1821 ; a carpenter in O. ; m. June 3, 1847, Margaret 

44 



346 SEVENTH GENERATION AND DESCENDANTS. 

E. Robinson, and has, 1. Sarah Rosalinda, b. Nov. 24, 1848; 2. James 
Abner, b. Jan. 13, 1851, d. June 10, 1851 ; 3. John M., b. June 19, 1853. 

3. Rebecca, b. Dec. 27, 1823. 

4. Orin, b. Nov. 15, 1829. - 5. Mary Jane, b. Sept. 7, 1831. 



463. Ammi Shattuck, s. of Abraham, (p. 204,) was b. in 
Wilton, N. H., Dec. 3, 1797, and is a farmer in Mason, N. H. 

He m. Nov. 26, 1823, Phebe Hutchinson, dau. of Philip 
Hutchinson of Milford, who d. in the army in 1813. 

1. Maria, b. July 5, 1824. 4. Orvilla, b. Dec. 9, 1830. 

2. Ammi, b. July 6, 1826. 5. Edith, b. Sept. 12, 1832. 

3. Mary, b. Mar. 26, 1828. 6. Henry, b. Sept. 30, 1840. 



464. Francis Shattuck, s. of David, (p. 209,) was b. in 
Pepperell, Jan. 9 ; 1794, and in J 812 settled in New Ipswich, 
where he d. April 8, 1842, ae. 48 y. 2 m. 29 d. He was a brick- 
layer, and owned a farm near the centre of the town. 

He m. Dec. 25, 1817, Mary Heald, dan. of Tho. H. Had,— 

1. Harriet, b. Oct. 22, 1818 ; d. unm., Jan. 17, 1848, se. 29 y. 2 m. 25 d. 

2. Charles, b. April 13, 1829; resides in New Ipswich. 



465. Shebuel Shattuck, s. of David, (p. 209,) was b. in 
Temple, N. H., June 12, 1797. He owned and improved several 
farms in New Ipswich, where he d. Sept. 19, 1846, se. 49 y. 3 
m. 7 d. 

He m. May 20, 1830, Elizabeth Knowlton, and had, — 
1. Charles Edward, b. Dec. 6, 1831. 5. Harriet Frances, b. Dec. 9, 1837; 

-2. Almira Jane, b. Jan. 26, 1833. d. Jan. 14, 1838, se. 1 m. 5 d. 

3. John Brown, b. Oct. 21, 1834. 6. George, b. Dec. 18, 1838. 

4. Eliza Ellen, b. Dec. 22, 1835. 7. Harrison, b. May 15, 1841. 



466. Daniel Shattuck, s. of David, (p. 209,) was b. in 
Temple, June 15, 1801. He was a merchant in Boston and 
Lowell. In 1838 he removed to New York, and afterwards to 
New Orleans, where he has carried on the soap and candle busi- 
ness. His family records were burned in his store in New York. 

He m. 1, in Boston, May 16, 1822, Lydia Eliot Woodbury of 
Salem, dau. of Capt. Ebenezer Woodbury. She d. in New 
York, March, 1842. 

He m. 2, White of Lexington, Ky. Had by his 1st 

wife, — 



BROOKS SHATTUCK CHARLES F. SHATTUCK. 347 

1. Frances, d. ce. 5 months. 2. A son, d. sc. 4 days. 

3. Helen Maria, b. ; m. James Butters of Haverhill, Mass. 

4. Martha Jane, b. ; m. William Day of Bradford, Mass. 

5. Henry, b. . Pie is with his father in New Orleans. 



467. Brooks Shattuck, s. of David, (p. 209,) was b. in 
Temple, Dec. 5, 1805. He was engaged twenty-two years in a 
manufactory, either as a machinist or overseer, successively, in 
Waltham, Taunton, New Ipswich, and Lowell. In 1843 he 
purchased a farm in Bedford, N. H., where he has since resided. 
He is President of the Hillsborough Agricultural and Mechanic 
Society, and takes a deep interest in the progress of those arts. 
In 1830 he made a public profession of religion in Lowell, and 
was subsequently chosen a deacon of the Appleton Street Church 
in that city. 

He m. 1, Dec. 29, 1825, Sophia SEARLs,b. in Fitchburg, Feb. 
26, 1803, but then of New Ipswich, dau. of Augustus Searls, 
who was killed at Walpole, N. H., by the falling of a well pole. 
She d. in Lowell, April 24, 1830, a3. 27 y. 1 m. 28 d. 

He m. 2, Nov. 22, 1831, Chloe Abbott Pevey, b. in Peter- 
borough, Oct. 6, 1806, dau. of Capt. Thomas Pevey and Lydia 
Abbott. She d. March 7, 1838, as. 31 y. 5 m. 1 d., twelve clays 
after the birth of her twin children. 

He m. 3, Sept. 26, 1838, Mary Marshall of Lyndeborough, 
b. Dec. 12, 1808. 



HIS CHILDREN, BY SOPHIA SEARLS, BORN IN . 

1. Charles Brooks, b. Mar. 31, 1827 ; d. in New Ipswich, April 16, 1831, oe. 4 y. 

m. 16 d. 

2. George Brooks, b. Sept. 22, 1829. Resides with his father. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY CHLOE A. PEVEY, BORN IN . 

3. Edward Payson, b. July 24, 1832; d. in Lowell, Dec. 25, 1832, ee. 5 m. 1 d. 

4. Amos Blanchard,h. June 24, 1834. He is a student in Williams College. 

5. A son, ) b. Feb. 23, 1838; d. Feb. 24, 1838, *e. 1 d. 

6. A daughter, S Twins. d. March 7, 1838, ee. 12 d. 



468. Charles F. Shattuck, s. of David, (p. 209,) was b. in 
Temple, Aug. 21, 1810. He was bred a machinist, but is now 
a butcher in New Ipswich, N. H. 

He m. Aug. 1, 1833, Sarah H. Bcjrnham of Rumney, N. H. 
Had,— 

1. Horace C, b. Aug. 3, 1834 ; d. March 19, 1847, se. 12 y. 7 m. 16 d. 

2. Henrietta M., b. May 21, 1836. 3. Hartley M., b. Sept. 14, 1840. 



348 SEVENTH GENERATION AND DESCENDANTS. 

469. Solomon Shattuck, s. of Solomon, (p. 210,) was b. in 
Pepperell, Nov. 6, 1790, and in 1813 settled in Hudson, Colum- 
bia Co., N. Y., where he has since resided as a merchant. 

He m. 1, Aug. 4, 1816, Hepzibah Folger, b. April, 1795, 
dau. of Abraham Folger of Hudson. She d. there in April, 
1827, a3. 32. 

He m. 2, Nov. 23, 1829, Polly Bunker, b. in Hudson, Feb. 
16, 1791, dau. of Paul and Eunice Bunker. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY HEPZIBAH FOLGER, BORN IN HUDSON. 

1. Frederick, b. May 25, 1817. 3. Caroline, b. Aug. 6, 1824; d. 

2. Mary, b. June 10, 1820. Feb. 1, 1851, re. 26 y. 5 m. 25 d. 

4. Ira, b. Aug. 8, 1827. 



470. Oliver Tarbell Shattuck, s. of Solomon, (p. 210.) 
b. in Pepperell, Jan. 7, 1795, and has resided in Windsor, Whee- 
lock, Weathersfield, and Williston, Vt., and other places. 

He m. in 1823, Susan Barrett, and has had, — 

1. Mary Ann, b. in Windsor, Sept. 5, 1825. 

2. Frances, b. in Wheelock, Jan. 30, 1829; m. Sept. 11, 1848, N. Slocum, and 

has Alice, b. in Burlington, Nov. 28, 1849. 

3. Harriet, b. in Wheelock, April 9, 1833. 

4. Augusta, b. in Weathersfield, Sept. 5, 1837. 

5. Alonzo, b. in Claremont, N. H., Sept. 4, 1839. 

6. Ira, b. in Weathersfield, Feb. 5, 1842. 



471. Edmund Shattuck, s. of Solomon, (p. 210,) b. in Wind- 
sor, Vt. in 1800, and is now a farmer in Hartland. 

He m. 1, in 1823, Lois Proctor. She d. in Windsor, May 
7, 1836. 

He m. 2, in 1837, Louisa A. Hall of Windsor. Has had, — 

1. Charles P., b. Aug. 20, 1825. 5. Henry S., b. Aug. 1, 1834. 

2. Arabella A., b. Sept. 14, 1827. 6. Eliza J., b. Oct. 11, 1838. 

3. William J., b. Oct. 10,1830. 7. Irelia A., b. Jan. 10, 1842. 

4. Edmund S., b. Sept. 4, 1832. 



472. Ira Shattuck, s. of Solomon, (210,) was b. in Weath- 
ersfield, Vt., March 16, 1804, and settled first in Middlebury, but 
in 1837 removed to Burlington. He has been a merchant and 
farmer, but is now retired from a regular business. Was deputy 
marshal of the United States, under Filmore. 

He m. May 31, 1832, Lucinda Cotterell, dau. of Patrick and 
Jemima Cotterell of Middlebur}^. Has had, — 



LUCY, ALBERT, HENRY S., AND LYDIA SHATTUCK. 349 

1. Harriette Minerva, b. in Middlebury, May 18, 1834; m. Feb. 7, 1854, H. G. 

Ludlow, s. of Judge Ludlow of Ogdensburg. He is superintendent of the 
gas works in Burlington. 

2. Ira Henry, b. Feb. 14, 1840; d. April 28, 1841, a3. 1 y. 2 m. 14 d. 

3. Ira Edmund, b. April 21, 1848. 



473. Lucy Shattuck, dau. of Solomon, (p. 210,) b. in Weath- 
ersfield, m. Feb. 4, 1831, Samuel Stone of Windsor, Vt.. and 
has, — 

1. Frederick, b. Nov. 12, 1831. 5. Samuel Newton, b. Sept. 27, 1838. 

2. Lucy Ellen, b. April 22, 1833. 6. Charles, b. July 15,1840. 

3. Manj Jane, b. Nov. 21, 1834. 7. .Ann Minerva, b. April 15, 1843. 

4. Richard Henry, b. Sept. 14, 1836. 8. James Albert, b. March 8, 1845. 



474. Albert Shattuck, s. of Solomon, (p. 210,) b. in Weath- 
ersfield, Nov. 6, 1810, removed in 1836 to Albany, N. Y., where 
he has since resided, as a mason. 

He m. in 1835, Harriet Hutchinson, and has had, — 

1. Caroline, b. Sept. 3, 1838. 4. Solomon, b. Oct. 6, 1843. 

2. James, b. Nov. 5, 1840. 5. Mary, b. Jan. 2, 1846. 

3. Giles, b. Nov. 12, 1842; 6. Elizabeth, b. Feb. 28, 1848. 

d. in 1843, a?. 1 y. 7. Anna, b. Nov. 5, 1852. 



475. Henry S. Shattuck, s. of Solomon, (p. 210,) was b. in 
Windsor, May 15, 1814, and is a railroad conductor in Lebanon, 
N. H. 

He m. in 1837, Nancy A. Stimson, and has had, — 

1. Mary E., b June 12, 1838 ; d. May 10, 1839, a-. 10 m. 28 d. 

2. William Henry, b. Jan. 21, 1840; d. May 31, 1843, ee. 3 y. 4 m. 10 d. 

3. George Henry, b. Dec. 6, 1844. 4. James A., b. Oct. 19, 1836. 

5. Mary E., b. July 8, 1849. 



476. Lydia Shattuck, dau. of Obii, (p. 212,) was b. in 
Wheelock, Vt., Nov. 17, 1795, where she d. Oct. 26, 1851, ae. 
55 y. 11 m. 9 d. 

She m. Dec. 1818, Jonathan Noyes, a farmer of Wheelock, 

and had, — 

1. Frederick, b. May 2, 1810; m. May 18, 1852, Maria L. Andrews, and has 

Charles Frederick, b. April 2, 1852. 

2. Franklin, b. Nov. 27, 1822 ; m. Dec, 1849, Amanda Chandler. 

3. Caroline, b. Jan. 11, 1825; m. April, 1851, Charles Kennedy of Boston. He 

is a piano-forte maker. 

4. Candace, b. Sept. 2, 1829. 



350 SEVENTH GENERATION AND DESCENDANTS. 

477. Mary Shattuck, dau. of Obil, (p. 212,) b. Nov. 2, 1796 : 
m. April 20, 1814, Harvey Kelsey, b. Sept. 7, 1790, s. of James 
Kelsey of Danville, where he resides as a farmer. Has had, — 

1. Daniel, b. March 13, 1815. He is a Methodist Minister in Alexander, Burke 

Co., Ga. ; in. and has 3 children. 

2. Mary A., b. July 30, 1818 ; m. Nov. 28, 1837, B. C. Howard. She d. in 1851. 

Have had, 1. Rosar.ond E., b. Nov. 29, 1838 ; 2. Mary Jane, b. June 14, 
1845, d. Jan. 7, 1850; 3. Celia M., b. Dec. 7, 1850, d. April, 1852. 

3. Roansa S., b. Nov. 22, 1821; m. Aug. 14, 1844, Person True, and has had, 1 . 

Ellen R., b. July 2, 1846; 2. Alice A., b. June 2, 1843; 3. Clara E., b. July 
27, 1851. 

4. Jane B., b. Sept. 11, 1827; m. Feb. 19, 1848, Joseph S. H. Weeks, and has 

had, 1. Adelia J., b. Dec. 30, 1848, d. March 30, 1849 ; 2. Adelia, b. July 27, 
1850 ; 3. Helen E., b. May 28, 1852. 

5. FloraS., b. May 15, 1831. 

6. Rosamond, b. Sept. 14, 1834; d. April 10, 1839, a?. 4 y. 6 m. 26 d. 



478. Thirza Shattuck, dau. of Obil, (p. 212,) was b. in 
Wheeloek, Vt., Nov. 14, 1798, and now resides in Batavia, Gene- 
see Co., N. Y. 

She m. 1, Jan. 2, 1820, James Harran, b. June 12, 1797. 
He was a tailor in Danville, where he d. Oct. 29. 1831, as. 34 
y. 4 m. 17 cl. 

She m. 2, John Johnson of Batavia, N. Y. 

HER CHILDREN, BY JAMES HARRAN, BORN IN DANVILLE. 

1. Algernon S., b. Sept. 22, 1820 ; d. July 5, 1825, se. 4 y. 9 m. 13 d. 

2. Mary, b. May 25, 1822; m. Feb. 5, 1840, Johnson, s. of John 

Johnson, and had James and Harriet. She d. Dec. 3, 1849. 

3. Ama, b. Mar. 22, 1824; m. Jan. 1, 1840, Dr. Boman. 

4. Ann $., b. Dec. 25, 1826; d. June 12, 1843, re. 16 y. 5 m. 17 d. 

5. Algernon S. t b. Nov. 22, 1828 ; d. April 15, 1833, re. 4 y. 4 m. 19 d. 

6. James E., b. Feb. 3, 1831 ; d. April 10, 1833, re. 2 y. 2 m. 7 d. 

HER CHILDREN, BY JOHN JOHNSON, BORN IN BATAVIA. 

7. Pearly W., b. Aug. 27, 1838. 8. John, b. Aug. 30, 1841. 



479. Obil Shattuck, twin s. of Obil, (p. 212,) b. Oct. 18, 
1801, d. in Danville, Jan. 7, 1848, se. 46 y. 2 m. 19 d. 
He m. March 3, 1825, Direxa Eastman, and had, — 

1. Candace C, b. Nov. 28, 1825; d. Jan. 6, 1827, re. 1 y. 2 m. 8 d. 

2. Bowman B., b. June 15, 1827 ; m. Feb. 6, 1849, Clarinda L. Bachelder, and 

has, 1. Clara A., b. March 9, 1851 ; 2. Ida V., b. June 10, 1852. 

3. Gilbert A., b. Dec. 13, 1829; d. Aug. 2, 1852, re. 22 y. 7 m. 19 d. 

4. Milo H., b. Jan. 6, 1832. 7. Josephine M., b. Mar. 16, 1839. 

5. MartinV. B.,b. Jan. 30, 1834 8. Lafayette, b. Feb. 16,1843. 

6. Ora C, b. April 14, 1836. 9. Solon, b. June 22, 1846. 



FAB1US, ANSON, SHADRACH, AND VARNUM P. SHATTUCK. 351 

480. Fabius Shattuck, s. of Obil, (p. 212,) was b. in 
Wheelock, Aug. 1, 1803. and settled as a farmer first in Dan- 
ville, but in 1852 removed to Clinton, Rock Co., Wis. 

He m. 1, March 29, 1830, Huldah Smith. She was b. Sept. 
29, 1807, and d. in Danville, May 12, 1838, ae. 30 y. 7 m. 13 d. 

He m. 2, Sept. 22, 1838, Melissa L. Farnsworth. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY HULDAH SMITH, BORN IN DANVILLE. 

1. William A., b. Dec. 3, 1831. 2. Susan A., b. Feb. 3, 1838. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY MELISSA L. FARNSWORTH, BORN IN DANVILLE. 

3. Edwin F, b. Aug. 22, 1840; d. Aug. 22, 1841, Be. 1 y. 

4. Ella C, b. Dec. 31, 1843. 5. Harvey F, b. April 29, 1849. 

6. Frederick E., b. April 7, 1851. 



481. Anson Shattuck, s. of Obil, (p. 212,) was b. Feb. 11, 
1805, and removed from Wheelock, about 1850, to Derby, Vt. 

He m. 1, Jan. 6, 1829, Mattie Heath, b. May 19, 1805, dan. of 
John Heath of Wheelock. She d. April 6, 1843, ae. 37 y. 10 m. 17 d. 

He m. 2, Dec. 5, 1843, Lucy Pierce. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY MATTIE HEATH. HIS CHILDREN, BY LUCY PIERCE. 

1. Jennette, b. May 8, 1831. 5. Ira Anson, b. Feb. 2, 1846. 

2. Justin Smith, b. June 22, 1833. 6. Mattie, b. Oct. 3,1847. 

3. Laura Angelina, b. Oct. 16, 1834. 7. Orloiv Brainard,b. Jan. 22, 1849. 

4. Silas Gaskell, b. June 30, 1839. 8. John Franklin, b. May 23, 1852. 



482. Shadrach Shattuck, s. of Obil, (p. 212,) was b. in 
Wheelock, April 4, 1810, and in 1845 settled as a farmer in 
Barrington, Cook Co., 111. 

He m. at Bethany, N. Y., Feb. 11, 1836, Celinda Minerva 
Crandall. 

1. Francis Orestes, b. Aug. 27, 1838 ; d. March 30, 1839, 83. 7 m. 3 d. 

2. jYathan Fellows, b. Dec. 14, 1839; d. Jan. 19, 1843, ©. 3 y. 1 m. 5. d. 

3. Edwin Orlando, b. June 13, 1842 ; d. Feb. 5, 1845, 83. 2 y. 7 m. 22 d. 

4. Mary Eliza, b. Sept. 9, 1846. 5. Harriet Minerva, b. May 31, 1849. 



483. Yarnum Prescott Shattuck, s. of Shadrach, (p. 215,) 
was b. in Charlestown, Oct. 22, 1804. He was a trader in New 
York and various other places, and d. in Yera Cruz, Mexico, 
June 12, 1847, ae. 42 y. 7 m. 20 d. 

He m. Jan. 13, 1827, his cousin Cherry Adams Locke, b. 
Jan. 13, 1807. (See "Book of the Lockes," p. 135.) She m. 

2, in 1848, Robertson. 

1. Varnum P., b. May 6. 1828. 



352 SEVENTH GENERATION AND DESCENDANTS. 

2. Cheri-y Louisa, b. May 13, 1830; d. in Galveston, Texas, Oct. 31, 1847. 

3. Josephine, b. Nov., 1831 ; d. in New York, July, 1833. 

4. Josephine M., b. Sept. 1, 1833. 

5. Warren Shadrach, b. Aug. 16, 1837; d. in Oswego, N. Y., Jan., 1838. 

6. Sarah Stickney, b. Oct. 7,1839. 7. CharlesThayer Scott, b. Feb. 15, 1841. 

8. Frances, b. Nov. 18, 1842. 

9. Warren, b. Dec, 1843; d. in New York, Oct., 1844. 
10. Robertine E., b. Sept., 1846; d. in Galveston, in 1849. 



484. Eliza Shattuck, dau. of Shadrach, (p. 215,) b. March 
30, 1806, m. Nov. 26, 1826, Charles Thayer Scott, b. in Bos- 
ton, July 1, 1803, s. of Ebenezer Scott and Rachel Thayer. He 
was a merchant, and removed to New York in 1832, where he d. 
April 15, 1848, 33. 44 y. 9 m. 14 d. Had,— 

1. Augusta Wheeler, b. July 20, 1828. 5. Eveline Frost, b. Feb. 18, 1839 ; 

2. Walter, b. Oct. 30, 1830. d. in New York, Aug. 31, 1840. 

3. Helen Carpenter, b. Jan. 28, 1834. 6. Edwina Le Fevre, b. Nov. 14, 1841. 

4. Charles T., b. Feb. 27, 1837. 7. Claretta S., b. Nov. 9, 1845. 



485. Warren Shadrach Shattuck, s. of Shadrach, (p. 215,) 
was b. in Charlestown, March 25, 1808, and was a merchant in 
New York, where he d. Oct. 15, 1833, as. 25 y. 6 m. 20 d. 

He m. in New York, Jan. 28, 1830, Eliza Ann Joy, dau. of 
Peter Joy and Eliza Dunham of Martha's Vineyard. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY ELIZA ANN JOY, BORN IN NEW YORK. 

1. Alonzo Doggett, b. Jan. 16, 1831 ; d. in New York, June, 1834, se. 3 y. 5 m. 

2. Warren Shadrach, b. Jan. 14, 1833. He is a merchant in New York. 



486. Artemas Locke Shattuck, s. of Shadrach, (p. 215,) 
was b. in Charlestown, March 31, 1810. He is a merchant, now 
in Philadelphia. 

He m. Aug. 30, 1832, Catharine Hickey, b. May 26, 1805, 
dau. of Michael Hickey and Catharine Ward of Philadelphia. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY CATHARINE HICKEY, BORN IN NEW YORK AND PHILADELPHIA. 

1. Catharine Maria, b. June 6, 1833 ; d. in N. York, Feb. 8, 1835, se. 1 y. 8 m. 2 d. 

2. Warren, b. Oct. 18, 1834. 6. Artemas Locke, b. May 22, 1843. 

3. Elizabeth Hickey, b. July 2, 1836; 7. Caroline Eliza, b. Nov. 24, 1844. 

d. in Phila., April 25, 1839. 8. Charles T. Scott, b. Dec. 13, 1847 ; 

4. Sarah Locke,. b. May 13, 1838. d. in Phila., May 8, 1850. 

5. Ellen Hickey, b. Nov. 27, 1839. 9. Walter A. Wheelock, b. July 1, 1852. 



487. Louisa Shattuck, dau. of Meshach, (p. 216,) b. in 
Boston, April 12, 1805 ; m. 1, Dec. 2, 1824, William H. Balch, 



LOUISA, REBECCA ANN, AND JOSEPH SHATTUCK. 353 

b. Oct., 1800, a shoemaker of Bradford. He d. Feb. 14, 1835, 
ae. 34 y. 4 m. She m. 2, March 23, 1837, Amos Parker, b. Jan. 
2, 1792. He is a trader in Groveland, formerly Bradford. 

HER CHILDREN, BY WILLIAM H. BALCH, BORN IN GROVELAND. 

1. Henry Augustus, b. Sept. 3, 1825; m. Nov., 1848, L. C. Whitcomb of Fairlee, 

Vt., and had Louisa Shattuck, b. Sept. 5, 1849. He d. Sept. 7. 1850, se. 25 
y. m. 4 d. 

2. Rebecca Ann, b. May 7, 1827. 

3. Mary Harris, b. May 8, 1830 ; d. Sept. 5, 1833, ae. 3 y. 3 m. 27 d. 

4. Helen Maria, b. May 14, 1832; d. Feb. 14, 1833, ae. 9 ra. 

HER CHILDREN, BY AMOS PARKER, BORN IN GROVELAND. 

5. Maria Louisa, b. April 2, 1838. 8. Isabella Eustace, b. April 21, 1843. 

6. Rufus Edward, b. Jan. 23, 1840. 9. George Amos, b. June 21, 1845. 

7. Charles Shattuck,h. July 22, 1841. 10. William Fisk, b. July 9,1851. 



488. Rebecca Ann Shattuck, dau. of Meshach, (p. 215,) b. 
Boston, March 10, 1811; m. March 9, 1837, Joseph E. Fisk, b. 
in Heath, Feb. 12, 1811, s. of William Fisk and Dolly Welling- 
ton. He is a dentist in Salem. 

HER CHILDREN, BY JOSEPH E. FISK, BORN IN SALEM. 

1. Josephine Elizabeth, b. Jan. 1, 1838. 

2. Ella Wheelock, b. May 22, 1840. 

3. Charlem Shattuck, b. Jan. 27, 1842. 

4. Maria Eustace Bacon, b. July 31, 1847. 

5. Camilla Leland, b. Jan. 4, 1850. 

6. Louisa Parker, b. Sept. 20, 1851. 



DESCENDANTS OE THE ANDOVER BRANCHES. 

489. Joseph Shattuck, s. of Joseph, (p. 220,) was b. in 
Andover, Oct. 18, 1793, and settled as a farmer in the West 
Parish. He has been one of the selectmen of the town fifteen 
years ; a Representative in the Legislature in 1838 and 1839 ; a 
Trustee of the Punchard School Fund, and in various other 
ways has received evidence of the respect and confidence reposed 
in him by the town. 

He m. May 25, 1826, Hannah Bailey, dau. of James Bailey 
and Lucy Brown. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY HANNAH BAILEY, BORN IN ANDOVER. 

1. Joseph, b. April 23, 1827; merchant in Lawrence. 

2. George Otis, b. March 2, 1829 ; graduated at Harvard College in 1851, and at 

the Law School in 1854 ; and is now settled in his profession in Boston. 

3. Charles Walter, b. June 13, 1831 ; merchant in Lawrence, with his brother. 

4. Lucy Brown, b. Feb. 10, 1834. 5. Edward, b. June 21, 1837. 

45 



354 SEVENTH GENERATION AND DESCENDANTS. 

490. Nathan Shattuck, s. of Joseph, (p. 220,) b. March 4, 
1797, is now a farmer in West Andover, on the Merrimack River, 
about two miles above Lawrence. He represented the town in 
the Legislature in 1834. 

He m. in 1824, Mary Fiske Abbott, b. July 9, 1803. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY MARY FISKE ABBOTT, BORN IN ANDOVER. 

1. Mary, b. Sept. 30, 1824 ; d. Jan. 5, 1828, *e. 3 y. 3 m. 5 d. 

2. Nathan, b. Feb. 13, 1827; d. Nov. 29, 1847, cb. 20 y. 9 ra. 16 d. 

3. Mary Fiske, b. Oct. 12, 1829; m. Jan. 1, 1851, Josiah Milton Abbott. 

4. Phebe Abbott, b. Dec. 13, 1831; m. Jan. 31, 1850, Charles Frye of Andover. 

5. Augusta E., b. April 22, 1834 ; d. June 11, 1835, a?. 1 y. 1 m. 19 d. 

6. Josiah Newton, b. Oct. 11, 1835. 

7. Sarah Foster, b. Feb. 16, 1838. 8. Augusta Porter, b. Nov. 27, 1840. 



491. Phebe Shattuck, dau. of Abiel, (p. 221,) b. in Andover, 
Nov. 26, 1787, m. July 21, 1814, John B. Upton, b. May 7, 1786. 
He has been a bookbinder in Andover and other places. Has 
had, — 

1. James J., b. Sept. 28, 1814 ; m. Sarah Mills. He is a millwright. 

2. Harriet, b. April 2, 1815; m. Cyrus A. Camp. He is a farmer. 

3. Henry E., b. Dec. 2, 1816; m. Clarissa Gay. He is a carpenter. 

4. Clark P., b. Jan. 29, 1824 ; m. Henry Sherman. He is a lawyer. 



492. Abiel Shattuck, s. of Abiel, (p. 221,) b. in Hills- 
borough, N. H., June 10, 1795, m. April 6, 1814, Susanna B. 
King of Merrimack, N. H., and has had, — 

1. Nancy Jane, b. May 26, 1815; m. Aug. 26, 1840, James Hildreth, a black- 

smith of Townsend, and has had, 1. Francis Augustus, b. July 18, 1841 ; 
2. James Madison, b. March 13, 1843 ; 3. Nathan Supply, b. March 20, 
1845, d. July 12, 1846, a;. 1 y. 3 m. 22 d. ; 4. Edwin Carrol], b. March 28, 
1848, d. March 30, 1848, ee. 2 d.; 5. Harriet Jane, b. March 28, 1849, d. 
June 23, 1850, ae. 1 y. 2 m. 25 d.; 6. Sarah Brown, b. Oct. 21, 1851. 

2. Charles Russell, b. March 1, 1817; m. in 1840, Rebecca Eagles of Roxbury, 

and has had, 1. Sarah Elizabeth, b. Nov. 25, 1842; 2. Susan Ward, b. Feb. 
12, 1844. 

3. Francis Mansfield, b. Feb. 17, 1819; m. Oct. 15, 1840, Elmira Blanchard of 

Greenfield, N. H. Lives in Nashua, and has had, 1. Mary Elizabeth, b. 
July 11, 1841 ; 2. Sarah Ann, b. Oct. 30, 1844; 3. Martha Jane, b. Jan. 
20, 1849. 

4. Sarah Ismena, b. Feb. 3, 1821 ; d. Oct. 10, 1823, se. 2 y. 8 m. 7 d. 

5. Abiel Edwin, b. Feb. 5, 1823 ; m. Susan Williams. Has Charles Horatio, b. 

Sept. 8, 1851. 

6. Sarah Marinda,b. Jan. 25, 1825; m. Dec. 21, 1842, James L. Simonds, a 

dentist of Dunstable. Has had, 1. Sarah Elizabeth Antoinette, b. Dec. 22, 
1843; 2. James Francello, b. June 17, 1847, d. Sept. 13, 1848, ce. 1 y. 2 m. 



ABIEL, WILLIAM, AND ZEBEDIAH SHATTUCK. 355 

26 d. ; 3. Harriet Francella, b. Juno 30, 1849, d. Aug. 12, 1849, se. 1 m. 12 
d. ; 4. James Alphonso, b. July 28, 1851, d. Sept. 5, 1851, as. 1 m. 7 d. ; 5. 
Ida Imogine, b. Oct. 18, 1852. 

7. Stephen Moss, b. June 25, 1827; m. June, 1850, Sophia Savryson. He d. 

Sept. 12, 1851, se. 24 y. 2 m. 17 d. Had George Stephen, b. April, 1851. 

8. Harriet Mahala, b. April 15, 1829; d. May 15, 1849, se. 20 y. 1 m. 

9. Supply Dean, b. Nov. 8, 1831. 10. Mary Caroline, b. Aug. 5, 1833. 
11. Elizabeth, b. Nov. 5, 1835 ; d. Nov. 25, 1837, se. 2 y. m. 20 d. 



493. William Shattuck, s. of William, (p. 222,) was b. in 
Otisfield, Me., April 25, 1792. He is a shoemaker, and first set- 
tled in Boston, but in 1832 removed to Lowell, in 1836 to Con- 
cord, and afterwards to South Acton, where he now resides. 

He m. in Boston, June 7, 1821, Elizabeth H. Hill, b. in 
Maidstone, Kent Co., England, near the birthplace of Q,ueen Vic- 
toria, Aug. 13, 1800, dau. of John Hill and Judith Potter. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY E. M. HILL, BORN IN BOSTON, LOWELL, AND CONCORD. 

1. William R., b. June 29, 1823 ; m. Sept. 20, 1846, Lucy J. Robbins of South Ac- 

ton, and have had, 1. Effie J. ; 2. Alice M. ; 3. Mary E. ; 4. William Orville. 
He is a jeweller and postmaster at South Acton. 

2. Worrell, b. Jan. 7, 1826; m. May 16, 1853, Elizabeth Gardiner, and has had 

Florence, b. Aug. 4, 1854, d. Nov. 7, 1854. He is a manufacturer of jewelry 
in Providence. 

3. Elizabeth H., b. Oct. 1, 1827; m. Oct. 1, 1846, Nathan H. Wheeler, a mer- 

chant tailor in South Acton, and has had, 1. Elizabeth M. ; 2. Albert A. 

4. George W., b. Dec. 19, 1829; m. Feb. 15, 1852, Caroline R. Homer, and have 

Ida R. He is a dealer in jewelry in Maiden. 

5. Alpheus Green, )h. March 15, 1832; dealer in jewelry in Maiden. 

6. Albert Greenleaf, S Twins. Manufacturer of jewelry in Providence. 

7. Mary A., b. Feb. 15, 1834 ; d. in Lowell, Aug. 11, 1836, se. 2 y. 5 m. 26 d. 

8. Sarah A., b. May 6, 1838, in Concord. 



494. Hon. Zebedtah Shattuck, s. of Zebediah, (p. 222,) 
was b. in Andover, June 7, 1792, and resided in Hillsborough, 
N. H., until 1826, when he removed to Nashua, where he has 
since lived as a merchant. He has been a Director in the 
Nashua Bank, and in several Railroad Companies ; a justice of 
the peace ; a Representative in the Legislature ; and in 1853 was 
one of the Governor's Council. 

He m. 1, Milly Taylor of Hillsborough. She d. June 7, 1812. 

He m. 2, July 3, 1817, Vashti Parker. She d. Dec, 1823. 

He m. 3, Mary Taylor, b. April 30, 1803, dau. of Samuel T. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY VASHTI PARKER, BORN IN HILLSBOROUGH. 

1. Emily T., b. March 1, 1822. Teacher in the Eliot School in Boston. 



356 SEVENTH GENERATION AND DESCENDANTS. 

2. Vashti P., b. Dec. 20,1823; m. March 6, 1851, Dr. Benj. Lyford, now of 

Nashua. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY MARY TAYLOR, BORN IN NASHUA. 

3. Mary E., b. Mar. 26, 1833. 

4. Clara A., b. Mar. 28, 1836. 6. Ellen M., b. June 25, 1841. 

5. Jefftrson J, b. May 19, 1838. 7. Kate M. B., b. Oct. 25, 1844. 



495. Joseph Shattuck, s. of Zebediah, (p. 222,) was b. in 
Hillsborough, April 5, 1797, and settled in Bradford, N. H., as a 
blacksmith, where he d. Aug. 15, 1840, as. 43 y. 4 m. 10 d. 
He was a Deacon in the Congregational Church. 

He m. July 29, 1822, Elizabeth K. West, and had, — 

1. Charlotte, b. ; d. in Bradford in 1841. 

2. Almira, b. ; m. March, 1847, Chester E. Albee. 

3. Joseph, b. Nov. 17, 1824; m. Feb. 6, 1854, Anna E. Bowden, dau. of Capt. 

John Bowden of Boston. He has been in California. 



496. Gilman Shattuck, s. of Zebediah, (p. 222,) b. Dec. 2, 
1802, settled in Nashua in 1826, where he has since resided as a 
merchant. He has been town treasurer, selectman, assessor, and 
held other public offices. 

He m. 1, Mary Jane Conant of Nashua. She d. Nov. 9, 1834. 

He m. 2, in 1846, Emeline B. Dutton of Hillsborough. 

He has had one child by each wife, born in Nashua. 

1. Gilman C, b. Oct. 23, 1834; in business with his father. 

2. Henry D., b. June, 1848. 



497. Simeon Shattuck, s. of Isaac, (p. 223,) b. in Andover, 

Nov. 22, 1807; m. 1, Dec. 13, 1832, Anstrus Hill; and 2, 
Eliza Hill, and had, — 

1. Isaac Henry, b. April 22, 1838. 4. Derby Augustine, b. Feb. 8, 1842. 

2. Leonard Granville, b. June 24, 1840. 5. James Newton, b. July 7, 1844 ; 

3. Charles Riley, b. Feb. 24, 1841 ; d. May 29, 1850, se. 5 y. 10 m. 22 d. 

d. May 29, 1842, se. 1 y. 3 m. 5 d. 6. George Frost, b. July 4, 1848. 



498, Samuel Shattuck, s. of Samuel, (p. 224,) b. Feb. 25, 
1797; m. July 4, 1819, Hannah Mansur. She d. Sept. 16, 

1847. Had,— 

1. Hannah, b. May 26, 1820 ; m. Dec. 21, 1840, James Midgley. 

2. Samuel E., b. Jan. 24, 1822; d. April 4, 1837, se. 15 y. 2 m. 10 d. 

3. Charles Otis, b. July 3, 1824 ; m. Lydia Copp. Reside in Lowell. 

4. Martha, b. Dec. 22, 1826; m. Daniel A. Davis. Now in Iowa. 

5. William M. B., b. Mar. 10, 1829 ; m. July 4, 1852, Almira Sampson. 



SAMUEL, SOPHHONIA, AND ROCCINA E. SHATTUCK. 357 



6. Rebecca, b. May 28, 1831 ; m. William Gray of Andover. 

7. Mary Ann, ) b. May 10, 1835. 

8. Sarah Ann, S Twins. d. Feb. 4, 1840, ee. 4 y. 8 m. 24 d. 

9. Caroline Augusta, b. Nov. 27, 1839; d. Feb. 14, 1840, re. 2 m. 17 d. 

10. Worthy White, b. April 26, 1841. 

11. James, b. April 15, 1843. 



DESCENDANTS OF THE DEERFIELU BRANCHES. 

499. Sophronia Shattuck, dau. of Samuel, (p. 225,) was b. 
in Sheldon, Vt., Nov. 22, 1798, and now (1854) resides in Tit- 
tabawassee, Saginaw Co., Mich. 

She m. in Durham, Canada East, July 22, 1818, John C. 
Tibbets, b. in Vermont, October 10, 1792. He first settled as a 
farmer in Brome, Canada East, but about 1832 removed to 
Toronto, Canada West, and about 1837 to Tittabawassee, where 
he d. Nov. 4, 1845, ee. 53 y. m. 24 d. 

HER CHILDREN, BY JOHN C. TIBBETS, BORN IN BROME AND TORONTO. 

1. Charles S., b. May 28, 1819; m. June 16, 1844, Angeline McLeroth, a farm- 

er, who resides in Stark Co., Indiana. 

2. Maria, b. May 21, 1821 ; m. Feb. 16, 1842, James N. Gotee, b. Aug. 29, 

1814; a carpenter in Saginaw city. Have had, 1. Mary S., b. April 15, 
1843, d. Aug. 17, 1852; 2. Alice S., b. Aug. 5, 1844. 

3. Jane, b. June 21, 1823; m. Nov. 4, 1847, William Trattles of St. Joseph's 

Co., Mich. 

4. Susanna, b. March 24, 1825 ; d. Aug. 15, 1826, re. 1 y. 4 m. 21 d. 

5. Edward, b. Aug. 31, 1827; m. Oct. 29, 1838, Chrestina Taylor. She d. 

Sept. 14, 1850. He is in California. 

6. Calista, b. July 21, 1829 ; m. Dec. 28, 1847, William O. Taylor, a farmer of 

Stark Co., Ind. She d. Dec. 25, 1848, ae. 19 y. 5 m. 4 d. 

7. Adeline, b. Feb. 19, 1834; m. Jan. 27, 1850, Morgan Jones, b. Jan. 8, 1822; 

a farmer in Tittabawassee. Have Adelbert Edward, b. Aug. 6, 1853. 

8. Charlotte, b. July 1, 1835; d. in Toronto, Sept. 22, 1835, re. 2 m. 21 d. 

9. Almy, b. May 9, 1838. 

10. Harriet, b. April 10, 1842 ; d. at Grand Blanc, July 17, 1842, a3. 3 m. 7 d. 



500. Roccina E. Shattuck, dau. of Samuel, (p. 225,) b. in 
Sheldon, Yt., Dec. 17, 1801 ; m. in Stukely, Canada East, July 
14, 1823, Lott Parker, b. Sept. 16, 1805, s. of Capt. Caleb 
Parker and Thankful Pratt, natives of Shrewsbury, Mass. He 
is a carpenter, and settled, soon after marriage, in SherTord, where 
he lived 9 years, and removed from thence to Brome, their pres- 
ent residence. 

HER CHILDREN, BY LOTT PARKER, BORN IN SHEFFORD AND BROME. 

1. Susan Ball, b. April 30, 1824. 2. Caleb Hamilton, b. Dec. 12, 1825. 



358 SEVENTH GENERATION AND DESCENDANTS. 

3. Mary, b. Dec. 12, 1827; m. Nov. 8, 1847, Versel E. Chamberlain. 

4. Eleanor, b. June 4,1830. 6. Maria Jane, b. Oct. 2, 1841. 

5. Elizabeth, b. Nov. 15, 1832. 7. Charles Edward, b. Feb. 3, 1848. 



501. Calista Shattuck, dau. of Samuel, (p. 225,) b. in 
Sheldon, June 15, 1805 ; m. Oct., 1830, Isaac Lawrence of 
Stukely, where she d. Feb. 28, 1836, ae. 30 y. 8 m. 13 d. 



1 . Prudence Mary, b. 

2. Anna Knowlton, b. 

3. Lucy Elmore, b. 

4. Edward Benj., b. 



d. in the winter of 1840. 

m. Sept., 1852, Stephen P. Goddard. 

m. Sept., 1850, Asahel Hoyt ; d. in Lowell. 

d. May, 1836. 



502. Chester Shattuck, s. of Samuel, (p. 225,) was b. in 
Stukely, Feb. 22, 1810, and settled as a farmer, first in Durham, 
Canada East, but in 1846 removed to Ohio, and in 1851 to 
Lancaster, Schuyler Co., Mo. 

He m. April 14, 1833, Alma Guy of Durham. Have had, — 
1. John Guy, b. Feb. 9, 1834. 2. Lydia Alma, b. Jan. 24, 1845. 



503. Samuel Shattuck, s. of Samuel, (p. 225,) was b. in 
Stukely, Sept. 27, 1814, and in 1835 removed to Michigan; and 
now resides in Tittabawassee as a carpenter, miller, and farmer. 

He m. at Bridgeport, Mich., May 3, 1842, Catharine Beach, 
b. in Lewiston, N. Y., March 23, 1816, dau. of Noah Beach. Have 
had, — 

1. Samuel M, b. Feb. 23, 1843; d. March 7, 1843, a?. 12 days. 

2. Elmore, b. Aug. 11, 1844; d. Sept. 5, 1844, ®. 24 days. 

3. Willard, b. Sept. 21, 1845. 

4. Elmore, b. Feb. 1, 1849; d. Sept. 3, 1853, as. 4 y. 7 m. 2 d. 

5. Samuel M, b. June 18, 1853. 



504. Richard A. Shattuck, s. of Consider, (p. 226,) was b. 
in Sheldon, March 19, 1802. He was a tanner for a few years, 
but relinquished the business ; and was chosen 23 years, until he 
declined a reelection, constable and collector of taxes ; and was a 
part of that time deputy sheriff and high bailiff. In 1852 he was 
justice of the peace, and is now United States Collector of the 
port of Alburgh Springs, Grand Isle Co., Yt. 

He m. March 7, 1824, Mary Smith, dau. of Daniel Smith, Esq. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY MARY SMITH, BORN IN SHELDON. 

1. Helen M., b. June 13, 1825 ; d. June 8, 1840, a?. 14 y. 11 m. 25 d. 

2. Deforest JG., b. Jan. 6, 1827 ; harness-maker in Franklin, Vt. 



HARRIET, BENJAMIN, AND SIMEON SHATTUCK. 359 

3. Ira Clesson, b. April 18, 1829. He settled in the mercantile business in Clar- 

enceville, Canada East, where he d. Oct. 6, 1852, se. 23 y. 5 m. 18 d. 

4. Emily E., b. Sept. 18, 1830. 8. JYorman L., b. July 19, 1838. 

5. Barnard G., b. June 16, 1832. 9. Charles S. b. June 5, 1840. 

6. D. Smith, b. April 14, 1834. 10. R. Alherion, b. June 13, 1842. 

7. Eliza H., b. Mar. 29, 1836. 11. Helen M., b. Feb. 4,1846. 

12. Sarah Anna Atherton, b. Feb. 14, 1848. 



505. Harriet Newell Shattuck, dau. of Chester, (p. 228,) 
b. in Portsmouth, Dec. 25, 1807; m. March 11, 1827, Charles 
Bishop Goodrich, Esq., b. in Hanover, N. H., March 26, 1804, 
s. of Josiah Goodrich, Jr. He graduated at Dartmouth College in 
1822, studied law, and first settled in Portsmouth, but removed 
to Boston, where he now resides. In 1853 he delivered a course 
of Lectures before the Lowell Institute, on the Science of Gov- 
ernment, which was printed. They have had, — 

1. Lucy Bishop, b. Dec. 22, 1827 ; d Dec. 16, 1838, re. 10 y. 11 m. 24 d. 

2. Charles B., b. Jan. 25, 1830. 

3. Marcelina Dunning, b. Feb. 3, 1833 ; d. Dec. 19, 1854, je. 21 y. 10 m. 16 d. 

4. Matilda Davis, b. Jan. 19, 1835 ; d. Sept.27, 1852, ae. 17 y. 6 m. 8 d. 

5. Frank Chester, b. June 1, 1837. 



506. Lieut. Benjamin Franklin Shattuck, s. of Chester, (p. 
228,) was b. in Portsmouth, Jan. 3, 1814; and in 1831 was ap- 
pointed a midshipman, and in 1841, a Lieutenant in the United 
States Navy. He has been stationed in the Navy Yard at 
Charlestown, and been engaged, meritoriously, in many naval 
expeditions. 

He m. Oct. 22, 1844, Anna B. Doane, dau. of Samuel Doanc 
of Boston, and sister of the late Dr. Augustus Sidney Doane of 
New York. They have had, — 

1. Frank Chester, b. Dec. 5, 1845; d. in Charlestown, Sept. 18, 1849, se. 3. y. 9 

m. 13 d. 

2. Anna Gray, b. Oct. 6, 1851. 3. Sidney Doane, b. Jan. 5, 1855. 



DESCENDANTS OF THE J^ITTEETOIV BRANCHES. 

507. Simeon Hildreth Shattuck, s. of William, (p. 265,) 
was b. in Bradford, N. H., April 9, 1800, and d. Oct. 4, 1849, se. 
49 y. 5 m. 25 d. in Sharon, Vt., to which place he removed a 
few months before his death. 

He m. 1, Sept. 23, 1823, Sarah Eaton, dau. of Joshua Eaton 
of Bradford. She d. Jan., 1831. 



360 SEVENTH GENERATION AND DESCENDANTS. 

He m. 2, Oct. 22, 1832, Caroline A. Richards of Norwich, Vt. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY SARAH EATON, BORN IN BRADFORD. 

1. William Bainbridge, b. April 10, 1824; m. May 21, 1850, Elizabeth Caroline 

Richardson, b. in Wellsville, Ohio, July 30, 1830, dau. of A. G. Richardson 
of Cincinnati. He is interested in an extensive publishing house in Cin- 
cinnati, and is editor of " The Columbian," a weekly newspaper, estab- 
lished in 1847, and of " The Daily Columbian," established in 1853. Has 
Albert Richardson, b. Jan. 31, 1854. 

2. Joshua Eaton, b. Aug. 8, 1826; d. unm., in Washington, Texas, Nov. 7, 

1853, a?. 27 y. 2 m. 29 d. 

3. Sarah Elizabeth, b. March 22, 1829 ; m. June 7, 1853, Charles D. Peaslee. 

HIS CHILDREN, BY CAROLINE A. RICHARDS, BORN IN PLAINFIELD. 

4. Helen Maria, b. Feb. 25, 1836; d. Dec. 26, 1854, se. 18 y. 10 m. 1 d. 

5. Simeon Hildreth, b. April 2, 1838. 

6. Caroline Augusta, b. July 24, 1840. 

7. Levi Richards, b. Oct. 19, 1842 ; d. May 20, 1855, a. 12 y. 7 m. 1 d. 

8. Adaline Jennette, b. Feb. 12, 1845 ; d. Nov. 16, 1849, ee. 4 y. 9 m. 4 d. 

9. Samuel Slade, b. June 30, 1847; d. April 19, 1848, se. 9 m. 19 d. 

10. Catherine Louisa, b. June 29, 1849; d. Aug. 26. 1854, se. 5 y. 1 m. 27 d. 



APPENDIX. 



i. J> annul jllnttiutli nt jsakm. 

(1.) DAMARIS SHATTUCK, then a widow, was admitted to the church in 
Salem in 1641. At what time she came from England, whether before or after 
the death of her first husband, and what his christian name was, are unknown. 
She afterwards became the 2d wife of Capt. Thomas Gardner, a distinguished 
merchant and citizen of Salem. She d. in that town, Nov. 28, 1674. Capt. 
Gardner d. Sept. 4, 1677, leaving a will, dated Dec. 7, 1668, in which he men- 
tions his wife, Damaris, six sons — Thomas, George, John, Samuel, Joseph, and 
Richard ; and daughters, Sarah Balch, Seeth Grafton, and Miriam Hall, all by his 
first wife, Margaret Frier. Two of his sons m. daughters of their stepmother. 
Damaris had by Mr. Shattuck several children, all probably born in England, the 
names of some of whom are known. 

1. Samuel ; who is noticed below. 

2. Damaris ; m. in Boston, Sept. 30, 1653, Samuel Page, or Pope. 

3. Mary ; m. Hams, and lived in Boston. (See her petition, further on.) 

4. Hannah; m. George Gardner. She united with the church in 1649, but was 

dismissed. They removed to Nantucket, where their son Joseph m. in 1670, 
and had several children. 

5. Sarah ; m. in 1652, Richard Gardner, and had Richard, Deborah, James, 

Damaris, Hope, and Levi. He and his wife were excommunicated from the 

church in Salem for attending Quaker meetings; and they removed in 1666 

to Nantucket, where their two youngest children were born. 

Second Generation, and Children. 

(2.) Samuel Shattuck, s. of Widow Damaris Shattuck, (1 ) was b. in England 

about 1620. He was a felt-maker or hatter, in Salem, where he died. A stone, 

still standing over his grave in Salem, bears the following inscription : — " Here 

lyeth buried y e body of Samuel Shattuck, aged 69 years, who departed this life 

y e 6th day of June, 1689." He was admitted to the church in Salem in 1642, 

and was described as " a man of good repute ;" but for reasons presently to be 

stated, he was excommunicated. He left a will, dated April 6, 1689, which 

appoints his wife Hannah executrix, and directs that his sons Samuel and Retire 

should each have a double portion of his estate ; and that the remainder should 

be divided equally between his six daughters. His estate was not settled and 

distributed until Nov. 1,1701. His son Retire, and his daughters Return and 

Patience, died after their father and before the distribution. They left no issue, 

and a~e not mentioned in the settlement. The husbands of Hannah, Damaris, 

46 



362 APPENDIX. 

and Priscilla had also died, and they are then described as widows. Samuel, the 
only surviving son, received a double portion, and the four daughters received 
each £37. 7. 4. (Essex Records, Vol. VII., pp. 111-114.) His children, b. in 
Salem, were, — 

1. Samuel, b. Oct. 7, 1649 ; m. Sarah Bucknam. (See below.) 

2. Hannah, b. Aug. 28, 1651 ; m. John Soames, s. of Morris Soames of Gloucester. 

He resided in Boston. Left a will, dated Nov. 13, 1687, proved Nov. 8, 1700. 
He left several children, but Benjamin was the only survivor at the final set- 
tlement of his estate. 

3. Damaris, b. Nov. 11, 1653; m. Benjamin Pope of Salem. His estate was ap- 

praised May 6, 1702, at £408. 12. 10, and divided between the widow and 4 
sons, Benjamin, Samuel, Ebenezer, and Jerome. 

4. Mary, b. March 14, 1655; m. Benjamin Trask of Beverly. 

5. Priscilla, b. May 1, 1658; m. April 26, 1694, Hugh Nichols of Salem. 

6. Return, b. Aug. 16, 1662 ; m. Sept. 14, 1688, John Saunders. 

7. Retire, b. March 28, 1664; d. unm. A stone erected in Salem to his mem- 

ory, has the epitaph : — " Here lyeth buried y e body of Retire Shattuck, aged 
27 years, departed this life y e 9th day of September, 1691." 

8. Patience, b. Nov. 18, 1666; m. July 29, 1689, John Smith of Salem. 
Return and Retire are supposed to have been named to commemorate his 

remarkable retiring and returning from England. 

Third Generation and Children. 

(3.) Samuel Shattuck, only surviving son of Samuel, above mentioned, (2.) 
was b. in Salem, Aug. 7, 1649, and followed the occupation of his father in his 
native town, where he d. in 1723, ae. 74. His will, dated Dec. 22, 1722, and 
proved March 25, 1723, mentions John, " his only son" and executor. (Essex 
Records, Vol. XIII., pp. 311-313.) He was taxed in Boston several years. He 
m. July 24, 1676, Sarah Bucknam, sister of William and Jose Bucknam of Mai- 
den. Elizabeth, wife of Benjamin Whittemore, Mary, wife of Benjamin Webb, 
and Mehitable, wife of Samuel Waite, were also his sisters. They had, — 

1. Samuel, b. Sept. 7, 1678 ; probably d. young, or before his father. 

2. John, b. Mar. 13, 1680 ; m. Mary Crowley. (See below.) 

3. Margaret, b. ; m. Daniel Bacon of Salem. 

Fourth Generation. 

(4.) Capt. John Shattuck, only surviving son of Samuel, (3) b. in Salem, 
March 13, 1680, was a master mariner. He m. in Salem, Nov. 11, 1708, Mart 
Crowley, but no record of any children has been found. On the 21st Feb., 1731, 
he sold his real estate in Salem to Samuel and Mighill Bacon, and probably re- 
moved from the town, since his name is not afterwards found. In him the name 
of Shattuck in this line appears to have become extinct. 



Samuel Shattuck, senior, son of widow Damaris Shattuck, above mentioned, 
was one of those who suffered persecution for " being called a Quaker." The 
circumstances relating to his connection with this extraordinary persecution are 
detailed in Besse's " Collection of the Sufferings of the People called Quakers," 
Vol. II., pp. 184 to 198; in "Bishop's New England Judged;" in Fox's Journal, 
and elsewhere ; and they are so intimately connected with the history of that 



SAMUEL SHATTUCK. 363 

period that they deserve preservation in this connection. Some allowance should 
perhaps be made for the partisan character of these authors; but their statements 
may be considered reliable and true, in the main, since they are confirmed by 
other coexisting official documents. 

Several orders in relation to the Quakers were passed by the General Court of 
Massachusetts, between July 11, 1656, and Oct. 14, 1657, c ne of which enacted 
that any person who embraced their sentiments, or harbored those that did, should 
be liable to fine, imprisonment, or other punishment. Under these laws Law- 
rence Southwick and his wife Cassandra, then members of the church in Salem, 
were imprisoned for entertaining Christopher Holder and John Copeland, sup- 
posed to be Quakers. Lawrence was soon discharged, but his wife was detained 
seven weeks, and fined forty shillings for " owning a paper of exhortation," writ- 
ten by Holder or Copeland. Soon after this happened Holder attempted to speak 
on a certain occasion, at the close of public worship ; but he was, says the ac- 
count, " pulled backward by the hair of his head, and had a glove and handker- 
chief thrust into his mouth, and so was turned out, and, with his companion, car- 
ried to Boston next day, where each of them received thirty stripes with a knotted 
whip of three cords, the executioner measuring his ground and fetching his 
strokes with all his strength, which so cruelly did cut their flesh that a woman at 
the sight of it fell down dead." They afterwards suffered other punishment. 

Samuel Shattuck, above described, as " an inhabitant of Salem of good repute," 
was present at the meeting when Holder attempted to speak ; and he " endeav- 
ored to prevent their thrusting the handkerchief into Holder's mouth lest it should 
have choked him ; for which attempt he also was carried to Boston and imprisoned 
till he had given bond to answer it at the next court, and not to come to any 
Quaker meeting." 

In 1658, while attending a meeting at the house of Nicholas Phelps, about five 
miles from Salem, Samuel Shattuck, with Lawrence Southwick and his wife, 
Josiah their son, Samuel Gaskin, and Joshua Buffum, were apprehended by " one 
Butter ;" and after being kept confined in a house two days, were taken before 
the magistrates, when the following examination took place, as reported by 
Besse. "One of the prisoners asked, 'How they might know a Quaker?' 
Simon Bradstreet, one of the magistrates, answered, ' Thou art one of them for 
coming in with thy hat on.' They replied, 'It was a horrible thing to make such 
cruel laws, to whip, cut off ears, and bore through the tongue, for not putting off 
the hat.' Then one of them said, ' That the Quakers held forth blasphemies at 
their meetings.' To Avhich they replied, 'They desire that they would make such 
a thing appear, if it were so, that they might be convinced ;' and that ' they 
would do well to send some to their meetings, that they might hear and give 
account of what was done and spoken there, and not conclude of anything they 
knew not.' But, said Major-General Dennison, ' If ye meet together and say 
anything, we may conclude that ye speak blasphemy.'" The result of this ex- 
amination was that they were sent to Boston. After being in close confinement 
three weeks they addressed a letter to the magistrates at Salem, dated " From 
the house of bondage in Boston, wherein we are made captives by the wills of 
men, although made free by the Son of God. John viii. 36. In which we 
quietly rest this 16th of the fifth month, 1658." This able and appropriate letter 
is printed in full in Besse, Vol. II., pp. 177, 178 ; and in Bishop, pp. 74, 75. It 



364 



APPENDIX. 



resulted in the release of Shattuck and Buffum. It appears, however, from an 
original document in the handwriting of Shattuck, that he was in prison with 
Nicholas Phelps, three months afterwards. It runs thus: — 

" This to y e Gen x Court and to y 8 Magistrates and Deputys there assembled. 

" Sirs : We whose names are underwritten are kept prisoners in Ipswich, it be- 
ing y e second time of our imprisonment upon y e account of y e law titled quakers. 
The Gen 1 Court have made laws against such persons ; y e laws expressing it 
y l they are a cursed sect of blasphemous heretics who hold diabolical doctrines. 
We being sufferers under this law in our bodies, estates and families ; and not 
being conscious to ourselves of any such thing that is justly charged upon us, do 
only request this much according to conscience, law and equity; y l we might 
have a fair and legal hearing and tryal according to law and justice; and y l we 
might only upon true tryal beare y e weight of W is justly charged upon us ; either 
by the Gen 1 Court, or a jury of indifferent, rational men, whose charges we shall 
willingly beare. Desiring y x our cause & y e state of our families might be se- 
riously and conscienallie weighed by you all, to whome we acknowledge our- 
selves subjects in all lawful things in y e Lord. 

Samuel Shattuck. 
Nicholas Phelps. 

" Written from the prison in Ipswich this 19th 8 mo 1658." 

What action was taken upon this reasonable petition does not appear. On the 
11th of May, 1659, the petitioners were taken before the Court with Lawrence, 
Cassandra, and Josiah Southwick, and Joshua Buffum, before mentioned, when 
the following trial took place, as described by Besse, Vol. II., pp. 197, 198.* 

" They asked the Governor [Endicot] ' what it was they required of them, 
whether the honor of God or themselves ?' He answered, ' They who honor 
those whom God sets over them honor God.' They replied, ' It was true, but in 
obedience to the law they suffered ;' and farther asked, ' Whether it were for 
that fault they were committed to prison, before the law had a being, and were 
banished, or what was it.' But the court answered them not. One of them de- 
sired the governor ' That he would be pleased to declare before the people the 

* It was at this time that the petition of his sister, already alluded to, was presented. The 
following- is a copy of the petition : — 

" The petition of Pdary Hams. 
To the honored Court now assembled at Boston your petitioner Doth Humbly crave so much 
favour of you that she may have liberty to goe along 1 with her brother Samuel Shaddak to the 
Flcv Mr. Norton. She hears her brother is sent for to the Court. If it may seem good to the 
honored Court to grant that when he corns into the towne he may goe along with me from my 
house to the Rev. x\Ir. Norton's house, I am persuaded that if it please God to set it home to 
his soule that Mr. Norton may convince him by som arguments that he may use So I doc ear- 
nestly desire that the Lord would be pleased abundantly to be seen in the mount to give his 
Blessing to what labors have bin used with him already in a Church way tfe that the Lord 
would be pleased to help to sanctifie what he may meet withal, further I doe very much and ear- 
nestly desire that the Lord would be pleased to help my Dear Brother to se wherein he hath 
swerved away from ye Rule of the word & I doe humbly beseach the honorable assembly now 
assembled that they will pity them that are so farre left at present, methinks I am not quite out 
of hope so long as there is life. Mary Hams. 

The deputyes think meet to grante this petition provided the keeper or some other publicke 
officer may goe with her, desiringe the Consent of our honored Magistrates hereto. 

Wm Torrey Cleric. 
17 May 1659 

Consented to by the magistrates 

Edw. Rawson Secretary" 



SAMUEL SHATTUCK. 365 

real and true causes of the proceedings against them.' He answered, 'It was for 
contemning authority in not coming to the ordinances of God.' He also added, 
that 'They had rebelled against the authority of the country in not departing ac- 
cording to their order.' They answered, 'They had no place to go to, but had 
their wives, children, families and estates to look after ; nor had they done any- 
thing worthy of death, banishment, or bonds, or any of the things for which they 
had suffered, though they had taken from them above one hundred pounds for 
meeting together.' Major General Dennison replied, that ' They stood against 
the authority of the country in not submitting to their laws: that he should not 
go about to speak much concerning the error of their judgment;' but, added he, 
' You and we are not able well to live together, and at present the power is in 
our hands, and therefore the hardest must fend off.' After this they were put 
forth awhile, and being called in again, the sentence of banishment was pro- 
nounced against them, and but a fortnight's time allowed for them to depart, on 
pain of death, nor would they grant them any longer time, though desired. 
Samuel Shattuck, Nicholas Phelps, and Josiah Southwick, were obliged to take 
an opportunity that presented four days after, to pass to England by Barbadoes. 
The aged couple, Lawrence and Cassandra, went to Shelter Island, where shortly 
after they died within three days of each other. Joshua Buffum departed to 
Rhode Island." The power of attorney given by Shattuck to his wife to trans- 
act his business during his absence, is dated May 19, 1659, and is recorded in 
the Essex Registry of Deeds. 

After Shattuck's arrival in England he immediately laid the subject of their 
sufferings before King Charles II. ; and by the assistance of Edward Burroughs 
he obtained, on the 19th September, 1661, a "mandamus," commanding the mag- 
istrates and ministers in New England " to forbear to proceed any farther" 
against the people called Quakers. Shattuck was appointed the King's Deputy 
to carry this mandamus to New England. An agreement was made with Ralph 
Goldsmith, a master of a good ship, for £300, for his conveyance. "He imme- 
diately prepared for the voyage," says Besse, " and in about six weeks arrived in 
Boston harbor, on a first day of the week. The townsmen seeing a ship with 
English colors, soon came on board, and asked for the captain. Goldsmith told 
them he was the commander. They asked him whether he had any letters. 
He answered yes ; but withal told them he would not deliver them that day. 
So they returned on shore again, and reported that there were many Quakers 
come, and that Samuel Shattuck (who they knew had been banished on pain of 
death,) Avas among them. But they knew nothing of his errand or authority. 
Thus all was kept close, and none of the ship's company suffered to go on shore 
that day. Next morning Ralph Goldsmith, the commander, with Samuel Shat- 
tuck, the King's Deputy, went on shore, and sending the boat back to the ship, 
they went directly through the town to the governor's house, and knocked at the 
door. He sending a man to know their business, they sent him word that their 
message was from the King of England, and that they would deliver it to none 
but himself. Then they were admitted to go in, and the governor came to them, 
and commanded Samuel Shattuck's hat to be taken off; and having received the 
deputation and the mandamus he laid off his own hat, and ordering Shattuck's hat 
to be given him again, perused the papers, and then went out to the deputy gov- 
ernor's, bidding the King's Deputy, and the master of the ship to follow him. 



366 APPENDIX. 

Being come to the Deputy Governor, and having consulted him, he returned to 
the aforesaid two persons, and said, ' we shall obey the King's command.'' After this 
the master of the ship gave liberty to his passengers to come on shore, which 
they did, and had a religions meeting with their friends of the town, when they 
returned praises to God for his mercy manifested in this wonderful deliver- 
ance." 

In consequence of these events an order was passed by the General Court on 
the 27th Nov., 1661, that " the execution of the laws in force against Quakers as 
such, so far as they respect corporeal punishment or death, be suspended until 
the court take further order." And the jailers were directed " to release and 
discharge the Quakers who are at present in your custody. See that you don't 
neglect this." The magistrates were evidently alarmed. They sent Col. Temple 
to England to inform the King that his order had been obeyed, and that the 
Quakers were at liberty. Very soon after, Rev. John Norton and Simon Brad- 
street visited England in relation to the same matter. 

Thus was stayed, principally through the instrumentality of Samuel Shattuck, 
one of the most extraordinary persecutions this country ever witnessed. Attempts 
were afterwards made to renew this persecution, but it was in a comparatively 
mild form, and it soon ceased entirely. Mr. Shattuck, notwithstanding the prom- 
inent part he had acted in these events, was thenceforward permitted to live in 
Salem in peace, except in a few instances. In 1663, he was imprisoned a few 
days for charging the country with shedding innocent blood. In 1663, he was 
slightly fined for absence from public worship ; and in 1669, he was confined for 
not paying one of these fines. These are all the public notices of him which we 
have found upon record in connection with these events. He seems to have pos- 
sessed that independence of opinion, and that unwillingness to submit to oppres- 
sion, which has ever been characteristic of the Shattuck family. 



II 



illiam SIpthult ni %nUxL. 



WILLIAM SHATTUCK, a shoemaker, was an inhabitant of Boston, from 
about 1650 to 1658. Like his namesake of Salem he appears to have suffered 
persecution for his Quakerism. Besse, in his History, (Vol. II., p. 184,) says, 
because he was "found on the first day of the week at home in the time of public 
worship, he was sent to the house of correction, and there cruelly whipped, and 
thus kept at hard labor, the deputy governor appropriating the proceeds of his 
labors to himself, while his Avife and children were in want. At length he had 
three days' time assigned him to depart that jurisdiction, which he, in regard to 
his wife and children, was necessitated to accept. Bellingham the deputy gov- 
ernor having terrified the woman with threats of keeping him still in prison, be- 
cause he was poor and not able to pay the fine of 5 shillings for his weekly 
absence from their places of public worship." Bishop says, Bellingham " tried 
to produce a separation between Shattuck and his wife, under a promise that he 
should be banished and heard of no more, and that she and her children should 
be provided for ;" but this proposition she spurned and detested. 



WILLIAM SHATTUCK. 367 

He was banished in 1658, and first went to Rhode Island ; and afterwards to 
New Jersey, and resided in Shrewsbury, Monmouth County. He was elected a 
member of the Assembly from that town in 1675, but declining to swear or take 
the oath of office required, he did not take his seat. The Collections of the 
New Jersey Historical Society (Vol. I. p. 77,) erroneously print his name William 
Shatluck instead of Shattuck. 

We cannot learn that William Shattuck had any male issue. The name probably 
became extinct in his family at his death. He had two daughters born in Bos- 
ton. 1. Hannah, b. July 8, 1654; and 2. Exercise, b. Nov. 12, 1656; of whom 
Hannah married Restore Lippincott. The following is a copy of their marriage 
certificate, which is the first entered in the Records of the Friends in Shrewsbury, 
N. J. It has been kindly furnished by Mr. James S. Lippincott of Philadelphia. 
" Att a meeting of the People of God & Lord gathered together for that end 
and purpose before whom Wm Shattock father to Hannah Shattock give his 
daughter Hannah to wife unto Restore Lippencott son of Richard and Abigail 
Lippincott in these words as followeth : I desire you all to take notice that I do 
give my daughter Hannah to Restore Lippencott to be his wife. The words of 
Restore Lippencott as followeth : I desire you all to take notice that accordingly 
I freely receive her to be my wife. The words of Hannah Shaddock as follow- 
eth : I desire you all to take notice that I do take Restore Lippencott to be my 
Husband in the fear of the Lord. And they were published 2 or 3 times and 
they had Friends Consent to take each other. And we whose names are under 
written are witnesses of this thing, &c. 

On the 6th of 9 mo 1674 at Wm Shattuck's house. 

Restore Lippencott mark X Hannah Shattock mark = 

Richard Lippencott Abigail Lippencott 

William Shattuck Ann Lippencott 

Hugh Dickman Margaret Lippencott 

John Hance Grace Dickman 

John Slocom Elizabeth Hance 

Hannaniah Giffbrd Lydia Wardell 

Thurlagh (?) Scoyng Faith Croft (?) 

William Worth Faith Worth 

Murboh Slocom " 
Restore Lippincott was the s. of Richard and Abigail Lippincott who resided 
several years in Boston, about the same time with Mr. Shattuck. He was b. in 
Plymouth, Old England, July 3, 16 — [48 to 53, record obscure,] removed with 
his parents to Shrewsbury, N. J., about 1668, and d. near Mount Holly, Burling- 
ton Co., N.J., July 22, 1741. He was a member of the Council of N. J. in 1703, 
and of the Assembly in 1704. A useful and active member of society. He 
had 9 children: — 

1. Samuel, b. June 12, ; 2. Abigail, b. Feb. 16, 16—; 3. Hannah, b. Oct. 

15, 167- ; 4. Hope, b. Sept. 15, 1681 ; 5. Rebecca, b. Oct. 24, 1684 ; 6. 
James, b. June 11, 1687 ; 7. Betty, b. March 15, 1690; 8. Jacob, b. Aug. 15, 
1692 ; 9. Rachel, b. Jan. 8, 1695. The descendants of these children at their 
father's death were over 200. Many of their descendants are now residing 
in Philadelphia, in the possession of wealth. 



g 



68 APPENDIX. 



Ill 



§Ifl0fo glemaiiah; 



(1.) JAMES BLOOD, who came to Concord about 1638, and d. there intes- 
tate, Dec. 17, 1683, is supposed to have been the ancestor of the families in 
New England that have borne his name. It is said by tradition that he was from 
Cheshire, England, though two of his sons, in 1649, then in Concord, sold an 
estate in Puddington, Northamptonshire, which might have been their place of 
nativity. He was a contemporary, and is said (with how much truth we are unable 
to say,) to have been a brother or near relative of Col. Thomas Blood, who d. 
Aug. 24, 1680, distinguished in history, during the reign of Charles II., as one of 
the most remarkable characters of his age. (See note in Scott's novel — Peverill 
of the Peak, near the end. See also, Pictorial History of England, Vol. III., p. 
708.) The family possessed large wealth. Ellen, the wife of James Blood, d. in 
Concord, Aug. 1, 1674. The following are supposed to have been their chil- 
dren : — 

1. James, was a deacon in the church in Concord, where he d. Nov. 26, 1692. 

He m. Oct. 26, 1657, Hannah Purchis, dau. of Oliver Purchis of Lynn. 
She d. Jan. 7, 1677. Sarah, their only surviving child, m. Capt. William 
Wilson of Concord, and had several children. 

2. Richard of Groton, (noticed below.) 

3. John, found dead in Concord, with gun in hand, Oct. 30, 1692, unmarried. 

4. Robert, d. in Concord, Oct. 27, 1701. He, in company with his brother John, 

owned " Blood's Farms," so called, consisting of about 2000 acres, now com- 
prised within the town of Carlisle. He m. April 8, 1653, Elizabeth Willard, 
dau. of Major Simon Willard. She d. Aug. 29, 1692. They had:— 1. 
Mary, b. March 4, 1655, m. John Buttrick, settled in Stow, and had a large 
family; 2. Elizabeth, b. June 14, 1656, m. Samuel Buttrick, a brother of 
John, and Avas the ancestor of the Concord families of that name; 3. Sarah,h. 
Aug. 1, 1658, m. Daniel Colburn of Dunstable; 4. Robert, b. Feb. 10, 1660, 
m. Dorcas Wheeler, and d. in South Carolina before his father; 5. Simon, b. 
Feb. 6, 1662, d. unmarried, April 4, 1692; 6. Josiah, b. April 6, 1664, m. 1, 
Mary Barrett, 2, Mary Thomas, and had 10 children, b. in Concord; 7. John, 
b. Oct. 29, 1666, d. unm. ; 8. Ellen, b. April 14, 1669, d. unm. ; 9. Samuel, b. 
Oct. 16, 1671, m. Hannah Davis, and was drowned in Merrimack river, 
leaving a family; 10. James, b. Nov. 3, 1673, m. Abigail Wheeler, whose 
father was killed at Lancaster; 11. Ebenezer, b. July 4, 1676, d. young; 12. 
Jonathan, b. 1679, d. Jan. 5, 1758, leaving a family. 

5. Mary, b. in Concord, July 12, 1640, m. in 1660, Lt. Simon Davis, who d. 

June 14, 1713, as. 77. They had Simon, Mary, Sarah, James, Ellen, Ebe- 
nezer, and Hannah, the ancestry of a numerous posterity in New England 
and elsewhere. 

Second Generation and Children. 

(2.) Richard Blood, above mentioned, was one of the original petitioners for 
Groton, and its largest proprietor, having owned a sixty acre right. He resided 

* The facts presented in the following pages relating to the Bloods, the Chamberlains, and 
the Parkers, arc not intended to be a history of those families, but merely a notice of their 
origin, and of the names of some who were connected with the Shattucks by marriage. Mate- 
rials exist from which a full history might be compiled. 



BLOOD MEMORIALS. 369 

near Hollinsworth's paper-mills, where he d. intestate, Dec. 7, 1683. His estate 
was valued at £180. 11. He was one of the selectmen many years, and was 
town clerk in 1608. No record of his family has been found; and as he died 
without a will, the names of all his children may not be known. He had by his 

wife Isabel , the 5 following, and perhaps others : — 

1. Man), d. April 19, 1662. 2. James, (noticed below.) 

3. Nathaniel lived and d. in Groton. He m. June 13, 1670, Hannah Parker, dan. 

of Cfipt James P., b. Jan. 5, 1647. She d. Jan. 14, 1728, ce. 81. Had, 1. 
Hannah, b. March 1, 1671, d. Jan. 6, 1676; 2. Elizabeth, b. Oct. 7, 1673; 
3. Sarah, b. April 2, 1675; 4. Mary, b. April 17, 1678; 5. Nathaniel, b. 
Jan. 16, 1679, m. Hannah Shattuck, (p. 96;*) 6. Joseph, b. Feb. 3, 1681, m. 

Hannah , and was father of Joseph Blood, who m. Hannah Blood. 

(See Butler, p. 389.) 

4. Elizabeth, m. Dec. 1, 1686, Thomas Tarbell, who was b. July 6, 1667, and d. 

• testate, Jan. 24, 1717, se. 49 y. 6 m. 18 d. ; town clerk, 1704 and 5; ancestor 
of those who have borne his name in New England ; s. of Thomas Tarbell.f 
They had, 1. Thomas, b. Sept. 15, 1687, town clerk, 1731 to 1733, and 1745 

to 1756, m. 1, Hannah , 2, Jan. 1, 1717, Abigail Parker, father of 

David, and grandfather of Sybil, (p. 199;) 2. William, b. June 10, 1689, m. 
Mary Farnsworth; 3. Elizabeth, b. Aug. 19, 1691, m. Joseph Willard, s. of 
Henry of Lancaster; 4. Sarah, b. Sept. 29, 1693 ; 5. John, b. July 6, 1695 ,* 
5. Samuel, b. Oct. 14, 1697, m. Dec. 19,1725, Lydia Farnsworth; 7. Zacha- 
riah, b. Jan. 25, 1700; 8. Anna, b. May 28, 1702, m. March 8, 1722, Eleazer - 
Green, Jr.; 9. James, b. Feb. 13, 1705; 10. Eleazer, b. April 28, 1707, m. 
Dec. 20, 1727, Elizabeth Bowers. Sarah, John, and Zachariah, were capt- 
ured by the Indians, (p. 79.) Thomas, William, Samuel, and Eleazer, had 
large families in Groton. (See Butler, pp. 302, 440, 480.) 

5. Joseph. Little has been found concerning him. Richard, supposed to have 

been his son, left Groton about 1700, probably on account of the Indian 
troubles, (p. 79,) and in the deeds of sale for several parcels of land in that 
town, he calls himself of Mendon in 1708, and of Dedham in 1710 and 1720. 
He probably d. in Dedham.J Robert, either a brother or a son of this Joseph, 
m. widow Elizabeth Parker, and appears not to have had any children himself. 
His wife had two daughters by Mr. Parker. Elizabeth m. Thomas Esta- 
brooks of Concord, and Margaret. [See Note in Sequel.] 

Third Genei'ation and. Children. 

(3.) James Blood, s. of Richard, above mentioned, settled upon a part of the 
paternal estate, where he was killed by the Indians, Sept. 13, 1692, as already 

* Benjamin Blood, s. of Nathaniel, (p. 96,) b. Aug. 22, 1719, m. Eunice , and had, 

1. Eunice, b. July 9, 1747, m. in 17G8, John Bancroft; 2. Benjamin, b. July 1, 1749; 3. Ed- 
mund, b. June lb', 1751, m. Nov. 14, 1772, Catharine Blood, (p. 137;) 4. Deborah, b. Oct. 1, 
1753 ; 5. Joshua, b. Jan. 26, 1756 ; 6. Rachel, b. April 13, 1753; 7. Anna, b. Nov. 29, 1760. 

f Thomas Tarbell, senior, was in Groton before 1666, and an owner of a 20 acre right in the 
town. His house was on the west side of Broadmeadow, not far from School House No. 2. 
He m. June 30, 1666, Hannah or Anna Longley, (p. 80.) She d. Dec. 29, 1680. Had, recorded 
in Groton, 1. Thomas, b. July 6, 1667. (noticed above ;) 2. Hannah or Anna, b. June 10, 1670, 
m. Nov. 9, 1687, John Lawrence, (father of Amos, grandfather of Samuel, and great-grandfather 
of Hon. Abbott of Boston;) S.William, b. Oct. 1, 1672, (nothing known of him;) 4. Mary, b. 
April 1, 1675. 

X He might have been the father of Ebenezer Blood, who m. Abigail and had a large family. 
(See Butler, p. 388 ; Bond, p. 598.) 

47 



370 APPENDIX. 

stated, (p. 79.) He m. 1, Sept. 7, 1669, Elizabeth Longley, (p. 80,) who d. about 
1677, having had 3 children. He m. 2, in Watertown, Dec. 20, 1686, Abigail 
Kemp of Groton. His estate, valued at £148. 35. 8c?., was divided in 1694 be- 
twen the widow, his 2 daughters Mary and Elizabeth, by his first wife, and Jona- 
than Kemp, uncle and guardian to his 3 children by his second wife. (Prob. Rec, 
Vol. VIII., pp. 70, 243, 244.) His children were :— 

1. Richard, b. May 29, 1670, d. July 8, 1670; 2. Mary, b. Sept. 1, 1672, m. 
John Shattuck, (p. 80 ;) 3. Elizabeth, b. April 27, 1675, m. Samuel Shattuck, (p. 
83;) 4. Hannah, d. Jan. 6, 1676 ; 5. James, b. Aug. 12, 1687 ; 6. John, b. March 
16, 1689, both described below, family (4) and (5);) 7. Martha, b. Oct. 20, 1692, 
after her father's death. 

Fourth. Generation and Children. 

(4.) James Blood, s. of James, (3) b. Aug. 12, 1687, resided in Groton ; m. 

Catharine , and had: — I.James, b. Oct. 26, 1714, m. Mary Gilson, (6) ; 

2. Sarah, b. Jan. 20, 1717, m. Aug. 15, 1747, Stephen Foster; 3. Elizabeth., b. 
March 22, 1719, m. Feb. 8, 1783, Nathaniel Bowers; 4. Solomon, b. March 13, 
1721 ; 5. Simeon, b. Sept. 15, 1722; 6. Silas, b. Sept. 8, 1725, m. May 12, 1747, 
Alathia Martin, (see p. 238;) 7. Lois, b. Aug. 25, 1727, m. March 16, 1749, 
Abraham Parker ; 8. Simon, b. Aug. 4, 1729, m. Anna Shattuck, (p. 137 ;) 9. 
Sampson, b. Aug. 16, 1731 ; 10. Eunice, b. June 22, 1735. 

(5 ) John Blood, s. of James, (3) b. March 16, 1689, m. July 13, 1712, Joanna 
Nutting, b. Feb. 21, 1691, and had :— 1. John, b. Feb. 18, 1714, (7.) ; 2. Elizabeth, 
b. March 19, 1716, m. Nov. 25, 1735, Ebenezer Proctor of Dunstable ; 3. David, 
b. Sept. 28, 1718, (8); 4. Lydia, b. Sept. 28, 1720, m. Aug. 29, 1738, Nehemiah 
Jewett; 5. William, b. Dec. 9, 1722,(9); 6. Moses, b. Nov. 25, 1724,(10); 7. 
Hannah, b, July 7, 1727; 8. Oliver, b. July 9, 1729, ^11); 9. Caleb, b. Nov. 23, 
1734. 

Fifth Generation and Children. 

(6.) James Blood, s. of James, (4) b. Oct. 26, 1714, m. Feb. 4, 1742, Mary 
Gilson, (p. 94,) and had: — 1. James, b. Sept. 23, 1742, m. 1, Elizabeth Jewett, (p. 
115,) 2, Martha Shattuck, (pp. 103, 143;) 2. Levi, b. March 27, 1744; 3. Manj, 
b. Aug. 6, 1746; 4. Lucy, b. Jan. 25, 1749, m. Feb. 4, 1773, David Shed, (p. 101 ;) 
5. Sybil, b. Feb. 15, 1751 ; 6. Maria, m. Edmund Jewett, (p. 116.) 

(7.) John Blood, s. of John, (5) b. Feb. 18, 1714, m. Dec. 8, 1741, Abigail 
Parker ; lived in Pepperell, and had, 1. John, b. Sept. 25, 1742 ; 2. Abigail, b. 
Feb. 3, 1744; 3. Abigail, b. Oct. 2, 1745, m. Oct. 11, 1764, Jonathan Sheple; 4. 
JYehemiah, b. Nov. 18, 1747; 5. Eunice, b. May 4, 1753, m. June 7, 1770, James 
Mosher ; 6. Sarah, b. Aug. 7, 1758; 7. John, b. April 15, 1761, m. Olive Ball, d. 
April 27, 1833, a3. 72; 8. Edmund, b. July 5, 1764, m. Lucy Taylor, d. Nov. 16, 
1843. Had, 1. Lucy, b. July 5, 1787, m. Thomas C. Shattuck, (p. 294;) 2. Ed- 
mund, b. Oct. 10, 1789. 

(8.) David Blood, s. of John, (5) b. Sept. 28, 1718; lived in Pepperell; 
joined the church in 1758 ; chosen deacon in 1762 ; m. May 1, 1740, Abigail 
Farnsworth, b. Sept. 2, 1718, dau. of Ebenezer Farnsworth. She d. Nov. 7, 1783. 
Had, 1. David, b. March 15, 1741, (13); 2. Jonathan, b. Nov. 3, 1742, (killed in 
Concord, July 19, 1763, by a cart wheel running over him ;) 3. Joshua, b. June 

26, 1744, m. Kezia Jewett, (14); 4. Lydia, b. Dec. 5, 1745; 5. Abigail, b. June 

27, 1748, m. Dec. 1, 1770, Ebenezer Haughton; 6. Isaac, b. Aug. 27, 1750, d. 



BLOOD MEMORIALS. 371 

Dec. 3, 1750; 7. Mary, b. March 10, 1753, m. Eleazer Shattuck, (p. 168;) 8. 
Ruth, b. July 23, 1755; 9. John, b. Sept. 17, 1758; 19. Isaac, b. Jan. 2, 17G0, m. 
Lydia Shattuck, (p. 143;) 11. Nathan, b. March 31, 1763,(15). 

(9.) William Blood, s. of John, (5) b. Dec. 9, 1722; m. 1, Feb. 11, 1736, 
Martha Lawrence ; m. 2, Jan. 5, 1748, Lucy Fletcher; lived in Pepperell. Had, 
1. Martha, b. Jan. 25,1737, m. Nov. 11, 1756, Capt. John Nutting, who com- 
manded the "minute men" in 1775, and represented the town in 1781, (see But- 
ler, p. 475 ;) 2. William, b. Sept. 14, 1748, m. Azubah Shattuck, (p 1 18 ;) 3. Lucy, b. 
July 13, 1750; 4. Jonas, b. Sept. 26, 1754; 5. Amos, b. Oct. 16, 1757 ; 6. Hannah, 
b. March 31, 1762; 7. Lydia, b. April 8, 1768. 

(10.) Moses Blood, s. of John, (5) b. Nov. 25, 1724, m. Jan. 27, 1745, Eliza- 
beth Stone, and had, 1. Elizabeth, b. July 6, 1746; 2. Sarah, b. March 16, 1748, 
m. Aug. 23, 1768, Elijah Ames ; 3. Moses, b. April 29, 1750, wounded in the bat- 
tle of Bunker Hill, (p. 141,) m. 1, Abigail Shattuck, (p. 100.) m. 2, Kezia Shat- 
tuck, (p. 141,) m. 3, Alice Wright, (p. 168 ;) 4. Abel, b. Sept. 17, 1752; 5. Anna, 
b. April 7, 1755; 6. Rachel, b. Nov. 11, 1757; 7. Anna, b. Sept., 1760; 8. Na- 
thaniel, b. Aug. 21, 1762; 9. Sewall, b. May 24, 1765; 10. Mary, b. April 4, 
1770. 

(11.) Oliver Blood, s. of John, (5) b. July 9, 1729; m. Nov. 8, 1751, Sarah 
Darling, who d. Oct., 1812, ee. 85. Lived in Groton. Had, 1. Oliver, b. Oct. 31, 
1752, m. Nov. 17, 1774, Hannah Blood, (below;) 2. Sarah, b. Oct. 9, 1754; 3. 
Lydia, b. March 31, 1756 ; 4. John, b. Nov. 10, 1759 ; 5. Annis, b. Nov. 6, 1762 ; 
7. Jonathan, b. March 31, 1765. 

(12.) Caleb Blood, s. of John, (5) b. Nov. 23, 1734, m. 1, Nov. 1, 1753, 
Hannah Holden. She d. Sept. 1, 1773. He m. 2, March 3, 1774, Elizabeth 
Farnsworth. Lived in Groton. Had, 1. Caleb, b. Oct. 24, 1755; 2. Hannah, b. 
Sept. 23, 1757, m. Oliver Blood, (above;) 3. John, b. Sept. 6, 1759 ; 4. David, 5. 
Samuel, (twins,) b. July 8, 1762; 6. Timothy, b. March 18, 1775, d. Jan. 13, 1777 : 
7. Thomas, b. Aug. 31, 1776, m. Mille Fitch, (168;) 8. Timothy, b. Sept. 8, 1778, 
representative from Groton in 1834, 1835; 9. Elizabeth, b. Aug. 25, 1780; 10. 
Ltvi, b. Sept. 14, 1782, d. Sept. 29, 1782; 11. Sally, b. Aug. 31, 1783; 12. 
Luther, b. Oct. 1, 1785; 13. Nancy, b. May 27, 1791. 

Sixth Generation and Children. 

(13.) David Blood, s. of David, (8) b. March 16, 1741, d. in Pepperell, April 
12, 1818, «. 77. He m. Nov. 2, 1762, Olive Taylor, and had, 1. Jonathan, b. 
Oct. 26, 1763, killed in battle, July 3, 1781 ; 2. Olive,h. Dec. 1, 1765; 3. Abigail, 
b. March 31, 1768 ; 4. Abi, b. June 7, 1771 ; 5. Submit, b. May 26, 1775 ; 6. David, 
b. Nov. 23, 1779, chosen deacon in the church, 1832, representative, 1836, 1837; 
7. Eunice, b. Nov. 9, 1781. 

(14.) Joshua Blood, s. of David, (8) b. June 26, 1744, m. Nov. 26, 1767, 
Kezia Jewett, (p. 115,) and had, 1. Ezra, b. May 29, 1770, m. Lydia Lawrence, 
(p. 203,) lived in Townsend ; 2. Nathan, b. Oct. 26, 1773 ; 3. Kezia, b. March 12, 
1775, m. Joshua Shattuck, (p. 168 ;) 4. Joshua, b. March 7, 1778; 5. Jonathan, b. 
Nov. 12, 1781. m. Nabby Shattuck, (pp. 168, 295.) 

(15.) Nathan Blood, s. of David, (8) b. March 31, 1763, m. 1, Feb. 1, 1801, 
Sybil, widow of Levi Shattuck, (p. 204.) He m. 2, Mary Brooks, who survived 
him and m. Jonathan Shattuck, (p. 291.) Had, 1. Mary, b. Nov. 29, 1801, m. 
William Shattuck, (p. 292 ;) 2. Nathan, b. Aug. 2, 1803, m. Mindwell Shattuck, 



372 



APPENDIX. 



(p. 219;) 3. Ashur, b. April 7, 1805, m. Lucretia B. Williams, (p. 207;) 4. Kezia, 
b. Jan. 3, 1807, m. Abijah Shattuck, (p. 291 ;) 5. Edward R, b. Feb. 24, 1810, m. 
Hannah Shattuck, (p. 219;) 6. Elizabeth, b. Feb. 24, 1816, m. her cousin, s. of 
Ezra Blood, above mentioned. 



IV 



(Kfeamfrerlaiu lUntflnah, 



(1.) The name of Chamberlain was borne by several of the early inhabitants of 
Massachusetts. THOMAS, Edmond, and Samuel, first of Charlestown and after- 
wards of Woburn, were among the petitioners and first settlers of Chelmsford. 
Thomas, probably the ancestor of all of the name who are mentioned in this 
volume, was one of those persons who purchased 1500 acres of land lying on 
both sides of Concord River; granted to Thomas Dudley. He settled in Chelms- 
ford, but the precise date of his death is unknown. His first wife, Mary , d. 

about 1670. He m. 2, April 19, 1674, in his old age, Mary Parker, who d. Feb. 
7, 1692. By his first wife he had, b. in Woburn, Thomas, (noticed below,) 
Samuel, b. Oct. 7, 1645, Mary, b. June 11, 1649, and perhaps other children. 

Second Generation and Children. 

(2.) Thomas Chamberlain, s. of Thomas, (1) above mentioned, settled in 
Chelmsford, where he d. May 28, 1727. He m. Aug. 10, 1666, Sarah Proctor, 
daughter of Robert Proctor, and had the following, and perhaps other children. 
1. Thomas, b. May 30, 1667, (noticed below;) 2. Sarah, b. Jan. 11, 1679; 3. 
Jane, b. Jan. 19, 1682; 4. Elizabeth, b. July 25, 1685. 

Third Generation and Children. 

(3.) Thomas Chamberlain, s. of Thomas, (2) b. May 30, 1667, was a car- 
penter and millei, first settled in Chelmsford, but removed to Groton, and lived 
about a quarter of a mile northerly of Wattle's pond, on the left hand side of the 
road to Hoi] is, where he d. about 1709. His widow sold her portion of the 
estate, and the remainder was divided in 1713 between eleven children, each 
receiving £2. 17. 6|, besides the widow's thirds. (Probate Records.) He m. 1, 

Elizabeth . She d. June 13, 1699. He m. 2, in Concord, Aug. 16, 

1699, Abigail Nutting of Groton. He had 7 children by each wife: — 

1. John, b. March 29, 1692, (see below;) 2. Joseph, b. Oct. 11, 1693; 3 and 4, 
Moses and Aaron, twins, b. July 3, 1695 ; 5. Gershom, b. Oct. 18, 1697, d. March 
20, 1707; 6. Elizabeth, d. June 13, 1699; 7. Sarah, b. March 23, 1699, d. Oct. 
14, 1699 ; 8. Elizabeth, b. May 26, 1700, m. Jonathan Shattuck, (p. 93 ;) 9. Abigail, 
b. June 21, 1702, m. April 13, 1723, Thomas Woods ; 10. Thomas, b. Feb. 3, 1704, 
father to A zub ah and Abia Chamberlain, (pp. 118, 167;) 11. Mary, m. April 9> 
1732, John Scott; 12. Jane, b. Feb. 2, 1706; 13. Dorothy, m. Nathaniel Lawrence, 
Feb., 1729, (p. 71 ;) 14. Sarah, b. Aug. 4, 1709, m. James Shattuck, (p. 100.) 

Fourth Generation and Children. 

(4.) John Chamberlain, (known as " Paugus John,") s. of Thomas, was b. 
March 22, 1692, and settled in Groton, where he owned a mill. The location of 



CHAMBERLAIN MEMORIALS. 373 

this mill is not precisely known, but it is supposed by some to have been near 
School House No. 9, on the small stream running from Martin's Pond. Butler 
says, a deep hole in this brook still bears the name of "Paugus Hole," into which 
it is supposed the body of young Paugus was thrown. He is supposed to have 
d. about 1758. Jeremiah Lawrence, administrator on his estate, presented his 
account in 1759. Pie m. Oct. 13, 1713, Abigail Woods, by whom he had 6 
children. 1. Elizabeth, b. Oct. 27, 1714, m. March 23, 1736, Jeremiah Lawrence, 
(p. 71 ;) 2. Hannah, b. Jan. 18, 1716; 3. John, b. March 24, 1720, (m. Dec. 3, 
1746, Rachel Lawrence, who d. Oct. 6, 1756, dau. of Zachariah L., (p. 71,) and 
had Rachel, b. July 10, 1747. d. Oct. 13, 1756 ; Abigail, b. Sept. 8, 1748, m. 
June 7, 1770, Edmund Shattuck, (p. 158;) John, b. Feb. 27, 1752; Edith, b. Oct. 
9, 1754 ;) 4. Sarah, b. April 27, 1727 ; 5. Abigail, b. Jan. 8, 1732 ; 6. Thomas, b. 
Sept. 2, 1735. 



John Chamberlain, senior, father of these children, was one of Capt. Lovell's 
company, whose fight with the Indians in 1725, near Pequawket, now Fryeburg, 
Me., forms one of the most interesting events in the history of New England. 
His encounter with Paugus, the chief who led the Indian forces on that occasion, 
places his name among the most heroic men of his age, and has distinguished 
him from the others of his name as " Paugus John Chamberlain." The story of 
the fight has often been told, as handed down in tradition and written history. 
It was drawn up, amplified with a little fiction, perhaps, but substantially correct, 
and was published in the Philadelphia Album for 1828. From that work the 
subjoined extract is taken. In the general engagement of the contending parties, 
Chamberlain's gun had become foul, and he went to the edge of the pond to wash 
it out. While there he discovered Paugus, whom he personally knew, engaged 
in the same act : — 

" They slowly and with equal movements cleansed their guns, and took their stations on the 
outer border of the beach. ' Now Paugus,' said Chamberlain, ' I 'II have you ;' and with the 
quickness and steadiness of an old hunter sprung to loading his rifle. ' Na — na — me have you/ re- 
plied Paugus, and he handled his gun with a dexterity, that made the bold heart of Chamberlain 
beat quick, and he almost raised his eye to take his last look upon the sun. They rammed their 
cartridges, and each at the same instant cast his ramrod upon the sand. ' 1 '11 have you, Paugus,' 
shouted Chamberlain, as in his desperation he almost resolved to rush upon the savage, with the 
breech of his rifle, lest he should receive his bullets before he could load. The woods across the 
pond echoed back the shout Paugus trembled as he applied his powder-horn to the priming j 
Chamberlain heard the grains of his powder rattle lightly upon the leaves beneath his feet. 
Chamberlain struck his gun breech violently upon the ground — the rifle primed herself ; he 
aimed, and his bullets whistled through the heart of Paugus. He fell, and as he went down, the 
bullet from the mouth of his ascending rifle touched the hair upon the crown of Chamberlain, 
and passed off without avenging the death of its dreadful master." 

The children and successors of Paugus, long after this event, indulged a de- 
termination to avenge his death upon Chamberlain ; and it is said that frequent 
unsuccessful attempts were made to carry their designs into execution. A cur- 
rent opinion prevailed among the Indians, that whoever should kill Chamberlain 
would be considered the greatest chief of the nation. On more than one occa- 
sion, if tradition be true, was Chamberlain obliged, for the preservation of his 
own life, to take the life of another. The following account of one of these 
instances was published in the Atlantic Souvenir for 1829. Though somewhat 
embellished, its truth is substantially confirmed by tradition : — 



374 APPENDIX. 

"In the year , towards the close of one of those fair days in autumn, which make up the 

' Indian summer/ a number of the villagers of P had gathered into their one-story tavern, 

to talk over their little politics, as they were wont, when they were surprised and startled by the 
entrance of a young Indian among them. An Indian, at that time, had got to be a rarity in 

P . He was tall, over six feet, and finely formed, after the fashion of the forest. He had a 

belt of wampum around his waist, and from it hung his tomahawk. A long gun was in his hand, 
and he stood in moccasins, with the grace and dignity of the son of a chief. He placed his gun 
behind the door, and silently took his seat by himself. A little before sunset the farmers left the 
inn and returned to their homes. One old hunter remained with the landlord and the young 
savage. The hunter eyed the Indian with keen attention, — his suspicions were awakened at the 
sight of this warrior, armed, so remote from the residence of the nearest tribe, and in a time of 
peace. He was acquainted with the Indians in the old wars, and his suspicions were heightened 
and confirmed, when he heard the young chief ask the landlord, in a low and indifferent tone, if 
- one Chamberlain dwelt in the village.' The landlord pointed out to him the mill, where the old 
man labored, and the cottage where he dwelt. The Indian took his gun and went out. 

" ' Some of the blood of old Paugus,' said the hunter, - and, I'll venture my life, come to 
avenge the death of that chief upon Chamberlain. I'll give the old man warning.' He hastily 
stepped out, and following a winding path, that led down to the saw-mill, where the old man 
was still at his toils, he reached the mill, and told Chamberlain, that young; Paugus, from Can- 
ada, had come with his rifle and tomahaivk to avenge upon him the death of that chief. Cham- 
berlain's cheek turned ashy pale, and he sternly replied, ' tell young Paugus I have the gun that 
slew his father, and he had far better return to his forest than molest me in my old age;' as he 
spoke, he pointed to the long gun as it hung upon prongs of the moose horn, driven into the saw- 
mill plate, and near it was suspended the bullet-pouch and powder-horn of Pequawket. The 
hunter had given his warning and retired. The sun was setting to the south of Moosehillnck. 
Chamberlain took down his gun, — tried his flint, — charged it, — took the pouch and horn and 
flung them upon his side,— hung up near the saw-gale the old garment he had worn at work 
through the day, — hoisted the gate of the mill and set it rapidly agoing, looked keenly around 
him, in every direction, and retired to an eminence a few rods distant, crowned with a clump 
of thick bushes, and crouched down to await the approach of his mysterious enem}*. He was 
not, however, mysterious to Chamberlain. The old man remembered every trait in the Indian 
character, and calculated with great accuracy as to the time and manner of Paugus's advance. 
Just as it was growing too dusk)* to distinguish a human form, except towards the west, the old 
man descried him creeping cautiously from a bunch of bushes, eight or ten rods above the mill, 
by the torrent, with his cocked rifle before him, and his hand upon the lock. The young savage 
heard the noise of the saw-frame, and could discern it in rapid motion, and shrunk back into the 
thicket. He came out again, a little distance from where he went in, and, with the wary mo- 
tions of the ambush, reconnoitered the mill. Chamberlain marked him all the while, as the cata- 
mount eyes the fox. Young Paugus came out of the bushes the third time, and in a new quar- 
ter, and was stealthily advancing, when something seemed to catch his eye in the form of his 
father's slayer — he stopped short — brought his rifle to his eye, and, with quick aim, fired The 
report rung sharp and low upon the still air, as if the gun itself were muffled, or afraid to speak 
above its breath. Young Paugus crept out upon a mill log, that extended over the rapid, and 
stretched himself up to his full height, as if to ascertain, without advancing, the success of his 
shot. The old man could spare him no longer. He saw the well-remembered form of the old 
Pequawket chief, as the young savage stood against the skj' of the west, which was still red 
with the rays of the sunken sun. He levelled the fatal gun — it blazed — young Paugus leaped 
into the air six feet, as the ball whistled through his heart— and his lifeless body fell far down 
into the rapid, that foamed below him, while his vengeful spirit fled and mingled with that stern- 
er one, which parted long before at Lovewell's pond, in 

• The land where their fathers had gone.' 
Chamberlain returned slowly and gloomily to his cottage. 

" The next morning a bullet hole through the centre of the old garment he had hung at the 
saw-frame, admonished him, that the aim, as well as the vengeance of old Paugus, had de- 
scended to his sons ; and as he mused upon those he had slain, and reflected, that although he 
was old, he still might have again to lift his gun against the blood of Paugus, or himself fall by 



PARKER MEMORIALS. 375 

their avenging hand, he wished bitterly, that some other bullet than his own had slain that 
renowned chief, and that they had never met to quench their battle thirst, and scour out their 
foul guns, upon the shore of Lovewcll's pond." 



v. father fftniitfrah. 

(1.) The name of Parker has ever been very common in New England, and 
has been borne by more families than any other in Groton and its vicinitv. 
James and Joseph, who first settled in Woburn, and were among the original 
grantees of Billerica, Chelmsford, Dunstable, and Groton, were ancestors of the 
most numerous families, though some were descended from Jacob, Abraham, 
and perhaps John, also early inhabitants of Woburn and Chelmsford. 

(2.) Capt. JAMES PARKER owned a fifty acre right in Groton, and resided 
there from its first settlement until his death in 1701. He was a distinguished 
and extraordinary man, and a leader in the municipal, military, ecclesiastical, and 
other affairs of the town. A copy of his will and a notice of his life, which we 
furnished Mr. Butler, are published in his History of Groton, (pp. 281, 421.) He 

m. 1, in Woburn, May 23, 1643, Elizabeth Long. He m. 2, Eunice . He 

had ten children by his first, and one by his second wife, the last b. when the 
father was over 80 years of age! 1. Elizabeth, b. April 12, 1645, m. William 
Gary of Roxbury ; 2. Hannah, b. Jan. 5, 1647, m. Nathaniel Blood, (p. 369;) 
3. John, b. Feb. 28, 1649; 4. Joseph; 5. James, m. Mary Parker, dau. of Abra- 
ham P. of Chelmsford. He was one of 20 persons killed by the Indians in 
Groton, July 27, 1694. His family were carried into captivity, one of whom— 
Phineas, afterwards escaped and resided in Groton. 6. Josiah, m. Elizabeth 
Saxon and lived in Cambridge; 7. Samuel, m. Abigail Lakin, (p. 95.) He was 
father of Samuel, grandfather of Lemuel, and great-grandfather of Lucinda, (p. 
293;) 8. Joshua, b. March 13, 1658, m. Abigail (Shattuck) Morse, (p. 77 ;) 9. 
Zachariah, b. Jan. 14, 1659; 10. Eleazer, b. Nov. 9, 1660; 11. Eunice, b. Dec. 
12, 1697. 

(3.) Capt. JOSEPH PARKER was the ancestor of the most numerous 
branches of the Parker families in Groton and its vicinity. He is supposed to 
have been a brother of James above mentioned. He owned a large estate in 
Groton, but he was considered an inhabitant of Dunstable, probably in that sec- 
tion of the town, which was originally a part of Chelmsford, and subsequently in- 
cluded within the bounds of Pepperell. The official seal of Groton, or " town's 
brand marke" was adopted by the State on his petition. (Massachusetts Records, 
Vol. IX., Part II., p. 301.) In 1675 he and his son were attacked by the Indians. 
(N. H. Hist. Col., Vol. III., p. 91.) He was constable of Dunstable from 1675 to 
1682. In the latter year the town voted " Yt Joseph Parker have 20 shillings 
allowed him for his seven years' service as constable." He was chosen one of 
the selectmen and a member of the "committee for managing town affairs." In 
1681 he bought of the town of Groton 300 acres of the common land for £15, a 
part of which was in the vicinity of Babatasset Falls. He died intestate in 1690, 
leaving a large property. About 700 acres of his land, lying in Chelmsford and 
Groton, was valued in 1698 at £178 sterling. (Probate Records.) Six of his 



376 APPENDIX. 

children by Margaret, his wife, are entered upon the Chelmsford Records : — 
1. Joseph, b. March 30, 1653, (noticed below ;) 2. Anna, b. Feb. 2, 1655, d. young; 
3. Mary, b. Oct. 28, 1657; 4. Jghn, b. Nov. 4, 1060, d. Oct. 8, 10GI ; 5. Anna, b. 
Nov. 16, 1663; 6. Sarah, b. Nov. 16, 1666, d. Sept. 15, 1704. 

Second Generation and Children. 

(4.) Joseph Parker, probably the only surviving s. of Joseph, b. March 30, 1653, 
(stated above,) was first an inhabitant of Dunstable, where he succeeded his father 
as constable in 1683, but was subsequently considered as of Groton, where he d. 

about 1725, leaving a large estate. He m. 1, Elizabeth . He m. 2, 

Nov. 19, 1684, Hannah Blood. The names of 3 of his children by his first, and 
4 by his second wife (who survived him and administered on his estate,) have 
been ascertained: — 1. Elizabeth, b. Aug. 31, 1679; 2. Nathaniel, (5) ; S.Isaac, 
(6); 4. Simon, b. Aug. 27, 1687; 5. Joseph, b. March 1, 1689, (7); 6. Benjamin, 
b. Dec. 3, 1691, (8); 7. John, b. Aug. 26, 1695, (9.) 

Third Generation and Children. 

(5.) Nathaniel Parker, s. of Joseph, (4) d. in Groton, July 6, 1715. He 
owned a large real estate in the vicinity of Babatasset Falls, appraised at £305, 
which was divided among the heirs in 1731. His brother Benjamin was admin- 
istrator and guardian to his children, (Probate Records.) His widow Lydia 

, m. 2, Feb. 10, 1718, Capt. Josiah Sawtell of Lancaster. She had by 

Mr. Parker, 1. Sarah, b. April 12, 1705, m. Jeremiah Shattuck, (p. 100;) 2. Na- 
thaniel, b. May 9, 1707, m. Dec. 6, 1733, Joanna Stevens; 3. William, b. May 28, 
1709, d. June 18, 1712 ; 4. Lydia, b. Oct. 30, 1711, m. Oct. 27, 1729, John Lakin, 
(Butler, p. 411;) 5. Deliverance, b. July 28, 1714, m. Feb. 28, 1734, William 
Blanchard of Dunstable; 6. William, b. Nov. 14, 1716. Supposed to have d. in 
Shrewsbury. 

(6.) Isaac Parker, s. of Joseph, (4) lived in Groton, and had by Ruth , 

1. Isaac, b. March 7, 1709, m. Mary , and had a large family, (Butler, p. 

423;) 2. William, b. Aug. 19, 1710, m. March 30, 1736, Susanna Kemp, grand- 
father of Abbott Lawrence; 3. Thomas, b. Sept. 24, 1712; 4. Esther, b. Sept. 24, 
1714, m. Jan. 7, 1739, Shebual Hobart; 5. Ruth, b. July 2, 1716; 6. Nathaniel, 
b. Feb. 25, 1718, m. May 25, 1741, Eleanor Walker, (see page 154;) 7. David, b. 
Feb. 20, 1720; 8. Anna, b. Nov. 9, 1721 ; 9. Abraham, b. Sept. 24, 1726, m. Lois 
Blood, (p. 370.) 

(7.) Joseph Parker, s. of Joseph, b. March I, 1689, m. Jan. 24, 1716, Abi- 
gail Sawtell, lived in Groton, where he d. in 1753. His widow Abigail was 
appointed administrator, Jan. 3, 1754. His estate was divided in 1756, between 
4 sons and 6 daughters: — 1. Mary, b. Oct. 12, 1716, m. Jan. 4, 1733, William 
Longly; 2. Josiah, b. Jan. 3, 1717; 3. Obadiah, b. Sept. 11, 1719; 4. Joseph, b. 
April 16, 1721, d. young; 5. Abigail, b. Feb. 27, 1723, m. John Blood, (p. 378 ;) 
6. Hannah, b. Oct. 14, 1724, m. Josiah Holden ; 7. Timothy, b. June 5, 1726 ; 
8. Nehemiah, b. Dec. 2, 1727; 9. Joshua, b. Jan. 25, 1730 ; 10. Ephraim, b. March 
25, 1732, m. Azubah Farnsworth ; 11. Sarah, b. June 15, 1734; 12. Tn/phena, b. 
April 15, 1736, m. Isaac Woods; 13. Sybil, b. March 5, 1737, m. Nathaniel 
Lakin ; 14. Zachariah, b. and d. 1740. 

(8.) Benjamin Parker, s. of Joseph, b. Dec. 3, 1691,(5) was a carpenter in 
Groton. He d. Oct. 29, 1769, leaving a will. He m. Oct. 23, 1718, Mary 



NAMES OF KINDRED AND RELATIONSHIP. 377 

Sawtell, who d. Jan. 18, 1766. Had, 1. Benjamin, b. Aug. 19, 1719; 2. Na- 
thaniel, b. July 17, 1721, m. Dec. 28, 1748, Eunice Lakin, (father of Jacob Lakin 
Parker, whose only child, Sarah, m. William Shattuck, p. 319;) 3. Amasa, b. 
Nov. 12, 1722 ; 4. Mary, b. May 7, 1728, d. 1736; 5. Sarah, b. Jan. 27, 1732, m. 
Dec. 19, 1750, Eleazer Green, Jr. ; 6. Mary, b. Jan. 30, 1737, m. Feb. 10, 1768, 
Dr. Thomas Marshall of Chelmsford ; 7. Anna, b. July 12, 1748, m. Dec. 15, 1763, 
Asa Worcester. 

(9.) John Parker, s. of Joseph, b. Aug-. 26, 1695, lived in Groton. He m. 
Nov. 29, 1715, Mary Bradstreet, probably the widow of Rev. Dudley Brad- 
street, and had, 1. Gideon, b. May 11, 1719; 2. Mary, b. April 7, 1722; 3. Abel, 
b. Jan. 17, 1724, m. Esther Shattuck, (p. 117;) 4. Sarah, b. April 14, 1726; 5. 
John, b. Oct. 13, 1728. 



(10.) Jacob Parker appears from the Chelmsford Records to have had, b. in 

that town, by his wife Sarah , 1. Sarah, b. Jan. 14, 1653; 2. Thomas, b. 

July 28, 1756, m. Oct. 21, 1678, Mary Fletcher, and had a large family; 3. 
Tabitha, b. Feb. 28, 1658; 4. Rebecca, b. May 29, 1661; 5. Rachel, b. May 9, 
1665 ; 6. Mai-y, b. Sept. 8, 1667. He probably had other children. 

(11.) Abraham Parker was made a freeman in 1645, then of Woburn. He 
afterwards removed to Chelmsford, where he d. Aug. 12, 1685. His wife Rose 

, d. Nov. 13, 1691. He had, 1. Anna, b. 1645 ; 2. John, b. 1647, m. Mary 

, and had a large family ; 3. Abraham, m. July 15, 1682, Martha Severance, 

and had 5 children; 4. Moses, (noticed below;) 5. Mary, b. Nov. 15, 1655, m. 
James Parker, (p. 375 ;) 6. Isaac, b. Sept. 13, 1660, m. Esther Fletcher; 7. Eliza- 
beth, b. April 10, 1663 ; 8. Lyd'% m. John Kidder; 9. Jacob, b. March 24, 1669. 

(12.) Moses Parker (above mentioned,) m. Abigail Hildreth, dau. of Richard, 
and had, 1. Moses, (killed by lightning ;) 2. Abigail, b. May 8, 1685; 3. Elizabeth, 
b. Dec. 26, 1691 ; 4. Aaron, b. April 9, 1689 ; 5. Joseph, b. March 25, 1694 ; 6. Ben- 
jamin, b. April 14, 1696 ; 7. Mary, b. Sept. 6, 1698. 

(13.) Aaron Parker, b. April 9, 1689, was father of Samuel and grandfather 
of Abel Parker, who m. Edith Jewett, (p. 115.) Since that account, furnished by 
one of the family, was printed, we have perused the valuable Memoir of Judge 
Parker, by Jacob B. Moore, published in the New Hampshire Historical Collec- 
tions, (Vol. III., p. 258,) and find there much valuable additional information. 



VI. 



Denies 0f |iitr&n& oft $elati0its{rijr. 



The following article is a new version of one which was published by the 
author in the New England Genealogical Register, (Vol. I., p. 355.) It is now 
altered, rewritten, and illustrated by references to relationships actually found 
in this volume, instead of by the diagram and illustrations inserted in the original 
article. If the information it contains shall be the means of denning more accu- 
rately, and of introducing a more correct use of the names of the different degrees 
of consanguinity and relationship, it will not be without its utility, and will be 
worthy of forming an appropriate part of this Appendix. 
48 



378 APPENDIX. 

t 

1. Husband and. Wife. 

A man who marries a woman is the husband of that woman, and she is the 
wife of that man. If it be her first marriage he is her first husband; if it be her 
second marriage he is her second husband. If it be his first marriage she is his 
first wife ; if it be his third marriage she is his third wife ; and so on for the fourth or 
fifth marriages. The history of families shows that the second wife has a first 
husband more often than the second husband has a first wife. When either party 
dies the other is left in a state of widoivhood ; and if a male, the person is called a 
widower ; and if a female, a widow. When a husband and wife are separated by 
a process of law, and the marriage contract is legally annulled, the separation is 
called a divorce. When a husband or a wife leaves the other voluntarily, it is 
called a desertion, and it may or may not be alleged as a cause of divorce. 

By reference to page 185 it will be perceived that Daniel Shattuck became the 
first husband to his first two wives, and the second husband to his third Avife ; that 
he was twice left a widower, and that he left his third wife a widow, in her second 
state of widowhood, until she became the second wife of her third husband. She 
is now in her third state of widowhood. 

2. Father and Mother. 

When a child results from the marriage union of a husband and wife, such hus- 
band is the lawful father, and such wife is the lawful mother of such child. The 
term parent is synonymous with father and mother ; and in a familiar sense, papa 
and pa are sometimes used for father, and mamma and ma for mother. We, how- 
ever, dislike these terms, and much prefer father and mother. Fifty or more 
years ago sir was sor.etimes used for father. The father and mother, not mar- 
ried, who have a child, are the natural-parents or the natural-father and the natu- 
ral-mother of such child. One who is reported or supposed to be the father is 
called the putative -father. A man who adopts the children of another as his own, 
and makes them heirs with his other children, if he has any, is the adoptive-father, 
and a woman who does the same thing, is the adoptive-mother of such children. 
A person who takes a child to bring up, merely, should not be considered the 
adoptive-father or mother of such child. Foster-father is a term which describes one 
who takes the place of a father in providing for and educating a child which is not 
adopted as his own ; and foster-mother is one who acts as mother in nursing and 
educating a child which is not her own or adopted as such. From these definitions 
the meaning of foster-son and foster-daughter, foster-brother and foster-sister, may 
be ascertained. One who is appointed to take charge of the estate and education 
of an orphan who is a minor, or of any person who is not of sufficient discretion 
to manage his own concerns, is called a guardian ; and the person committed to 
the care of such guardian is called the ward. 

A father is father-in-law to the person whom his child marries ; and the mother 
is mother-in-law to the same person. A man who marries a woman having 
children by another man is step-father to such children, and a woman who marries 
a man having children by another woman is step-mother to such children. Some- 
times the terms father-in-law and step-father are used as synonymous, but this is 
incorrect. It is also erroneous to use step-father as the father of an orphan. It 
may or may not be so. A step-father whose step-child marries a person is step- 
father-in-law to such person, and a woman under similar circumstances is step- 
another-in-law. 



NAMES OF KINDRED AND RELATIONSHIP. 379 

3. Grandfather and Grandmother. 

The father of one's father is his grand-father, and the mother of one's father is 
his grand-mother. The father and mother of one's mother are also his grand- 
father and grandmother. The father of one's grandfather is called his great- 
grand-; father, and the mother of one's grandfather his great-grand-mother. In 
more remote degrees, the word great is added to each preceding generation, as 
great- great -grand-father. The ancestor of the father is called the paternal-ancestor, 
and that of the mother the maternal ancestor. Instead of great-grandfather or great- 
grandmother the term paternal or maternal ancestor of the second degree, third 
degree, or more remote degrees, may be used. There may be also a step-grand- 
father, and a step -grand-mother. 

4. Son and Oanghter. 

The male child of a father or mother is called the son, and the female child is 
called the daughter, of such father or mother. A son or daughter, born after the 
death of the father, is called a posthumous -son, or a posthumous-daughter. If 
single a posthumous child, and if twins posthumous children. Sons or daughters, 
born of parents not married, are called natural- sons, or natural-daughters, illegit- 
imate sons, or illegitimate daughters, or bastards. The sons or daughters who are 
taken by persons not their parents, as their own children, are adopted-sons, or 
adopted-daughters. The husband of a daughter is her father's or mother's son-in- 
laiv ; and the wife of a son is his father's or mother's daughter-in-law. A son or 
daughter of one and the same parent (the other being dead) who marries another 
man or woman, is a step-son or step-daughter to such man or woman. They are 
not sons or daughters-in-law ; they are not always, though they sometimes may 
be, orphans. A man who marries a step-child is the step-son-in-law of such 
child's father or mother ; and the woman who marries a step child is the step- 
daughler-in-law to such child's step father of mother. The children of sons or 
daughters are grand-sons, or grand-daughters, or grand-children ; and the children 
of grand- children are great-grand-sons, or great-grand-daughters, or great-grand- 
children; and in more remote generations the degree of kindred is expressed hy 
the word great repeated for each generation, or by the number prefixed to the 
degrees or generations of removal from the common ancestor. 

5. Brother and Sister. 

The male children of one parent, or of the same parents, are brothers, and the 
female children of like parents are sisters. Male children, having the same father 
but a different mother, or the same mother but a different father, are half-brothers, 
and female children having like parents are half-sisters. The man who marries a 
woman is a brother-in-law to her brother or sister, and the woman who marries a 
man is a sister-in-law to his brother or sister. A man who marries a sister of 
one's wife, or husband, is not, strictly speaking, a brother-in-law, but the wife's or 
husband's brother-in-law ; and the woman who marries a brother of one's wife or 
husband, is not, strictly speaking, a sister-in-law, but the wife's or husband's sistei'- 
in-law, though these terms are not unfrequently thus loosely used. The male 
children by one marriage, if one parent dies, and the surviving parent marries 
again to a widow or widower having children, are step-brothers to the children of 
such widow or widower, and the female children having like parents are step- 
sisters. 



380 APPENDIX. 

Many of these relationships may be illustrated by referring to the family and 
connections of Susanna Shattuck, (p. 6G,) who married successively Joseph Morse, 
John Fay, and William Brigham. She was the step-mother of Mr. Fay's children, 
(sons and daughters by his first wife,) and they were her step-children and step- 
brothers and sisters of her children by Mr. Morse, and the latter were step-chil- 
dren of Mr. Fay, and he was their step-father. Her children by Mr. Morse were 
half brothers and half-sisters to her children by Mr. Fay ; and the latter were half- 
brothers and half-sisters to Mr. Fay's children by his first wife. John Fay, 
born Nov. 30, 1669, was a step-son of Mrs. Susanna (Shattuck) Morse, and a 
step-brother of Joseph Morse born Nov. 11, 1G67, and a half-brother of David 
Fay, born April 23, 1679; and David Fay was half-brother to both of the others, 
John Fay having been the father of each by different mothers, and Susanna hav- 
ing been the mother of each by different fathers ; and their grand-children, the 
children of each, were either half-cousins or step-cousins to each other, and the 
other children of Mr. Fay and Mrs. Morse, step-uncles, and step-aunts, or half- 
uncles and half-aunts. Joseph Morse, Jr., was step-uncle to the children of John 
Fay, Jr., and half uncle to the children of David Fay. Tabitha Ward, who mar- 
ried Samuel Fay, (p. 66,) was step-daughter-in-law of Mrs. Susanna Morse. 
Other combinations may be made of the different members of these families, illus- 
trating other degrees of kindred. 

6. Cousins. 

The children of one brother or sister, or grandchildren of the same ancestor 
are cousins to the children of another brother or sister, and are called first-cousins, 
or cousins- german. Cousin was sometimes used in ancient wills and other legal 
instruments as synonymous with nephew and niece, and in a loose sense for any 
relationship more remote than brother or sister. The term kinsman is often found 
also in similar ancient legal papers, and is sometimes used as synonymous with 
cousin, nephew, or niece ; but its meaning is not sufficiently definite to designate 
any particular relationship. It is used indiscriminately for various degrees of 
kindred, but generally for those of a remote degree. The children of a half- 
brother or half-sister are half-cousins to each other; and the children of one or 
more brothers or sisters who marry sisters or brothers, having three quarters of the 
same blood, are double-cousins to each other. The children of cousins or great- 
grand-children of the same ancestor are second-cousins. It is erroneous to say 
that the children of first cousins are second cousins to first cousins, as it is some- 
times loosely done. The children of second-cousins or great-great-grandchil- 
dren of the same ancestor are third cousins. The children of more remote and 
the same degree of descent or generation from the same ancestor are fourth, fifth, 
sixth, or more remote, cousins, as the fact may be. There may be also half- 
second- cousins or double-second-cousins, or more remote cousins of similar kind. 
There may be also cousins-in-law, and step-cousins of the various degrees. 

7. Uncle and Aunt. 

The brother of the father or mother of a child is the uncle of that child, and the 
sister of such father or mother is that aunt ; or half-uncle or half-aunt, or step-uncle 
or step aunt, as the case may be. The brother of the grandfather or grandmother 
of a child is the great-uncle of that child, and the sister of such grandfather or 
grandmother is the great-aunt, or half-great-uncle or half-grcat-aunt, or step-great- 



NAMES OF KINDRED AND RELATIONSHIP. 381 

uncle or step-great-aunt. So on in more remote degrees of kindred, by adding 
great to each preceding degree, or by saying, after each specific relationship, of 
the third degree or the fourth degree, as the fact may be. Nephews and nieces of 
uncles and aunts are cousins to each other, or second-cousins, third-cousins, &c, 
as the degree of kindred may be. There may also be uncle-cousins and aunt- 
cousins of the different degrees. 

8. Nephew and Niece. 

The male children of a brother or sister are nephews, and the female children 
of a brother or sister, are nieces to such brother or sister. The same descendants 
of half-brothers or half-sisters, are half-nephews and half nieces. There may be 
also step-nephews or step-nieces. The male children of cousins are cousin-neph- 
ews, and the female children of cousins, are cousin-nieces to such cousins. They 
are sometimes called cousin's sons or cousin's daughters. The same children are 
grand-nephews or grand-nieces to brothers or sisters; or half-cousin-nephews, or 
half-cousin nieces, half-grand-nephews, or half-grand-nieces, as the fact may be. 
The male children of second cousins are second-cousin-nephews, and the female 
children are second- cousin-nieces to such second cousins ; or the same children 
are great-grand-nephews or great-grand-nieces to brothers and sisters, or half of 
each, as the fact may be. The same may be said of more remote degrees of kin- 
dred. The children of one's great-uncles and great-aunts are great-uncle-neph- 
ews or great-uncle-nieces, or great-aunt-nephews, or great-aunt-nieces to such 
one ; or the same individuals are cousins to his father or mother. 

These terms might be extended to other, or more remote degrees of kindred ; 
but those already given will suggest others, and are deemed sufficient for our 
present purposes. 

If it is desired to ascertain the relationship which any person or descendants 
sustain to any other person or descendants named in this volume or elsewhere, it 
can be done by tracing each upwards to a common ancestor, and afterwards 
downwards to the person or descendants designated. This may be illustrated 
thus : Suppose it is desired to know the relationship which existed between the 
late Dr. George C. Shattuck, (p. 244,) and Col. Daniel Shattuck, (p. 300.) In 
tracing each back it will be found that the line of ascent does not meet until 
we arrive at William Shattuck, the common ancestor of the family. From him 
the line of descent may be exhibited as follows : — 

1st Generation. William Shattuck, (p. 57.) Common Ancestor. 

2d Gen. John Shattuck, (p. 68.) William Shattuck, (74.) Brothers. 

3d Gen. John Shattuck, (p. 77.) Benjamin Shattuck, (p. 89.) Cousins. 

4th Gen. Jonathan Shattuck, (p. 92.) Stephen Shattuck, (p. 108.) 2d Cousins. 
5th Gen. John Shattuck, (p. 116.) Benjamin Shattuck, (p. 155.) 3d Cousins. 

6th Gen. John Shattuck, (p. 171.) George C. Shattuck, (p. 244.) 4th Cousins. 

7th Gen. Daniel Shattuck, (p. 300.) Geo. C. Shattuck, Jr.. (p. 254.) 5th Cousins. 

From this statement it appears that the late Dr. Shattuck was fourth cousin to 
Col. Shattuck's father, and his own fourth-cousin-uncle, and that he is fifth cousin 
to George C. Shattuck, Jr. ; that Benjamin Shattuck, (p. 155,) was his 3d cousin- 
great-uncle ; and that John Shattuck, his father, was Benjamin Shattuck's -3d 
cousin-nephew. 

If it be desired to know the relationship which Judge Joel Parker of Cambridge 



382 APPENDIX. 

and his brothers sustain to the author, it may be found by tracing each back to 
their common ancestor, arid forward to the present generation, thus : — 
4th Generation. Jonathan Shattuck, (p. 92.) Common Ancestor. 

5th Gen. Elizabeth Shattuck, (p. J 15.) John Shattuck, (p. 116.) Brother & sister. 
6th Gen. Edith Jewett, (p. 115.) John Shattuck, (p. 171.) Cousins. 

7th Gen. Joel Parker, (p. 116.) Lemuel Shattuck, (p. 302.) 2d Cousins. 

By this it appears that these brothers are 2d cousins of the author, and that 
they bear the same relationship as he does to Dr. Shattuck, (p. 254,) both being 
his 5th cousins and descendants of the 7th Generation from William Shattuck, 
their common ancestor. Dr. Edmund Parker of Pepperell, son of Edmund of 
Nashua, (p. 116,) is 3d cousin of Dr. J. C. Shattuck of Brookline, (p. 293,) and 
sustains the same relationship to other descendants of Jonathan Shattuck, (p. 92,) 
of the same generation. 

In like manner the relationship between Hon. Judge Shattuck of California 
and Hon. John A. Dix of New York may be ascertained. By tracing each back 
it will be found that their common ancestor is William Shattuck, Jr., (p. 74,) and 
that their descent from him is as follows : — 

2d Generation, William Shattuck, (p. 74.) Common Ancestor. 

3d Gen. Benjamin Shattuck, (p. 89.) Robert Shattuck, (p. 92.) Brothers. 

4th Gen. Sarah Shattuck, (p. 111.) Robert Shattuck, (p. 114.) Cousins. 

5th Gen. Timothy Dix, (p. 112.) David Shattuck, (p. 165.) 2d Cousins. 

6th Gen. Timothy Dix, (p. 112.) David O. Shattuck, (p. 288.) 3d Cousins. 

7th Gen. John A. Dix, (p. 112.) Francis Wm. Shattuck, (p. 289.) 4thCous. 

It thus appears that David O. Shattuck is 3d cousin to the father of John A. 
Dix, or his own 3d cousin-uncle ; and that Francis William Shattuck is his 4th 
cousin. Both being of the same generation in descent from a common ancestor 
as the author, are his 5th cousins. These illustrations will be sufficient to enable 
any one to ascertain the exact relationship which any descendant sustains to any 
other descendant. 



VII 



®to0 %tlobti Sistm. 



The author devotes this page to the more particular Memorials of two beloved 
sisters, the dates of whose births and deaths have already been given, (p. 172.) 
If an apology to his readers for so doing be considered needful by any one, he 
trusts that fraternal affection for real worth will be a sufficient one. These sisters 
seemed possessed originally of good constitutions ; their persons were well 
formed ; and they enjoyed good health until a severe cold began to develop a 
tendency to that fearful disease which takes away the lives, and destroys the 
hopes of many New England families. The progress of the disease in the elder 
sister was slow, and did not perform its perfect work until nearly three years 
after its first appearance; but in the younger sister it was rapid, and terminated 
in as many months. Just as they were maturing into womanhood, and were 
about to take their stations as heads of families, and as useful members of society, 
their career was arrested, and they were numbered with that great multitude of 
similar cases, in which Providence seems mysteriously to select the most merito- 



TWO BELOVED SISTERS. 383 

rious, and those of the greatest promise of usefulness in this world, for another 
sphere of existence. And yet we trust they did not live entirely in vain; and 
that even their short lives were not useless lives. Nature endowed them hoth 
respectahly, but Rebecca especially with more than common intellectual powers. 
They, however, enjoyed imperfect advantages for their cultivation and develop- 
ment. The common school which they might legally attend was too remote, 
and the old fashioned New Ipswich winters were too severe, to allow them to de- 
rive therefrom much benefit. To their home education, to which we have already 
alluded, (p. 302,) they were principally indebted for the knowledge they pos- 
sessed. One or two terms in the academy elicited from their preceptor a certifi- 
cate of " ample qualifications for teachers" themselves, and they afterwards spent 
several seasons in this employment. 

They were early taught both by precept and example, by one of the kindest 
and best of fathers, to respect religion, and to consider it as the " one thing need- 
ful" to prepare them for a useful life and for a happy death. Yet their attention 
was not called especially to the subject, as their own personal matter, until the 
great awakening in New Ipswich in 1811. A change was then wrought in their 
views ; and on the 3d of May, 1812, they both made a public profession of relig- 
ion, and united with the church then under the pastoral care of Rev. Richard 
Hall. Betsey was then twenty years of age, and Rebecca fifteen. 

They were two of eleven young ladies in New IpsAvich who, on the previous 
April, had formed themselves into a society " for the promotion of religion and 
charity." This society met once a fortnight, and spent the season in labor for 
charitable purposes, and in efforts for mutual improvement in female excellence 
and in religion. It was one of the early associations of its kind, and in many of 
its useful purposes it has hardly been excelled or equalled by those of more mod- 
ern date and of similar design. The proceeds of their labors and their annual 
contributions were partly devoted to the education of a pious and talented young 
man for the ministry ; and his subsequent history showed that their charity was 
well and usefully bestowed. Rebecca, although seven years younger than the 
oldest member, and three years younger than any other one, was chosen its pre- 
siding officer in the second year after its formation, and was afterwards reelected 
daring her lifetime. Her associates have often spoken of her great usefulness 
generally, and in that association in particular; and of the happy influence of her 
example and conversation in their s